Graduate Students

Michael Solomon

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2019)
B.Sc. Human Kinetics, University of Guelph (2017)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Skating

Personal Statement:

I commenced my Masters in the Ice Hockey Research Group under the guidance of Dr. David Pearsall in the fall of 2017. I previously completed my bachelor of science degree in Human Kinetics at the University of Guelph, where I had the opportunity to conduct research in the Spine and Muscle Biomechanics lab with supervision from Dr. Stephen Brown. My passion for sport, driven by many years training and competing at a provincial, national and varsity level in cross country skiing, ultimately spurred my interest in the realm of biomechanics. I look forward to continuing my time in academia with the IHRG here at McGill.




Neil MacInnis

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2019)
B.Sc. Human Kinetics (Honors), St. Francis Xavier University (2016)

Current Research:

- 3D Ice hockey Slap Shot Analysis

Personal Statement:

I began work in biomechanics while taking my Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics at Saint Francis Xavier University. Under the supervision of Dr. Sasho Mackenzie, I completed my honors research evaluating near vs. far target gaze fixation while putting on a slope in golf. I then went on to work under Dr. Mackenzie as a research assistant in the Golf Biomechanics Lab. My positive experience under Dr. Mackenzie led me here to McGill University. I began my graduate studies with the McGill Ice Hockey Research Group in the Fall 2017 under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. I intend to use my knowledge acquired from previous research to investigate the kinematics of a slap shot using 3D motion capture software.


picture of graduate student Brian McPhee

Brian McPhee

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2018)
B.Sc. Biomechanics, University of Calgary (2015)

Current research:

- Ice Hockey Skating

Personal Statement:

In the fall of 2016, I began working on my Masters degree through the Ice Hockey Research Group at McGill, under the Supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. Prior to this I completed my Bachelors of Science in Biomechanics through the University of Calgary, where I gained valuable experience working in the Human Performance Lab under the direction of Dr. Darren Stefanyshyn. Sport specific research relating to the biomechanics of athletic performance has been a growing passion of mine since I started my undergraduate degree, and I look forward to continuing my studies in the IHRG.


picture of graduate student Kristie Liu

Kristie Liu

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2018)
B.Kin. Kinesiology, University of Toronto (2014)

Current research:

- Ice Hockey Helmet Fit

Personal Statement:

My research with the Ice Hockey Research Group began in the fall of 2016, under the direction of Dr. David Pearsall. I completed my undergraduate degree in Kinesiology at the University of Toronto, where I conducted research as part of the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Injury Prevention Lab supervised by Dr. Tyson Beach. While competing on the varsity lacrosse and mountain biking teams during my undergrad, I developed an interest in the biomechanics of sports equipment and how they pertain to injury. The focus of my research with the Ice Hockey Research Group is the effect of hockey helmet fit on impact attenuation.


picture of graduate student Aiden Hallihan

Aiden Hallihan

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2018)
B.Sc. Kinesiology (Honors), University of New Brunswick (2016)
 

Current research:

- Ice Hockey Skating

Personal Statement:

I began my graduate studies in the McGill Ice Hockey Research Group in Fall 2016 under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall as a Master’s student. My Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology degree from the University of New Brunswick led me to further pursue my interests in biomechanics at the graduate level. I have always had a strong interest in how sports and biomechanics coincide to alter performance variables in hockey equipment. Ice hockey specific research is something that only seemed natural for me to study as I grew up playing the sport. I intend to investigate the kinematics of ice hockey skates using 3D motion capture software.


picture of PhD student Daniel Aponte

Daniel Aponte

M.Sc. Clinical Exercise Physiology, Concordia University (2013)
B.Sc. Exercise Science, Concordia University (2010)

Current research:

- Hockey Helmet Fit

Personal Statement:

I began work in the field of biomechanics during my masters, when I developed a behavioural paradigm to test the anticipatory postural behaviour in an animal model. Using a custom built force-plate and video analysis, I used classical conditioning to successfully train rodents to associate a stimulus tone to a platform perturbation. I then worked as a research assistant with Dr. Karen Li, and a research coordinator at the Concordia PERFORM Centre. The projects I worked on with Dr. Li focussed primarily on the effects of aging and mild hearing loss have on mobility and cognition.

My doctoral work at the IHRG is in a very different branch of biomechanics: protective equipment. My project will be centered on the question of hockey helmet fit. Using medical imaging (MR and CT), I want to visualize the interface of head and helmet, and analyse how different heads actually fit within a helmet (point-loading, gapping, etc.), in the hopes that maximizing fit leads to improved impact management. 


picture of graduate student Daniel Boucher

Daniel Boucher

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2017)
B.Sc. Honours in Human Kinetics, St. Francis Xavier University (2015)

Current research:

- Three-dimensional kinematic analysis of ice hockey wrist and slapshots on the ice surface

Personal Statement:

I began my research with the Ice Hockey Research Group in the fall of 2015, under the direction of Dr. David Pearsall. Both science and sport have both long been passions of mine, and I see sport specific research as a fantastic opportunity to participate in them. I applied to McGill after garnering 2 years of experience as a lab assistant in the Sports Biomechanics lab at St. Francis Xavier University under Dr. Sasho MacKenzie. My current thesis work intends to provide a more fundamental understanding of the kinematics involved in producing ice hockey shots.