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LECTURE: Esin Örücü, ‘One Into Three: Spreading the Word – Three Into One: Creating a Civil Law System’

Juris Diversitas - mer, 02/11/2015 - 09:46
I’m delighted to announce that Professor Esin Örücü, of the University of Glasgow and our illustrious Advisory Council, will deliver the 38th Tucker Lecture next month. Not only does this fall on St Patrick’s Day (17 March 2015), but it also takes place at my alma mater, the Paul M Hebert Law Center of Louisiana State University.
In addition, this marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Center of Civil Law Studies, directed by our own Vice President Olivier Moréteau. The Center has been, and remains, very important to the different traditions that make up Louisiana law (and the law of many other jurisdictions).
Professor Örücü’s presentation is entitled ‘One Into Three: Spreading the Word – Three Into One: Creating a Civil Law System’. The LSU Law Worldwide Blog describes it in the following manner:
This lecture will consider “one into three”, since the now monolingual Louisiana Civil Code is being translated into French and Spanish, defining this as ‘spreading the word’. The Louisiana Civil Code Translation Project Conference in 2014 called this expansion, ‘enhancing visibility’. A well-known instance of this kind is also the monolingual Dutch Code being converted, by translation, into a trilingual Code (Dutch, French and English), that is another “one into three”. There is also the instance of the translation of the bilingual Quebec Code (originally in French and English) into Spanish, thus creating yet another trilingual Code, rivalling the Louisiana one, this time “two into three”. Then there is the Fisher’s translation of the Civil Code of Philippines from Spanish into English, “one into two”.
The lecture will start by looking at some general concerns such as language, culture, transpositions, neologisms, equivalence, mistranslations and then move onto illustrating these issues through the experience of Turkey with her process of total and global modernization, westernization, secularization, democratization and constitutionalism.
In this way, before considering the Louisiana case, the lecture will deal with the translation into Turkish from the already trilingual Swiss Civil Code, seemingly a “three into one” case, though only the French version was used by the Turkish translators. This is defined as ‘creating a civil law system’, converting within the span of five years, via five Codes, the efforts of reform resting solely on import and translation from major continental Codes both as to form and content, creating a civilian legal system out of a mixed one.
Finally, a crucial question related to all translated codes will be posed: why translate a code? Aims and reasons which vary will be analysed bringing the lecture to a close.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

WORKSHOP: The Making of Commercial Law; Small, Medium-Sized and Large Companies in Law and Economic Practice (Brussels, 21-22 May 2015)

(image source: archdaily.com)
 The Free University of Brussels (VUB), Research Group CORE (Contextual Research in Law) organizes a two-day workshop in the project "The Making of Commercial Law" (Helsinki/VUB/Frankfurt/Lille-II).

Abstract:

The goal of this workshop is to bring together scholars who have worked on the interactions between law and economic practice, and to address topics concerning the history of business ventures, from the Middle Ages until c. 1900. The papers of participants assess differences with regard to the size of partnerships and companies. Over the past years, limited and general partnerships have received ample attention from economic and legal historians. Organizational laws containing structural models for small enterprises (e.g. the French sprl and German GmbH) have been held up to the light. Doctrine and case law concerning partnerships have been analyzed. It seems that in both legal and economic practice, and for all periods mentioned, smaller companies mattered more than has previously been thought, and even in periods in which corporations existed. In view of this, many ideas about companies and firms – large and small – can be reconsidered. Topics that will be discussed during the workshop are, among others, legal personhood, limited liability, corporate finance, and corporate governance. 
The workshop is the second in a series on the history of commercial law, organized during the 2014-2017 period in Helsinki, Brussels and Frankfurt. The conferences will be organized in the framework of the project “The making of commercial law: common practices and national legal rules from the early modern period to the modern period".  Programme:

Thursday 21 May 20159h coffee

9h30-10h50 first session 
  • Ulla Kypta (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt), Associates or Agents? Trading Enterprises in Northern and Southern Germany in the Late Middle Ages 
  • Bart Lambert (University of York) Making Size Matter Less: Italian Merchant Guilds as Tools for Capital Redistribution in Late Medieval Bruges 


10h50-11h05 coffee
11h05-12h35 second session 
  • Anja Amend-Traut (Würzburg Universität), Structure of Early Enterprises – from Commenda-like Arrangements to Chartered Joint-Stock Companies (Early Modern Period) 
  • Luisa Brunori (Université Paris Sud 11 – Université Lille 2), The Secunda Scholastica and the Commercial Company: Persons and Capital in the 16th and 17th Centuries


12h35-14h lunch
14h-15h20 third session 
  • Bram Vanhofstraeten (Maastricht University), Small-scale and Medium-sized Industrial Enterprises in Seventeenth-Century Liège 
  • Julie Hardwick (University of Texas), 'She Failed to Make a Book': Account Books, Small Enterprises and Emerging Practices of Record Keeping in Early Modern Lyon 


15h20-15h35 break 
15h35-17h fourth session 
  • Stefania Gialdroni (Roma Trè, Arcadia University), Incorporation and Limited Liability in the English EIC: an Uneasy Relationship 
  • Jelten Baguet (Vrije Universiteit Brussels), Corporate Governance in a Small-Scale Pre-Modern Maritime Enterprise: The Case of the Ostend Company (1722-1731) 


Friday 22 May 2015 9h coffee

9h30-10h50 fifth session 
  • Carlos Petit (Universidad de Huelva), From Commercial Guild to Commercial Law. Spanish Company Regulations, 1737-1848. 
  • Annamaria Monti (Bocconi University), Italian Late 19th-Century Companies: Size and Corporate Governance 
10h50-11h05 coffee

11h05-12h25 sixth session 
  • Ron Harris (Tel Aviv University), Private companies in 19th century England
  • Dag Michalsen (Oslo University), The Development of Norwegian Company Law 1875-1910 
12h30-14h lunch

14h-15h20 seventh session 
  • Joeri Vananroye (KU Leuven), Partnerships in 19th-20th c. French and Belgian Doctrine 
  • Dave De ruysscher (Vrije Universiteit Brussels), Small Companies, Contractual Leeway and Third-Party Protection (Belgium, c. 1830-c. 1850) 
15h20-15h45 break 

15h45-17h10 eighth session 
  • Edouard Richard (Université de Rennes), The Banque d’Union générale: legal aspects of its shut-down (1878-1885).
  • Matthijs de Jongh (Hoge Raad, The Hague), Fuzzy Borders: Dutch Partnership and Company law in the Second Half of the 18th Century. 
Practical information:
SQUARE Brussels Meeting Centre (www.square-brussels.com/, Glass Entrance, rue Mont des Arts, B-1000 Brussels), Brussels

Entrance is free, but registration is required. The final date is 15 April 2015. Please send an email to dderuyss@vub.ac.be. Papers will be sent to participants. Source: Nomôdos.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE ANNOUNCEMENT: Emerging African Jurisprudence Suggesting the Desirability of the Abolition of Capital Punishment

Juris Diversitas - mar, 02/10/2015 - 05:53
Emerging African Jurisprudence Suggesting the Desirability of the Abolition of Capital Punishment from the African Journal of International and Comparative Law by C. Anyangwe.
Click here for further information and to download the article.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT: The Law of Divorce and Dissolution of Life Partnerships in South Africa

Juris Diversitas - mar, 02/10/2015 - 05:27

The Law of Divorce and Dissolution of Life Partnerships in South Africa provides a detailed exposition and analysis of the law relating to the termination of civil unions, civil marriages, customary marriages, Muslim marriages and Hindu marriages by divorce. The publication also offers an in-depth discussion and analysis of the law relating to the dissolution of life (domestic) partnerships. Written by a team of subject specialists, it provides a rich source of expertise. 

The book is divided into five parts. Part 1 focuses on the dissolution of civil marriages and civil unions by divorce. This part deals with the grounds for divorce, the personal and financial consequences of divorce, and the position of minor and dependent children of divorced or divorcing spouses or civil union partners. Part 2 focuses on all aspects of divorce in customary marriages, while Part 3 concerns divorce in Muslim marriages and Hindu marriages. Part 4 addresses all aspects relating to the dissolution of a life partnership. The final part of the book — Part 5 — considers issues that are of general application to divorce and the dissolution of life partnerships. These issues are domestic violence; jurisdiction, procedure, and costs; mediation and other forms of alternative dispute resolution; and conflict of laws. 
Click here to download the brochure of this publication. 
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 3 Visiting Fellowships (2016) – Institute for European Global Studies, University of Basel

Juris Diversitas - lun, 02/09/2015 - 13:12
The Institute for European Global Studies, University of Basel, Switzerland welcomes applications for 3 Visiting Fellowships (three months in the academic year 2016) within European Global Studies with focus on “Scaling Regions“.
The Institute for European Global Studies is an interdisciplinary research Institute at Switzerland’s oldest university, the University of Basel. With an established study program on the MA level and a doctoral program in the planning stage, the Institute develops new concepts and methodologies designed to reveal the close interconnectedness between Europe, Asia and Africa across cultural, geographic, and linguistic borders and the consequences of such entanglements on the global and the local level.
The Institute particularly welcomes applications from researchers who are interested in investigating agencies and actors in global contexts as well as in adopting a conceptual approach beyond the nation state. Projects should fit the general research perspective of the Institute and at the same time engage with the topic of Scaling Regions which covers transterritorial concepts and border-crossing methodologies.
The deadline for application is May 15, 2015.

For more information, please see the call for applications at https://europa.unibas.ch/en/institute/career-opportunities/ .
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CONFERENCE REPORT: Dutch-Belgian Legal History Colloquium (Brussels: VUB, 11-12 Dec 2014) (by Maarten Vankeersbilck, Ghent)


Maarten Vankeersbilck graduated as Master in Law (Ghent, 2011) and took a specialized Master in European and International Law (VUB, 2012). From 1 October 2012 on, he works as an academic assistant at the Ghent Legal History Institute, where he focuses on the codification and development of civil procedure in Belgium, under the direction of Prof. D. Heirbaut.

On Thursday December 11 and Friday December 12, 2014, the Belgian-Dutch Legal Historian Colloquium took place at the Free University of Brussels (VUB, see announcement earlier on this blog). Since the early 1970s, this bi-annual (and at times annual event) has been alternately organized by either a Belgian or a Dutch university.  From the start, this forum promoted inter-universitary cooperation in the Low Countries. Young researchers traditionally receive the opportunity to disperse their findings to their peers. 

Fertile ground indeed, as we were welcomed by professor dr. Dirk Heirbaut (Ghent University), who himself is a longtime participant and presided the first panel on comparative legal history. First speaker was dr. Agustin Parise (Maastricht University) who applied the methodology developed in his dissertation to the case of the Dutch Burgerlijk Wetboek (1838) and the Argentinian Código Civil (1871), studying the influence of aforementioned Burgerlijk Wetboek on Argentines own codification. Next was Dr. Janwillem Oosterhuis (Maastricht University)  who presented his research on the impact of World War I (and its aftermath) on the concept of ‘Unexpected Circumstances’.

The organizer, professor dr. Dave De ruysscher, presided the next panel on Public Law in which Matthias Castelein (Catholic University of Leuven) presented his first findings of his dissertational research on the complicated relationship between the divided local traditions of Corsicaand those of the new sovereign rulers of Liguria who had a more egalitarian and centralistic approach. Maarten Colette(Free University of Brussels) closed the morning sessions discussing Rousseau’s concept of liberty sparking a lively discussion on the interpretation of Rousseauhimself.

The afternoon session on International Law opened under de presidency of professor dr. Randall Lesaffer (Tilburg University and Catholic University of Leuven). Dr. Mieke van der Linden(Catholic University of Leuven), who recently successfully defended her dissertation, gave us a glimpse on her thesis by presenting Euro-centrism within 19thCentury International Law by studying the legal and political justification of New Imperialism (1870-1914). Could international law be applied to all peoples? Was it a European creation or a product of the confrontation between European states with non-European political entities? Shavana Mussa (Tilburg University) took us to the 17thcentury and discussed the end of the first Anglo-Dutch war (1652-1654) and the negotiations leading up to the Treaty of Westminster (1654). She focused on the remarkable arbitration commission that resulted from it, adding another peacemaking-tool to the arsenal of International Law. From one conflict to another, dr. Frederik Dhondt (Ghent University) discussed the Spanish Succession. He demonstrated how Vatteland Réal de Curban took a different strand of argumentation from respectively a Protestant-Swiss and a French point of view. Both used historical material implying a degree of objectivity but by the selective use of exempla continued the war on paper. Where Vattel rose to fame in International Law, Réal is less known resulting in a one-sided image of the war in legal doctrine.

French revolutionaries committed themselves to draft a constitution that would reconcile the organisation of the French state with modern ideas such as sovereignty of the people and the separation of powers. Amongst other things, this refers to the question of who can declare war, supervise diplomatic relations,… Dr. Raymond Kubbenpainted the picture of the administrative direction of foreign relations in Benjamin Constants constitutional thinking. Inge Van Hulle (Catholic University of Leuven) closed the first day with a contribution on the concept of ‘sphere of influence’ in International Law (1870-1920). Even though this concept is strongly associated with the Cold War, Ms. Van Hulle proved its relevance  in the international discourse and state practice at the end of the 19thcentury.

The forum resumed its operations the next day with an extensive session on administrative  and constitutional law under the presidency of Kees Cappon (University of Amsterdam). Nestor professor dr. Paul Nève (Tilburg University) shed his light on the transformations of Maastricht’s double government (the city had two schepenbanken and two ‘mayors’, the bishop of Liège and the duke of Brabant) at the end of the 14thcentury (1378-1409) and the defining role of Anthony of Burgundy. Lukas van den Berge (Utrecht University) discussed the admissibility of administrative jurisdiction in Dutch doctrine by studying the arguments made in the beginning of the 19thcentury by legal scholar Antonius Struyckenand Jan Loeff. From the Netherlands Brecht Deseure(Free University of Brussels) brought us back to Belgium by studying the (degree of) recuperation of the ideas of old constitutions, as symbols of the old freedoms, by Belgian revolutionaries in 1830 and in which way these constitutions were a beacon of resistance under the French occupation.

After the coffee break, the colloquium resumed with a session on Private Law. Wouter Druwé (Catholic University of Leuven) addressed the question of whether or not the writ of debt was actually an English condictio, Marten Reijntjes (Groningen University) presented a historical perspective on the civil responsibility of judges overstepping the deontological boundaries of their function. Lastly, Benoît Lagasse (University of Liège) presented his planned dissertation on 17th century Liégois lawyer Charles de Méan, detectingthe influence of roman law and Liège customary law aspects of Private Law in Charles de Méans’ work Observationes et res judicatae ad jus civile Leodiensium.


Respecting the chronology, the final panel was  on contemporary legal history. In the spirit of the Belgian-Dutch cooperation, dr. Sebastiaan Vandenbogaerde (Ghent University) discussed the use of Dutch language in Belgium’s legal periodicals and tried to unveil possible international relations, or is law really a nationalist theme? Dr. Bruno Debaenst (Ghent University) on the other hand turned his gaze to the international forum again with a contribution on the cradle of a social Europe indicating the role played by the international congresses on labour accidents and social insurances.

The colloquium was formally closed by the dean of the Brussels Law Faculty, professor dr. Wilfried Rauws, who showed his sympathy towards legal history. He emphasized and reminded the attendees of the importance of legal history and plead for its conservation in Belgian universities. Encouraging, in times were academic curricula are under pressure by an abundance of ever more specialized courses on positive law.


Catégories: Comparative Law News

VACANCY: Ph.D.-fellowship at the University of Leuven (KUL), Comparative Legal History of Banking Regulation (DEADLINE 18 FEBRUARY 2015)

(caricature of a banker, source tnhistoireXIX)
The Legal History Blog announced a vacancy at the University of Leuven (KUL) for a doctoral position on 19th and 20th century banking law.

Details:
For the Division for Roman Law and Legal History we are looking for a PhD candidate with a master's degree in law [for a position,] Comparative Legal History of Banking Regulation in the Modern Period.  The Research Unit of Roman Law and Legal History is a dynamic and strong team with expertise in all fields of legal history ranging from Roman law through canon law and Byzantine law. Particularly, the candidate will strengthen the department's expertise in the modern history of economic and financial law.

Within the framework of project on "Finance and Faith (fides) in the Western Legal Tradition", funded by the Special Research Fund (BOF), the candidate will be expected to conduct research on banking regulation in the 19th and 20th centuries from a comparative perspective.

The candidate has obtained a master's degree in law from a Belgian or a foreign university with at least distinction. The candidate will be expected to apply for international travel grants and follow-up funding.

For more information please contact Prof. dr. Wim Decock, tel.: +32 16 32 52 39, mail: wim.decock@law.kuleuven.be. You can apply for this job no later than February 18, 2015 via the online application tool
Catégories: Comparative Law News

PODCAST: Alain Wijffels on the endgame between the Hanse and England


(image source: twitter)
Prof. dr. Alain Wijffels (KUL/UCL/CNRS) held the annual lecture of the Stair Society on 15 November 2014, on the theme 'England and the German Hanse: The Long Endgame (1474-1604)'.

The event has been broadcast as a podcast (Soundcloud), available here.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

E-JOURNAL: Clio@Thémis VIII: argumentative practices and legal procedure

(image source: nomodos)

Nomôdos anonunces the publication of a new issue of the electronic journal Clio&Thémis.

Table of contents:
Dossier: L'argumentation au cœur du processus judiciaire

  • C. Denyset N. Seriu, L’argumentation au cœur du processus judiciaire.
  • A. Wijffels, L’argumentation dans les recours en révision au Grand Conseil de Malines: une distinction estompée entre «fait» et «droit»?
  • M. Cavina, Consilia: il modello di Andrea Alciato. Tipologie formali e argomentative fra mos italicus e mos gallicus.
  • I. Arnal-Corthier, Une source d’argumentation dans l’appel de grand criminel à la fin du XVIIe siècle: les lettres de cassation présentées au parlement de Toulouse.
  • J. Lorgnier, Vérités contradictoires en Parlement: Preuve et justification des parties à la troisième chambre du parlement de Tournai.
  • N. Seriu, Argumentation au sujet d’un délit méconnu: Achat et «troc» d’uniformes de déserteurs à la fin l’Ancien Régime.
  • Br. Debaenst, The argumentation in workplace accident trials. The case of the civil court of Mons (1870-1904).
  • Fr. Chauvaud, Pleurs, effroi et rires dans les prétoires. Le triomphe de l’émotion en cour d’assises (1880-1940).
Varia
  • Fr. Charlin, Droit romain et Code Noir. Quelques réflexions a posteriori
  • A. Rita Jurewicz, Commorientes. Einige Bemerkungen zu dem Rechtsinstitut im polnischen Zivilrechtsystem

Abstracts:
RésumésDossier:L'argumentation au cœur du processus judiciaireS’intéresser aux pratiques judiciaires d’une société du passé, observer le déroulement d’un procès à l’aide des archives judiciaires conduit d’emblée à constater la place centrale que prend l’argumentation. Si les mots – dits et écrits – produits dans ce cadre sont pléthore, ils s’inscrivent généralement dans une visée stratégique qui a pour but de convaincre. Les plaideurs – souvent assistés par des juristes professionnels – cherchent à démontrer la légitimité de leur cause. La partie adverse réplique pour (...) - Lire l'article
Résumé : Au XVIe siècle, le recours en révision au Grand Conseil de Malines était en principe réservé aux cas où une partie alléguait une erreur de fait dans le jugement du Grand Conseil. Les archives de la pratique révèlent toutefois que dans les procédures en révision, les conseils justifiaient souvent le recours à partir d’arguments juridiques. Une analyse plus détaillée de ces argumentations semble démontrer que les arguments juridiques se référaient dans ces procédures en révision avant tout aux sources (...) - Lire l'article
On propose un examen de la structure dialectique des consilia sapientis pro veritate du droit commun, de leur évolution et de leurs « trois » différents styles entre Moyen Âge et Âge Moderne, en se concentrant en particulier sur l’œuvre et la pensée de Carlo Ruini (1456-1530), mais surtout de Andrea Alciato (1492-1550), qui se révèle très riche de nouveautés très intéressantes. Mots-clés : Consilia, Alciat, Ruini Abstract : We suggest a review of the dialectical structure of consilia sapientis pro (...) - Lire l'article
Dans le dernier tiers du XVIIe siècle, alors que dans l’appel de grand criminel la seule formalité nécessaire se résume à l’audition des accusés, certains trouvent le moyen de présenter une défense élaborée, impliquant la participation de juristes. Dans quelques rares cas, l’accusé produit ainsi devant le Parlement des « Lettres royaux pour obtenir cassation », ce qui a pour effet de faire « recevoir le procès par écrit ». C’est donc un procureur (parfois un avocat) qui élabore pour l’impétrant (...) - Lire l'article
L’argumentation, en justice, a pour objet d’exposer des faits ou des idées afin d’emporter la conviction du juge. La procédure organise et cadre les débats afin de révéler une vérité judiciaire fondée sur des preuves solides, admises contradictoirement. 
Le parlement de Tournai ne déroge pas à cette règle. Ainsi, à la troisième chambre du parlement de Flandre, de nombreux conflits à propos de la jouissance de biens et de droits montrent tout d’abord combien, à défaut de titres, il a fallu se contenter (...) - Lire l'article
Cet article s’intéresse aux argumentations qui se déploient dans les procès prévôtaux intentés contre des individus – hommes et femmes – ayant acquis des uniformes militaires auprès d’un déserteur, et poursuivis comme « fauteurs » de désertion dans les trois dernières décennies de l’Ancien Régime. Comment cherchent-ils à justifier leur transaction avec les déserteurs ? Si, par exemple, la mise en avant de leur ignorance au sujet de l’illégalité de leurs gestes est une stratégie couramment employée, (...) - Lire l'article
À la fin du dix-neuvième siècle, les procès d’accident du travail se multiplient en Belgique, comme dans les autres pays européens. Ces procès ont un caractère hybride, mêlant argumentation industrielle et juridique. L’article analyse cette argumentation spécifique via l’étude de 293 procédures ayant eu lieu devant le tribunal civil de Mons entre 1870 à 1904. Mots clés : Belgique, responsabilité, accidents du travail, argumentation, tribunal civil Abstract : At the end of the nineteenth century, (...) - Lire l'article
Dans l’enceinte des juridictions répressives, les émotions jouent un rôle essentiel. Des présidents de cours d’assises, des avocats et des observateurs du fonctionnement de la justice pénale l’ont régulièrement mentionné. Entre 1880 et 1940, mémoires, livres de souvenirs et témoignages donnent à cet égard de nombreuses informations. L’un d’eux souligne à sa manière, en 1923, qu’il s’agit d’un tournant herméneutique. Les émotions, il est vrai, occupent une place centrale dans la fabrique de « la (...) - Lire l'articleVaria
À Rome la servitude est domestique, avant les conquêtes qui en transforment la nature. L’esclavage colonial est une exploitation économique fondée sur la traite négrière. Comment les administrateurs appréhendent-ils la qualification juridique de l’esclave ? Le Code Noir reprend-il des règles locales ou des précédents romains pour encadrer une pratique en fonction des effets attendus sur la propriété des colons ? Si le droit romain sert de matrice, s’agit-il d’une simple reprise ou d’une influence (...) - Lire l'article
Cet article est consacré à la question de la présomption de décès simultanés de deux personnes ou plus qu’établit la loi civile polonaise (art. 32 KC). Posant la question de l’interprétation juridique (linguistique et systématique) et des prémisses nécessaires à l’application de ce type de présomption selon la doctrine civiliste polonaise, il s’interroge aussi sur les doutes liés à sa reconnaissance. Mots-clés  : comourants, présomption légale, praesumptio juris tantum, praesumptio ec de iure, droit (...) - Lire l'article
Catégories: Comparative Law News

VIDEO: Donlan on World is Crazier and More of It than We Think: Reflections on Legal-Comparative Methodologies

Juris Diversitas - ven, 02/06/2015 - 08:07
There may be some changes soon on this blog. Among these, will be an effort to make it (or its replacement) more open to participation and dialogue. 

One way in which you can share with us, and others, is to provide us with presentations in which you've participated. These may have to be vetted, of course, but I hope that you'll consider sending something along. They can be published here, on Facebook, on Twitter, etc.

With this in mind, I'll get things started with a very basic presentation on comparative method that I gave in the autumn: 

'World is Crazier and More of It than We Think: Reflections on Legal-Comparative Methodologies'

Enjoy. I'm sure you can do better ...
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: "The Evolution of Corporate Law in Post-Colonial India: From Transplant to Autochthony", by Umakanth Varottil

Umakanth Varottil (National University of Singapore (NUS) - Faculty of Law), The Evolution of Corporate Law in Post-Colonial India: From Transplant to Autochthony
LEGAL HISTORY eJOURNALVol. 19, No. 13: Feb 3, 2015abstract
The essential thesis of this paper is that while Indian corporate law began as a legal transplant from England, it has been progressively decoupled from its source with subsequent amendments and reforms being focused either on finding solutions to local problems or borrowing from other jurisdictions. To that extent, decolonization has had a significant effect of radically altering the course of Indian corporate law. Current Indian corporate law not only represents a significant departure from its colonial origins, but the divergence between Indian law and English law as they have developed since independence has been increasing. While the Indian lawmaking process indulged in close cross-referencing of English legal provisions during the colonial period and immediately thereafter, the more contemporary legislative reforms pay scant regard to corporate law in the origin country that initially shaped Indian corporate law. 




This offers valuable lessons. First, even though India is considered to be part of the “common law” family, corporate law has evolved somewhat differently from the origin country, England. In that sense, it casts significant doubt on the assumption that all countries within a legal family bear similarities. On the contrary, each host country may follow a trajectory that is different from that followed by the origin country of corporate law. Second, it supports the proposition that legal transplants can be challenging unless the local conditions in the host country are similar to that in the origin country. Variations in economic, social, political and cultural factors may bring about dissonance in the operation of a transplanted legal system. Third, a comparison of the historical colonial experience in the functioning of the transplanted legal system and the more contemporary experience in the post-colonial period suggests fragility in the foundations of the transplant.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: "Unwritten Verities: The Making of England's Vernacular Legal Culture, 1463-1549", by Sebastian Sobecki


Unwritten Verities: The Making of England's Vernacular Legal Culture, 1463-1549, by Sebastian Sobecki
all information here
Description
In Unwritten Verities: The Making of England’s Vernacular Legal Culture, 1463-1549, Sebastian Sobecki argues that the commitment by English common law to an unwritten tradition, along with its association with Lancastrian political ideas of consensual government, generated a vernacular legal culture on the eve of the Reformation that challenged the centralizing ambitions of Tudor monarchs, the scriptural literalism of ardent Protestants, and the Latinity of English humanists.Sobecki identifies the widespread dissemination of legal books and William Caxton’s printing of the Statutes of Henry VII as crucial events in the creation of a vernacular legal culture. He reveals the impact of medieval concepts of language, governance, and unwritten authority on such sixteenth-century humanists, reformers, playwrights, and legal writers as John Rastell, Thomas Elyot, Christopher St. German, Edmund Dudley, John Heywood, and Thomas Starkey.Unwritten Verities argues that three significant developments contributed to the emergence of a vernacular legal culture in fifteenth-century England: medieval literary theories of translation, a Lancastrian legacy of conciliar government, and an adherence to unwritten tradition. This vernacular legal culture, in turn, challenged the textual practices of English humanism and the early Reformation in the following century. Ultimately, the spread of vernacular law books found a response in the popular rebellions of 1549, at the helm of which often stood petitioners trained in legal writing. Informed by new developments in medieval literature and early modern social history, Unwritten Verities sheds new light on law printing, John Fortescue’s constitutional thought, ideas of the commonwealth, and the role of French in medieval and Tudor England.

“Sebastian Sobecki’s lucid and lively study seeks to address a major lacuna in the current understanding of English vernacularity from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries: English common law. This huge body of knowledge and practice, written and unwritten, awaits focused attention from historians and literary historians, particularly in the light of new scholarship on Anglo-French vernacularity in this period. Sobecki’s ambitious, original, and deeply considered account includes such figures as John Fortescue, John Rastell, and Christopher St. German and their investments in and influence on early Tudor commonality. The range and intelligence of his approach to this material, his ability to think beyond period and disciplinary boundaries, and his alertness to the complex bilingual condition of English intellectuals add a compelling dimension to the debate on the linguistic and political shapes of insular identity in these centuries.” — Ardis Butterfield, John M. Schiff Professor of English, Yale University“Unwritten Verities proposes an arresting and original thesis: that the English common law’s commitment to an oral tradition permitted it, on the eve of the Reformation, to become a transformative repository for notions of consensual government, of the inwardness of spiritual jurisdiction, and of the preeminence of English. This elegantly written and engagingly controversial book will stimulate literary scholars, legal historians, and historians of political thought to look afresh at some of their fundamental assumptions about English literature, politics, and the law at the turn of the fifteenth century." — Lorna Hutson, Berry Professor of English Literature, University of St. Andrews
Catégories: Comparative Law News

LIBRARY: Free on-demand digitizing at the Berlin State Library (books published between 1701 and 1902)

(Image Source: Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin
Forum Historiae Iuris reports the possibility for researchers to have legally relevant material digitized, thanks to a fund created for the next three years

Full entry (in German):

Insbesondere die zu rechtshistorischen Themen Forschenden möchte der Fachinformationsdienst für internationale und interdisziplinäre Rechtsforschung exklusiv einladen, sein kostenfreies Serviceangebot zur On-Demand-Digitalisierung von rechtswissenschaftlich relevanten Texten aus dem gemeinfreien Bestand der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin zu erproben.
Zentrale Aufgabe des von der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft an der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin eingerichteten Fachinformationsdiensts für internationale und interdisziplinäre Rechtsforschung ist es, die wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten der juristischen Fachcommunity an universitären wie außeruniversitären Forschungseinrichtungen in Deutschland mit nachfrageorientierten Informationsdienstleistungen zu unterstützen.
Insbesondere die zu rechtshistorischen Themen Forschenden möchte der Fachinformationsdienst daher exklusiv einladen, ²DoD zu erproben – sein kostenfreies Serviceangebot zur On-Demand-Digitalisierung von rechtswissenschaftlich relevanten Texten aus dem gemeinfreien Bestand der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin.
Sollten Sie im Rahmen der Durchführung oder Beantragung eines historisch orientierten Forschungsvorhabens Zugriff auf Quellenwerke aus dem – gerade im Bereich der europäischen Rechtsgeschichte außerordentlich dichten – Bestand der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin benötigen, so steht Ihnen in den kommenden drei Jahren ein Fonds zur Verfügung, aus dessen Mitteln die Umsetzung Ihrer Digitalisierungswünsche ermöglicht wird.
Bitte beachten Sie, dass dieses Angebot mit Blick auf die umfänglichen Digitalisierungskampagnen der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft im Bereich der im deutschen Sprachraum des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts erschienenen Drucke vorläufig nur für zwischen 1701 und 1920 erschienene Werke gilt und zudem weiteren Restriktionen unterworfen ist.
Nähere Informationen zu den Nutzungsbedingungen dieses kostenfreien Serviceangebots sowie einen Direktlink zum Antragsformular finden Sie bitte unter: http://vifa-recht.de/intr2dod
Über das allgemeine Profil des Fachinformationsdiensts für internationale und interdisziplinäre Rechtsforschung orientiert Sie das entsprechende Webangebot der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin: http://staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/recherche/fachgebiete/rechtswissenschaft/
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Catégories: Comparative Law News

JOURNAL: Comparative Legal History Vol. 2, Issue 2: Special Issue, 'The Great War and Private Law' (eds. Michael Lobban & Willem H. van Boom)

(image source: Hart)

The second issue of Comparative Legal History's second volume, a theme issue on 'The Great War and Private Law' (eds. Michael Lobban and Willem H van Boom) has just appeared.

Research articles:
  • "Introduction" (Michael Lobban) 
  • "The Great War and Private Law: A Delayed Effect" (David Deroussin) 
  • "The Effects of World War I on Austrian Private Law" (Martin P. Schennach) 
  • "The Great War and the Reorientation of Italian Private Law" (Carlotta Latini) 
  • "Private Law, Judge-Made Law and Heimatfront" (Hans-Peter Hafermap) 
  • "English Contract Law and the Great War" (Catherine MacMillan) 
  • "The Great War and Dutch Contract Law" (Willem H van Boom)
Review article:
  • Comparative Legal Histories, Pluralities, and Empires (Seán Patrick Donlan)
Book reviews

Access all articles on IngentaConnect.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CONFERENCE: Honour and Law, at the occasion of the conferral of a doctorate honoris causa to Prof. dr. James Whitman (Leuven, 25-26 February 2015)

(image source: yale.edu)
Theb Catholic University of Leuven organizes a two-day conference at the occasion of the conferral of a doctorate honoris causa to Prof. dr. James Whitman (Yale Law School).

Program:
Day 1
9.30
Welcome
Opening remarks and introduction by Prof. Dr. Matthias E. Storme and Prof. Dr. Wim Decock (Law, KU Leuven)
Introductory lecture by Prof. Dr. Andrea Robiglio(Law, KU Leuven), ‘The Unbearable Obsolescence of the Concept of Honor
10.10 – 12.30
Honour, Reputation, Business,Creditworthiness and Insolvency (Session 1)
Chair: Prof. Dr. Laurent Waelkens (Law, KU Leuven)
Reporter: Drs. Matthias Castelein (Law, KU Leuven)
Speakers:
1. Dr. Rowena Olegario (Oxford Saïd Business School), ‘Reputation and Creditworthiness’
2. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Förster (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen), ‘Vom Schandstein zum Konkursverfahren -- die rechtshistorische Entwicklung’
3. Drs. Wouter Druwé (Law, KU Leuven), ‘Dignity and Cessio Bonorum in 16th-century Consilia”.
Q&A

lunch break
14.00 – 15.50 Honour, Defamation and Legal Remedies (Session 2)
Chair: Prof. Dr. Stephan Parmentier (Law, KU Leuven)
Reporter: Dra. Huma Saeed (Law, KU Leuven)
Speakers:
1. Dr. Eric De Scheemaeker (Edinburgh Law School),‘The Amende Honorable’
2. Dr. Gijs Van Dijck (Universiteit Tilburg)‘Tort Law, Compensation and Respect’
Q&A


16.10 – 18.00 Honour (Codes) as Competitor for Law (Session 3)
Chair: Prof. Dr. Wim Decock (Law, KU Leuven)
Reporter: Drs. Rafael Van Damme (Law, KU Leuven)
Speakers:
1. Prof. Dr. Letizia Paoli (Law, KU Leuven),‘Honour Codes (of Criminal Organizations) as Alternative Legal Orders’
2. Prof. Dr. Marco Cavina (History of Law, Università degli studi di Bologna), ‘La 'codification' du droit des gentilhommes (de la science 'normative' del'honneur [XVI-XVIII s.] aux codes du duel [XIX-XX s.])’
Q&A

Day 2
9.00 – 10.50 Harsh Justice and Symbolic Sanctions (Session 4)
Chair: Prof. Tom Daems (Law, KU Leuven)
Reporter: Dra. Brunilda Pali (Law, KU Leuven)
Speaker:
1. Dra. Tine van den Driessche (Institute of Philosophy, KU Leuven), ‘Symbolic Punishment’
Q&A

11.00 – 12.50 Honour and the Law of War and Peace (Session 5)
Chair: Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters (Law, KU Leuven)
Reporter: Dra. Nele Verlinden (Law, KU Leuven)
Speakers:
1. Prof. Dr. Randall Lesaffer (Law, KU Leuven/Tilburg University), ‘Warmongers, Disturbers of the Peace and Violators of Sacred Trust: War, crime and infamy before Versailles’
2. Prof. Dr. Tom Ruys (Law, UGent), ‘Honour and the Modern Law of Non-international Armed Conflict’
Q&A


12.50 Closing Remarks
Prof. Dr. Matthias E. Storme (Law, KU Leuven)

Practical information:
• VENUE
- Faculty of Law, Leuven
Auditorium Zeger Van Hee, College De Valk
Tiensestraat 41, 3000 Leuven
• TIMING:
Wednesday 25 February 2015: 9.30 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Thursday 26 February 2015: 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
• FEE: 25 euros. Registration is required.
Please note that the honorary doctorate of
Professor Whitman is free of charge and takes place on Thursday 26 February 2015 at 5 p.m. in the Promotiezaal, Universiteitshallen, Naamsestraat 22, 3000 Leuven.
Attendance by registration only.
• FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, including the online registration tool, please visit
www.pvthemis.be or www.law.kuleuven.be
For more information, please contact Erik De Dijn (erik.dedijn@law.kuleuven.be, + 32 16 32 51 16)

Catégories: Comparative Law News

SUMMER ACADEMY: Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal History

Juris Diversitas - jeu, 01/29/2015 - 07:14
Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal HistoryThe Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal History, offered by the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History (MPIeR), provides an in-depth introduction to methods and principles of research in legal history. Although its main focus is on European legal history, there is special emphasis on global perspectives on legal history. It addresses a selected group of highly motivated early-stage researchers, usually PhD candidates, working on a research project with an interest in the basic research of historical formation and transformations of law and other normative orders.The academy consists of two modules and lasts two weeks; the first week provides an introduction to the study of sources, methodological principles, as well as theoretical models and controversial research debates on basic research fields of legal history (module 1). During the second week the participants discuss a special research theme and develop their own approach to the theme (module 2).DateThe next Summer Academy will take place from July 27 until August 7, 2015.Course aimThe overall aim of the Max Planck Summer Academy for Legal History is to provide PhD candidates with an expertise on the methods and principles of legal history and to equip them with the ability to apply this knowledge to their research projects and other research in legal history or related disciplines.CurriculumLectures and workshops in history of legal history, methodological principles of legal history, antiquity, legal history in antiquity, Ius Commune, legal bibliography, history of private law in the modern era, constitutional history, history of criminal law, and history of international law form the core of the academy.
  • History of Legal History
  • Antiquity
  • An introduction into the secular Ius Commune I (12th-16th century)
  • Ius Commune II – Classical and Post-Classical Canon Law (12th-16th century)
  • History of Private Law in the Modern Period
  • Constitutional History
  • History of Criminal Law
  • Contemporary Legal History Introduction to Legal Theory
  • History of International Law
In addition to the lectures and workshops the participants have the opportunity to work on their individual research projects which should reflect the special theme (see below) and present and discuss them in plenum. Furthermore, the academy offers additional courses in complementary skills. As a summer academy should not consist of academic activities only, a variety of extra-curricular activities, such as visits to nearby historical sites and several get-togethers in the evenings are offered.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

SUMMER ACADEMY: Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal History

Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal HistoryThe Max-Planck Summer Academy for Legal History, offered by the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History (MPIeR), provides an in-depth introduction to methods and principles of research in legal history. Although its main focus is on European legal history, there is special emphasis on global perspectives on legal history. It addresses a selected group of highly motivated early-stage researchers, usually PhD candidates, working on a research project with an interest in the basic research of historical formation and transformations of law and other normative orders.The academy consists of two modules and lasts two weeks; the first week provides an introduction to the study of sources, methodological principles, as well as theoretical models and controversial research debates on basic research fields of legal history (module 1). During the second week the participants discuss a special research theme and develop their own approach to the theme (module 2).DateThe next Summer Academy will take place from July 27 until August 7, 2015.Course aimThe overall aim of the Max Planck Summer Academy for Legal History is to provide PhD candidates with an expertise on the methods and principles of legal history and to equip them with the ability to apply this knowledge to their research projects and other research in legal history or related disciplines.CurriculumLectures and workshops in history of legal history, methodological principles of legal history, antiquity, legal history in antiquity, Ius Commune, legal bibliography, history of private law in the modern era, constitutional history, history of criminal law, and history of international law form the core of the academy.
  • History of Legal History
  • Antiquity
  • An introduction into the secular Ius Commune I (12th-16th century)
  • Ius Commune II – Classical and Post-Classical Canon Law (12th-16th century)
  • History of Private Law in the Modern Period
  • Constitutional History
  • History of Criminal Law
  • Contemporary Legal History Introduction to Legal Theory
  • History of International Law
In addition to the lectures and workshops the participants have the opportunity to work on their individual research projects which should reflect the special theme (see below) and present and discuss them in plenum. Furthermore, the academy offers additional courses in complementary skills. As a summer academy should not consist of academic activities only, a variety of extra-curricular activities, such as visits to nearby historical sites and several get-togethers in the evenings are offered.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALLS FOR PAPERS - BACK-TO-BACK CONFERENCES: Juris Diversitas (2-4 June 2015) and Irish Society of Comparative Law (5-6 June 2015)

Juris Diversitas - jeu, 01/29/2015 - 05:43
NOTE: CALLS FOR PAPERS
The Juris Diversitas and Irish Society of Comparative Law (ISCL) annual conferences will be hosted back-to-back at the School of Law of the University of Limerick in Limerick, Ireland.

Please feel free to submit the same proposal for both conferences.
The theme of the Juris Diversitas conference is ‘The State and/of Comparative Law’ and the deadline for proposals is 28 February 2015.

The theme of the ISCL conference is ‘Comparative Law: From Antiquity to Modernity’ and the deadline for proposals is 30 January 2015.
See the links here and here.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK REVIEW: Julius R. Ruff reviews Reynald ABAD, The Grace of the King: Letters of Clemence by the Grande Chancellerie in the 18th Century (Paris: PUPS, 2011)


H-France Reviews, vol. 13 (2013) contains a review by a work of interest to legal historians. Prof. Reynald Abad (Paris IV-Sorbonne/Centre Roland Mousnier) published an elaborate study on the practice of royal mercy in 18th Century France. Focusing on the responses by the proctor-general of the Parliament of Paris, Joly de Fleury (father and son) to inquiries by chancellor d'Aguesseau, Abad (according to the reviewer, Julius R. Ruff) has written 'a book that all students of old regime French law and society will wish to consult'.
Full text of the review on H-France.

Reference: Reynald Abad, La grâce du roi: lettres de clémence de Grande Chancellerie au XVIIIe siècle (Paris: Presses de l'Université Paris-Sorbonne, 2011, 964 p.). More information on the PUPS' website.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

eJOURNAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal

Juris Diversitas - mer, 01/28/2015 - 10:40
The 2014 vol 17 no 5 issue of the Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal (PER) is now freely available on our website at http://www.nwu.ac.za/p-per/2014%2817%295You can access and download the following manuscripts in pdf format from the website:1.     Transboundary Movements of Genetically Modified Organisms and the Cartagena Protocol: Key Issues and Concerns
OJ Lim Tung
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295LimTung%20.pdf2.     Defending the Absurd: The Iconoclast's Guide to Section 47(1) of the Superior Courts Act 10 of 2013
H McCreath and R Koen
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295McCreath%26Koen.pdf3.     The Legal Status of the Spanish Imperial Eagle in Spain and Thoughts on Environmental Law and Policy as Contributing Factors in the Conservation of Species
JC Knobel
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Knobel.pdf4.     Barriers to Advocacy and Litigation in the Equality Courts for Persons with Disabilities
W Holness and S Rule
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Holness%26Sarah.pdf5.     Reassessing Judicial Independence and Impartiality against the Backdrop of Judicial Appointments in South Africa
K Malan
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Malan.pdf6.     The Different Worlds of Labour and Company Law: Truth or Myth?
MM Botha
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Botha.pdf7.     The Regulation of Acid Mine Drainage in South Africa: Law and Governance Perspectives
L Feris and LJ Kotzé
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Feris%26Kotze.pdf8.     Spatial Practices in Lowliebenhof: The Case of Maphango v Aengus Lifestyle Properties (Pty) Ltd
I de Villiers
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295DeVilliers.pdf9.     Rectification and Party Misdescription: To what extent is Rectification Competent or Useful?
R Sharrock
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Sharrock.pdf
10.   Limiting Organisational Rights of Minority Unions: POPCRU v Ledwaba 2013 11 BLLR 1137 (LC)
T Cohen
http://www.nwu.ac.za/sites/www.nwu.ac.za/files/files/p-per/issuepages/2014volume17no5/2014%2817%295Cohen.pdf
Catégories: Comparative Law News

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