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Plant Biology Specialization

The Plant Biology specialization emphasizes the study of plants from their cellular structure to their role in the ecosystem.

You will examine the structure and development of plants in the context of their function as the primary producers on earth. You will learn about the physiology and biochemistry of plants from the basics of photosynthesis to the production of chemical compounds used for defense against herbivores, pests and pathogens.

You will also develop skills in plant identification, plant propagation, and molecular methods for studying plants and fungi. You will learn how natural selection has shaped the diversity of plants, explore the dynamics of plant communities in the ecosystem, and appreciate the role of plants in society as the source of food, fiber, fuel, medicinal compounds, poisons, and recreation.

Most courses offer laboratory classes that expand on the lecture material and introduce students to the latest techniques in plant biology. Many laboratory exercises use the excellent research and field facilities at the Morgan Arboretum, McGill Herbarium, Lods Centre, the Horticultural Centre and the Plant Science greenhouses, as well as McGill field stations. Students may undertake a research project under the guidance of a member of the Plant Science Department as part of their studies.

THIS SPECIALIZATION MAY BE TAKEN WITH ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAJORS: Environmental Biology and Life Sciences.

For questions about the Plant Biology Specialization, please contact the bsc-advisor [dot] agenvscatmcgill [dot] ca (student advisor).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits

To view the list of courses, please see the Electronic Course Calendar.

CAREER PATHS CAN INCLUDE:

Field biologist; research technician (field or lab); forest management; environmental biologist; ethnobotanist; conservation biologist; plant pathologist; museum curator; manager, educator, or researcher in a botanical garden; horticulturalist; environmental assessment specialist; botanist in national and provincial parks or forests or ecological reserves; researcher in fields of botany, mycology, ecology, molecular biology, plant pathology, or genetics if you continue in this field for graduate studies.

For more career paths, please visit the Career Planning Service (CaPS) website.