Applied Ecology Specialization

Applied Ecosystem SciencesWe all use ecosystems; every day and in a myriad of ways.

The food we eat, the water we drink, the air we breathe, many of the materials we use, and much of the diversity of life, recreation and culture we enjoy are products of ecological systems.

We manage ecosystems to provide these benefits. And our use and mis-use often degrades the ability ecosystems to provide the benefits we value. Many of the problems we have to deal with, like the effects of pollution, over-harvesting, acid rain and climate change, arise because we don’t understand the many connections that make up the ecosystems we are part of.

In the  specialization you will develop your ability to understand how ecosystems function. You will build on your understanding of living and non-living components of ecosystems and how they interact. You will to apply systems thinking to the challenge of managing ecosystems for agriculture, forestry, fisheries, protected areas and urban development. You will learn concepts and tools that help you to deal with the complexity that an ecosystem perspective brings.

YOU MAY TAKE THIS SPECIALIZATION WITH THE FOLLOWING MAJOR: Environmental Biology

For questions about the Applied Ecosystem Sciences Specialization, please contact the bsc-advisor [dot] agenvsc [at] mcgill [dot] ca (student advisor).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits

To view the list of courses:

Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences) (B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.)) - Applied Ecology (24 Credits)

CAREER PATHS CAN INCLUDE:

The Applied Ecosystem Sciences program will help you enter a diversity of careers. You could conduct environmental impact assessments, and develop regulations to combat pollution or protect threatened species. You could write briefs on agriculture or environment for executives in industry or government. You could work as a field ecologist on studies of water quality, forest management or restoration of disturbed lands. You could develop plans for parks and protected areas, or teach others to understand how ecosystems work.

    For more career paths, please visit the Career Planning Service (CaPS) website.