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CFA: "UC Berkeley Seeks Director of Legal Studies" (July 2015)



WHAT: Call for application
WHERE: University of California, Berkeley

WHEN: from 1 July 2015

Via H-Net, we have the following job posting:
Director, Legal StudiesLocation: Berkeley, CASalary: Commensurate with experienceThis is a three-year renewable contract position at 100% timeExpected Start Date: July 1, 2015          The final deadline for applications is January 15, 2015
Job Description:The Legal Studies Program at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law seeks a full time academic coordinator and lecturer for the position of Director of Legal Studies. The Legal Studies Program was founded more than 35 years ago as one of the nation’s first interdisciplinary majors for undergraduates in law and legal studies. Along with the graduate program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy, the Legal Studies Program is committed to providing a substantive liberal arts curriculum on law and legal institutions, practices, and discourses. Legal Studies currently serves approximately 250 undergraduate students. Its teaching faculty consists of 19 scholars from a range of disciplines, including sociology, political science, history, economics, psychology, and law, supplemented by regular lecturers.The Director of Legal Studies will be responsible for the day-to-day administration of the program as well as working with the Associate Dean for Jurisprudence and Social Policy to evaluate and revise the program. The Director of Legal Studies will be the chief faculty adviser to all Legal Studies undergraduate majors, organizing and overseeing our honors program and advising students writing honors theses. The Director of Legal Studies will select and hire graduate students to serve as Graduate Student Instructors, resolve student academic problems that arise, and supervise multiple staff persons who carry out advising and course scheduling for Legal Studies. In addition, the Director will work with the Associate Dean for Jurisprudence and Social Policy to carry out curricular and budgetary planning for the department; and manage staff shared by Legal Studies, Jurisprudence and Social Policy, and the Center for the Study of Law and Society. The Director will collaborate with the Associate Dean for Jurisprudence and Social Policy to develop and implement the International Program in Legal Studies. The Director will operate as our liaison to the College of Letters and Sciences, to faculty teaching Legal Studies-related curriculum across campus, and at national conferences on Legal Studies. The Director will also teach in the Legal Studies Program. Teaching responsibilities will constitute up to 50% of the position responsibilities and would normally include teaching the Legal Studies Honors Pro-seminar in the fall of each year in addition to courses in the More information is available here
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: "The Evolution of Law and the State in Europe. Seven Lessons", by Spyridon Flogaitis (2014)


Spyridon Flogaitis' "The Evolution of Law and the State in Europe. Seven Lessons", 2014, 122 p.

all information here

Most books about public power and the state deal with their subject from the point of view of legal theory, sociology or political science. This book, without claiming to deliver a comprehensive theory of law and state, aims to inform by offering a fresh reading of history and institutions, particularly as they have developed in continental Europe and European political and legal science. Drawing on a remarkably wide range of sources from both Western and Eastern Europe, the author suggests that only by knowing the history of the state, and state administration since the twelfth century, can we begin to comprehend the continuing importance of the state and public powers in modern Europe. In an era of globalization, when the importance of international law and institutions frequently lead to the claim that the state either no longer exists or no longer matters, the truth is in fact more complex. We now live in an era where the balance is shifting away from the struggle to build states based on democratic values, towards fundamental values existing above and beyond the borders of nations and states, under the watchful gaze of judges bound by the rule of law.Spyridon Flogaitis is currently Professor of Administrative Law at the University of Athens, Director of the European Public Law Organization, and an Attorney at Law of the Greek High Court and the Council of State. He is also a member of the Appeals Board of the European Space Agency. He was formerly President of the United Nations Administrative Tribunal (UNAT), Minister of the Interior, Public Administration and Decentralization (Aug-Sept. 2007) and Minister of the Interior (Aug-Sept. 2009). He has a Degree in Law from Athens University, a Docteur en Droit from the University of Paris II (Pantheon-Assas), a Docteur en Histoire from the University of Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne), and a Diplome de l'Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes. He is Doctor honoris causa, at the National School of Political Science and Public Administration, Bucarest and at the Faculty of Law, University of Lisbon. He is also a Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur (French Republic), and Cavalliere del'Ordine di Merito (Italian Republic).During 2013 he was the Arthur Goodhart Visiting Professor of Legal Science at the University of Cambridge.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT: The Evolution of Law and the State in Europe

Juris Diversitas - mer, 12/03/2014 - 11:27
A new book from Hart Publishing by Spyridon Flogaitis. Click here to buy this title.
Most books about public power and the state deal with their subject from the point of view of legal theory, sociology or political science. This book, without claiming to deliver a comprehensive theory of law and state, aims to inform by offering a fresh reading of history and institutions, particularly as they have developed in continental Europe and European political and legal science. Drawing on a remarkably wide range of sources from both Western and Eastern Europe, the author suggests that only by knowing the history of the state, and state administration since the twelfth century, can we begin to comprehend the continuing importance of the state and public powers in modern Europe. In an era of globalization, when the importance of international law and institutions frequently lead to the claim that the state either no longer exists or no longer matters, the truth is in fact more complex. We now live in an era where the balance is shifting away from the struggle to build states based on democratic values, towards fundamental values existing above and beyond the borders of nations and states, under the watchful gaze of judges bound by the rule of law.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT: The law of superheroes

Juris Diversitas - mer, 12/03/2014 - 11:18
An intriguing and entertaining look at how America’s legal system would work using the world of comic books.

The dynamic duo behind the popular website LawAndTheMultiverse.com breaks down even the most advanced legal concepts for every self-proclaimed nerd.

James Daily and Ryan Davidson—attorneys by day and comic enthusiasts all of the time—have clearly found their vocation, exploring the hypothetical legal ramifications of comic book tropes, characters, and powers down to the most deliciously trivial detail.

The Law of Superheroes asks and answers crucial speculative questions about everything from constitutional law and criminal procedure to taxation, intellectual property, and torts, including:
  • Could Superman sue if someone exposed his true identity as Clark Kent?
  • Are members of the Legion of Doom vulnerable to prosecution under RICO?
  • Do the heirs of a superhero who comes back from the dead get to keep their inherited property after their loved one is resurrected?
  • Does it constitute “cruel and unusual punishment” to sentence an immortal like Apocalypse to life in prison without the possibility of parole?
Engaging, accessible, and teaching readers about the law through fun hypotheticals, The Law of Superheroes is a must-have for legal experts, comic nerds, and anyone who will ever be called upon to practice law in the comic multiverse.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALL FOR PAPERS: 25 YEARS AFTER THE TRANSFORMATION - LAW AND LEGAL CULTURE IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE BETWEEN CONTINUITY AND DISCONTINUITY

Juris Diversitas - mer, 12/03/2014 - 08:17
Deadline: 31 December 2014
Quarter of a century ago, attheturn of 1989 and 1990, Central and Eastern Europe - then known as the ‘Soviet bloc’ - experienced an unprecedented socio-economic and political transformation. The hitherto existing system, known as ‘Actually Existing Socialism’, crumbled, and countries of the region started a transition towards a capitalist market economy and a political democracy.
The aim of the conference is to focus on the socio-legal aspects of the transformation. Whilst some areas, such as lustration and transitional justice, have been already thoroughly researched, others such as the impact of transformation upon private law, procedural law or general administrative law still remain to be analysed in more detail. In particular, an aspect which is generally neglected in contemporary scholarship are so-called ‘legal survivals’ of the socialist period, that is those legal institutions which have not been removed after transformation but still remain in place. Furthermore, some scholars argue that there is a strong continuity in legal culture, such as attitudes of judges and scholars to legal interpretation or generally held views on the place of law in society. Our aim is to invite a broad outlook upon the socio-legal aspects of transformation, including the role of law in the transformation of social conciousness, the construction of collective identities and the framing of social dialogue.

The conference will take place at the Masaryk University (Brno, Czech Republic), on 16-17.4.2015. 
Click here for the full text of this call.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALLS FOR PAPERS - BACK-TO-BACK CONFERENCES: Juris Diversitas (2-4 June 2015) and Irish Society of Comparative Law (5-6 June 2015)

Juris Diversitas - mar, 12/02/2014 - 09:22
NOTE: CALLS FOR PAPERS
The Juris Diversitas and Irish Society of Comparative Law annual conferences will be hosted back-to-back at the School of Law of the University of Limerick in Limerick, Ireland.
The theme of the former is ‘The State and/of Comparative Law’; the theme of the latter is ‘Comparative Law: From Antiquity to Modernity’.
See the links here and here.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

REVIEW: International conference: «The Judicial Reform in Russia: Past, Present, and Future» (Moscow, 25–28 November 2014)

«The Judicial Reform in Russia: Past, Present, and Future»(Moscow, 25–28 November 2014)
reviewed by Dmitry Poldnikov (dpoldnikov@hse.ru)
The conference was organized by the Moscow Subdivision of the Association of Lawyers of Russia during the 4th Moscow legal week (25 November to 5 December 2014) and hosted jointly by two leading centres of legal education in Russia — the Faculty of Law of Lomonosov Moscow State University and Kutafin Academy of Law. It commemorated the 150th anniversary of the Judicial Reform of 1864 in the Russian Empire, one of the turning points in Russian legal history. In the aftermath of the defeat of Russia in the Crimean War (1853–56) this reform became a crucial part of the modernization of Russia as it set out to replace the slow, unpredictable, corrupt judiciary with a «prompt, equitable, humane, and equal to all (classes)» system of justice (to quote the manifesto of 20 November 1864 of Tsar Alexander II).By its purpose to re-examine the lessons of the past the conference motivated many renowned jurists (including those who usually deal with the contemporary law) to express their statements regarding this part of national legal history. The tone for the whole conference was set during the plenary session at Moscow State University (on 25 November) by the keynote speakers: Valery Zorkin and Gadis Gadzhiev (the chairman and the judge of the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation respectively), Sergey Shakhray (the vice-rector of Moscow State University), Igor Isaev (the head of the chair of legal history at Kutafin Academy of Law), Elena Borisova and Leonid Golovko (professors of civil and criminal procedure respectively at Moscow State University).Talking about the lessons of the Judicial Reform of 1864 for modern day Russia Valery Zorkin (doctor iuris and graduate of Moscow State University) praised the national legal history as «the key to understand the logic of historical development of the law of the land». In his speech he focused on the «living history» which is «alive as long as we are willing to understand it… to look into the well of history in order to discern our own reflection down there». Zorkin went that far to describe all Russian legal history since the 19th century as the sequence of reforms and counter-reforms, the continuous clash of democratic and authoritarian tendencies. Contemplating the preconditions for the success of the former he underlined the duty of the reformers to evaluate the historical necessity of the proposed measures and to build on the continuity with the previous historical experience. Neglect of building the necessary foundation to support the modern liberal judiciary and procedural rules in 1864, according to Zorkin, caused unexpected consequences of this reform: instead of producing the social consensus in Russia it «infected the society with a rebellious psychology» (which led to the assassination of ‘Tsar emancipator’ Alexander II in 1881 and, ultimately, to the Bolshevik revolution of 1917) and pushed Russian authorities to pursue the path of counter-reforms. Hence, the lesson to be learned is that any reform should be designed and carried out to foster social consensus based on shared values and equality of possibilities.Other keynote speakers draw attention to the role of modern judiciary for establishing and maintaining free-market economy (Gadzhiev), paving the way to checks on the public authorities and separation of powers (Shakhray), breaking ground for civil society and democratic rule (Isaev). Despite various approaches to evaluate the Judicial Reform of 1864, all speakers seemed to underline the crucial importance of its lessons for Russia till now. During the first day of the conference this conclusion was backed up by Shakhray and Krakovsky who presented a new illustrated dictionary on the Judicial Reform of 1864 (with a foreword by Sergey Naryshkin, the chairman of the State Duma of the Russian Federation).On November 26–27 the participants of the conference split up into 34 sections and workshops (held mostly at Kutafin Academy of Law) dedicated to nearly all branches and academic disciplines of Russian law. The section on legal history met on 26 November. It gathered together presenters from numerous law faculties across Russia who investigated national and foreign experience in matters of reforming the judiciary as well as judicial procedure before and after 1864. Publication of selected conference papers is forthcoming. On 28 November the debating club of the Moscow Subdivision of the Association of Lawyers discussed the current issues of Russian judicial system.As the joint conference attracted lawyers from all over Russia, the organizers seized this opportunity to hold several other meetings, including the Third Congress of the Academy of Legal Sciences, the Annual Meeting of the Moscow Subdivision of the Association of Lawyers of Russia, the Fourth Chess Tournament of the Faculties of Law in Moscow, even the Fourth Art Festival of Moscow Law Students.Although the primary focus of discussions during this conference was on the current issues of judicial system in Russia, it undoubtedly fostered the dialogue between contemporary national law, comparative law, and legal history.

(Conference webpages: http://www.law.msu.ru/node/30516 and http://msal.ru/primary-activity/scientific-activities/conferences_workshops/index.php?id_4=1935in Russian)
The front matter of the official edition the Judicial Statutes of 1864 (the first part), available athttp://civil.consultant.ru/reprint/books/115/Tsar Alexander II, engraving dated 1880, from http://dlib.rsl.ru/viewer/01003902326Reproduction of Konstantin Savitsky’s (d. 1905) painting «Awaiting sentencing» (1895) at Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALL FOR PAPERS: The State and/of Comparative Law - Juris Diversitas Conference (2-4 June 2015 - Limerick, Ireland)

Juris Diversitas - lun, 12/01/2014 - 14:24
CALL FOR PAPERSJURIS DIVERSITASANNUAL CONFERENCE  2-4 June 2015School of Law, University of LimerickLimerick, Ireland
THE STATE AND/OF COMPARATIVE LAW
While any proposal on comparative law (broadly conceived) will be considered, the conference’s primary theme is the relationship between social and legal norms and social and legal institutions. In memory of Roderick A Macdonald (1948-2014) and H Patrick Glenn (1940-2014), both former members of our Advisory Council, particular attention will be given to the diverse themes of their scholarship: for example, ‘common laws’, ‘constitutive polyjurality’, ‘critical legal pluralism’, ‘everyday law’, and ‘legal cosmopolitanism’.
As with our past conferences, proposals on a wide variety of topics will be accepted: comparative jurisprudence and legislation, legal philosophy, legal education, law reform, etc. Presentations may be theoretical analyses or case studies on the past or present, North or South, East or West ….
Panel proposals and interdisciplinary presentations are strongly encouraged, as is the participation of doctoral students and scholars from outside of the discipline of law. While parallel sessions of three twenty-minute presentations will be used, we welcome more original session structures.
Proposals should be in English or French. Proposals of c250 words (or 1000 words for panel proposals) should be submitted to Olivier Moréteau at moreteau@lsu.edu by 15 January 2015, with a short biography or resume (c250 words). Please send Word documents only, with minimal formatting.
Registration fees are €200 (€125 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2015). Membership and fee payment information is available on the Juris Diversitas Blog (http://jurisdiversitas.blogspot.ie/). Note that fees don’t cover travel, accommodation, or the conference dinner (€50).
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Robert Kolb (ed.)'s Commentary on the League of Nations Covenant (Brussels: Bruylant, 2014)

 
Bruylant just published Prof. Robert Kolb (Geneva)'s collective commentary on the League of Nations' Covenant. 1400 pages cover a fundamental text for the history of international law, as well as our understanding of the UN Charter
Contributions by Pierre d’Argent, Louis Balmond, Giulio Bartolini, Christian Birebent, Laurence Boisson de Chazournes, François Bugnion, Emmanuel Bourdoncle, Vincent Chetail, Giorgio Conetti, Olivier Corten, Florian Couveinhes-Matsumoto, Luigi Crema, Yann Decorzant, Martin Denis, Giovanni Distefano, Gleider I Hernández, Ivan Ingravallo, Pierre Klein, Robert Kolb, Anne Lagerwall, Makane Vittorio Mainetti, Moïse Mbengue, Karin Oellers-Frahm, Bernardine Pejovic, Vassilis Pergantis, Géraldine Ruiz, Markus Schmidt, Matthias Schulz, Massimo Starita, Antonios Tzanakopoulos, Agatha Verdebout, Sylvain Vité, Nigel D. White and Emmanuelle Wyatt. 
The book can be ordered here and is available online on strada.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Duve (ed) on Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual Approaches

Juris Diversitas - ven, 11/28/2014 - 15:33
I'm delighted to announce the publication of Thomas Duve (ed), Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual ApproachesThe book is the first on a new series--Global Perspectives on Legal History 1--from the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History. It's free online here and available in Print on Demand. And for those interested, it includes my 'Entangled up in Red, White, and Blue: Spanish West Florida and the American Territory of Orleans, 1803–1810':
Legal History presents a broad panorama of historical processes that trigger theoretical reflections on legal transfers and legal transplants and on the problem of the reception and assimilation laws and other modes of normativity. In this volume, legal historians across the globe reflect on their analytical traditions and present case studies in order to discuss how entangled histories of law can be understood, analyzed and written.

In the first section of this volume, ‘Traditions of Transnational Legal History’, the authors revisit specific achievements and shortcomings of legal historical research against the backdrop of postcolonial and global studies. Reflections on our own disciplinary traditions that reveal the path-dependencies include critical accounts on the tradition of ‘European Legal History’,‘Codification history’, the emergence of ‘Hindu Law’, and the methodological aspects of Comparative Law.

The four articles in the second section, ‘Empires and Law’, showcase entangled legal histories forged in imperial spaces, for instance, through treaties concluded in the spheres of influence of ancient Roman Empire, which in this instance is analyzed as a process of ‘narrative transculturation’. Analogously, transnational institutions adjudicating merchant-disputes in the Early Modern Spanish Empire and normative frameworks constructed in a multilingual space shortly after its decline are analyzed as ‘diffusion and hybridization’. And finally, the spotlight is cast on the so-called ‘craftsmen of transfer’ and the bureaucrats that took practical comparative law as the basis to design the German colonial law.

In the third section, ‘Analyzing transnational law and legal scholarship in 19th and early 20th century’, seven case studies offer theoretical reflections about entangled legal histories. The discussions range from civil law codifications in Latin America as ‘reception’ or ‘normative transfers’, entangled histories of constitutionalism as ‘translations’ and ‘legal transfer’, formation of transnational legal orders in 19th century International Law and the International Law on state bankruptcies to the impact of transnational legal scholarship on criminology. All articles engage in methodological reflections and discussions about their concrete application in legal historical research.




ContentsIntroduction3Thomas Duve
Entanglements in Legal History. Introductory RemarksTraditions of Transnational Legal History29Thomas Duve
European Legal History – Concepts, Methods, Challenges67Inge Kroppenberg, Nikolaus Linder
Coding the Nation. Codification History from a (Post-)Global Perspective101Geetanjali Srikantan
Towards New Conceptual Approaches in Legal History: Rethinking “Hindu Law” through Weber’s Sociology of Religion129George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo
Legal Transplants between Time and SpaceEmpires and Law151Emiliano J. Buis
Ancient Entanglements: The Influence of Greek Treaties in Roman ‘International Law’ under the Framework of Narrative Transculturation187Ana Belem Fernández Castro
A Transnational Empire Built on Law: The Case of the Commercial Jurisprudence of the House of Trade of Seville (1583–1598)213Seán Patrick Donlan
Entangled up in Red, White, and Blue: Spanish West Florida and the American Territory of Orleans, 1803–1810253Jakob Zollmann
German Colonial Law and Comparative Law, 1884–1919Analyzing Transnational Law and Legal Scholarship in the 19th and early 20th Century297Francisco J. Andrés Santos
Napoleon in America?
Reflections on the Concept of ‘Legal Reception’ in the Light of the Civil Law Codification in Latin America315Agustín Parise
Libraries of Civil Codes as Mirrors of Normative Transfers from Europe to the Americas: The Experiences of Lorimier in Quebec (1871–1890) and Varela in Argentina (1873–1875)385Eduardo Zimmermann
Translations of the “American Model” in Nineteenth Century Argentina: Constitutional Culture as a Global Legal Entanglement427Bram Delbecke
Modern Constitutionalism and Legal Transfer: The Political Offence in the French Charte Constitutionnelle (1830) and the Belgian Constitution (1831)461Lea Heimbeck
Discovering Legal Silence: Global Legal History and the Liquidation of State Bankruptcies (1854–1907)489Clara Kemme
The History of European International Law from a Global Perspective: Entanglements in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century India543Michele Pifferi
Global Criminology and National Tradition: The Impact of Reform Movements on Criminal Systems at the Beginning of the 20th Century565Contributors
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Duve (ed) on Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual Approaches (part of new series--Global Perspectives on Legal History 1--from the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History)


Thomas Duve (ed), Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual Approaches is the first on a new series--Global Perspectives on Legal History 1--from the Max Planck Institute for European Legal HistoryIt's free online here and available in Print on Demand:
Legal History presents a broad panorama of historical processes that trigger theoretical reflections on legal transfers and legal transplants and on the problem of the reception and assimilation laws and other modes of normativity. In this volume, legal historians across the globe reflect on their analytical traditions and present case studies in order to discuss how entangled histories of law can be understood, analyzed and written.

In the first section of this volume, ‘Traditions of Transnational Legal History’, the authors revisit specific achievements and shortcomings of legal historical research against the backdrop of postcolonial and global studies. Reflections on our own disciplinary traditions that reveal the path-dependencies include critical accounts on the tradition of ‘European Legal History’,‘Codification history’, the emergence of ‘Hindu Law’, and the methodological aspects of Comparative Law.

The four articles in the second section, ‘Empires and Law’, showcase entangled legal histories forged in imperial spaces, for instance, through treaties concluded in the spheres of influence of ancient Roman Empire, which in this instance is analyzed as a process of ‘narrative transculturation’. Analogously, transnational institutions adjudicating merchant-disputes in the Early Modern Spanish Empire and normative frameworks constructed in a multilingual space shortly after its decline are analyzed as ‘diffusion and hybridization’. And finally, the spotlight is cast on the so-called ‘craftsmen of transfer’ and the bureaucrats that took practical comparative law as the basis to design the German colonial law.

In the third section, ‘Analyzing transnational law and legal scholarship in 19th and early 20th century’, seven case studies offer theoretical reflections about entangled legal histories. The discussions range from civil law codifications in Latin America as ‘reception’ or ‘normative transfers’, entangled histories of constitutionalism as ‘translations’ and ‘legal transfer’, formation of transnational legal orders in 19th century International Law and the International Law on state bankruptcies to the impact of transnational legal scholarship on criminology. All articles engage in methodological reflections and discussions about their concrete application in legal historical research.




ContentsIntroduction3Thomas Duve
Entanglements in Legal History. Introductory RemarksTraditions of Transnational Legal History29Thomas Duve
European Legal History – Concepts, Methods, Challenges67Inge Kroppenberg, Nikolaus Linder
Coding the Nation. Codification History from a (Post-)Global Perspective101Geetanjali Srikantan
Towards New Conceptual Approaches in Legal History: Rethinking “Hindu Law” through Weber’s Sociology of Religion129George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo
Legal Transplants between Time and SpaceEmpires and Law151Emiliano J. Buis
Ancient Entanglements: The Influence of Greek Treaties in Roman ‘International Law’ under the Framework of Narrative Transculturation187Ana Belem Fernández Castro
A Transnational Empire Built on Law: The Case of the Commercial Jurisprudence of the House of Trade of Seville (1583–1598)213Seán Patrick Donlan
Entangled up in Red, White, and Blue: Spanish West Florida and the American Territory of Orleans, 1803–1810253Jakob Zollmann
German Colonial Law and Comparative Law, 1884–1919Analyzing Transnational Law and Legal Scholarship in the 19th and early 20th Century297Francisco J. Andrés Santos
Napoleon in America?
Reflections on the Concept of ‘Legal Reception’ in the Light of the Civil Law Codification in Latin America315Agustín Parise
Libraries of Civil Codes as Mirrors of Normative Transfers from Europe to the Americas: The Experiences of Lorimier in Quebec (1871–1890) and Varela in Argentina (1873–1875)385Eduardo Zimmermann
Translations of the “American Model” in Nineteenth Century Argentina: Constitutional Culture as a Global Legal Entanglement427Bram Delbecke
Modern Constitutionalism and Legal Transfer: The Political Offence in the French Charte Constitutionnelle (1830) and the Belgian Constitution (1831)461Lea Heimbeck
Discovering Legal Silence: Global Legal History and the Liquidation of State Bankruptcies (1854–1907)489Clara Kemme
The History of European International Law from a Global Perspective: Entanglements in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century India543Michele Pifferi
Global Criminology and National Tradition: The Impact of Reform Movements on Criminal Systems at the Beginning of the 20th Century565Contributors
Catégories: Comparative Law News

The Peace Palace Library and Legal History


The excellent website of the Peace Palace Library (The Hague) posted three messages relevant to historians of international law:
  •  The announcement of  an upcoming lecture by dr. Maartje Abbenhuis (Auckland) on the 1899 and 19707 Hague Conferences, neutrality and the First World War (cf. dr. Abbenhuis' most recent monography on international great power politics in the long nineteenth century and neutrality at Cambridge UP)
  • An interview with Prof. dr. Henk Nellen (Erasmus University) on the publication of the English translation of his impressive Grotius-biography (link) (book webpage at Martinus Nijhoff/Brill)
  • "Grotius and the Dutch Jurists: the Bibliography Continues?" (interview with Dr. D. Osler, MPI Frankfurt) (link)
Catégories: Comparative Law News

SEMINAR: "Etat, société et diversité culturelle et religieuse" (Paris, December-April 2015)


WHAT: Etat, société et diversité culturelle et religieuseLES SEMINAIRES Norma 2014-2015
WHERE: 59-61 rue Pouchet, 75017 Paris M° Guy Môquet ou Brochant,RER C Porte de Clichy, Bus 66 arrêt "La Jonquière
WHEN: December-April 2015
Calendar
 
 12 december 10:00-12:00, salle 311
Karsten Lehmann, chercheur à  Vienne,"Organisations internationales et religions"

6 february 10:00-12:30, salle 159
Yves Bizeul, professeur à  Rostock,"Etat, migrations et religion en Allemagne: la gestion locale de la diversité religieuse en Allemagne"

5 march, 10:00-12.30, salle de conférences
Dominique Schnapper, Directeur d'études à l'EHESS,"L'esprit démocratique des lois"

9 april Programme en cours de définition, salle 159
Journée d'études du programme Sécularisation, post-sécularisation
 
Catégories: Comparative Law News

JURIS DIVERSITAS BOOK SERIES UPDATE: Farran, Gallen, Hendry, and Rautenbach (eds), The Diffusion of Law is added to 2015 Titles

Juris Diversitas - mar, 11/25/2014 - 10:51

Juris Diversitas is proud to have a book series with Ashgate Publishing (we're also a Publishing Partner): 
Rooted in comparative law, the Juris Diversitas Series focuses on the interdisciplinary study of legal and normative mixtures and movements. Our interest is in comparison broadly conceived, extending beyond law narrowly understood to related fields. Titles might be geographical or temporal comparisons. They could focus on theory and methodology, substantive law, or legal cultures. They could investigate official or unofficial ‘legalities’, past and present and around the world. And, to effectively cross spatial, temporal, and normative boundaries, inter- and multi-disciplinary research is particularly welcome. 


The series currently includes:

Launches of these titles will be announced soon.

Among other titles, the following are due in 2015:
    While we anticipate publishing future collections (original, conference-based, Festschriften, etc), we're also very interested in publishing monographs and student texts. 

    Note that selected volumes are also provided free with membership.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    ARTICLE: Methodological pluralism and legal comparison

    Juris Diversitas - mar, 11/25/2014 - 09:48
    A new interesting article From social and political philosophy eJournal.

    Methodological Pluralism and Legal Comparison
    Roberto Scarciglia 
    University of Trieste
    May 1, 2014

    in R. Scarciglia and W. Menski (eds.)m Islamic Symbols in European Courts, Cedam-Kluwer, 2014, pp.21-34. 
    Abstract:      

    The aim of this paper is to show how the methodological tools used in much more comparative analyses are not suitable to study complex phenomena as the diversity and legal implications of religious factors on the decision of the courts.
    Click here for more details.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    WANTED: Youngish Society would like to meet Complementary Societies and Individuals.

    Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/24/2014 - 08:31
    WANTED
    Youngish society would like to meet complementary societies and individuals. Both trysts and marriage(s) considered. Long distance relationships acceptable, but willing to relocate. Fun and travel anticipated. 
    Must accept bald men. Size irrelevant.
    Juris Diversitas

    PS Sense of humour essential.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    BOOK: Rohe on Islamic Law in Past and Present

    Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/24/2014 - 07:31
    Mathias Rohe, Islamic Law in Past and Present, tr. Gwendolin Goldbloom:
    Islamic Law in Past and Present, written by the lawyer and Islamicist Mathias Rohe, is the first comprehensive study for decades on Islamic law, legal theory, reform mechanisms and the application of Islamic law in Islamic countries and the Muslim diaspora. It provides information based on an abundance of Oriental and Western sources regarding family and inheritance law, contract and economic law, penal law, constitutional, administrative and international law. The present situation and ‘law in action’ are highlighted particularly. This includes examples collected during field studies on the application of Islamic law in India, Canada and Germany.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    BOOK: Foblets et al on Belief, Law and Politics: What Future for a Secular Europe

    Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/24/2014 - 07:29
    Marie-Claire Foblets, Katayoun Alidadi, Jørgen S Nielsen, and Zeynep Yanasmayan (eds), Belief, Law and Politics: What Future for a Secular Europe?
    This edited collection gathers together the principal findings of the three-year RELIGARE project, which dealt with the question of religious and philosophical diversity in European law. Specifically, it covers four spheres of public policy and legislation where the pressure to accommodate religious diversity has been most strongly felt in Europe: employment, family life, use of public space and state support mechanisms. Embracing a forward-looking approach, the final RELIGARE report provides recommendations to governance units at the local, national and European levels regarding issues of religious pluralism and secularism. This volume adds context and critique to those recommendations and more generally opens an intellectual discussion on the topic of religion in the European Union. The book consists of two main parts: the first includes the principal findings of the RELIGARE research project, while the second is a compilation of 28 short contributions from influential scholars, legal practitioners, policy makers and activists who respond to the report and offer their views on the sensitive issue of religious diversity and the law in Europe.

    Catégories: Comparative Law News

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