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Human sounds convey emotions better than words do

It takes just one-tenth of a second for our brains to begin to recognize emotions conveyed by vocalizations, according to researchers from McGill. It doesn’t matter whether the non-verbal sounds are growls of anger, the laughter of happiness or cries of sadness. More importantly, the researchers have also discovered that we pay more attention when an emotion (such as happiness, sadness or anger) is expressed through vocalizations than we do when the same emotion is expressed in speech.

Published: 18Jan2016

First language wires brain for later language-learning

Research also demonstrates brain's plasticity and ability to adapt to new language environments

Published: 1Dec2015