Quick Links

Comprehensive Examinations (DMus, PhD)

On this page:

General Information 

Comprehensive examination schedule and content: D.Mus. Composition | PhD Composition | Music Education | Musicology | Music Technology | Sound Recording | Music Theory | Performance

 

General information

Candidates for Doctoral degrees must pass the Doctoral Written and Oral Comprehensive Examinations (MUGS 701 and 702). The comprehensive examinations are administered in order to ensure that candidates are prepared for their professional duties as composers, performers, or scholars, and as teachers. Comprehensive examinations are normally taken at the end of the second year in the program. They may be taken in May or November. During the November Comprehensive Examination period especially, examinations may take place in the evening to ensure that they are held in a suitable venue. Samples of previous comprehensive examinations may be obtained from the Graduate Studies Coordinator. The language reading examination requirements must be met before the comprehensive examinations are taken. Students register for the comprehensive examinations at the beginning of the academic year in which they wish to take them. The candidate must inform the Graduate Director in writing that he/she intends to take the comprehensive examinations at least five months in advance of the examination session. At that time PhD candidates will also declare a "special field" for purposes of the examination. Further details may be obtained from the appropriate Area Chair. Each candidate must complete all parts of the comprehensive examinations in one session.

Candidates in PhD programs (except Music Education, Music Technology and Performance) will be provided with a copy of their answers to the written examinations prior to the oral examination to help them prepare. On the completion of the oral examination, the candidate will receive a letter from the Chair of the Examination Committee commenting on the candidate's performance in all parts of the written and oral examinations, and supporting the final grade. In the event of a failure the student is permitted to repeat the examinations, either in whole or in part, as determined by the Comprehensive Examination Committee. No part of the comprehensive examinations may be repeated more than once. See also section 3.3 of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Programs, Courses and University Regulations Calendar.

Comprehensive Examination Committee

The Music Research Examination Committee, whose members will be appointed by the Graduate Director in consultation with the Area, will consist of three full-time staff members from the candidate's area of specialization and one member from a different area within the Department. (Normally a theorist will sit on the Musicology Examination Committee, and a musicologist will sit on the Theory Examination Committee.) The Graduate Director, or an appointed representative, will chair the Examination Committee.

The Comprehensive Examination Committee consists of the candidate’s Advisory Committee, plus a Chair selected by the Director, Graduate Studies, Schulich School of Music. The Chair of the Comprehensive Examination Committee is not a member of the Advisory Committee.)

Assessment, Grading and Reporting

The Written Examination is read by the Comprehensive Examination Committee before the Oral Examination, and the decision to pass or fail the Written Comprehensive Examination is not made until after the Oral Examination. For each examination, the majority of the Committee must pass the Candidate. The Chair prepares a written evaluation detailing the candidate’s strengths and weaknesses as assessed by the Committee.

Failures

In the event that the candidate is not awarded a pass for the examinations, but is permitted to repeat them, the conditions for retaking the examinations must be clearly stated to the candidate in writing, including the time frame, potential dates, and the nature of the reexaminations. The student may repeat the comprehensive examinations or any portion thereof only once. After a second failure, the student will be asked to withdraw from the program See also 3.3 PhD Comprehensives Policy in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies General Information, Regulations and Research Guidelines Calendar.

Rereads Policy

In the case of the Written Comprehensive Examination, the Reread Policy of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office applies.

In the case of the Oral Examination, a student who fails this may request a review. In such cases, the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office will conduct a review of the examination process and procedures.

Comprehensive examination schedule and content

 D.Mus. Composition

  1. History of Music (Monday): Two two-hour sessions. The candidate will be expected to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of Western Music since 1900 by writing two essays. The candidate will also be expected to write two essays based upon seven or eight topics drawn from various periods prior to 1900 and prepared beforehand in consultation with the supervisor. The candidate is expected to display knowledge of secondary sources.
  2. Harmony and Counterpoint (Tuesday): Two two-hour sessions. The candidate will be required to complete a given passage of not more than four instrumental parts in 19th-century style and a given passage of not more than four vocal parts in 16th-century style.
    The counterpoint exam may be replaced if the student has successfully passed MUTH-302, Modal Counterpoint 2.
  3. Analysis Parts I & II. (Wednesday): Two two-hour sessions. For Part I recordings of a number of short excerpts will be played several times. Candidates will be required to suggest the composer or period, giving stylistic reasons. Part II consists of a written analysis of one excerpt of a given score.
  4. Orchestration Parts I & II (Friday): Take-home examination. Part I consists of orchestration of a given full score, and Part II a piano reduction of a given full score. This examination is picked up by the candidate on Friday at 9:00 a.m. from the Music Graduate Studies Office and returned to that office at 9:00 a.m. the following Monday morning.
  5. Oral Examination: Two hours. (Week following the written examinations). A wide knowledge of the repertoire, history, compositional practices, theory and aesthetics of the twentieth century is expected, as well as a detailed knowledge of four works from the 20th and 21st century assigned during the first term the candidate was registered in the program. One of these works will be chosen by the candidate.

PhD Composition

  1. Special Field Examination (Monday): One four-hour session. The student is required to answer two of three essay questions. The Special Field examination includes questions about a special field chosen by the student in consultation with the Composition Area Committee. The special field normally consists of a topic related to the candidate’s dissertation research.
    In the essay questions, the candidate is expected to show substantial understanding of musical works, secondary literature, source problems and research tools. It is highly recommended that a student take the course, MUHL-570, Research Methods in Music.
  2. Harmony and Counterpoint (Tuesday): Two two-hour sessions. The candidate will be required to complete a given passage of not more than four instrumental parts in 19th-century style and a given passage of not more than four vocal parts in 16th-century style.
    The counterpoint exam may be replaced if the student has successfully passed MUTH-302, Modal Counterpoint 2.
  3. Analysis Parts I & II. (Wednesday): Two two-hour sessions. For Part I recordings of a number of short excerpts will be played several times. Candidates will be required to suggest the composer or period, giving stylistic reasons. Part II consists of a written analysis of one excerpt of a given score.
  4. Orchestration Parts I & II (Friday): Take-home examination. Part I consists of orchestration of a given full score, and Part II a piano reduction of a given full score. This examination is picked up by the candidate on Friday at 9:00 a.m. from the Music Graduate Studies Office and returned to that office at 9:00 a.m. the following Monday morning.
  5. Oral Examination: Two hours. (Week following the written examinations). A wide knowledge of the repertoire, history, compositional practices, theory and aesthetics of the twentieth century is expected, as well as a detailed knowledge of four works from the 20th and 21st century assigned during the first term the candidate was registered in the program. One of these works will be chosen by the candidate.

Music Education

The comprehensives will take place in either the first or second semester. Topics for the first two papers described below will be presented to candidates at the beginning of the semester. The candidate may begin the third paper before the beginning of the semester. These papers will be due two months after they are given to the student. The public presentation will take place near the end of the semester.

The comprehensive examination will consist of:

  1. A paper dealing with research methodology as employed in music education.
  2. A paper dealing with methodological, historical, and philosophical foundations in music education.
    Papers 1 and 2 should be a maximum of 15 pages each, double-spaced. Each of these papers may require the candidate to respond to two or three questions related to the topic.
  3. A paper related to the student's area of research specialty. This paper should be closely related to the dissertation literature review.
  4. A public presentation on current issues in music education, to be determined by the student in consultation with the Music Education Area. The candidate is expected to take a position on one or more issues, and present a cogent argument. The presentation will be in three parts, each lasting approximately 30 minutes: (1) the presentation, (2) a question period, and (3) a meeting with the student's committee afterwards.

The papers should be submitted to the Graduate Studies Office, Room A726A, one month before the date scheduled for the public presentation.

Musicology

Rationale

The general comprehensive examinations in musicology are intended to provide students with a strong background in musicology outside their specialties. We hope that the preparation for the examinations will ensure that students are prepared to function as professors and professionals within the discipline of musicology. The comprehensive examinations are also the first place in which students function independently, as they develop a wide range of skills that may not be covered in focused graduate seminars.

Each of the different sections serves a slightly different purpose.

1) The written general examinations

  • provide preparation for teaching a broad range of topics in music history. Most musicologists (unlike scholars in larger fields, such as literature or history) have to teach outside their specialty, and almost all musicologists have to teach a history-survey-type course.
  • require students to learn how to master a field of research outside the bounds of a course, where material is pre-selected organized by the professor.
  • expose students to many different repertoires and methodologies in the field, providing a range of models for their own scholarship.
  • allow students to function as professionals in the various scholarly societies (e.g. as members of program committees, book award committees, editorial boards), with some knowledge of a broad range of topics.
  • allow students to engage intelligently with other music scholars on a wide variety of topics and approaches (a very useful skill for job interviews).
  • teach students to synthesize and evaluate scholarship, and to create a reasoned written argument in a limited time frame.

2) The score identifications

  • provide graduate students with the skills that they will be teaching undergraduate students (identification of different styles and genres).
  • ensure that students not only focus on secondary scholarship, but also spend time with musicology’s primary source, music.
  • require students to develop fluency in reading music in different styles, recognizing characteristic features, and articulating in a concise way the salient points of a composition.

3) The complementary analysis exam

  • requires students to develop a command of analytical techniques appropriate to the general period of the dissertation (pre-tonal, tonal, or post-tonal).
  • requires students to look at a complete piece in detail and develop a sustained argument about a piece of music.
  • provides an opportunity to practice skills (analysis and argument) that will be used in the dissertation and in teaching.

4) The oral examination

  • provides students with a chance to correct errors in the written examination, and to demonstrate what they have learned since the examination.
  • allows students to expand or clarify points for which there was insufficient time in the written exam.
  • is a practice situation for job interviews, where applicants must think fast, articulate their ideas clearly, and demonstrate command of material.

Musicology Examination Guidelines

Written Exam

  1. 1. Section I and Section II (normally Monday and Wednesday): Two three-hour sessions. During each session the student is required to answer three out of four questions, for a total of six out of eight questions. Questions cover the eight topics that the candidate has chosen and prepared for, divided into two groups of four (for Section I and Section II).Choosing eight topicsThe candidate chooses eight fairly broad topics in collaboration with the Music History Area pertaining to the history of music. At least one of the topics will be a broader critical or theoretical issue, not necessarily specific to a certain period. At this time, the candidate will also communicate her/his preference for analyzing one of the following in the Complementary Examination (see No. 3 below): pre-tonal, tonal, or post-tonal music.The deadlines for submission and approval of the above topics are as follows: For November examinations: topics submitted by the supervisor to the Musicology Area by April 1, for approval by May 1. The candidate will meet with the Area by May 1 to confirm the topics.For May examinations: topics submitted by the supervisor to the Musicology Area by October 1, for approval by November 1. The candidate will meet with the Area by November 1 to confirm the topics.Compiling bibliographiesAfter the Musicology Area approves the eight topics in writing, a Comprehensive Examination Committee consisting of the supervisor, two other full-time members from the Musicology Area, and one member from a different area within the Department of Music Research (normally a music theorist), is established. In close consultation with this committee, the candidate sets forth to compile a reading list for each of the topics. Each list should consist of at least fifteen items with a good balance between books and articles. When appropriate, a group of articles or essays may be counted as one item. Guiding principles in compiling a bibliography are comprehensiveness and awareness both of the scholarly tradition and current trends in research. In addition to studying the literature of the reading lists, the candidate will acquire close familiarity with the repertoire connected with each topic.ExaminationFive months before the exam, the examination committee collectively approves the eight reading lists. These bibliographies provide the basis for the examination. In their answers, candidates are expected to demonstrate thorough knowledge and critical evaluation of the selected literature, familiarity with the relevant repertoire, and a keen awareness of the scholarly tradition as well as the current debates within the discipline.
  2. Section III: Score Identifications (normally Wednesday): One three-hour session.After the second three-hour session (Section II, normally on Wednesday morning) the candidate will have three additional hours in the afternoon to identify ten out of twelve score extracts, at least one from each period (Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th/ 21st Centuries), selected by the examination committee from a wide range of periods, genres, and styles. No more than two of the excerpts will be taken from popular music and jazz repertories. For jazz and popular music, a recorded excerpt may substitute for a score extract. The candidate attempts to identify the composer and the repertory, and supports his or her decisions with observations about style and genre. These supporting comments will weigh more heavily in the evaluation than the actual identification of piece or composer. A piano will be made available during this portion of the exam.
  3. Complementary Exam: Take-Home Analysis (normally Friday).This is normally picked up by the candidate, normally on Friday at 10:00 a.m. from the Music Graduate Studies Office and returned to that office, normally at 9:00 a.m. the following Monday morning.Four to five months before the examination, after the examination committee approves the bibliographies, the candidate communicates to the committee a preference for analyzing pre-tonal, tonal, or post-tonal music. For the examination, the committee will then select three pieces from the chosen area, of which the candidate chooses one for analysis. In the analytical essay, the candidate discusses the significant structural features of the composition. Pitch relations, motivic/thematic content, texture, and overall formal and phrase-structural organization should be considered. While the candidate may wish to refer to general features of the style in which the piece is written, the focus should primarily be on features unique to it. The analysis should demonstrate original insight more than knowledge of published analytical work.

Oral Exam

Oral Examination (normally Friday of the second week): Two hours.

The candidate should review the written responses for Sections I – III as well as the Complementary Exam, and be prepared to defend them or expand on them, as part of a discussion with the committee members. Copies of the answers will be provided to the candidate immediately after the written examination in order that s/he may prepare for the oral examination. At the oral examination, the candidate will be expected to arrive without written materials. A clean copy of the answers will be provided to the candidate by the chair of the committee. The examination committee members may question the candidate in detail about some answers or ask the candidate to elaborate more freely on others. The candidate should also be prepared to discuss larger issues that have remained problematic within the field, and articulate his or her relationship to the discipline.

A selection of previously approved topics can be found here: Musicology Comp. Exam Topics

Music Technology

The Music Technology comprehensive exam will explore historical, practical, and theoretical aspects of a candidate's intended dissertation research area from the diverse perspectives of the members of the exam committee. The committee will consist of three full-time staff members from the candidate's area of specialization and one member from a different area within the Department, as well as the Graduate Director. Before starting the comprehensive exam process, supervisors and candidates will agree on the dissertation research field. The comprehensive exam will consist of two parts: a written exam and an oral exam. The written exam questions will be contributed by the examination committee members based on a candidate’s comprehensive reading list. The reading list will relate to the student’s Ph.D. research interests and be finalized with input from all examination committee members at least five months prior to the oral exam date. It is expected that the reading list will bring a multidisciplinary perspective to the research interests of the student and provide a broad knowledge base from which to proceed after the comprehensive exam. The reading list will be sent to the director of the Graduate Studies of the Schulich School of Music.

a) The Written Exam:

All examination committee members will contribute potential examination questions and these will be discussed by the committee to ensure that they are relevant to the projected dissertation research topic and that they lead the student to a broad perspective on this topic. The student’s supervisor will be responsible for collating the final list of questions in consultation with all committee members. Some questions will be posed in such a way that answers could form the basis for background portions of the Ph.D. dissertation. The expected length of answers will be indicated for each question and will generally range between 5 - 20 pages, with a total output for all questions in the range of 40 – 60 pages (typed, double-spaced, 11 pt). Students will have three months to research and complete the written exam.

b) The Oral Exam:

The oral exam will take place two weeks after the written exam has been submitted so as to allow in-depth evaluation by the examination committee. The oral exam will consist of questions posed by the committee designed to give the candidate a chance to clarify and/or expand on written responses. As well, candidates should expect questions based on other related topics in order to assess their breadth of domain-specific knowledge.

Sound Recording

The Sound Recording comprehensive exams will consist of two parts, a written exam followed, one week later, by an oral exam. The exam questions will be generated on the basis of the student’s comprehensive reading list, which is created with input from all members of the examination committee, and should be finalized and approved by the committee members at least six months prior to the exam date. The structure of the reading list will have 10 sections, 5 general topics related to the techniques of the discipline and current research trends and directions in the field as exemplified in the literature, and 5 topics related to the student's specific area of research. General topics in the Sound Recording literature include, but should not be considered limited to, the following:

Acoustics
Audio Quality Evaluation
Audio Signal Processing
Behavioral Statistics
Electroacoustic Measurement
Human Factors in Audio Devices and Applications
Microphone Techniques
Multichannel Loudspeaker Reproduction
Production Techniques
Psychoacoustics
Technical Listening Skills

a) The Written Exam

Potential examination questions will be contributed by the entire examination committee, members of which are designated by the Graduate Studies Office of the Schulich School of Music. The final list of questions is then composed from the contributed questions in consultation with the Sound Recording Area Chair. The written exam will take place on two consecutive days and will consist of two parts:

* Questions on General Topics: four hours in total on Day 1
* Questions on Specific Topics: three hours in total on Day 2

a.1) Day 1 Exam: Candidates will be given five questions based upon their selected General Topics, and must choose three for which complete answers will be given.

a.2) Day 2 Exam: Candidates will be given five questions based upon their selected Specific Topics, and must choose three for which complete answers will be given.

b) The Oral Exam:

The oral exam will take place approximately one week after the written exam and will consist of questions posed by the examination committee members, after they have had a chance to review the candidate’s responses given during the written exam. The members will compose questions for the Oral exam that will give candidates the chance to clarify and/or expand on their written responses.

The following questions are examples of examination items on two general-topics and two specific-topics within the Sound Recording Area:

1. General Topic: Psychoacoustics.

Delineate the factors that contribute to the perceived loudness of typical musical material, with all of its spectro-temporal variation. How might you go about collecting from a listener a continuous indication of the variation in loudness over time for such non-stationary signals? How would you predict such continuous loudness variation from an analysis of the signal presented to those listeners? Give specific details regarding how your signal analysis might be informed regarding perceptually-oriented factors to improve that prediction.

2. General Topic: Technical Listening Skills.

Describe methods and strategies that can be used to develop memory for the discrimination and identification of timbre quality references as defined by the center frequency of 1/3-octave-band resonances. Elaborate on the choice of tasks, sound stimuli, and learning aids that can help maximize the building of robust and reliable sound quality references. Discuss these issues in light of commonly acknowledged limitations of short-term memory.

3. Specific Topic: Multichannel Microphone Techniques.

Name and describe a variety of well-established microphone arrays for multichannel recordings. Elaborate on the use of microphones of diverse polar patterns within each array, with regard in particular to the resulting sense of envelopment associated with the recording. Discuss the optimization of the perceived sound quality of a microphone array according to subjective evaluation criteria. Comment on balance considerations of microphone signals for multichannel recording according to both esthetic and technical criteria.

4. Specific Topic: Multichannel Loudspeaker System Evaluation.

Describe and discuss issues involved in the mapping of sound imagery as produced by multichannel sound systems with data collection methods used in listening tests. Elaborate on characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of methods involving verbal descriptors, graphical representations, visual pointing mechanisms, and discuss alternatives to these methods.

Music Theory

The doctoral comprehensive exams in music theory consist of a written exam (three parts) and an oral exam (two parts).

The exam period consists of two consecutive weeks in November or May. Nine months prior to the exam period, an examination committee is struck, consisting of a principal advisor (normally the anticipated thesis advisor) and at least three additional members, one of which is from a different area (e.g., composition, music history).

Written exam:

Part one, "music theory": six (out of eight) one-hour essay questions related to prepared topics and reading lists. An individual question may embrace more than one topic. Topics will focus primarily on recent research and must range beyond the student's area of research specialization. The student will establish the topics and reading lists for each topic according to the following procedure. In consultation with the principal advisor, the student draws up a list of ten topics; this list is then approved by the full examination committee. In consultation with the principal advisor, the student prepares a reading list for each topic (approximately 10-12 items per topic); these lists are then approved by the full committee. The topics and reading lists should be finalized six months prior to the exam period. The exam will be taken on one day early in week one of the exam period (three questions in the morning; three in the afternoon).

Part two, "music history": The exam consists of twelve score excerpts covering the history of western music from the middle ages to the present. The student identifies ten of these with respect to the historical style, genre, and possible composer(s); each identification is explained in a brief essay. The student has access to a piano during the examination, but not to recordings. The exam will last four hours and be taken late in the first week of the exam period.

Part three, "music analysis": Three analytical essays (15-20 pages of text, double spaced; examples, charts, tables may be added) on three works (or movements) from different style periods. The essays should emphasize original analytical work, but may include references to secondary literature where appropriate. In consultation with the principal advisor, the student proposes three pieces to be analyzed; these pieces are then approved by the full committee. The choice of pieces should be finalized six months prior to the exam period. The three analytical essays are to be submitted no later than one month prior to the exam period.

Oral Exam:

Part one, "teaching practicum": The student teaches a regularly scheduled class of upper-level theory (300-level or above). The topic of the class is an individual work (or movement). The class members prepare the work in advance so that the student can engage the members in discussion. In consultation with the examination committee, the regular instructor of the class chooses the work to be taught. The chosen work is conveyed to the student one week prior to the class. The class will be given one to two months prior to the exam period.

Part two, "question period": In a session of two hours, the student meets with the examination committee to answer any questions associated with the written exam or part one of the oral exam. The committee may also ask new questions on any topic of music theory, history, or analysis. Prior to the exam, the student should review the responses given on the three parts of the written exam (as well as the performance during the teaching practicum) and be prepared to defend them or expand upon them. The student should be prepared to expand on his or her selected topics and special field, discuss larger issues that have remained problematic within the field, and articulate his or her relationship to the discipline. The exam will be taken toward the end of the second week of the exam period.

Performance

The purpose of the D.Mus. Comprehensive Examinations is to prepare candidates are for a career in a university or college setting and/or develop expertise in areas of research that will inform different aspects of one's professional practice. These examinations are intended to assess the breadth and depth of the candidate's knowledge in his or her principal area of specialization. In particular, candidates are expected to demonstrate familiarity with recent musicological, analytical and inter-disciplinary (as appropriate to particular topics) research in their field, along with a general knowledge of repertoire, history, performance practice and style appropriate to their area of interest. Candidates will be evaluated on both their written skills and their ability to present and defend material orally. The results of these examinations determine whether or not a candidate is allowed to continue in the program.

The Comprehensive Examinations are to be taken after completion of all required course work, and no later than the comprehensive exam period in the fifth term of enrollment. They may be taken in May or November. Students register for the comprehensive examinations at the beginning of the academic year in which they wish to take them. The candidate must inform the Director of Graduate Studies, Schulich School of Music, in writing that he/she intends to take the comprehensive examinations at least five months in advance of the examination session. Each candidate must complete alll parts of the comprehensive examinations in one session. These examinations must be successfully completed before the Lecture-Recital may be presented.

Content

There are two large areas of content:

1) The “special” area, which is usually related to the candidate’s lecture-recital topic. Preparation for this part of the comps provides background (knowledge of secondary literature, etc.) for the lecture-recital, and will involve a relatively short time period and geographical area. The candidates are expected to know not only music for their instrument, but serious art music for all instruments and their section areas.

2) The “general” area (usually divided into two topics groups), which ensures the candidate’s broad knowledge of repertoire, performance traditions, pedagogy, etc., for his/her instrument. For an instrument whose entire history can easily be grasped, the general part might be based on the history and performance traditions of that instrument. But for instruments with a long and developed history, the general part may be subdivided into smaller slices outside the specialty. Thus for a pianist specializing in Shostakovich’s preludes and fugues, the general part might consist of “Studies in performance anxiety” and Romantic piano literature 1827-49).” For a candidate in vocal pedagogy, the general part might consist of “German Lieder” and “Art Song in North America.”

Topic areas are defined on the basis of student interests in collaboration with their advisory committee. The candidate then compiles a bibliography of about 100 items in consultation with individual members of Advisory Committee. Each topic area has about 30-35 bibliography items. The bibliography must be submitted by email to the Graduate Studies Office (graduatestudies [dot] music [at] mcgill [dot] ca) at least ninety days before the exams are to be taken for approval by the Advisory Committee. The examination questions will be based on information from the bibliography.

Format

The Written Examination

Within 30 days of the examination date, the Chair of the Committee requests two or more questions for each of the three topics from each member of the panel. The Chair then compiles a list of approximately ten questions grouped according to topic and submits it to the Comprehensive Examination Committee for discussion, amendment, and final approval. The candidate is required to answer, in essay form, five questions: one from each of the three topic areas with the remaining two selected from two different topic areas. Each essay should be from five to ten pages long, typewritten or computer printed, double spaced, with page numbers and references as appropriate. The candidate picks up the questions from the Graduate Studies Office (A726A) on a Monday at 9 a.m., and submits the answers no later than 4 p.m. on the following Friday. The Music Library, the Internet or any other appropriate resources may be used in the preparation of the essays.

The Oral Examination

The Oral Examination, a two-hour session, is scheduled during the week following the written examination; The Oral Examination may consist of questions drawn from items in the submitted written work, questions from the list of submitted questions not answered by the candidate, or other material.