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Juris Diversitas 6th Annual Conference, Call for Papers

mar, 12/12/2017 - 18:47
CALL FOR PAPERS

JURIS DIVERSITAS6th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
June 25-27, 2018
Potchefstroom, South Africa

In partnership withFaculty of Law, North-West University, Potchefstroom & the Centre for Comparative Law in Africa
Law, Roots & Space
The Theme:A couple of lawyers’ old friends: ‘Sources’ and ‘Jurisdictions’. In their parlance, these notions are often associated to modern, ‘positive’ law.The idea of ‘Legal formants’ has been introduced to complete the picture, flexibilising it, making it more accurate, nuanced, realistic; an idea associated to comparative, socio-legal, anthropologic studies.With ‘Roots’ and ‘space’ geographers, historians, political scientists get involved. These are certainly less frequent notions in legal circles: we may still wish to make friends with them, to enrich our perception of legal phenomena.‘Roots’ is often associated to history of law and related discourses – if legal formants may complete a picture, legal roots do complete the movie, so to speak.‘Space’: an open notion, perhaps a non-notion in modern legal discourse, generic enough to include every spatial dimension of legal phenomena: dissemination of movie theaters and other forms of diffusion of the various show-biz products could be the appropriate metaphor here, including space law and virtual property.A legal discourse that goes beyond the checkboards, or the series of juxtaposed swimming pools – Tetris-style – containing water from their respective individual sources, produced by modern, Westphalian conceptions of the law. It goes, instead, to normative forces producing their effects without a precise geographic boundary: like radio stations, magnetic or gravitational fields. Or like intricate sets of rivers, lakes, canals, ponds, infiltrated wetlands, oceans, weather, all contributing to a locally diversified but still unitary eco-system and bio-sphere of water, landscape, vegetation, fauna.A discourse on normative forces and the fuzziness of their historic and geographic reach.Submissions:Panel proposals and interdisciplinary presentations are strongly encouraged, as is the participation of doctoral students and scholars from outside of the discipline of law. While parallel sessions featuring three presentations of twenty-minute each will be the pattern, we welcome creative arrangements.Proposals should be in English or in French. Proposals of circa 250 words (or 1000 words for panel proposals with three or more speakers) should be submitted to Professor Salvatore Mancuso at: Salvatore.Mancuso@ac.ac.za or Professor Christa Rautenbach at: Christa.Rautenbach@nwu.ac.za by December 15, 2017, with a short biography paragraph listing major or relevant publications. Make this a single Word document with minimal formatting, so that proposal and biography can be copied easily into the conference program.Registration Fees:€200 or €125 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2018. Special rate for young scholars under the age of thirty coming the first time and for scholars in developing nations: €150 or €75 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2018.Note that fees do not cover travel, accommodation, or the conference dinner (€25).Additional Information:Information regarding accommodation options, travel, other conferences in South Africa, payment methods, etc. will be provided soon.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

Call for Papers - Flags, Identity, Memory: Critiquing the Public Narrative through Color

mer, 10/11/2017 - 11:58
Flags, Identity, Memory: Critiquing the Public Narrative through Color
Anne Wagner and Sarah Marusek (eds)
In our project, the identification of “identity” employs culturally specific color codes and images that conceal assumptions about members of a people comprising a nation, or a people within a nation. Flags narrate constructions of belonging that become tethered to negotiations for power and resistance over time and throughout a people’s history. Bennet (2005) defines identity as “the imagined sameness of a person or social group at all times and in all circumstances”. While such likeness may be imagined or even perpetuated, the idea of sameness may be socially, politically, culturally, and historically contested to reveal competing pasts and presents. Visually evocative and ideologically representative, flags are recognized symbols fusing color with meaning that prescribe a story of unity. Yet, through semiotic confrontation, there may be different paths leading to different truths and applications of significance.
Knowing this and their function, we should investigate these transmitted values over time and space. Indeed, flags may have evolved in key historical periods, but contemporaneaously transpire in a variety of ways. We should therefore investigate these transmitted values:
- Which values are being transmitted?
- Have their colors evolved through space and time? Is there a shift in cultural and/or collective meaning from one space to another?
- What are their sources?
- What is the relationship between law and flags in their visual representations?
- What is the shared collective and/or cultural memory beyond this visual representation? Considering the complexity and diversity in the building of a common memory with flags, we would suggest our contributors interrogate the complex color- coded sign system of particular flags and their meanings attentive to a complex
configuration of historical, social and cultural conditions that shift over time.
For the reference book:
Abstracts should be submitted by April 1, 2018 to Anne Wagner (valwagnerfr@yahoo.com) and Sarah Marusek (marusek@hawaii.edu). Acceptance will be sent by May 31, 2018 with other instructions.

A PRELIMINARY CONFERENCE WILL BE ORGANIZED FROM 7 TO 9 February 2018 at the Université de Lille 2 (France). 
Should you wish to participate to this conference, please send an abstract by 2 January 2018 at the latest to Anne Wagner (valwagnerfr@yahoo.com).
Further information about registration fees will be sent afterwards.

Anne Wagner, Ph. D., Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches - QualifiéeAssociate Professor, Université du Littoral Côte d'Opale (France)Correspondante LANSAD/CRL - CGU CALAISCentre Droit et Perspectives du Droit, Equipe René Demogue - Université de Lille II (France)Research Professor, China University of Political Science and Law (Beijing - China)http://fr.linkedin.com/in/annewagnerhttp://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-90-481-9322-6/page/1Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - http://www.springer.com/law/journal/11196Series Editor, Law, Language and Communication - Routledge (https://www.routledge.com/series/ASHSER1363)
President of the International Roundtables for the Semiotics of Law - http://www.semioticsoflaw.com/
Catégories: Comparative Law News

New Publications from Klaus Schwarz Verlag, Berlin

lun, 10/09/2017 - 11:52
New Publications / NeuerscheinungenKlaus Schwarz Verlag New releases / Neuerscheinungen 2017/2018
Gábor HamzaStudies on Legal Relations between the Ottoman Empire/the Republic of Turkey and Hungary, Cyprus, and MacedoniaSelected Essays in Hungarian, English, German, and TurkishWith a foreword by Kinga Hazai, a postface by J. Hóvári, and a devotement by GyörgyHazai
Berlin 2017, Hardcover, 240 pp., 978-3-87997-463-4 € 48,00 Gábor Hamza's studies contribute immeasurably to the understanding of the history of civil law, the different codification processes and its cross-border influence. Comparative legal studies such as his are not only invaluable for fathoming the various ways in which society can exist but also pave the way for future legal experts to one day achieve the long desired co-existence and mutual respect between differencing cultures and religions.Şuayip Seven
Traditionelle Hadith-Hermeneutikim Zusammenhang mit modernen Ansätzen der Ankaraner SchuleIslamkundliche Untersuchungen 335Berlin 2017. Hardcover, 337 S., 978-3-87997-470-2 € 49,80Şuayip Seven stellt die Gedankenstrukturen zweier Ausrichtungen der traditionellen Hadithwissenschaften, der traditionalistischen und der teleologischen, gegenüber und setzt sie zu modernen Ansätzen der Ankaraner Schule in Beziehung. Er plädiert dafür, in der modernen Hadith-Hermeneutik an diese bis heute wenig beachtete sinn- und zweckorientierierte Gelehrsamkeit in der traditionellen Hadithwissenschaft anzuknüpfen.Please find here a complete list of our new and forthcoming publications.
Hier finden Sie eine vollständige Liste unserer neuen und in in Vorbereitung befindlichen Publikationen: Klaus Schwarz Verlag New releases / Neuerscheinungen 2017/2018
Catégories: Comparative Law News

Juris Diversitas 6th Annual Conference, Call for Papers

mar, 10/03/2017 - 17:54
CALL FOR PAPERS

JURIS DIVERSITAS6th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
June 25-27, 2018
Potchefstroom, South Africa

In partnership withFaculty of Law, North-West University, Potchefstroom & the Centre for Comparative Law in Africa
Law, Roots & Space
The Theme:A couple of lawyers’ old friends: ‘Sources’ and ‘Jurisdictions’. In their parlance, these notions are often associated to modern, ‘positive’ law. The idea of ‘Legal formants’ has been introduced to complete the picture, flexibilising it, making it more accurate, nuanced, realistic; an idea associated to comparative, socio-legal, anthropologic studies. With ‘Roots’ and ‘space’ geographers, historians, political scientists get involved. These are certainly less frequent notions in legal circles: we may still wish to make friends with them, to enrich our perception of legal phenomena.‘Roots’ is often associated to history of law and related discourses – if legal formants may complete a picture, legal roots do complete the movie, so to speak.‘Space’: an open notion, perhaps a non-notion in modern legal discourse, generic enough to include every spatial dimension of legal phenomena: dissemination of movie theaters and other forms of diffusion of the various show-biz products could be the appropriate metaphor here, including space law and virtual property. A legal discourse that goes beyond the checkboards, or the series of juxtaposed swimming pools – Tetris-style – containing water from their respective individual sources, produced by modern, Westphalian conceptions of the law. It goes, instead, to normative forces producing their effects without a precise geographic boundary: like radio stations, magnetic or gravitational fields. Or like intricate sets of rivers, lakes, canals, ponds, infiltrated wetlands, oceans, weather, all contributing to a locally diversified but still unitary eco-system and bio-sphere of water, landscape, vegetation, fauna. A discourse on normative forces and the fuzziness of their historic and geographic reach.Submissions:Panel proposals and interdisciplinary presentations are strongly encouraged, as is the participation of doctoral students and scholars from outside of the discipline of law. While parallel sessions featuring three presentations of twenty-minute each will be the pattern, we welcome creative arrangements.Proposals should be in English or in French.Proposals of circa 250 words (or 1000 words for panel proposals with three or more speakers) should be submitted to Professor Salvatore Mancuso at: Salvatore.Mancuso@ac.ac.za or Professor Christa Rautenbach at: Christa.Rautenbach@nwu.ac.za by December 15, 2017, with a short biography paragraph listing major or relevant publications. Make this a single Word document with minimal formatting, so that proposal and biography can be copied easily into the conference program.Registration Fees:€200 or €125 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2018. Special rate for young scholars under the age of thirty coming the first time and for scholars in developing nations: €150 or €75 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2018.Note that fees do not cover travel, accommodation, or the conference dinner (€25).Additional Information: Information regarding accommodation options, travel, other conferences in South Africa, payment methods, etc. will be provided soon.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

The Santillana Codes, by Dan E. Stigall

lun, 09/11/2017 - 16:30
The Santillana Codes: the Civil Codes of Tunisia, Morocco, and Mauritania. In that book, my objects of focus are the civil codes in force in Tunisia, Morocco, and Mauritania.  The book also explores the history of their “intellectual father” – a Jewish man from Tunisia named David Santillana (1855 – 1931) who was a masterful comparativist and an expert in both Islamic law and European legal systems.  It also touches on the importance of civil codes in facilitating stability in volatile regions.These subjects are difficult and intriguing due to the persistent lacunae in the literature regarding the law and legal history of Maghrebian and Sahelian states—a veil of obscurity which has served to undervalue African, Islamic, and Jewish contributions to global legal development.  The aim of my forthcoming book is, therefore, to dispel this obscurity by illuminating the work of David Santillana, an influential jurist and lawyer who worked in North Africa and Europe during the latter nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and his innovative approach to codification.  Beyond that, I aim to show how the legal histories and cultures of each relevant country contributed to this distinct class of uniquely African civil codes that are still in force today in a legal arc that extends from the Maghreb to the Sahel.About the Author:Dan E. Stigall is an attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice, Counterterrorism Section, National Security Division. He previously served on active duty in the U.S. Army JAG Corps from 2001-2009, serving in Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. LL.M., 2009, George Washington University School of Law; J.D., 2000, Louisiana State University, Paul M. Hebert Law Center; B.A., 1996, Louisiana State University.Dan E. Stigall is a Contributing Fellow of the LSU Center of Civil Law Studies.Additional Information:This forthcoming book can already be ordered online. See: Friends of the Law Library of CongressTo download order form with 30% discount (valid until October 1, 2018), click here.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

6th Annual Conference in South Africa: Mark your Calendar

ven, 09/01/2017 - 19:34
Juris Diversitas will hold its 6th Annual Conference during the last week of June 2018 (25-29 June). 

Venue: 
Faculty of LawNorth-West University Potchefstroom
South Africa
Topic: Law, Roots & Space
Call for Papers to be sent shortly.
Catégories: Comparative Law News