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Research Chairs in law

William C. Macdonald Chair

Professor Lionel Smith. Established in 1895, the Macdonald Chair is one of the oldest endowed positions at McGill. Chair holders teach and supervise undergraduate students and graduate students at the master and doctoral levels in the Faculty of Law, and take a leadership role in research in their field locally, nationally and globally.

F.R. Scott Chair in Public and Constitutional Law

Professor Roderick A. Macdonald.

Peter M. Laing Chair

Professor H. Patrick Glenn.

Samuel Gale Chair

Professor Margaret Somerville.

Wainwright Chair in Civil Law

Professor Daniel Jutras. The Wainwright Chair is supported by the Wainwright Fund.

Tomlinson Chair in Global Governance in Air & Space Law

Professor Paul Dempsey.

Jean Monnet Chair in the Law of International Economic Integration

Professor Armand de Mestral

James McGill Chair

Professors Richard Gold, Stephen Smith and Daniel Weinstock - The James McGill Chair is awarded by McGill to advance and support the scholarship and research of exceptional academic staff in priority areas of intellectual interest.

William Dawson Scholars

Professors Adelle Blackett and Robert Leckey - The William Dawson Chair is awarded by McGill to advance and support the scholarship and research of exceptional academic staff in priority areas of intellectual interest.

Canada Research Chair in the Law of Human Rights and Legal Pluralism

Professor Frédéric Mégret - The Chair studies how globalization of law both excludes opportunities and creates opportunities for inclusion of various minority groups. The Chair's research contributes to the development of rights-based legal strategies that foster better inclusion of minorities.

H. Heward Stikeman Chair in the Law of Taxation

Professor Allison Christians. The Stikeman Chair provides intellectual leadership on issues related to fiscal and tax law locally, nationally and globally.

Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law

Professor François Crépeau - The Oppenheimer Chair provides a Canadian locus for the study and research of international law, with particular attention to the relationship between international legal obligations and domestic law. The Chair studies theoretical and practical dimensions of the implementation of international treaty, customary and other obligations in domestic law with due regard to the constitutional setting in federal and unitary states.

Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy

Professor Ronald Niezen.

Tenable jointly inside McGill's Faculties of Arts and of Law, the Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy was created in 2011 through a generous gift from the McConnell Foundation. The Pearson Chair assumes leadership within a new Civil Society Program at McGill, which rests on a broad meaning of civil society as an analytic term for the social sciences and humanities. 

L. Yves Fortier Chair in International Arbitration and International Commercial Law

Professor Andrea Bjorklund.

Created in 2008 by Rio Tinto Alcan, the L. Yves Fortier Chair in International Arbitration and International Commercial Law leads advances in the field of international arbitration, and conducts research to help shape the future of both the practice and understanding of international law.

Peter MacKell Chair in Federalism

The Peter MacKell Chair in Federalism, endowed in 2011, was made possible by a generous $3 million bequest from Peter R. D. MacKell, Q.C., BCL'51.

Articulated around an interdisciplinary background in law, political theory and public policy, the Chair will make contributions to the theory and comparative practice of federalism, understood broadly as a mode of governance and a technique of social organization. The compass of the Chair embraces not only state-federalism, but inter-state federalism, federalism in non-state normative orders, and federalism within NGOs, QUANGOs, corporations and labour organizations. The chairholder will lead research programs relating to all aspects of the federal idea, and more generally to the place of federalism as a mode of social structuring for the global legal order.

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