Quick Links

Agrégateur de flux

BOOK (forthcoming): Laurent PFISTER and Franz-Stefan MEISSEL (eds.), The Austrian Civil Code (ABGB). Another Bicentenary (Paris: Éditions Panthéon-Assas, 1 Dec 2015)

(image source: IHD)
The Institut d'Histoire du Droit (Paris II Panthéon-Assas/CNRS, UMR 7184) announces the fourthcoming publication of a collective work on the Austrian Civil Code (ABGB).

Summary:
Comme le Code civil français, le Code civil autrichien (Allgemeines bürgerliches Gesetzbuch) est bicentenaire : promulgué en 1811, il est encore en vigueur aujourd’hui. Malgré sa longévité, il reste méconnu en France. Y remédier est l’une des ambitions du présent ouvrage. Issues du colloque organisé en décembre 2011, les contributions de chercheurs autrichiens et français qui y sont réunies apportent des éclairages tant sur le passé que sur le présent du Code civil autrichien, dans une perspective comparative.
L’élaboration, l’esprit et le contenu du Code de 1811 sont étudiés au regard de la première vague de codification moderne en Europe. Des étapes majeures de l’évolution du Code sont exposées, particulièrement son application durant la période nazie, et ce à partir de documents inédits. Les projets de réforme en cours, notamment en matière de sûretés réelles et de responsabilité délictuelle, sont présentés et examinés en contemplation de l’évolution du droit français. Démonstration est également faite du potentiel apport du Code civil autrichien à la construction du droit privé européen.
L’approche comparative qui innerve l’ensemble des contributions permet de connaître et de comprendre les singularités du Code civil autrichien ainsi que ses parentés avec d’autres droits, notamment français et allemand. Elle permet ainsi de proposer des réflexions sur le fonds juridique commun à l’Europe, sur ses contours et ses limites, sur la circulation des idées et des règles, sur la concurrence des droits, sur l’impact des transformations politiques, sociales et économiques, ou encore du droit européen.Contributors:
 Avec les contributions de Louis d’Avout, Jean-Sébastien Borghetti, Benjamin Bukor, Olivier Descamps, Georg Kathrein, Yves Mausen, Franz-Stefan Meissel, Laurent Pfister et Christiane Wendehorst.More information here.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALL FOR PAPERS: Symposium on Founding Moments in Constitutionalism (Yale Law School, 15-16 Apr 2015); DEADLINE 21 DEC 2015

(image: Yale Law School; source: yalebiodebate.wordpress.com)
The Legal History Blog signals the following Call for Papers, convened by Richard Albert (Boston College/Yale Law School) and Menaka Guruswamy (Yale Law School):
Founding moments are landmark events that break ties with the ancien regime and lay the foundation for the establishment of modern states. Founding moments shape national law, influence surrounding countries, establish future power structures and legitimize certain political institutions within the country.
But what exactly is a founding moment? When do we know the “founding” process is over and when do we know it is ongoing? Is it possible to have a founding moment without a new constitution? It is not always easy to identify and define founding moments. The establishment of a new constitutional identity is almost never encompassed in one event—and may span decades in the form of anti-colonial movements, revolutions, civil wars, legitimation crises, power struggles and consolidation processes.
Founding moments sometimes endow certain elements in society—such as revolutionary parties or political leaders—with political legitimacy. A key line of inquiry therefore concerns the relationship between founding moments and “founding figures,” and the extent to which the future of a nation should be guided by the intentions of those who orchestrated these founding moments.
Founding moments moreover are not always a single moment. How does a revolution relate to and influence the promulgation of the constitution? How does the promulgation of the constitution trigger crises in the consolidation process? Is there some danger to the revolutionary fervor being entrenched in words, symbolism and structures in a country’s written constitution?
We might also consider the phenomenon of unfinished foundings, which occur when revolutionary groups overthrow a dictator but not the entire “old guard.” To what extent is an event a founding moment if it is a partial or an unfinished revolution? How do such unfinished foundations influence the identity of the country?
Alexander Herzen described revolutions and national foundings as “pregnant widows”:The death of contemporary forms of social organization should gladden rather than oppress the soul. But what’s frightening is that the departing world leaves not an heir but a pregnant widow. Between the death of one and the birth of the other much time will go by, a long night of chaos and desolation will have to pass.
Some though not all founding moments occur at tumultuous times in a country’s history. They are bloody revolutions, fierce anti-colonial struggles and decades-long political upheavals. Countries undergoing founding moments—“pregnant widows” in Herzens words—should not be studied only as historical events but also as modern realities that influence and indeed often drive our understanding of law. From Egypt, Libya, Iraq to Nepal, countries around the world are undergoing the birth pangs of founding, constitution and reconstitution—they are waging civil wars, mounting revolutions and writing constitutions.
This conference on founding moments in constitutionalism is an opportunity to address this phenomenon and how it relates to our understanding of law.Practical details:
Eligibility
Submissions are invited from scholars of all ranks, including doctoral students.
Publication
The Convenors intend to publish the papers in an edited book or in a special issue of a law journal. An invitation to participate in this Symposium will be issued to a participant on the following conditions: (1) the participant agrees to submit an original, unpublished paper ranging between 8,000 and 11,000 words consistent with the submission guidelines issued by the Symposium Convenors; (2) the participant agrees to submit a pre-Symposium draft March 30, 2016; and (3) the participant agrees to submit a full post-Symposium final draft by September 1, 2016.
Submission Instructions
Interested scholars should email biographical information and an abstract of no more than 500 words by Monday, December 21, 2015 to Nishchal Basnyat (nishchal.basnyat@yale.edu) on the understanding that the abstract will form the basis of the pre-Symposium working draft of a minimum of 3000 words to be submitted by Monday, March 30, 2016. Scholars should identify their submission with the following subject line: “Yale Law School—Abstract Submission—Founding Moments.”
Notification
Successful applicants will be notified no later than January 15, 2016.
Costs
There are no costs to participate in this Symposium. Successful applicants are responsible for securing their own funding for travel.  Arrangements will be made for a special rate at a local hotel. Organizers:
Questions
Please direct inquiries in connection with this Symposium to:
Richard Albert
Associate Professor, Boston College Law School
Visiting Associate Professor, Yale Law School
richard.albert@yale.edu
Menaka Guruswamy
Yale Law School
menaka@post.harvard.edu
About the ConvenorsRichard Albert is an Associate Professor at Boston College Law School and, in 2015-16, a Visiting Associate Professor of Law and Canadian Bicentennial Visiting Associate Professor of Political Science at Yale University. A specialist in comparative public law with a focus on formal and informal constitutional amendment, he has since December 2014 been Book Reviews Editor for the American Journal of Comparative Law, which awarded him the Hessel Yntema Prize in 2010 for “the most outstanding article” on comparative law by a scholar under the age of 40. He is also a member of the Governing Council of the International Society of Public Law, an elected member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, an elected member of the Executive Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law, and a founding co-editor of I-CONnect, the new scholarly blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law. Prior to joining the faculty of Boston College Law School, Albert served as a law clerk to the Chief Justice of Canada and earned degrees from Yale, Harvard and Oxford.
Menaka Guruswamy
Dr. Menaka Guruswamy is a Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School. She also practices law at the Supreme Court of India where she has litigated a number of significant constitutional rights cases. Her cases include those that successfully  sought reform of public administration and the bureaucracy in the country (TSR Subramanium and Ors v Union of India and Ors), defending federal legislation that mandates that all private schools admit disadvantaged children (the Right to Education Act),  and litigating against Salwa Judum—state sponsored vigilante groups in Chhattisgarh. She has also challenged the constitutionality of the colonial-era sodomy law in India.
Dr. Guruswamy studied law as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, a Gammon Fellow at Harvard Law School, and at the National Law School of India. Her doctorate from Oxford University is on constitution-making in India, Pakistan, and Nepal. She has been visiting faculty at Columbia Law School and New York University School of Law.  Dr. Guruswamy has been a consultant to the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) in New York, UNICEF in South Sudan and the Government of India. She has also supported the constitution-making process in Nepal.  Her most recent publication is a chapter on ‘Crafting Constitutional Values: An Essay on the Supreme Court of India’,(in An Inquiry into the Existence of Global Values, Hart Publishing/Bloomberg:(2015). Contact Info:
Ryan Hynes
Boston College Law School
Faculty Support Assistant 
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CONFERENCE: "The History of Legal Thought: Historiography, Relevance and Challenges" (Bordeaux (Pessac), 20 Nov 2015


(image source: nomodos)

Nomôdos announes the following conference: L'histoire de la pensée juridique. Historiographie, actualité et enjeux, organised by the Aquitainy Centre for Legal History (CAHD).

Organizing committee:

  • Géraldine Cazals, professeur, université de Rouen, Institut universitaire de France
  • Nader Hakim, professeur, université de Bordeaux, CAHD 
 Program:

  • 9h30. - Propos introductifs, Géraldine Cazals, Université de Rouen, Institut universitaire de France, et Nader Hakim, université de Bordeaux
  • 10h. - L’histoire doctrinale est-elle un sport de combat?, Christophe Jamin, École de droit, Science Po.
Pause

CONTROVERSES
  • 11h. - Les juristes et l’histoire. Pour une nouvelle archéologie du droit, Aldo Schiavone, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa-Firenze
  • 11h30. - L’histoire de la pensée juridique en Allemagne. Le débat actuel, Michael Stolleis, Max-Planck Institut für Europäische Rechtsgeschichte
  • 12h. - Une histoire transnationale des idées juridiques?, Jean-Louis Halpérin, École normale supérieure, Institut universitaire de France
PENSER, TRANSMETTRE ET RECOMMENCER
  • 14h. - Les juristes romains comme écrivains: une littérature invisible et sa transmission, Dario Mantovani, Université de Pavie
  • 14h30. - École, cénacle ou lignée? Penser la transmission des idées dans l’histoire de la doctrine juridique médiévale, Marie Bassano, Université Toulouse Capitole
  • 15h. - Penser les institutions françaises: avec ou sans la nation?, Pierre Bonin, École de droit de la Sorbonne, Université Paris 1.
Pause

CLIO VERSUS THEMIS
  • 16h. - Le XXe siècle: le retour de l’historicité du droit, Paolo Grossi, Cour constitutionnelle italienne
  • 16h30. - Les historiens du droit administratif sont-ils encore plus positivistes que les adminîstrativistes?, Fabrice Melleray, École de droit de la Sorbonne, Université Paris 1, Institut universitaire de France
  • 17h. - Faire l’histoire de la pensée «par le milieu»: usages du droit vs vérités du droit dans l’historiographie contemporaine, Frédéric Audren, École de droit, Science Po
Practical information:

 More information here.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Willem Theo OOSTERVELD, The Law of Nations in Early American Foreign Policy. Theory and Practice from the Revolution to the Monroe Doctrine [Theory and Practice of Public International Law, ed. V. Chetail] (Leiden/Boston: Martinus Nijhoff/Brill,...

(image source: Brill)

Willem Theo Oosterveld (Hague Centre for Strategic Studies) published The Law of Nations in Early American Foreign Policy in Brill's new series "Theory and Practice of Public International Law" (ed. V. Chetail).

Summary:
In The Law of Nations in Early American Foreign Policy, Willem Theo Oosterveld provides the first general study of international law as interpreted and applied by the generation of the Founding Fathers. A mostly neglected aspect in the historiography of the early republic, this study argues that international law was in fact an integral part of the Revolutionary creed.
Taking the reader from colonial debates about the law of nations to the discussions about slavery in the early 19th century, this study shows the zest of the Founders to conduct foreign policy on the basis of treatises such as Vattel’s The Law of Nations. But it also highlights the deep ambiguities and sometimes personal struggles that arose when applying international law. On the author:
Willem Theo Oosterveld (Ph.D, Graduate Institute, Geneva, 2011) is a strategic analyst with The Hague Centre for Strategic Studies in The Hague (Netherlands), where he works on issues relating to conflict, justice and development. More information on the publisher's website.

Source: International Law Reporter.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLES WANTED: Comparative Legal History, the official journal of the European Society for Comparative Legal History

Juris Diversitas - mer, 11/18/2015 - 07:58
Articles are being sought for publication in Comparative Legal History. The journal is published by Taylor & Francis (UK), both online and in print, twice a year: Articles … explore both internal legal history (doctrinal and disciplinary developments in the law) and external legal history (legal ideas and institutions in wider contexts). Rooted in the complexity of the various Western legal traditions worldwide, the journal will also investigate other laws and customs from around the globe. Comparisons may be either temporal or geographical and both legal and other law-like normative traditions will be considered. Scholarship on comparative and trans-national historiography, including trans-disciplinary approaches, is particularly welcome.
Comparative Legal History is the official journal of the European Society for Comparative Legal History (ESCLH). The Society’s membership fees include a subscription to the journal.
The Editors welcome scholarly submissions in the English language:
To submit an article, please contact Articles Editor Heikki Pihlajamäki (heikki.pihlajamaki@helsinki.fi). The optimal length for articles is between 7500 to 15000 words, including footnotes. All articles are submitted to double blind peer review.
To propose a review, please contact Reviews Editor Agustín Parise (agustin.parise@maastrichtuniversity.nl). Book reviews will generally range from 1500 to 2500 words. Review articles will also be considered.
Potential contributors should pay special attention to the ‘Instructions for Authors’. In particular, contributors whose first language is not English should have their papers edited by native Anglophone scholars in advance of their submission to ensure a clear presentation of their ideas and an accurate appraisal of their work.
Spread the word. 
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLES WANTED: Comparative Legal History, the official journal of the European Society for Comparative Legal History

Articles are being sought for publication in Comparative Legal History. The journal is published by Taylor & Francis (UK), both online and in print, twice a year:
Articles … explore both internal legal history (doctrinal and disciplinary developments in the law) and external legal history (legal ideas and institutions in wider contexts). Rooted in the complexity of the various Western legal traditions worldwide, the journal will also investigate other laws and customs from around the globe. Comparisons may be either temporal or geographical and both legal and other law-like normative traditions will be considered. Scholarship on comparative and trans-national historiography, including trans-disciplinary approaches, is particularly welcome.
Comparative Legal History is the official journal of the European Society for Comparative Legal History (ESCLH). The Society’s membership fees include a subscription to the journal.
The Editors welcome scholarly submissions in the English language:
To submit an article, please contact Articles Editor Heikki Pihlajamäki (heikki.pihlajamaki@helsinki.fi). The optimal length for articles is between 7500 to 15000 words, including footnotes. All articles are submitted to double blind peer review.
To propose a review, please contact Reviews Editor Agustín Parise (agustin.parise@maastrichtuniversity.nl). Book reviews will generally range from 1500 to 2500 words. Review articles will also be considered.
Potential contributors should pay special attention to the ‘Instructions for Authors’. In particular, contributors whose first language is not English should have their papers edited by native Anglophone scholars in advance of their submission to ensure a clear presentation of their ideas and an accurate appraisal of their work.
Spread the word. 
Catégories: Comparative Law News

REMINDER/CFP: "LEARNING LAW BY DOING: EXPLORING LEGAL LITERACY IN PREMODERN SOCIETIES" (Turku University, 14-15 Jan 2016); DEADLINE 23 NOV 2015




(image source: utu.fi)

14-15 January 2016,
Faculty of Law, University of Turku, Finland

ABSTRACT
In many European regions, there was a gap between learned law and the largely illiterate laity. Especially where the legal language was another than the vernacular, such as Latin or Law French, this effectively helped to monopolize law and legal knowledge to learned lawyers. Yet, in the shades of what are generally called legal professionals, there were many other people who had some legal literacy, i.e., knowledge of the law and legal skills. Indeed, one may regard legal know-how as a sliding scale between what could be called true professionalism and complete ignorance. While trained legal professionals have been much researched, the legal knowledge and skills of laymen have largely been unexplored in legal history.

In this largely unresearched grey area, one finds people who had pursued some law studies, but never taken a degree or finished the required curriculum. There were also people doing some legal work or part-time advocacy such as scribes, scriveners, clerks, bailiffs and officials. Jury-members, lay magistrates and priests were legal literates in their communities and could also act as legal intermediaries between the people and the authorities. In eighteenth-century Japan even inn-keepers started to offer legal services to the people.

Legal literates had often acquired some knowledge of the contents of the law or legal skills by doing law-related work or being exposed to the practice of law in their lives. This way more marginal groups such as peasants, women and children could acquire a modicum of legal literacy. However, little research has been done on legal literacy in the premodern world, partly because of a scarcity of sources and the marginality of many common people.

This conference explores many facets of legal literacy in the pre-modern world: Europe and European colonies, but also other non-European legal cultures. Believing that cross-fertilization of different academic disciplines (law, social history, literacy studies etc.) will help research the elusive phenomenon, we invite papers on various aspects of the phenomenon, e.g.:
*       groups or individuals who had acquired some legal literacy
*       what legal skills and knowledge were acquired and how this was manifested
*       mechanisms of acquiring legal literacy
*       the uses of legal literacy
*       what legal literacy signified for individuals personally and as members of their community
*       conflicts and/or cooperation between self-made legal literates and members of the legal profession
*       sources for exploring legal literacy

PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS AND FURTHER INFORMATION:
For more information about the conference or to submit a proposal (about 200 words), please contact Professor Mia Korpiola (mia.korpiola[at]utu.fi, Faculty of Law, University of Turku). The deadline for submitting paper proposals is 23 November 2015. Please feel free to share and circulate this CFP.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice’ by Benjamin Spagnolo

Juris Diversitas - mar, 11/17/2015 - 12:17
Hart Publishing is delighted to announce the publication of ‘The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice’ by Benjamin Spagnolo
We are pleased to offer you 20% discount on the book
To order online with your 20% discount please click on the link below the title and then click on the ‘pay now’ button on the right hand side of the screen. Once through to the ordering screen type ref: CV7 in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’
Alternatively, please contact Hart Publishing’s distributor, Macmillan Distribution Limited, by telephone or email (details below) quoting ref: CV7
The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice
by Benjamin Spagnolo
The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice examines a persistent and fascinating question about the continuity of legal systems: when is a legal system existing at one time the same legal system that exists at another time?
The book's distinctive approach to this question is to combine abstract critical analysis of two of the most developed theories of legal systems, those of Hans Kelsen and Joseph Raz, with an evaluation of their capacity, in practice, to explain the facts, attitudes and normative standards for which they purport to account. That evaluation is undertaken by reference to Australian constitutional law and history, whose diverse and complex phenomena make it particularly apt for evaluating the theories’ explanatory power.
In testing whether the depiction of Australian law presented by each theory achieves an adequate ‘fit’ with historical facts, the book also contributes to the understanding of Australian law and legal systems between 1788 and 2001. By collating the relevant Australian materials systematically for the first time, it presents the case for reconceptualising the role of Imperial laws and institutions during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and clarifies the interrelationship between Colonial, State, Commonwealth and Imperial legal systems both before and after Federation.
Benjamin Spagnolo is the Penningtons Student (Fellow) and Tutor in Law at Christ Church, Oxford.
Please click here to view the table of contents for this book
BOOK DETAILSOctober 2015   9781849468831    280pp   Hbk   RSP: £5820% Discount Price: £46.40
 Order OnlineIf you would like to place an order you can do so through the Hart Publishing website (link below). To receive the discount, please click on the ‘pay now’ button on the right hand side of the screen. Once through to the ordering screen type ref:CV7in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’.http://www.hartpub.co.uk/BookDetails.aspx?ISBN=9781849468831
Alternatively, please contact Hart Publishing’s Distributor, Macmillan Distribution Limited, by telephone or e-mail and quote reference CV7 when placing your order.
Macmillan Distribution (MDL), Brunel Road, Houndmills, Basingstoke, RG21 6XS, UK
UK ORDERS: Tel: +44 (0)1256 302692    Fax: +44 (0)1256 812521 / 812558      E-mail: direct@macmillan.co.uk
EU AND ROW ORDERS: Tel: +44 (0)1256 329242    Fax: +44 (0)1256 842084    E-mail: export@macmillan.co.uk


Catégories: Comparative Law News

ROUND TABLE: "Image et Droit III. Du refus à la régulation des images" (Rome, November 23-25 2015)


WHAT Image et Droit III. Du refus à la régulation des images, roundtable
WHEN  November 23-25 2015

WHERE  École française de Rome, Piazza Navona 62, Rome
Cette dernière table ronde entend revenir sur le refus et la régulation des images, un thème qui a pris, ces derniers mois, une ampleur toute singulière.En février 2015, l’attaque contre le musée de Mossoul et contre plusieurs oeuvres issues du patrimoine irakien provoquèrent la stupeur et l’incrédulité dans la presse et sur les réseaux sociaux. Ces destructions, qui font écho à celles des Bouddhas de Bâmiyân en 2001, témoignaient de la reviviscence d’un iconoclasme aux enjeux et aux contextes nouveaux. Les destructions, elles-mêmes soigneusement mises en image et en scène, ne posaient pas seulement la question de la licéité des représentations, mais désignaient sans fard le refus absolu des images - y compris celles dont les usages cultuels avaient disparu depuis des siècles- comme un signe de ralliement à une interprétation radicale d’un type d’islam. L’indignation qu’elle suscita sembla cependant oblitérer le fait que ces questions s’adossaient à une très longue histoire de la méfiance et de la relégation des images.C’est cette histoire que la troisième rencontre du projet Image et Droit souhaite évoquer, celle d’une intense défiance que les images peuvent susciter, de l’abondante réflexion sur leur licéité, leur rejet et leur limitation. Quelles étaient celles qui demeuraient autorisées? Comment les restrictions et les régulations d’images pouvaient-elles produire de nouveaux types d’image? Dans un contexte ouvertement hostile à la représentation du vivant, les formes abstraites et l’ornementation furent-elles une des réponses visuelles à ce choix? Les destructions ou les occultations d’images furent-elles l’objet de codifications précises? Comment les destructions d’images entendaient-elles fonder sinon un nouvel ordre juridique qui ne se restreint pas à la simple question des images, du moins une nouvelle normativité des pratiques? Ces questions ne touchent pas seulement les images de culte, mais aussi, pour certaines périodes historiques, les représentations profanes et notamment le portrait dont la régulation ne fut pas seulement posée par les théologiens protestants, mais aussi par les révolutionnaires français qui légiférèrent précisément sur les retraits de certaines figures royales. Elles continuent encore aujourd’hui de préoccuper les représentants des Etats pour l’établissement des papiers d’identité où la question de la définition légitime de la ressemblance constitue l’objet d’une législation tatillonne. En somme, cette table ronde propose de repenser à nouveaux frais la question du droit des images. Il s’agira de voir combien sa limitation est à la fois l’objet et le produit de conflits juridiques, religieux et politiques, conduisant à de nouvelles définitions et de nouvelles élaborations d’images.

Programme


Lundi 23 novembre 201514h 30 : Ouverture du colloque : S. Bourdin, C. Michel d’Annoville, N. Ghermani, C. DelageRecomposer le droit des images : enjeux contemporainsPrésidence C. Delage et N. Goedert15h00 : Emmanuel Alloa, Université de Saint-Gall
La mobilisation de l’aura. L’oeuvre d’art à l’époque de sa déplaçabilité15h30 : Frédéric F. Martin, Université de Nantes
« Marquées par le droit » : le cadre juridique des images au prisme de ses manifestations visuelles16h00 : Agnès Maffre-Baugé, Université d’Avignon
La création et la circulation des images confrontées à l’ordre publicDiscussion et pause17h00 : Jean-Michel Bruguière, Université de Grenoble-Alpes
Le « droit » de défiguration et de destruction de l’oeuvre d’art par son créateur ou des artistes tiers17h30 : Alexis Fournol, Université Paris I-Panthéon Sorbonne
L’enfance dans l’art : l’encadrement juridique de la représentation au muséeDiscussion
Mardi 24 novembre 2015
Détruire les images : souveraineté et limitations du corps
de l’antiquité à l’âge de la digitalisation
Présidence A. Stoehr-Monjou, C. Michel d’Annoville, G. Milani9h30 : David Freedberg, Warburg Institute : Conférence inauguralePrésentation et discussion : Olivier Christin, Université de Neuchâtel
10h00 : J. César Magalhães de Oliveira, Université de São Paulo
Le rasage d’Hercule : une statue outragée à Carthage au début du Ve siècle10h30 : Hervé Inglebert, Université Paris Ouest-Nanterre
Les statues dans l’espace public et dans l’espace privé : le licite et l’illicite à Byzance et chez les Omeyyades dans la première moitié du VIIIe siècleDiscussion et pause11h30 : Marina Prusac, University of Oslo
The Necessity of Destruction. Damnatio Memoriae explained through a Perspective on the Animism of Roman Portraits12h00 : Ionna Rapti, École Pratique des Hautes Études
Destructive Devotion : Damage as a Devotional BehaviorDiscussion et pause déjeunerJustifier et penser la destruction des imagesPrésidence O. Christin, N. Ghermani14h30 : Valérie Hayaert-Vanautgaerden, Paris, Institut des Hautes Études sur la Justice
Le portrait lacéré15h00 : Emmanuel Fureix, Université-Paris XII-Créteil
Réguler l’iconoclasme politique dans une société postrévolutionnaire : le cas de la RestaurationDiscussion et pause16h00 : Silvia Naef, Université de Genève
Images à détruire, images à préserver : la multiplicité des positions des religieux musulmans16h30 : Dominique Clévenot, Université de Toulouse II
Esthétique de la censure. Sur quelques gestes défiguratifs dans le monde islamiqueDiscussion
Mercredi 25 novembre 2015
Préserver ou réévaluer l’image ?
Présidence A-L. Connesson, G. Mazeau9h30 : Sabine Fialon,Université de Montpellier
Virtus et miracles d’images dans l’Antiquité tardive (IIe-VIesiècles)10h00 : Brigitte Miriam Bedos-Rezak, New York University
Beyond Images? Printed Matter and the Feel of the Law (Western Europe XIth-XIVth Centuries)Discussion et pause11h30 : Fabian Steinhauer, Frankfurt-am-Main Universität
Censoring the cinema. From pastoral sorrow to cinema law12h00 : Nathalie Goedert, Université Paris Sud et Ninon Maillard, Université de Nantes
Vérité judiciaire versus vérité médiatique. Les fictions du réel constituent-elles une menace pour la justice ?
Renseignements:naima.ghermani@upmf-grenoble.frcaroline.michel-dannoville@upmf-grenoble.fr
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: "The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice" by Benjamin Spagnolo (October 2015)


Benjamin Spagnolo, The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice
introduction here
The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice examines a persistent and fascinating question about the continuity of legal systems: when is a legal system existing at one time the same legal system that exists at another time?
The book's distinctive approach to this question is to combine abstract critical analysis of two of the most developed theories of legal systems, those of Hans Kelsen and Joseph Raz, with an evaluation of their capacity, in practice, to explain the facts, attitudes and normative standards for which they purport to account. That evaluation is undertaken by reference to Australian constitutional law and history, whose diverse and complex phenomena make it particularly apt for evaluating the theories’ explanatory power.
In testing whether the depiction of Australian law presented by each theory achieves an adequate ‘fit’ with historical facts, the book also contributes to the understanding of Australian law and legal systems between 1788 and 2001. By collating the relevant Australian materials systematically for the first time, it presents the case for reconceptualising the role of Imperial laws and institutions during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and clarifies the interrelationship between Colonial, State, Commonwealth and Imperial legal systems both before and after Federation.

Catégories: Comparative Law News

NOTICE: "Histoire de l'Economie sans Travail. Finances, Investissement, Spéculation de l'Antiquité à nos Jours" Cycle de colloques (Paris, December 2015/June 2017)


WHAT Histoire de l'Economie sans Travail.Finances, Investissement, Spéculation de l'Antiquité à nos Jours, cycle de colloques
WHEN December 2015/June 2017

WHERE Centre aquitain d'Histoire du Droit, Université de Bordeaux, Centre d’Histoire Judiciaire, Université Lille 2, Institut d'Histoire du Droit, Université Paris 2-Panthéon-Assas
Comité scientifique
  • Luisa Brunori, Centre d’Histoire Judiciaire-Université Lille 2
  • Serge Dauchy, Centre d’Histoire Judiciaire-Université Lille 2
  • Olivier Descamps, Université Panthéon-Assas
  • Xavier Prévost, Université de Bordeaux 
1. - Les sources intellectuelles - Université Paris 2, 2 décembre 2015

La difficile conjoncture des premières années du troisième millénaire semble demander un regard de grande ampleur sur les dynamiques qui ont conduit à des phénomènes - la crise de 2008, la crise des subprimesou les bulles spéculatives – qui restent encore largement à décrypter.   Au-delà des approches dictées par l’urgence, les aspects constitutifs des systèmes économico-juridiques contemporains, de moins en moins référés au travail humain et de plus en plus orientés vers la rémunération d’activités spéculatives, demandent désormais de faire l’objet d’une réflexion approfondie vouée à recentrer les questions et les enjeux.L’« économie sans travail », à savoir la masse d’opérations financières rémunératrices ni du travail humain ni d’un échange de biens, a aujourd’hui un impact extraordinaire sur l’agencement socio-économique contemporain. Elle peut aller jusqu’à le mettre en danger tout en questionnant de nombreux principes fondateurs de la justice substantielle ou « distributive » qu’on considère à la base de nos systèmes institutionnels.   Les outils juridiques de cette « économie sans travail » sont effectivement voués à la rémunération d’un quid ontologiquement très différent des prestations qui font l’objet des relations synallagmatiques classiques (le travail, l’échange de biens). Il s’agit, selon les cas, de rémunérer la capacité de prévision (dans les contrats, par exemple, defutures, de warrants, d’option), le transfert du risque (dans les dérivés de crédit, les assurances), ou la mise à disposition du capital (participations de capital en sociétés, marché actionnaire, etc.).   Cela conduit nécessairement à s’interroger sur la justification de cette rémunération ; justification à laquelle on ne peut pas renoncer, non seulement dans les relations entre les particuliers mais dans tous les aspects du droit de l’économie.   Le regard historique paraît nécessaire pour la compréhension de ces phénomènes, d’autant plus que ces questionnements se posent de longue date aux acteurs institutionnels. Mais la réflexion historique ne peut être qu’interdisciplinaire, compte tenu des superpositions réciproques et complexes de problématiques juridiques, économiques et philosophiques impliquées dans ce thème.
   Ainsi, on observe qu’à partir de la distinction aristotélicienne entre « économie » et « chrématistique », le souci d’assurer la justice commutative à l’intérieur de la communauté a toujours imposé une réflexion sur la valeur de l’argent et sur son rôle dans les échanges entre les personnes. L’idée de la stérilité de l’argent, ultérieurement développée par la pensée thomiste, a provoqué depuis l’Antiquité et tout au long du Moyen Âge, une méfiance, voire une défiance, envers la rémunération des capitaux monétaires non accompagnée par le travail humain.   La conception de la valeur de l’argent est donc la base des théories condamnant ou justifiant la rémunération des opérations spéculatives. Cette conception change complètement à partir du XVIème siècle avec l’abandon progressif de l’idée de la stérilité de l’argent. L’argent devient un facteur productif de richesse lorsqu’il est injecté dans le circuit économique, représentant donc une valeur comme bien. En conséquence, dans un système de droit des contrats qui se veut cohérent, la mise à disposition de l’argent ou la soumission au risque de son capital, doivent non seulement être encouragées pour le bien-être de toute la communauté, mais doivent également être rémunérées même si elles ne sont pas accompagnées d’un travail personnel.   Cependant, ce changement radical de conception n’a jamais fait perdre de vue la nécessité d’un encadrement de ces activités spéculatives. Le danger d’une dégénérescence de ces opérations économiques qui, de productives de richesse peuvent devenir destructives, s’est fait jour bien avant les crises du début des années 2000. Si l’encadrement était à l’origine (XVIème siècle) d’ordre moral, progressivement la science juridique, économique et philosophique a dégagé des outils techniques voués à empêcher les effets pervers d’une utilisation déréglée de l’« économie sans travail ».   Les aspects normatifs des échanges spéculatifs sont donc devenus l’objet d’une analyse scientifique de la part des juristes, des économistes mais également des philosophes. Le respect de la justice contractuelle et de l’équilibre des prestations économiques même dans un contexte de plus en plus « capitaliste » est un des soucis majeurs des sciences sociales depuis le XVIIIème siècle. Il reste encore aujourd’hui un des enjeux majeurs des sociétés contemporaines.

II – Objets de l’enquêteLa recherche s’articule autour de quatre volets thématiques :1) Les sources intellectuelles (Paris, 2 décembre 2015)

   Les grands courants de la culture juridique, économique et philosophique concernant la nature et la valeur des opérations spéculatives seront ici abordés.   A) C’est le monde gréco-latin qui perçoit en premier le problème de la justice commutative qui doit guider tous les échanges à l’intérieur de la communauté. Dans ce contexte, naît la distinction entre l’activité dont la finalité est de répondre aux besoins humains, nommée « activité économique », et celle ayant pour but l’accumulation d’argent, dénommée « chrématistique ». Seule la première correspond à l’idée decommutatio et est donc légitime et juste.
   Au Moyen Âge également la doctrine économique et juridique s’inscrit principalement dans la thématique de la justice commutative, critère général qui doit déterminer le droit des particuliers. Le droit médiéval et canonique se fondent sur le postulat aristotélicien-thomiste quepecunia non parit pecuniam : ce qui en résulte est la négation du profit et de l’intérêt en cas de financement exclusivement monétaire d’une opération économique qui ne peut que donner lieu à des opérations usuraires. C’est donc la conception de la valeur de l’argent qui est en cause, et cela encore plus à la fin du Moyen Âge quand la monnaie recommence à circuler et les premières banques voient la lumière.   B) Les grandes découvertes conduisent à une véritable révolution économique qui remet en cause tout l’équilibre classique des relations synallagmatiques. L’« économie sans travail » éclate, les opérations purement spéculatives (assurances, change, commissions, participation exclusivement monétaire à une société commerciale…) se multiplient.   La conception de la valeur de l’argent change complètement, le capital devient facteur productif de richesse qui doit être rémunéré. En conséquence, toute la théorie des contrats doit être revue, notamment en ce qui concerne la rémunération du capital et du risque. Dans ce contexte, la théologie et l’éthique sont également appelées à s’adapter, mais aussi à encadrer ce nouvel esprit du capitalisme naissant.   Mais c’est surtout le XIXe siècle qui devra se mesurer à la maturité du capitalisme, ce qui se traduit dans le milieu juridique par la reconnaissance du capital emportant des effets juridiques, par la prise de risque comme véritable prestation devant être rémunérée et par l’intervention des pouvoirs publics dans l’encadrement des activités spéculatives. Le relais passe donc aux juristes positivistes appelés aujourd’hui à replacer l’« économie sans travail » - grâce aux outils du droit de l’économie et du droit fiscal - dans un cadre de justice substantielle. C’est aussi le cas des économistes qui explorent ce domaine au prisme des thèses de l’économie du droit.



2 – Les acteurs, Université de Bordeaux, 1 avril 2016
3 –  Les résolutions des controverses, Université de Lille 2, 18 novembre 2016
4 – L’approche internationale, Villa Finaly, Florence (Italie), 7-8-9 juin 2017


Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: "Histoire du Terrorisme" Gérard Chaland, Arnaud Blin (dir.) (Paris, September 2015)


Histoire du Terrorisme, Gérard Chaland, Arnaud Blin (dir.)Paris, September 2015
all information here
Nous vivons à l'heure du terrorisme, et nous ignorons son histoire. Pris par la violence des images, la surenchère des menaces, la confusion de l’information «en continu», nous laissons finalement peu de place à la réflexion et à l'analyse. Il est pourtant urgent de chercher à comprendre le phénomène terroriste.
Avec le concours de spécialistes internationaux, Gérard Chaliand et Arnaud Blin retracent dans cet ouvrage l'histoire du terrorisme, depuis l'Antiquité jusqu'à ses formes les plus récentes, et nous font comprendre combien la perception du terrorisme a évolué. L'islamisme radical est ainsi replacé dans son contexte historique. Seule cette profondeur de vue peut nous permettre de cerner les enjeux actuels de ce phénomène, dont les effets sont loin d'être épuisés.
Les auteurs ont aussi réuni pour ce livre les discours, manifestes et autres textes théoriques des acteurs principaux du terrorisme, de Bakounine à Ben Laden – la plupart inédits en français. Ce que vous avez entre les mains, lecteurs, c’est la première grande encyclopédie du terrorisme.

Catégories: Comparative Law News

JOURNAL: Revue d’Histoire moderne et contemporaine "Antisémitisme(s): un éternel retour?" (2015/2-3 ,n° 62-⅔)


Revue d’Histoire moderne et contemporaine "Antisémitisme(s): un éternel retour?" (2015/2-3 ,n° 62-⅔)
all information here

Sommaire
La religion, aux sources de l’enseignement du mépris?L’antisémitisme en action : pratiques et politiquesLes avatars de l’antisémitisme contemporain: entre permanences et renouveauPierre Birnbaum, Jour de colère - Résumé Consulter 5 €LectureComptes rendus
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: "Ce droit qu’on dit administratif… Études d’histoire du droit public" by Grégoire Bigot (2015)


 Grégoire Bigot, Ce droit qu’on dit administratif… Études d’histoire du droit public
Le droit administratif n’a pu naître, aux alentours de 1900, comme science universitaire autonome, qu’à la condition d’escamoter son histoire. Écrire cette histoire, c’est s’interroger sur la nature de ce droit qu’on dit administratif. Elle est politique dans la mesure où elle raconte la confrontation de l’individu, armé des droits subjectifs que les Déclarations lui reconnaissaient, et de l’État. Elle met en lumière le drame d’une Révolution française qui, par défiance de la justice comme pouvoir, ne sut pas ériger de juges en tiers garant de ces droits. Le modèle napoléonien, qui plonge pour plus d’un siècle la France dans l’oubli des droits comme fondement du politique, crée la justice administrative dans l’intérêt d’un pouvoir réglé, celui d’un État en surplomb des droits. Le droit administratif est ainsi une science de l’État, sur lequel il fonde ses fins et sa légitimité. 
Author
  • Grégoire Bigot, Agrégé d’Histoire du droit,  Professeur à l’Université de Nantes, Membre de l’Institut universitaire de France


Sommaire
  • Préface. «Ce droit qu’on dit administratif…»
Première PartieCHAMP THÉORIQUE
Chapitre I – Les mythes fondateurs du droit administratif
1 – Les mythes des origines
2 – Le mythe de la signification
Chapitre II – Le Conseil d’État, juge gouvernemental
1 – Les origines impériales du droit administratif
2 – Favoriser la puissance de l’État: le droit de la responsabilité de l’administration
3 – Légitimer la puissance de l’État: le recours pour excès de pouvoir
Chapitre III – La difficile distinction droit public/droit privé. L’exemple du droit administratif
1 – Les remontées dans l’ancien droit
2 – Justice et mixité du droit avant 1789A – État et justiceB – Justice et administration
3 – Politique et dualité des droits après 1789A – La rupture révolutionnaireB – L’élaboration d’une jurisprudence exorbitante du droit privé
Chapitre IV – L’exorbitance dans la formation historique du droit administratif
1 – L’exorbitance des fondations: le sacré et le profane
2 – L’exorbitance des fins: acte administratif et puissance publique
Deuxième PartieCADRAGE CONSTITUTIONNEL
Chapitre I – Les bases constitutionnelles du droit administratif avant 1875
1 – L’histoire des bases constitutionnelles
2 – L’inactualité des bases constitutionnelles
Chapitre II – Les enjeux constitutionnels de la présidence du Tribunal des conflits
1 – Séparation des pouvoirs et séparation des autorités
2 – Une tentative avortée : le Tribunal des conflits, Tribunal constitutionnel
3 – La question de la récusation du président du Tribunal des conflits
Chapitre III – Justice administrative et libéralisme sont-ils compatibles?
1 – Au nom de la liberté politiqueA – La question de l’inconstitutionnalité de la justice administrative dans les premières années de la RestaurationB – La question de l’inconstitutionnalité de la justice administrative à la fin des années 1820
2 – Au nom de la liberté en soiA – Le moment TocquevilleB – La liberté civile extérieure à l’État
Troisième partieUN UNIVERS DE FICTIONS
Chapitre I – La théorie du ministre juge: endoscopie d’une fiction juridique
1 – L’ère du critère matérielA – Sous le régime napoléonienB – Sous les monarchies censitaires
2 – L’ère du critère fonctionnelA – Les anticipations du second EmpireB – Les réalisations de la troisième République
Chapitre II – L’État de droit selon le droit administratif français
1 – Redéfinir l’État
2 – Redéfinir le droit administratif
Chapitre III – Personnalité publique et puissance publique
1 – Une fonction de rattrapage historique et politiqueA – L’assimilation de l’État à la Nation chez les juristesB – La Nation irréductible à l’État
2 – Une fonction de légitimation juridiqueA – La «redécouverte» de la personnalité morale par la doctrine publicisteB – Fiction heureuse ou dangereuse? Les controverses relatives à la personnalité de l’État
  • Origine des articles
  • Table des matières
Site Internet de La Mémoire du Droit: http://www.memoiredudroit.fr/page.php
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: "L'État dans ses colonies. Les administrateurs de l’empire espagnol au XIXe siècle" Jean-Philippe Luis (ed.) (2015)


Jean-Philippe Luis (ed.), L'État dans ses colonies.Les administrateurs de l’empire espagnol au XIXe siècle
La phase des indépendances latino-américaines des années 1810-1825 fait penser à tort que l'Espagne était une puissance coloniale définitivement déchue. En effet, un empire ultramarin persiste, fort de près de 10 millions d'habitants à la fin du siècle et vivant sur un territoire (Cuba, Porto Rico, les Philippines et la Guinée équatoriale) égal en superficie à celui de la métropole. Il connaîtra une mutation vers un modèle colonial de plus en plus proche des nouveaux empires européens du xixe siècle. Centré sur ce processus, ce livre, montre quelles ressources humaines et financières ont été mobilisées par l'État espagnol pour le contrôle de ces territoires et comment ces ressources étaient un excellent dérivatif pour limiter le mécontentement social des classes moyennes qui ne parvenaient pas à trouver dans la péninsule les débouchés professionnels espérés.
Table of contents here
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CFP: British Crime Historians Symposium (Edinburgh, October 7-8 2016)





WHAT the British Crime Historians Symposium, 5, Call for papers
 WHEN  October 7-8 2016

WHERE University of Edinburgh
The British Crime Historians Symposium meets every two years as a forum for discussion, debate and the presentation of research for all aspects of the history of crime, law, justice, policing, punishment and social regulation. Previous events (organised by the British Crime Historians Network) have taken place in Leeds, Sheffield, Milton Keynes (Open Uiversity) and Liverpool.
Our initial starting point, as in former years, is the British Isles and its former colonies. However we particularly encourage approaches that open up and develop comparative and transnational frameworks across period and place.
This year’s conference particularly welcomes proposals that engage with the following: • Interdisciplinary perspectives • Comparative, international and transnational histories • The relationship between past and present
 Confirmed Keynotes Speakers are: Professor David Garland (New York University) and Dr Julia Laite (Birkbeck, University of London).We welcome proposals for individual papers as well as panels, which should be emailed as an attached Word document to BCH5@ed.ac.uk by 31 March 2016
Each speaker whose proposal for a paper is accepted will be asked to speak for 20 minutes (to allow further time for questions and discussion). A panel should consist of three papers which together address an over-arching theme or topic. We welcome proposals from scholars at all stages of their career including postgraduate students, and we encourage panel organisers to reflect this in any panel proposals.
 For each individual paper proposed please include: title of paper; name, institutional affiliation (if any) and email address of speaker; abstract of 250 words. Proposals for panels should also include: name, institutional affiliation (if any) and email address of the panel organiser; title of panel; summary of aims of panel (150 words); name of panel chair if known (if not included in the proposal a chair will be allocated by the conference committee); and full details of all papers and speakers (as for individual papers above). 
The Conference Committee is: Chloe Kennedy (School of Law, University of Edinburgh); Louise Jackson, David Silkenat and Rian Sutton (School of History Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh). Any queries should be addressed to: BCH5@ed.ac.uk






Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK REVIEWS: Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung XLII (2015), No. 1

 (image source: Duncker & Humblot)
The Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung XLII (2015), No.1 contains reviews of the following works, relevant to legal historians. All texts have been published on recensio.net in open access:

- Thomas F. MAYER, The Roman Inquisition. A Papal Bureaucracy and Its Laws in the Age of Galileo (Philadelphia: Univ of Pennsylvania Press, 2013), 385 p.: fulltext of the review by Bernward Schmidt here

-  Norbert BRIESKORN, Gideon STIENIG (eds.), Francisco de Vitorias "De Indis" in interdisziplinärer Perspektive/Interdisciplinary Views on Francisco de Vitoria's "De Indis" [Politische Philosophie und Rechtstheorie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Reihe II: Untersuchungen, 3] (Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 2013) and Kristin BUNGE, Stefan SCHWEIGHÖFER, Anselm SPINDLER and Andreas WAGNER (eds.), Kontroversen um das Recht. Beiträge zur Rechtsbegründung von Vitoria bis Suárez / Contending for Law. Arguments about the Foundation of Law from Vitoria to Suárez/Contending for Law. Arguments about the Foundation of Law from Vitoria to Suárez [Politische Philosophie und Rechtstheorie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Reihe II: Untersuchungen, v. 4] (Stuttgart/Bad CannStatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 2013): fulltext of the review by Daniel Damler here.

- Oliver BACH, Norbert BRIESKORN, Gideon STIENIG (eds.), "Auctoritas omnium legum". Francisco Suárez' "De Legibus" zwischen Theologie, Philosophie und Jurisprudenz [Politische Philosophie und Rechtstheorie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit; Reihe II: Untersuchungen, 5] (Stuttgart: Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 2013); fulltext of the review by Nils Jansen here.

- Milan KULHI, Carl Gottlieb Svarez und das Verhältnis von Herrschaft und Recht im aufgeklärten Absolutismus [Studien zur Europäischen Rechtsgeschichte, 272] (Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 2012): fulltext of the review by Esteban Mauerer here.

- Karin NEHLSEN-VON STRYCK, Rechtsnorm und Rechtspraxis in Mittelalter und früher Neuzeit. Ausgewählte Aufsätze, hrsg. von Albrecht Cordes und Bernd Kannowski [Schriften zur Rechtsgeschichte, 158] (Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, 2012), fulltext of the review by Hiram Kümper here
Catégories: Comparative Law News

Judicial Decision-Making in a Globalised World

Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/16/2015 - 12:04
NEW AS PAPERBACKJudicial Decision-Making in a Globalised WorldA Comparative Analysis of the Changing Practices of Western Highest CourtsElaine Mak
Reviews‘...the reviewers strongly suggest the reading of this brilliant book which has all the qualities for becoming a "must-read" for...scholars and practitioners,It is a very meticulous and welcome, but specialized, addition to the globalization of law literature...’Suzanne Comtois and Mauro Zamboni, Canadian Journal of Administrative Law and Practice
‘…the virtues of this book are many…[it] contributes importantly to what I hope will be a growing field of “trans-Atlantic” studies.,Mak’s comparative study offers a significant contribution to the scholarship on the use of foreign legal materials in legal developments. The close scrutiny of the inner workings of the highest courts also make it a welcome addition to the field of comparative judicial studies. The book certainly merits attention from both lawyers and political scientists.’Martin Shapiro, Law and Politics Book Review
Why do judges study legal sources that originated outside their own national legal system, and how do they use arguments from these sources in deciding domestic cases? Based on interviews with judges, this book presents the inside story of how judges engage with international and comparative law in the highest courts of the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, France and the Netherlands. A comparative analysis of the views and experiences of the judges clarifies how the decision-making of these Western courts has developed in light of the internationalisation of law and the increased opportunities for transnational judicial communication. While the qualitative analysis reveals the motives that judges claim for using foreign law and the influence of 'globalist' and 'localist' approaches to judging, the author also finds suggestions of a convergence of practices between the courts that are the subject of this study. This empirical analysis is complemented by a constitutional-theoretical inquiry into the procedural and substantive factors of legal evolution, which enable or constrain the development and possible convergence of highest courts' practices. The two strands of the analysis are connected in a final contextual reflection on the future development of the role of Western highest courts.
Elaine Mak is Professor of Empirical Study of Public Law, in particular of Rule-of-Law Institutions, at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Click here for more details about the Hart Studies in Comparative Public Law Series
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALL EXTENDED: ESCLH Biennal Conference 2016 Gdansk "Culture, Identity and Legal Instrumentalism" => NEW DEADLINE SATURDAY 21 NOV 2015

(image: the Green Gate at Gdansk, source: Wikimedia Commons)
The organisers of next year's ESCLH Biennal Conference in Gdánsk ("Culture, Identity and Legal Instrumentalism") sent out the following message:

Due to the high demand, we have extended the deadline for the call for
papers until midnight, Saturday 21 November. Join the 94 people from 33
countries who have already offered papers, and we'll see you in Gdańsk!

All information are available on the Conference website http://esclhconference2016.pl/
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ADVANCE JOURNAL ARTICLES: Journal of the History of International Law/Revue d'histoire du droit international XVIII (2016), No. 1: Umut ÖZSU & Thomas SKOUTERIS (eds.), Theme Issue on the Legal History of the Ottoman Empire

(Image: Muhamed Ali Pasha; Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Brill's Books and Journals Online website published six advance articles of next year's volume XVIII of the Journal of the History of International Law/Revue d'histoire du droit international.

The contributions are part of a theme issue, edited by Umut Özsu (Winnipeg) and Thomas Skouteris (Athens):
  •  International Legal Histories of the Ottoman Empire: An Introduction to the Symposium (Umut Öszu and Thomas Skouteris)
  • European Legal Doctrines on Intervention and the Status of the Ottoman Empire within the ‘Family of Nations’ Throughout the Nineteenth Century (Davide Rodogno)
  • War without War: The Battle of Navarino, the Ottoman Empire, and the Pacific Blockade  (Will Smiley)
  • The Ottoman ‘School’ of International Law as Featured in Textbooks (Berdal Ardal)
  • International Lawyers without Public International Law: The Case of Late Ottoman Egypt (Will Hanley)
  • Forced Migration as Nation-Building: The League of Nations, Minority Protection, and the Greek-Turkish Population Exchange  (Sarah Shields)
All contributions can be read here.

Source: ESIL Interest Group History of International Law
Catégories: Comparative Law News

Pages