Digital Collection Data

Digital collections that have available to download as data sets. 

Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection 

With the completion of a massive retrospective digitization project the Library has made available the full text and metadata of over 38,000+ theses and dissertations from 1881 - 2016 for research purposes. In addition there is also a funded Computational Research Fellowship meant to encourage use of this collection. 

Title McGill Library Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) collection (1881-2016)
File types XML and HTML
Download link (URL) http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/downloads/etd-data.zip (3.5 GB)
Source (URL): http://escholarship.mcgill.ca
Last updated

May 15, 2017

Notes

Current download includes both ETDs and faculty eprints from the institutional repository.  To be able to isolate the ETDs we’ve included a correspondence txt file that lists the PID (unique identifier) of the full text HTML file with the PID of the corresponding XML file.  

Chapbook Collection

The McGill Library Chapbooks digital collection was also a text encoding project. A team in Rare Books and Special Collections created a TEI XML file for each of the chapbooks using TEI P5:Guidelines for Electronic Text Encoding and Interchange by the TEI Consortium. Level 4 coding from Best Practices for TEI in Libraries was used to guide the encoding. Headers are minimal and without bibliographic information. The woodcuts in each chapbook were assigned a classification code from the Iconclass thesaurus to describe the subject of the image.

 

Title McGill Library Chapbook Collection TEI files
File types TEI encoded XML
Download link (URL) https://digital.library.mcgill.ca/chapbooks/files/mcgill-chapbooks-xml.zip (6.5 MB)
Source (URL): https://digital.library.mcgill.ca/chapbooks/
Last updated 2015
Notes File names are based on the original chapbook call number.


We are making these files available on the condition that user credit the McGill University Library and Archives when using or reproducing them in any context. Giving credit promotes good scholarship, and helps others find the original source material. Contact di.library [at] mcgill.ca for more information.
 

 

 

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