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REVIEW: International conference: «The Judicial Reform in Russia: Past, Present, and Future» (Moscow, 25–28 November 2014)

«The Judicial Reform in Russia: Past, Present, and Future»(Moscow, 25–28 November 2014)
reviewed by Dmitry Poldnikov (dpoldnikov@hse.ru)
The conference was organized by the Moscow Subdivision of the Association of Lawyers of Russia during the 4th Moscow legal week (25 November to 5 December 2014) and hosted jointly by two leading centres of legal education in Russia — the Faculty of Law of Lomonosov Moscow State University and Kutafin Academy of Law. It commemorated the 150th anniversary of the Judicial Reform of 1864 in the Russian Empire, one of the turning points in Russian legal history. In the aftermath of the defeat of Russia in the Crimean War (1853–56) this reform became a crucial part of the modernization of Russia as it set out to replace the slow, unpredictable, corrupt judiciary with a «prompt, equitable, humane, and equal to all (classes)» system of justice (to quote the manifesto of 20 November 1864 of Tsar Alexander II).By its purpose to re-examine the lessons of the past the conference motivated many renowned jurists (including those who usually deal with the contemporary law) to express their statements regarding this part of national legal history. The tone for the whole conference was set during the plenary session at Moscow State University (on 25 November) by the keynote speakers: Valery Zorkin and Gadis Gadzhiev (the chairman and the judge of the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation respectively), Sergey Shakhray (the vice-rector of Moscow State University), Igor Isaev (the head of the chair of legal history at Kutafin Academy of Law), Elena Borisova and Leonid Golovko (professors of civil and criminal procedure respectively at Moscow State University).Talking about the lessons of the Judicial Reform of 1864 for modern day Russia Valery Zorkin (doctor iuris and graduate of Moscow State University) praised the national legal history as «the key to understand the logic of historical development of the law of the land». In his speech he focused on the «living history» which is «alive as long as we are willing to understand it… to look into the well of history in order to discern our own reflection down there». Zorkin went that far to describe all Russian legal history since the 19th century as the sequence of reforms and counter-reforms, the continuous clash of democratic and authoritarian tendencies. Contemplating the preconditions for the success of the former he underlined the duty of the reformers to evaluate the historical necessity of the proposed measures and to build on the continuity with the previous historical experience. Neglect of building the necessary foundation to support the modern liberal judiciary and procedural rules in 1864, according to Zorkin, caused unexpected consequences of this reform: instead of producing the social consensus in Russia it «infected the society with a rebellious psychology» (which led to the assassination of ‘Tsar emancipator’ Alexander II in 1881 and, ultimately, to the Bolshevik revolution of 1917) and pushed Russian authorities to pursue the path of counter-reforms. Hence, the lesson to be learned is that any reform should be designed and carried out to foster social consensus based on shared values and equality of possibilities.Other keynote speakers draw attention to the role of modern judiciary for establishing and maintaining free-market economy (Gadzhiev), paving the way to checks on the public authorities and separation of powers (Shakhray), breaking ground for civil society and democratic rule (Isaev). Despite various approaches to evaluate the Judicial Reform of 1864, all speakers seemed to underline the crucial importance of its lessons for Russia till now. During the first day of the conference this conclusion was backed up by Shakhray and Krakovsky who presented a new illustrated dictionary on the Judicial Reform of 1864 (with a foreword by Sergey Naryshkin, the chairman of the State Duma of the Russian Federation).On November 26–27 the participants of the conference split up into 34 sections and workshops (held mostly at Kutafin Academy of Law) dedicated to nearly all branches and academic disciplines of Russian law. The section on legal history met on 26 November. It gathered together presenters from numerous law faculties across Russia who investigated national and foreign experience in matters of reforming the judiciary as well as judicial procedure before and after 1864. Publication of selected conference papers is forthcoming. On 28 November the debating club of the Moscow Subdivision of the Association of Lawyers discussed the current issues of Russian judicial system.As the joint conference attracted lawyers from all over Russia, the organizers seized this opportunity to hold several other meetings, including the Third Congress of the Academy of Legal Sciences, the Annual Meeting of the Moscow Subdivision of the Association of Lawyers of Russia, the Fourth Chess Tournament of the Faculties of Law in Moscow, even the Fourth Art Festival of Moscow Law Students.Although the primary focus of discussions during this conference was on the current issues of judicial system in Russia, it undoubtedly fostered the dialogue between contemporary national law, comparative law, and legal history.

(Conference webpages: http://www.law.msu.ru/node/30516 and http://msal.ru/primary-activity/scientific-activities/conferences_workshops/index.php?id_4=1935in Russian)
The front matter of the official edition the Judicial Statutes of 1864 (the first part), available athttp://civil.consultant.ru/reprint/books/115/Tsar Alexander II, engraving dated 1880, from http://dlib.rsl.ru/viewer/01003902326Reproduction of Konstantin Savitsky’s (d. 1905) painting «Awaiting sentencing» (1895) at Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

CALL FOR PAPERS: The State and/of Comparative Law - Juris Diversitas Conference (2-4 June 2015 - Limerick, Ireland)

Juris Diversitas - lun, 12/01/2014 - 14:24
CALL FOR PAPERSJURIS DIVERSITASANNUAL CONFERENCE  2-4 June 2015School of Law, University of LimerickLimerick, Ireland
THE STATE AND/OF COMPARATIVE LAW
While any proposal on comparative law (broadly conceived) will be considered, the conference’s primary theme is the relationship between social and legal norms and social and legal institutions. In memory of Roderick A Macdonald (1948-2014) and H Patrick Glenn (1940-2014), both former members of our Advisory Council, particular attention will be given to the diverse themes of their scholarship: for example, ‘common laws’, ‘constitutive polyjurality’, ‘critical legal pluralism’, ‘everyday law’, and ‘legal cosmopolitanism’.
As with our past conferences, proposals on a wide variety of topics will be accepted: comparative jurisprudence and legislation, legal philosophy, legal education, law reform, etc. Presentations may be theoretical analyses or case studies on the past or present, North or South, East or West ….
Panel proposals and interdisciplinary presentations are strongly encouraged, as is the participation of doctoral students and scholars from outside of the discipline of law. While parallel sessions of three twenty-minute presentations will be used, we welcome more original session structures.
Proposals should be in English or French. Proposals of c250 words (or 1000 words for panel proposals) should be submitted to Olivier Moréteau at moreteau@lsu.edu by 15 January 2015, with a short biography or resume (c250 words). Please send Word documents only, with minimal formatting.
Registration fees are €200 (€125 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2015). Membership and fee payment information is available on the Juris Diversitas Blog (http://jurisdiversitas.blogspot.ie/). Note that fees don’t cover travel, accommodation, or the conference dinner (€50).
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Robert Kolb (ed.)'s Commentary on the League of Nations Covenant (Brussels: Bruylant, 2014)

 
Bruylant just published Prof. Robert Kolb (Geneva)'s collective commentary on the League of Nations' Covenant. 1400 pages cover a fundamental text for the history of international law, as well as our understanding of the UN Charter
Contributions by Pierre d’Argent, Louis Balmond, Giulio Bartolini, Christian Birebent, Laurence Boisson de Chazournes, François Bugnion, Emmanuel Bourdoncle, Vincent Chetail, Giorgio Conetti, Olivier Corten, Florian Couveinhes-Matsumoto, Luigi Crema, Yann Decorzant, Martin Denis, Giovanni Distefano, Gleider I Hernández, Ivan Ingravallo, Pierre Klein, Robert Kolb, Anne Lagerwall, Makane Vittorio Mainetti, Moïse Mbengue, Karin Oellers-Frahm, Bernardine Pejovic, Vassilis Pergantis, Géraldine Ruiz, Markus Schmidt, Matthias Schulz, Massimo Starita, Antonios Tzanakopoulos, Agatha Verdebout, Sylvain Vité, Nigel D. White and Emmanuelle Wyatt. 
The book can be ordered here and is available online on strada.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Duve (ed) on Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual Approaches

Juris Diversitas - ven, 11/28/2014 - 15:33
I'm delighted to announce the publication of Thomas Duve (ed), Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual ApproachesThe book is the first on a new series--Global Perspectives on Legal History 1--from the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History. It's free online here and available in Print on Demand. And for those interested, it includes my 'Entangled up in Red, White, and Blue: Spanish West Florida and the American Territory of Orleans, 1803–1810':
Legal History presents a broad panorama of historical processes that trigger theoretical reflections on legal transfers and legal transplants and on the problem of the reception and assimilation laws and other modes of normativity. In this volume, legal historians across the globe reflect on their analytical traditions and present case studies in order to discuss how entangled histories of law can be understood, analyzed and written.

In the first section of this volume, ‘Traditions of Transnational Legal History’, the authors revisit specific achievements and shortcomings of legal historical research against the backdrop of postcolonial and global studies. Reflections on our own disciplinary traditions that reveal the path-dependencies include critical accounts on the tradition of ‘European Legal History’,‘Codification history’, the emergence of ‘Hindu Law’, and the methodological aspects of Comparative Law.

The four articles in the second section, ‘Empires and Law’, showcase entangled legal histories forged in imperial spaces, for instance, through treaties concluded in the spheres of influence of ancient Roman Empire, which in this instance is analyzed as a process of ‘narrative transculturation’. Analogously, transnational institutions adjudicating merchant-disputes in the Early Modern Spanish Empire and normative frameworks constructed in a multilingual space shortly after its decline are analyzed as ‘diffusion and hybridization’. And finally, the spotlight is cast on the so-called ‘craftsmen of transfer’ and the bureaucrats that took practical comparative law as the basis to design the German colonial law.

In the third section, ‘Analyzing transnational law and legal scholarship in 19th and early 20th century’, seven case studies offer theoretical reflections about entangled legal histories. The discussions range from civil law codifications in Latin America as ‘reception’ or ‘normative transfers’, entangled histories of constitutionalism as ‘translations’ and ‘legal transfer’, formation of transnational legal orders in 19th century International Law and the International Law on state bankruptcies to the impact of transnational legal scholarship on criminology. All articles engage in methodological reflections and discussions about their concrete application in legal historical research.




ContentsIntroduction3Thomas Duve
Entanglements in Legal History. Introductory RemarksTraditions of Transnational Legal History29Thomas Duve
European Legal History – Concepts, Methods, Challenges67Inge Kroppenberg, Nikolaus Linder
Coding the Nation. Codification History from a (Post-)Global Perspective101Geetanjali Srikantan
Towards New Conceptual Approaches in Legal History: Rethinking “Hindu Law” through Weber’s Sociology of Religion129George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo
Legal Transplants between Time and SpaceEmpires and Law151Emiliano J. Buis
Ancient Entanglements: The Influence of Greek Treaties in Roman ‘International Law’ under the Framework of Narrative Transculturation187Ana Belem Fernández Castro
A Transnational Empire Built on Law: The Case of the Commercial Jurisprudence of the House of Trade of Seville (1583–1598)213Seán Patrick Donlan
Entangled up in Red, White, and Blue: Spanish West Florida and the American Territory of Orleans, 1803–1810253Jakob Zollmann
German Colonial Law and Comparative Law, 1884–1919Analyzing Transnational Law and Legal Scholarship in the 19th and early 20th Century297Francisco J. Andrés Santos
Napoleon in America?
Reflections on the Concept of ‘Legal Reception’ in the Light of the Civil Law Codification in Latin America315Agustín Parise
Libraries of Civil Codes as Mirrors of Normative Transfers from Europe to the Americas: The Experiences of Lorimier in Quebec (1871–1890) and Varela in Argentina (1873–1875)385Eduardo Zimmermann
Translations of the “American Model” in Nineteenth Century Argentina: Constitutional Culture as a Global Legal Entanglement427Bram Delbecke
Modern Constitutionalism and Legal Transfer: The Political Offence in the French Charte Constitutionnelle (1830) and the Belgian Constitution (1831)461Lea Heimbeck
Discovering Legal Silence: Global Legal History and the Liquidation of State Bankruptcies (1854–1907)489Clara Kemme
The History of European International Law from a Global Perspective: Entanglements in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century India543Michele Pifferi
Global Criminology and National Tradition: The Impact of Reform Movements on Criminal Systems at the Beginning of the 20th Century565Contributors
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Duve (ed) on Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual Approaches (part of new series--Global Perspectives on Legal History 1--from the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History)


Thomas Duve (ed), Entanglements in Legal History: Conceptual Approaches is the first on a new series--Global Perspectives on Legal History 1--from the Max Planck Institute for European Legal HistoryIt's free online here and available in Print on Demand:
Legal History presents a broad panorama of historical processes that trigger theoretical reflections on legal transfers and legal transplants and on the problem of the reception and assimilation laws and other modes of normativity. In this volume, legal historians across the globe reflect on their analytical traditions and present case studies in order to discuss how entangled histories of law can be understood, analyzed and written.

In the first section of this volume, ‘Traditions of Transnational Legal History’, the authors revisit specific achievements and shortcomings of legal historical research against the backdrop of postcolonial and global studies. Reflections on our own disciplinary traditions that reveal the path-dependencies include critical accounts on the tradition of ‘European Legal History’,‘Codification history’, the emergence of ‘Hindu Law’, and the methodological aspects of Comparative Law.

The four articles in the second section, ‘Empires and Law’, showcase entangled legal histories forged in imperial spaces, for instance, through treaties concluded in the spheres of influence of ancient Roman Empire, which in this instance is analyzed as a process of ‘narrative transculturation’. Analogously, transnational institutions adjudicating merchant-disputes in the Early Modern Spanish Empire and normative frameworks constructed in a multilingual space shortly after its decline are analyzed as ‘diffusion and hybridization’. And finally, the spotlight is cast on the so-called ‘craftsmen of transfer’ and the bureaucrats that took practical comparative law as the basis to design the German colonial law.

In the third section, ‘Analyzing transnational law and legal scholarship in 19th and early 20th century’, seven case studies offer theoretical reflections about entangled legal histories. The discussions range from civil law codifications in Latin America as ‘reception’ or ‘normative transfers’, entangled histories of constitutionalism as ‘translations’ and ‘legal transfer’, formation of transnational legal orders in 19th century International Law and the International Law on state bankruptcies to the impact of transnational legal scholarship on criminology. All articles engage in methodological reflections and discussions about their concrete application in legal historical research.




ContentsIntroduction3Thomas Duve
Entanglements in Legal History. Introductory RemarksTraditions of Transnational Legal History29Thomas Duve
European Legal History – Concepts, Methods, Challenges67Inge Kroppenberg, Nikolaus Linder
Coding the Nation. Codification History from a (Post-)Global Perspective101Geetanjali Srikantan
Towards New Conceptual Approaches in Legal History: Rethinking “Hindu Law” through Weber’s Sociology of Religion129George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo
Legal Transplants between Time and SpaceEmpires and Law151Emiliano J. Buis
Ancient Entanglements: The Influence of Greek Treaties in Roman ‘International Law’ under the Framework of Narrative Transculturation187Ana Belem Fernández Castro
A Transnational Empire Built on Law: The Case of the Commercial Jurisprudence of the House of Trade of Seville (1583–1598)213Seán Patrick Donlan
Entangled up in Red, White, and Blue: Spanish West Florida and the American Territory of Orleans, 1803–1810253Jakob Zollmann
German Colonial Law and Comparative Law, 1884–1919Analyzing Transnational Law and Legal Scholarship in the 19th and early 20th Century297Francisco J. Andrés Santos
Napoleon in America?
Reflections on the Concept of ‘Legal Reception’ in the Light of the Civil Law Codification in Latin America315Agustín Parise
Libraries of Civil Codes as Mirrors of Normative Transfers from Europe to the Americas: The Experiences of Lorimier in Quebec (1871–1890) and Varela in Argentina (1873–1875)385Eduardo Zimmermann
Translations of the “American Model” in Nineteenth Century Argentina: Constitutional Culture as a Global Legal Entanglement427Bram Delbecke
Modern Constitutionalism and Legal Transfer: The Political Offence in the French Charte Constitutionnelle (1830) and the Belgian Constitution (1831)461Lea Heimbeck
Discovering Legal Silence: Global Legal History and the Liquidation of State Bankruptcies (1854–1907)489Clara Kemme
The History of European International Law from a Global Perspective: Entanglements in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century India543Michele Pifferi
Global Criminology and National Tradition: The Impact of Reform Movements on Criminal Systems at the Beginning of the 20th Century565Contributors
Catégories: Comparative Law News

The Peace Palace Library and Legal History


The excellent website of the Peace Palace Library (The Hague) posted three messages relevant to historians of international law:
  •  The announcement of  an upcoming lecture by dr. Maartje Abbenhuis (Auckland) on the 1899 and 19707 Hague Conferences, neutrality and the First World War (cf. dr. Abbenhuis' most recent monography on international great power politics in the long nineteenth century and neutrality at Cambridge UP)
  • An interview with Prof. dr. Henk Nellen (Erasmus University) on the publication of the English translation of his impressive Grotius-biography (link) (book webpage at Martinus Nijhoff/Brill)
  • "Grotius and the Dutch Jurists: the Bibliography Continues?" (interview with Dr. D. Osler, MPI Frankfurt) (link)
Catégories: Comparative Law News

SEMINAR: "Etat, société et diversité culturelle et religieuse" (Paris, December-April 2015)


WHAT: Etat, société et diversité culturelle et religieuseLES SEMINAIRES Norma 2014-2015
WHERE: 59-61 rue Pouchet, 75017 Paris M° Guy Môquet ou Brochant,RER C Porte de Clichy, Bus 66 arrêt "La Jonquière
WHEN: December-April 2015
Calendar
 
 12 december 10:00-12:00, salle 311
Karsten Lehmann, chercheur à  Vienne,"Organisations internationales et religions"

6 february 10:00-12:30, salle 159
Yves Bizeul, professeur à  Rostock,"Etat, migrations et religion en Allemagne: la gestion locale de la diversité religieuse en Allemagne"

5 march, 10:00-12.30, salle de conférences
Dominique Schnapper, Directeur d'études à l'EHESS,"L'esprit démocratique des lois"

9 april Programme en cours de définition, salle 159
Journée d'études du programme Sécularisation, post-sécularisation
 
Catégories: Comparative Law News

JURIS DIVERSITAS BOOK SERIES UPDATE: Farran, Gallen, Hendry, and Rautenbach (eds), The Diffusion of Law is added to 2015 Titles

Juris Diversitas - mar, 11/25/2014 - 10:51

Juris Diversitas is proud to have a book series with Ashgate Publishing (we're also a Publishing Partner): 
Rooted in comparative law, the Juris Diversitas Series focuses on the interdisciplinary study of legal and normative mixtures and movements. Our interest is in comparison broadly conceived, extending beyond law narrowly understood to related fields. Titles might be geographical or temporal comparisons. They could focus on theory and methodology, substantive law, or legal cultures. They could investigate official or unofficial ‘legalities’, past and present and around the world. And, to effectively cross spatial, temporal, and normative boundaries, inter- and multi-disciplinary research is particularly welcome. 


The series currently includes:

Launches of these titles will be announced soon.

Among other titles, the following are due in 2015:
    While we anticipate publishing future collections (original, conference-based, Festschriften, etc), we're also very interested in publishing monographs and student texts. 

    Note that selected volumes are also provided free with membership.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    ARTICLE: Methodological pluralism and legal comparison

    Juris Diversitas - mar, 11/25/2014 - 09:48
    A new interesting article From social and political philosophy eJournal.

    Methodological Pluralism and Legal Comparison
    Roberto Scarciglia 
    University of Trieste
    May 1, 2014

    in R. Scarciglia and W. Menski (eds.)m Islamic Symbols in European Courts, Cedam-Kluwer, 2014, pp.21-34. 
    Abstract:      

    The aim of this paper is to show how the methodological tools used in much more comparative analyses are not suitable to study complex phenomena as the diversity and legal implications of religious factors on the decision of the courts.
    Click here for more details.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    WANTED: Youngish Society would like to meet Complementary Societies and Individuals.

    Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/24/2014 - 08:31
    WANTED
    Youngish society would like to meet complementary societies and individuals. Both trysts and marriage(s) considered. Long distance relationships acceptable, but willing to relocate. Fun and travel anticipated. 
    Must accept bald men. Size irrelevant.
    Juris Diversitas

    PS Sense of humour essential.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    BOOK: Rohe on Islamic Law in Past and Present

    Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/24/2014 - 07:31
    Mathias Rohe, Islamic Law in Past and Present, tr. Gwendolin Goldbloom:
    Islamic Law in Past and Present, written by the lawyer and Islamicist Mathias Rohe, is the first comprehensive study for decades on Islamic law, legal theory, reform mechanisms and the application of Islamic law in Islamic countries and the Muslim diaspora. It provides information based on an abundance of Oriental and Western sources regarding family and inheritance law, contract and economic law, penal law, constitutional, administrative and international law. The present situation and ‘law in action’ are highlighted particularly. This includes examples collected during field studies on the application of Islamic law in India, Canada and Germany.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    BOOK: Foblets et al on Belief, Law and Politics: What Future for a Secular Europe

    Juris Diversitas - lun, 11/24/2014 - 07:29
    Marie-Claire Foblets, Katayoun Alidadi, Jørgen S Nielsen, and Zeynep Yanasmayan (eds), Belief, Law and Politics: What Future for a Secular Europe?
    This edited collection gathers together the principal findings of the three-year RELIGARE project, which dealt with the question of religious and philosophical diversity in European law. Specifically, it covers four spheres of public policy and legislation where the pressure to accommodate religious diversity has been most strongly felt in Europe: employment, family life, use of public space and state support mechanisms. Embracing a forward-looking approach, the final RELIGARE report provides recommendations to governance units at the local, national and European levels regarding issues of religious pluralism and secularism. This volume adds context and critique to those recommendations and more generally opens an intellectual discussion on the topic of religion in the European Union. The book consists of two main parts: the first includes the principal findings of the RELIGARE research project, while the second is a compilation of 28 short contributions from influential scholars, legal practitioners, policy makers and activists who respond to the report and offer their views on the sensitive issue of religious diversity and the law in Europe.

    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    JOURNAL: Caron on Teaching law and Transnationalism

    Juris Diversitas - dim, 11/23/2014 - 15:08
    David Caron (Dean, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London) has published 'Teaching of law must reflect realities of a transnational world':
    We live in a period of economic globalisation in which we are witnessing the convergence of humanity around fundamental rights and values and the demands of shared challenges such as climate change.
    Once you accept that law is a reflection of – and is fundamentally shaped by – underlying political, social and economic structures, then it becomes clear that a transnational emphasis is essential....
    The full article is here.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    SSRN ARTICLE ANNOUNCEMENT: Law and Society in Brazil at the Crossroads: A Review

    Juris Diversitas - ven, 11/21/2014 - 10:23
    We suggest some interesting articles from SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY eJOURNAL, Vol. 7, No. 155: Nov 19, 2014. Please click here to view the full full abstracts for this issue.

    "Law and Courts in Authoritarian Regimes"  Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 10, pp. 281-299, 2014TAMIR MOUSTAFA, Simon Fraser University (SFU)
    Email: tmoustafa@sfu.caOnce regarded as mere pawns of their regimes, courts in authoritarian states are now the subject of considerable attention within the field of comparative judicial politics. New research examines the ways in which law and courts are deployed as instruments of governance, how they structure state-society contention, and the circumstances in which courts are transformed into sites of active resistance. This new body of research constitutes an emergent field of inquiry, while simultaneously contributing to a number of related research agendas, including authoritarian durability and regime transition, human rights, transitional justice, law and development, and rule-of-law promotion. Moreover, this research offers important insights into the erosion of rights and liberties in “consolidated democracies.”

    Law and Society in Brazil at the Crossroads: A ReviewAnnual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 10, pp. 91-103, 2014JOSÉ REINALDO LOPES, University of Sao Paulo - Faculdade de Direito
    Email: jrllopes@terra.com.br
    ROBERTO FREITAS FILHO, Uniceub
    Email: robertofreitas_filho@yahoo.com.brThis article presents a general overview of Brazilian sociolegal studies. After presenting a short historical narrative of the field in Brazil, we argue that the early years of intense teaching of legal sociology had a politically committed approach, which gave rise to growing criticism of Brazilian legal scholarship that in turn affected the self-image of law professors. Different theoretical strands appeared in the years that followed, and some specific fields of research gained importance, particularly those concerning a sociology of the legal profession, the administration of courts, and law schools. However, we contend that as time went by, many sociolegal scholars began to neglect the critical approach to law, and today most of them fail to confront critical aspects of the gap between law on the books and law in action, especially when that gap affects lower classes or stigmatized populations.

    "Critical Race Theory Meets Social Science"  Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 10, pp. 149-167, 2014DEVON W. CARBADO, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law
    Email: carbado@law.ucla.edu
    DARIA ROITHMAYR, USC Gould School of Law
    Email: droithmayr@law.usc.eduSocial science research offers critical race theory (CRT) scholars a useful methodology to advance core CRT claims. Among other things, social science can provide CRT with data and theoretical frameworks to support key empirical claims. Social psychology and sociology in particular can help to explain how race constructs key aspects of social experience - for example, the role of race in suspicion of African Americans as potentially criminal and the use of excessive force by law enforcement. At the same time, a collaboration between CRT and social science risks undermining CRT critiques of objectivity and neutrality and potentially limits the theory's ability to combat structural forms of racial inequality. CRT scholars can mitigate these risks by choosing social science methods carefully and by recognizing that social science is only one among several modes of knowledge production.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    JOURNAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Theory and Practice of Legislation new issue

    Juris Diversitas - ven, 11/21/2014 - 10:05
    Hart Publishing has just published a new issue, volume 2, no. 2, of The Theory and Practice of Legislation.
    Click here to visit the Journal's homepage.

    The Theory and Practice of Legislation aims to offer an international and interdisciplinary forum for the examination of legislation. The focus of the journal, which succeeds the former title Legisprudence, remains with legislation in its broadest sense. Legislation is seen as both process and product, reflection of theoretical assumptions and a skill. The journal addresses formal legislation, and its alternatives (such as covenants, regulation by non-state actors etc.). The editors welcome articles on systematic (as opposed to historical) issues, including drafting techniques, the introduction of open standards, evidence-based drafting, pre- and post-legislative scrutiny for effectiveness and efficiency, the utility and necessity of codification, IT in legislation, the legitimacy of legislation in view of fundamental principles and rights, law and language, and the link between legislator and judge. Comparative and interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged. But dogmatic descriptions of positive law are outside the scope of the journal. The journal offers a combination of themed issues and general issues. All articles are submitted to double blind review.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT: Legal Innovations in Asia

    Juris Diversitas - ven, 11/21/2014 - 09:57
    Judicial Lawmaking and the Influence of Comparative Law

    Edited by John O. Haley, Affiliate Professor of Law, University of Washington, Professor of Law, Vanderbilt University and William R. Orthwein Distinguished Professor of Law Emeritus, Washington University in St. Louis., US and Toshiko Takenaka, Washington Research Foundation/W. Hunter Simpson Professor of Technology Law, University of Washington School of Law, US

    'Armed mainly with tremendous scholarly energy, the University of Washington has developed into the premier center of Asian legal studies in North America. This volume is a tribute to the breadth and depth of activity at the Asian Law Center over its first five decades, and a treasure trove of substantive insights into comparative law in Asia. As Asian law continues to attract more attention around the world, we must all be grateful for the contributions of the innovators who built the field.'
    – Tom Ginsburg, University of Chicago Law School, US

    ‘Professors Haley and Takenaka have put together a wonderfully eclectic collection of essays to commemorate the founding of the Asian Law Center at the University of Washington School of Law in 1964. Written by leaders in their respective fields, the essays, which explore legal developments, innovations and transplants in Japan and its neighbours, will appeal to scholars and students of Japanese law, as well as comparative lawyers with an interest in Asian law.’
    – Jean Ho, National University of Singapore

    ‘For fifty years now, the University of Washington's Asian Law Center has stood at the center of American scholarship on Japanese law. Its scholars have consistently produced the very best work in the field, and men and women associated with it have increasingly turned their attention to other legal systems in Asia as well. In this broad-ranging volume, the contributors explore the intriguing connections among the many legal systems at stake. They have produced a tantalizing blend of analytical depth and geographical breadth.’
    – J. Mark Ramseyer, Harvard Law School, US

    Legal Innovations in Asia explores how law in Asia has developed over time as a result of judicial interpretation and innovations drawn from the legal systems of foreign countries.

    Expert scholars from around the world offer a history of law in the region while also providing a wider context for present-day Asian law. The contributors share insightful perspectives on comparative law, the role of courts, legal transplants, intellectual property, Islamic law and other issues as they relate to the practice and study of law in Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea and Southeast Asia.

    Students and scholars of Asian law will find this a timely and fascinating read, as will legal practitioners and colleagues of the Asian Law Center.

    2014 392 pp Hardback 978 1 78347 278 9 Regular Price £95.00  Web Price £85.50 ebook 978 1 78347 279 6

    Studies in Comparative Law and Legal Culture series

    Ebooks from £13.00 for monographs and £36.90 for handbooks are available on Google and Ebooks.com. Prices vary due to retailer discount and local tax.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    CONFERENCE: "LE DROIT ET LA DUREE : UNE APPROCHE CRITIQUE…"

    Juris Diversitas - ven, 11/21/2014 - 09:26
    SÉMINAIRE INTERNATIONAL "LE DROIT ET LA DUREE : UNE APPROCHE CRITIQUE…"Laboratoire CERC - Jeudi 27 novembre 2014 Campus de Toulon Porte d’Italie
    « Il faut bien attendre que le sucre fonde »Dans l’œuvre de Bergson la durée est cette conscience qui, par le biais de l’intuition, appréhende le temps à partir d’une prise de conscience immédiate. Pour que certaine choses se fassent il faut du temps, certes, mais pas uniquement ce temps extérieur de la science il est aussi nécessaire que cette chose se diffère en qualité. En ce sens, la durée intérieure est une durée qualitative et un progrès… La durée est ainsi ce progrès continu du passé qui ronge l’avenir et qui gonfle en avançant. Cette durée qui fait boule de neige dans notre perception du temps permet ainsi d’associer, d’une part, la matière qui se déroule du passé vers le futur sous une forme déterministe et d’autre part, la vie qui quant à elle est indétermination et ouvre le présent à l’avenir. On le comprend cette question de la durée ouvre à l’égard du droit un champ complexe d’interrogations : le droit privilégie t-il la durée ou l’évènement ? Comment le droit s’inscrit-il dans la vie d’une société ? Comment parvient-il également à s’inscrire dans une conscience sous une forme intuitive ?Cette question inhérente à la relation entre droit et durée est elle différente selon les systèmes juridiques ? Par ailleurs cette relation est-elle nécessaire à la construction d’une ontologie du droit ?C’est à ces interrogations que la journée du 27 sera consacrée.
    Dans ce but nous suivrons durant deux demi-journées des cours qui, dans un premier temps, nous permettrons de nous familiariser avec le droit anglo saxon et certaines de ces institutions qui s’inscrivent manifestement dans la durée (matinée du 27 novembre).
    • Les professeurs D. MARRANI de l’Institut of Law de Jersey et Claire DE THAN de London city University chercheront à démontrer la forme d’institutionnalisation qui est présente dans le droit anglo-saxon en traitant successivement de l’institutionnalisation de la Common Law et du Trust comme institution au sein du droit anglo-saxon.
    • Le professeur Sean DONLAN (University of Limerick) quant à lui intervenant comme historien et philosophe du droit nous permettra de réfléchir à la pérennité des juridictions mixte dans la durée…
    Enfin, l’après midi du 27 novembre sera consacrée à l’étude critique de cette relation entre droit et durée et ceci avec deux cours dispensés par :
    • Les professeur MELKEVIK de l’Université Laval et le professeur qui remettra en cause la relation entre le droit et la durée au bénéfice de l’instant et de l’évènement ;
    • Le professeur G. LHUILLIER de l’ENS Rennes remettra en cause la relation entre le droit et la durée au bénéfice du « rapport » et du « lieu » : Le droit transnational permet d’introduire très simplement aux questions de « relativité » de mesure du temps et de l’espace et donc à leur subjectivité. Apparait alors l’actuelle mutation des relations entre le temps et l’espace dans le droit et notamment le décentrement de sa « relativité », de l’institution vers le sujet. Des exemples très concrets seront pris dans les objets décrit le matin, -les trusts et les juridictions mixtes- pour illustrer ces mutations de la durée dans le droit.
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

    CONFERENCE: "Police et Justice: Le noeud gordien Du temps des Lumières à l’État libéral (1750-1850)" (Geneva, 20-22 November 2014)


    WHAT: Police et Justice: Le noeud gordien Du temps des Lumières à l’État libéral (1750-1850), Conference
    WHERE: University of Geneve - Faculty of Literature - Unité d'Histoire Moderne / Damoclès, Uni Bastions, B 111
    WHEN: 20-22 November 2014

    Program
    20 novembre 20149h. - Accueil9h30. - Mot de bienvenue: Christine CHAPPUIS, doyenne de la Fac. de droit (Uni. de Genève)9h45. - Introduction au colloque: Marco CICCHINI, Michel PORRET (Uni. de Genève)10h15. - SÉANCE 1. POLICE ET JUSTICE: L’EMBOÎTEMENT (I)Présidence de séance: Vincent Milliot (Uni. de Caen)
    • Les abus de pouvoir de José Conejo, alcalde de barrio à Mexico à la fin du XVIIIe siècle, Arnaud EXBALIN (Casa de Velázquez, Madrid)
    • Policier le matin et juge l’après-midi: l’imbrication des fonctions de police et justice à Lisbonne sous l’Ancien Régime,Flávio BORDA D’ÁGUA (Uni. de Genève)
    • Justice et police dans l’Espagne des Lumières: le cas des "alcaldes de barrio" de Valladolid, Lourdes AMIGO VÁZQUEZ (Uni. de Murcia)
    12h15. - Déjeuner14h. - SÉANCE 2. POLICE ET JUSTICE : L’EMBOÎTEMENT (II)Présidence de séance: Marco Cicchini
    • Du délit à la peine: les policiers du Tribunal de Police de Marseille dans le processus pénal (seconde moitié du XVIIIe siècle)Audrey ROSANIA (Uni. d’Aix-Marseille)
    • Juges et policiers. De la fondation de la Royale audience d’Estrémadure à l’établissement de la Surintendance Générale de la Police (1790-1824)Miguel Ángel MELÓN (Uni. de Extremadura), Gregorio SALINERO (Uni. de Paris-1)
    • Les "Capitanes pedáneos", juges et policiers à Cuba (1765-1851), François GODICHEAU (Uni. de Bordeaux, IUF)
    15h30. - Pause
    16h. - SÉANCE 3. CRIMES ET DÉSORDRES SOUS L’OEIL DE LA POLICE (I)Présidence de séance : Michel Porret
    • La répression du vol nocturne à Genève vers 1750: les efforts conjoints de la police et de la
    • justice pour l’établissement de la "sûreté publique", Lucie BUTTEX (Uni. de Genève)
    • Criminalisation de la contrebande: fiscalité, police et justice de l’Ancien Régime à la Révolution française, Michael KWASS (Johns Hopkins University)
    • Dénouer le noeud gordien ? Justice et police dans l’Essai sur les lettres de cachet de Chrétien-Guillaume Lamoignon de Malesherbes, Vincent DENIS (Uni. de Paris-1, IUF)

    18h. - CONFÉRENCE
    • From a concept to an institution: "Police" in Europe 1750-1850, Clive EMSLEY (Open University)
    19h15. - Buffet
    Vendredi 21 novembre 2015
    9h. - SÉANCE 4. CRIMES ET DÉSORDRES SOUS L’OEIL DE LA POLICE (II)Présidence de séance: Elisabeth Salvi (Uni. de Genève)
    • La police judiciaire à l’épreuve du "banditisme" sous la Révolution et l’Empire: l’affaire des garotteurs de la Dyle,Xavier ROUSSEAUX (Uni. catholique de Louvain)
    • "Veiller les malfaiteurs pour éventer le crime". Le préfet, la police judiciaire et la répression du brigandage sous l’Empire, Vincent FONTANA (Uni. de Genève)
    • Police administrative, justice préventive? Sens et usages du délit de vagabondage en France (1815 1850), Pierre GAUME (EHESS)
    10h30. - Pause
    10h50. - SÉANCE 5. CRIMES ET DÉSORDRES SOUS L’OEIL DE LA POLICE (III)Présidence: Alessandro Pastore (Uni. di Verona)
    • "En ma qualité de lieutenant de police, il etoit de mon devoir de chercher les causes… ». La naissance de l’enquête policière à Namur, 1769-1793, Antoine RENGLET (Uni. de Lille-3)
    • Les inspecteurs de la sûreté ou "l’invention pratique" de la police judiciaire dans le Paris des LumièresVincent MILLIOT, Rachel COUTURE (UQAM)
    • Enquêtes de police et ouverture de la procédure judiciaire. Le rôle des curés dans le Tribunal du Vicaire de Rome pendant la Restauration, Chiara LUCREZIO MONTICELLI (Deutsches Historisches Institut, Roma)
    12h30. - Déjeuner
    14h15. - SÉANCE 6. RÉFORME ET AUTONOMIE DE LA POLICEPrésidence de séance: Catherine Denys (Uni. de Lille-3)
    • Agir avec justice et pour la justice: le cas des agents de la Lieutenance de police dans la deuxième moitié du XVIIIe siècle, Nicolas VIDONI (Uni. d’Aix-Marseille)
    • La mort d’une magistrature: le cas du Tribunal de santé du Duché de Milan, Livio ANTONIELLI (Uni. di Milano)
    • Réformes de police et magistratures de justice en Italie (1770-1800)Brigitte MARIN (Uni. d’Aix-Marseille)
    • L’expérience dramatique de Luigi De Medici, chef de la police napolitaine (1791-1795), Giorgia ALESSI (Uni. di Napoli)
    16h. - Pause
    16h20. - SÉANCE 7. LA SÉPARATION DES POUVOIRS EN QUESTIONPrésidence de séance: Fabrice Brandli (Uni. de Genève)
    • Situare la polizia: i dilemmi dello Stato italico (1796-1814),Simona MORI (Uni. di Bergamo)
    • La garantie judiciaire dans la procédure des visites domiciliaires: un principe à l’épreuve des faits de police (1795-1835)Loris CHAVANETTE (Uni. de Paris Est Créteil)
    • Polizia, giustizia, costituzioni nel Triennio repubblicano. Il caso della CisalpinaMichele SIMONETTO (EHESS)
    • Régime des droits vs utilité publique. Justice, police et administration, France–Grande-Bretagne, 1750-1850, Thomas LE ROUX (Maison française d’Oxford/EHESS)
    20h. - Dîner du colloque
    Samedi 22 novembre 2014
    9h. - SÉANCE 8. HAUTE POLICE ET JUSTICEPrésidence de séance: Jean-Marc Berlière (Uni. de Bourgogne/CESDIP)
    • La haute police impériale (1799-1815): quand la police s’affranchit de la justice?Jeanne-Laure LE QUANG (Uni. Paris-1)
    • Le juge, le préfet et l’acquitté: la justice pénale face aux mesures de haute police sous le Consulat et l’Empire,Emmanuel BERGER (Uni. de Namur)
    • Police ou justice? La qualification juridique des infractions ‘politiques’ dans la Modène de la première moitié du XIXe siècleElio TAVILLA (Uni. di Modena)
    10h30. - Pause
    10h45. - CONCLUSIONS DU COLLOQUE, René LÉVY (CESDIP)12h15. - Déjeuner de clôture
    Organisation
    • Marco CICCHINI (Uni. de Genève, Damoclès)
    • Vincent DENIS (Uni. de Paris 1, Syspoe)
    • Vincent MILLIOT (Uni. de Caen, Syspoe)
    • Michel PORRET (Uni. de Genève, Damoclès)
    Comité scientifique
    • Livio ANTONIELLI (Uni. di Milano), Pascal BASTIEN (UQAM)
    • Jean-Marc BERLIÈRE (Uni. de Bourgogne/CESDIP)
    • Frédéric CHAUVAUD (Uni. de Poitiers), Catherine DENYS (Uni. de Lille 3)
    • Clive EMSLEY (The Open University)
    • Paul FRIEDLAND (Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University)
    • Donald FYSON (Uni. Laval, Québec)
    • Karl HÄRTER (Max-Planck-Institute für europäische Rechtsgeschichte)
    • Anja JOHANSEN (Uni. of Dundee)
    • René LÉVY (CESDIP)
    • Brigitte MARIN (Uni. d’Aix-Marseille)
    • Alessandro PASTORE (Uni. di Verona)
    • Xavier ROUSSEAUX (Uni. catholique de Louvain).
    Avec le soutien de:
    • École doctorale Archives des Lumières 
    • Maison de l’histoire (Unige)
    • Faculté des lettres
    • Département d’histoire générale
    • Fonds national suisse de la recherche scientifique (FNS)
    • Commission administrative (Unige)
    • Société académique de Genève
    Contact:Source: http://syspoe.hypotheses.org/410
    Catégories: Comparative Law News

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