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Comparative Law News

SEMINAR: "Droit et littérature. La norme entre commandement et récit" (Paris, 4 March - 10 June 2014)


What: "Droit et littérature. La norme entre commandement et récit", series of meetings organized by Emanuele Coccia and Michele Spanò
Where: École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Centre d'études des norme juridiques Yan Thomas (CENJ), Salle 10, 105 boulevard Raspail, 75006, Paris
When: every Tuesday, from 4 March to 10 June, 3:00-5:00 pm
All information here


Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Morin on "Fraternité, Souveraineté Et Autonomie Des Autochtones En Nouvelle-France (Fraternity, Sovereignty and Autonomy of Aboriginal Peoples in New France)"


Legal History e-Journal
Michel Morin, University of Montreal, "Fraternité, Souveraineté Et Autonomie Des Autochtones En Nouvelle-France (Fraternity, Sovereignty and Autonomy of Aboriginal Peoples in New France)"
Abstract:During the 17th and 18th centuries, the legal principles which formed the framework for relationships between the Algonquians peoples of the Saint-Lawrence Valley and the French were generally well understood by both parties. Founded initially on the concepts of friendship, alliance or fraternity, they assumed the existence of independent nations which had their own decisional systems and customs, as well as local or regional chiefs enjoying strong authority in practice. From 1628 to 1663, only new converts were granted the status of subject of the French king; from 1664 to 1674, only their descendents qualified. Afterward, the situation was ambiguous. However, Christian communities living close to the French cities enjoyed a wide autonomy and seldom renounced it. They were sometimes called children of the king, because they unconditionally supported him at the military level. During the second half of the 17th century, nations which had not become Christian also bestowed paternal status on the French king, but this socio-economic dependency did not call into question their independence, something the French understood very well.
Full text available here
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Morin on "The discovery and Assimilation of British Constitutional Law Principles in Quebec, 1764-1774)"


Legal History e-Journal
Michel Morin, University of Montreal,"The discovery and Assimilation of British Constitutional Law Principles in Quebec, 1764-1774)"
Abstract
This paper examines information available to Francophone persons regarding their rights as British subjects prior to the adoption of the 1774 Quebec Act, as well as the use they made of these concepts. The bilingual Quebec Gazette reported on legal developments in France, England, and the American colonies, including challenges to the traditional vision of governmental authority. It discussed the right to be taxed by elected representatives and the conflicts between the metropolis and the colonies. Debates about these issues are thought to have appeared in Quebec only after the beginning of the American Revolution, but they circulated earlier. Educated members of the Francophone elite sought more specific information about the new legal system. Many of them were eager to obtain an Assembly, if Catholics could sit in it. This was considered one of their rights as British subjects, together with the continuation of property rights guaranteed by the Capitulation of 1760 and, by extension, inheritance and matrimonial laws. In the end, requests for an assembly were shelved in order to obtain religious equality. Thus, British officials were free to declare that Canadians had no interest in such an institution, creating a lasting and misleading impression.
Full text available here
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: The Discourse of Political Constitutionalism in Contemporary China

Juris Diversitas - mer, 2014-03-19 14:32
Albert H. Y. Chen's article "The Discourse of Political Constitutionalism in Contemporary China"  in the Legal History eJournal is now available on SSRN.
The discourse of “political constitutionalism” that emerged in China a few years ago is of considerable scholarly value, and is likely to have impact on the development of Chinese constitutional thought in the longer term. This article discusses the discourse of political constitutionalism in contemporary China by introducing and commenting on the scholarship of Professor Gao Quanxi, the leading theorist of political constitutionalism in China today. The article begins by providing readers with some basic information about modern Chinese constitutional history and the constitutional systems that are in force in mainland China (the People’s Republic of China) and Taiwan (the Republic of China) today. The article then describes the main features of Gao Quanxi’s studies on political constitutionalism. The article concludes by reflecting and commenting on Gao’s scholarship.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Genealogical Analysis of Islamic Law Books Relied on in the Courts of Pakistan

Juris Diversitas - mer, 2014-03-19 14:31
Islamic Law and Law of the Muslim World eJournal has published an article  "Genealogical Analysis of Islamic Law Books Relied on in the Courts of Pakistan" by Shahbaz Ahmad Cheema and Samee Uzair Khan.  It is available on SSRN.


The article explains the significant positive impact the World Trade Organization (WTO) could have on the Middle East and international trade globally, but the struggle Middle Eastern countries are having in their accessions to the WTO. There is a comparison within the article, between Middle Eastern Countries that have acceded to the WTO and Middle Eastern Countries that have been the accession process for many years with very little progress in gaining membership. The article makes suggestions on how the Middle Eastern Countries stuck in the accession process can advance by following in their neighbors’ steps, as well as, why current WTO members should support Middle Eastern Countries’ accession, due to the vast benefits membership would reap bringing about peace, security, and solidarity.

Catégories: Comparative Law News

SEMINAR: "La révolution et l’exception : exception à la règle et exception dans la règle" (Paris, 20 March 2014)



What: Séminaires Norma, séminaire du sous-projet Connaître la Loi sous l’Ancien Régime (CLAR) sur « La révolution et l’exception: exception à la règle et exception dans la règle »
Where: 105, bd. Raspail, Paris (6e), salle 1
When: 20 March 2014, 5:00-7:00 pm
All information here
 
 Speakers: Yann-Arzel Durelle-Marc, Maître de Conférences en Histoire du droit, Université de Franche Comté
Catégories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Robert Jacob on the judiciary and the sacred (Le grâce des juges. L'institution judiciaire et le sacré en Occident, Paris, PUF, 2014)



Prof. Robert Jacob (ULg/USL/CNRS) just published his new book La grâce des juges. L'institution judiciaire et le sacré en Occident at the Presses Universitaires de France.

The publisher presents the work as follows:

Comment  comprendre  le  halo  de  sacralité  qui  entoure  aujourd’hui  encore  la  pratique  de  la  justice  ?  Comment  s’explique le fossé qui sépare la conception de la fonction de juger en Occident et dans d’autres cultures, comme celle de la Chine ? Quelle est l’origine de l’écart qui s’est creusé entre les justices de common law et celles de l’Europe continentale, jusque dans la construction de la vérité judiciaire ?
À ces questions, ce livre cherche des réponses dans l’histoire  des  articulations  entre  justices  humaines  et  justice  divine au sein même de la pratique des procès. En Occident, elles sont passées par deux phases. La première fut d’instrumentalisation. La christianisation des ordalies permettait  de solliciter directement de Dieu le jugement des causes. 
La seconde fut d’imitation. À partir du Moyen Âge central, les hommes allaient assumer seuls la charge du jugement.
Mais jamais ils ne perdirent de vue l’exigence de perfection que leur imposait la référence à l’idéal d’une justice absolue.
L’ouvrage entreprend de dénouer les fils de cette histoire, en même temps qu’il l’éclaire du dehors en l’inscrivant dans une ample anthropologie comparative des rituels judiciaires.
Catégories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Morin on "Blackstone and the Birth of Quebec's Legal Culture 1765-1867"

Legal History e-Journal, March 2014, vol. 18 n. 29
Michel Morin, University of Montreal, "Blackstone and the Birth of Quebec's Legal Culture 1765-1867"
Abstract:      
Blackstone’s commentaries were soon translated in French and became, prior to the French Revolution, the principal reference on British constitutional and criminal law. In Quebec, his work was known as early as 1767 and was used to buttress arguments for the preservation of French civil law. He was quoted in court proceedings and in a draft petition. In 1773, François-Joseph Cugnet sent documents concerning these issues to Blackstone, who forwarded them to the British Government. This probably convinced the ministry that the francophone population had no objection to English Criminal Law and to testamentary freedom. Thus, the Quebec Act of 1774 expressly preserved these parts of English Law, while restoring the laws in force prior to the Conquest concerning “Property and Civil Rights”. French versions of the Commentaries were available in Quebec as early as 1784. After the creation of an Assembly, politicians who opposed the Government and wanted to assimilate the provincial Assembly to the British House of Commons regularly quoted Blackstone. His Commentaries, which had benefitted from an improved translation by Chompré in 1822, remained a model for the first legal authors in Quebec. He clearly was part of Quebec’s legal culture and facilitated the understanding of arcane rules of English Law, both because of the clarity of his writings and of various translations of his work made in Europe.
Full text available here
Catégories: Comparative Law News