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MIME 470 - Engineering Biomaterials

 

Liaison librarian

  • Giovanna [dot] Badia [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Email) 514-398-7340
  • McGill users only
  • Open access resource
  • Free resource
  • In-library-use only
  • Catalogue record

Where to find background information

TitleCall number
Biomaterials E-book
Biomaterials: an introduction E-book
Encyclopedia of biomaterials and biomedical engineering, volumes 1-2 R857 M3 E63 2004 (Reference)
Wiley encyclopedia of biomedical engineering E-book
Encyclopedia of medical devices and instrumentation E-book
Encyclopedia of smart materials, volumes 1-2 E-book
Encyclopedia of polymer science and technology E-book

Where to find references to journal articles

Multidisciplinary

  • Web of Science – multidisciplinary; allows citation analysis
  • Scopus – multidisciplinary; allows citation analysis

Subject specific


How to Locate Journal Articles or Books

Look for the Find Full Text button when searching databases.  Click on this button to link to our catalogue.

The library has two versions of its catalogue.  Search the McGill WorldCat Catalogue or the McGill Classic Catalogue to find journals or books, whether in print or electronic format.  To locate the full text of a journal article, search the library's catalogue by the title of the journal in which the article is published.

How to Obtain Materials Not Available at McGill

McGill students and staff may order articles and books that are not available at McGill using COLOMBO.  Please do not wait until it is too late for us to help you with COLOMBO.

Liaison librarian

  • Giovanna [dot] Badia [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Email) 514-398-7340
  • McGill users only
  • Open access resource
  • Free resource
  • In-library-use only
  • Catalogue record
Literature Searching: How-to Strategies for Biomaterials Engineering
(workshop slides - Jan. 2014)

How to obtain articles & books not available at the McGill Library using Colombo - Interlibrary Loan (handout)

Searching PubMed with MeSH
(tri-fold handout from the U.S. National Library of Medicine, includes screenshots)
 

Summary of Search Tips - Principles of Online Searching

1.  Define your research question.
Example:  Is the use of bone cement effective in total hip replacements for older patients, i.e., age 65 or older?

2.  Identify the appropriate source(s) to search.
Example: 
PubMed

3.  Break down the question into its separate concepts.
Example: 
Is the use of bone cement effective in total hip replacements for older patients, i.e., age 65 or older?

4.  Search each concept separately to find appropriate subject headings.  If subject headings are not available, brainstorm synonyms for each concept.
Example: 
Search each concept separately in PubMed to find the appropriate medical subject headings (i.e., MeSH terms).  The MeSH terms are:

-       “Bone Cements” (for bone cement)

-       “Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip” (for total hip replacements)

5.  Combine search terms (AND/OR).
Example:
 “Bone Cements” [MeSH] AND “Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip”[MeSH]

6.  Apply limits.
Example: 
Limit search results to English language articles published in the past 5 years.  Note that PubMed allows you to limit your results to studies involving participants in a certain age group, such as “Aged: 65+ years.”

7. Evaluate your results & modify your search strategy if necessary.
Example
:  Look at the title, abstract, and/or subject headings of a relevant result to pick out additional words or subject headings that you can use to revise your search.  If you obtain very few search results, try clearing all your limits (called “filters” in PubMed).  Remember that PubMed will apply limits from your initial search to all the searches you do, unless you click on the “Clear all” link to the left of the list of search results.
 

Using Endnote to Cite Your References

McGill students and staff can download the software for free.  There are library workshops given throughout the year on how to use this software effectively, or contact Giovanna for a review or additional training.

Liaison librarian

  • Giovanna [dot] Badia [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Email) 514-398-7340
  • McGill users only
  • Open access resource
  • Free resource
  • In-library-use only
  • Catalogue record

Take the Post-Test: The purpose of the post-test is to determine whether you can apply effective PubMed search techniques, taught in class, to researching your own term paper topics.

The feedback on your search strategies will be available on this page within 48 hours after you submit the post-test. 

Nam (.pdf file)

If you would like feedback on your PubMed search strategy and do not wish to complete the post-test, contact Giovanna.

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