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CONFERENCE: The Present and the Future of Jus Cogens

Juris Diversitas - Tue, 2014-04-29 01:36

Law School of Sapienza University of Rome organizes a conference in honor of Gaetano Morelli Lectures 1st Edition with title The Present and the Future of Jus Cogens. The conference will take place at 29, 30 and 31 May 2014 in Legal Science Department of  Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome.

Programme

THURSDAY, 29 MAY 2014
2.30 pm - Commencement Addresses
ENZO CANNIZZARO, Professor of International and European Law, Sapienza University of Rome
GIORGIO GAJA (to be confirmed), Judge, International Court of Justice, The Hague
ANDREA TIRITICCO, Head of the Legal Office, Ministry of Foreign Affaires, Rome
3.00 pm - The Emergence of the Notion of Jus Cogens: the Contribution of the ICJ
PIERRE-MARIE DUPUY, Professor of Public
International Law, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva - Emeritus Professor Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris
5.00 pm - Jus Cogens and the UN Security Council
CHRISTIAN TOMUSCHAT, Emeritus Professor of Public International Law and European Law, Humboldt University, Belin

FRIDAY, 30 MAY 2014
9.00 am - Jus Cogens and the UN Security Council
CHRISTIAN TOMUSCHAT, Emeritus Professor of Public International Law and European Law, Humboldt University, Belin
11.00 am - The Emergence of the Notion of Jus Cogens: the Contribution of the ICJ
PIERRE-MARIE DUPUY, Professor of Public
International Law, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva - Emeritus Professor Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris

SATURDAY, 31 MAY 2014
9.00 am - The Emergence of the Notion of Jus Cogens: the Contribution of the ICJ
PIERRE-MARIE DUPUY, Professor of Public
International Law, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva - Emeritus Professor Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris
11.00 am - Interactive Seminar Consequences of serious breaches of Jus Cogens
ENZO CANNIZZARO, Professor of International and European Law, Sapienza University of Rome
PAOLO PALCHETTI, Professor of International Law, University of Macerata
BEATRICE I. BONAFE', Associate Professor of Public International Law, Sapienza University of Rome


Official program is here.
Categories: Comparative Law News

CONFERENCE: Investor-State Arbitration and Beyond

Juris Diversitas - Tue, 2014-04-29 01:03






Britinsh Institute of International and Comparative Law is announced 22nd ITF Public Conference Investor-State Arbitration and Beyond at Thursday 8 May 2014, 8:30 - 17:30 in BMA House, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9 JP.

This meeting proceeds from the observation of a period of unprecedented re-examination and innovation with respect to the dispute settlement aspects of the investor-state treaty regime. The purpose of this meeting is to address some of the most important policy and rule changes which have taken place over the past several years and ask about changes and new structures currently under consideration.


Keynote Address
"The Tokyo Resolution of the Institut de Droit International on Investment Treaty Arbitration"
Professor Andrea Giardina, Chiomenti Studio Legale; University of Rome (Sapienza)
Panel 1: Alternatives to Ad Hoc Dispute Settlement. This panel will look at proposals and mechanisms for alternatives to "ad hoc" arbitral tribunals, such as the use of specialised dispute settlement mechanisms for particular classes of claims, treaty-based interpretative committees, and the use of treaty-based appellate mechanisms.Anne van Aaken, University St Gallen
Bart Legum, Dentons
Ted Posner, Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP
Yanick Radi, University of Leiden
Christoph Schreuer, University of Vienna
Panel 2: Beyond Arbitration. This panel will consider the adoption by some states of domestic legislation to replace investment treaties and the future of ISDS in investment treaties between developed states, such as the US and EU.Mark Kantor, Indipendant Arbitrator
Mark McNeill, Shearman & Sterling
Rodrigo Polanco, University of Chile; World Trade Institute
Christian Vidal-Leon, Price Waterhouse Coopers
Jason Yackee, University of Wisconsin
Panel 3: Making the Most of Current Processes. This panel will look at recent changes to existing investor-state arbitral structures, such as UNCITRAL's new rules on transparency, innovations in mediation practice, and the role of treaty secretariat's as potential engines for reform.Alejandro Carballo, Energy Charter Secretariat
Jean Kalicki, Arnold & Porter; Georgetown University
Wolf von Kumberg, Northrup Grumman Corporation
Julia Salasky, UNCITRAL Secretariat
Closing Remarks
N Jansen Calamita, Investment Treaty Forum
Details here.
Categories: Comparative Law News

SEMINAR: "The Use of the Glossators and Commentators by Jacques Cujas (1522-1590): A Humanist Criticism of the Medieval Jurisprudence” (Edinburgh, 2 May 2014)


What: "The Use of the Glossators and Commentators by Jacques Cujas (1522-1590): A Humanist Criticism of the Medieval Jurisprudence", Alan Watson Seminar in Legal History
Where: Lorimer Room, Old College, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh
When: 2 May 2014, 5:30 p.m.

Speakers:
Dr. Xavier Prévost, Sorbonne Law School (Université Paris I) - Ecole nationale des Chartes, Paris
Categories: Comparative Law News

LECTURE: Hendry on Legal Comparison and Translation

Juris Diversitas - Wed, 2014-04-23 04:04
The Centre for Criminal Justiceof the University of Limerickinvites you to a seminar on:
Legal comparison and the (im)possibility of legal translation Dr Jen Hendry (University of Leeds School of Law)
Wednesday, 23 April 20143:30 pm, Board Room, Plassey House ALL WELCOME
Described as both the 'mantra and the bête noire of contemporary comparative law' (Michaels, 2006), the functional approach to comparative law has increasingly become a 'marmite' approach within comparative legal research. This (once mainstream) positivistic approach to identifying similar legal features and operations across legal orders has been challenged by many comparatists who question both the desirability and possibility of such 'translation-based’ undertakings, and who prefer a 'contextual' or law-in-context approach, characterised by a focus on context, culture and episteme. This presentation argues that translation is a key issue in this methodological debate, not only in terms of the focus and content of comparative law but also the way in which it informs and frames the debate at second-order level.
Dr Jen Hendry is a lecturer in Jurisprudence at the University of Leeds School of Law and the Deputy Director of the Centre for European Law and Legal Studies.

Enquiries to: sean.donlan@ul.ie
Categories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Jean Salmon, Droit international et argumentation (Bruxelles: Bruylant, 2014)



(source: International Law Reporter)

Prof. em. Jean Salmon (Université libre de Bruxelles) published a collection of 20 articles on argumentation and international law. Althought this seems to concern prima facie legal theory in the strict sense, Salmon positions his book in the tradition of Chaïm Perelman. Reflections on legal order, judicial motivation and interpretation can be useful to comparative legal historians as well.

Abstract (in French):
L’ouvrage rassemble une vingtaine d’articles que Jean Salmon a écrits au cours des années et qui se consacrent à la place et au rôle de l’argumentation en droit international.
Ces réflexions se situent à la croisée des enseignements du philosophe Chaïm Perelman sur la rhétorique et ceux de l’internationaliste Charles Chaumont sur les contradictions en droit international.
Le droit entend conformer les faits d’existence à du devoir être ; il le fait par un langage, exprimé dans le cadre d’un système et d’institutions, qui, elles-mêmes sont dominées par les contradictions entre les valeurs et les aspirations des États, créateurs par leurs volonté commune ou antagonistes des règles qui les gouvernent.
L’ordre juridique qui en résulte n’est ni clos, ni complet ; il est lacunaire, permet l’esquive. Il est fondé fréquemment sur un langage ambigu, faisant une place importante aux notions confuses La solution des antinomies n’est pas aisée en raison de l’absence d’hiérarchie entre les règles ou entre les organes chargés de les résoudre.
La qualification unilatérale reste majoritaire, l’idéologie affichée ou occultée dominante. Dans un tel contexte, l’argumentation, quoique soumise à ces contraintes et aux rapports de force, est présente à chaque moment de la vie du droit : sa création, son interprétation, son application au cas concret ou son évolution. L’identification de l’auditoire que l’on désire convaincre, le choix des arguments susceptibles d’y parvenir sont essentiels. Néanmoins, la prétention que le raisonnement juridique est présidé par le syllogisme judiciaire est largement illusoire. La motivation du juge international, essentielle pour régler les conflits, étant elle-même une argumentation qui doit convaincre, est un exercice d’autant plus délicat.
Link to the publisher's website.
Categories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Daniel M. Klerman, "Economic Analysis of Legal History"

(source: Legal History Blog)

Daniel M. Klerman (USC Law School) published "Economic Analysis of Legal History" on SSRN, to be published in a forthcoming work on Methodologies of Law and Economics

Abstract:
This essay surveys economic analyses of legal history. In order to make sense of the field and to provide examples that might guide and inspire future research, it identifies and discusses five genres of scholarship.

Law as the dependent variable. This genre tries to explain why societies have the laws they do and why laws change over time. Early economic analysis tended to assume that law was efficient, while later scholars have usually adopted more realistic models of judicial and legislative behavior that take into account interest groups, institutions, and transactions costs.

Law as an independent variable. Studies of this kind look at the effect of law and legal change on human behavior. Examples include analyses of the Glorious Revolution, legal origin, and nineteenth-century women’s rights legislation.

Bidirectional histories. Studies in the first two genres analyze law as either cause or effect. In contrast, bidirectional histories view law and society as interacting in dynamic ways over time. Laws change society, but change in society in turn leads to pressure to change the law, which starts the cycle over again. So, for example, the medieval communal responsibility system fostered international trade by holding traders from the same city or region collectively responsible. Nevertheless, the increase in commerce fostered by the system undermined the effectiveness of collective responsibility and put pressure on cities and nations to develop alternative enforcement institutions.

Private ordering. A significant body of historical work investigates the ability of groups to develop norms and practices partly or wholly independently of the state. Such norms include rules relating whaling, the governance of pirate ships, and, more controversially, medieval commercial law (the “law merchant”).

Litigation and Contracts. Law and economics has developed an impressive body of theories relating to litigation and the structure of contracts. These theories often shed light on legal behavior in former times, including contracts between slave ship owners and captains, and the suit and settlement decisions of medieval private prosecutors.
Categories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Legal Modernity and Early Amerindian Laws

Juris Diversitas - Tue, 2014-04-15 10:21
The Indigenous Nations & Peoples Law eJournal has published "Legal Modernity and Early Amerindian Laws" by William Conklin. It is now available on SSRN.

This essay claims that the violence characterizing the 20th century has been coloured by the clash of two very different senses of legal authority. These two senses of legal authority correspond with two very different contexts of civil violence: state secession and the violence characterizing a challenge to a state-centric legal authority. Conklin argues that the modern legal authority represents a quest for a source or foundation. Such a sense of legal authority, according to Conklin, clashes such a view with the unwritten laws of early Amerindian traditional societies. Conklin argues further that by arguing that the Amerindian sense of legal authority has been concealed in the dominant modern sense of legal authority.
Categories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Advanced Introduction To Comparative Constitutional Law

Juris Diversitas - Tue, 2014-04-15 10:20
Edward Elgar Publishing has recently published Advanced Introduction To Comparative Constitutional Law by Mark Tushnet.

Description Elgar Advanced Introductions are stimulating and thoughtful introductions to major fields in the social sciences and law, expertly written by some of the world’s leading scholars. Designed to be accessible yet rigorous, they offer concise and lucid surveys of the substantive and policy issues associated with discrete subject areas.

Mark Tushnet, a world-renowned scholar of constitutional law, presents an introduction to comparative constitutional law through an analysis of topics at the cutting-edge of contemporary scholarship. His authoritative study investigates constitution making, including the problem of unconstitutional constitutional amendments; recent developments in forms of constitutional review, including ‘the battle of the courts’; proportionality analysis and its alternatives; and the emergence of a new ‘transparency’ branch in constitutions around the world. Throughout, the book draws upon examples from a wide range of nations, demonstrating that the field of comparative constitutional law now truly encompasses the world.

Contents

Contents: Introduction 1. Constitution-Making 2. The Structures of Constitutional Review and Some Implications for Substantive Constitutional Law 3. The Structure of Rights Analysis: Proportionality, Rules, and International Law 4. The Structure of Government Conclusion Index
Categories: Comparative Law News

WORKSHOP: Workshop on Malinowski

Juris Diversitas - Tue, 2014-04-15 10:19
 The Commission on Legal Pluralism has announced a workshop on “Malinowski’s Concept of Law from the Native’s Point of View.”
Bronislaw Malinowski’s 130th Birth Anniversary International Workshop. Time: 12-13 September, 2014. Place: Cracow (Poland). Organizers: Department of Sociology of Law, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland) and International Institute for the Sociology of Law, Oñati (Spain). Participants are invited to send for information about participation in and to submit a short (300 word) abstract of the paper by 1 June 2014. For more information:
Workshop Overview
Kaspar Bronislaw Malinowski (1884-1942) does not need special introduction. A lot has been written about his achievements as a “founding father” of the new paradigm of social/cultural anthropology, cofounder of mature functionalism (defined as a specific kind of social theory, as well as a particular method of scientific analysis) and the participant-observer technique. Malinowski’s views on religion, magic, totemism and culture occupy prominent place within the social sciences. Against this background, his writings on the (primitive) law are being less noticed and less discussed. His concept of law hasn’t been fully recapitulated yet. The Bronislaw Malinowski’s 130th Birth Anniversary is an excellent occasion for making critical evaluation of his legal concepts. Cracow –the town where he was born and grown up –seems to be perfect place for this event. The aim of the workshop is to create a discursive space for researchers interested in Malinowski’s views on the law. The papers presented on workshop could be concentrated on following topics: (1) the problem of dynamics of his legal thought, (2) the relationship between his and others conceptions and works (eg. Petrazycki’s), (3) the type of legal functionalism established by Malinowski, (4) his biological-based view on legal phenomena, (5)influence of his legal concepts on anthropology and legal science, (6) use of participant-observer technique to study legal institutions, (7) relation between modernism (Mloda Polska) and Malinowsi’s ideas. There are only examples of potential areas of the planned workshop. We invite all scholars interested in Malinowski’s thought as well as in application of his ideas to participate in the workshop and in this way pay intellectual homage to him.The workshop fee is 50 EUR. dr Mateusz Stęień email –
mateusz.stepien@uj.edu.pl



Categories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Anthropology and Law as Two Sibling Rivals

Juris Diversitas - Tue, 2014-04-15 10:05
ARTICLE: Anthropology and Law as Two Sibling Rivals

The Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal has published "Anthropology and Law as Two Sibling Rivals" by George Emile Bisharat. It is now available on SSRN.

This lecture discusses the relationship between two academic disciplines, law and anthropology, and suggests that the optimal relationship is, on the one hand, competitive and conflictual, and on the other hand, mutually respectful and supportive — something like the relationship between two sibling rivals. The conflictual aspects of this relationship derive from the different orientations of the two fields — instrumental for law, speculative for anthropology — and the fact that anthropology, based on long-term ethnography, often challenges and subverts law’s claims to distinctive authority. The positive aspects of the relationship build on the possibilities that each field can genuinely assist the other, as anthropological understanding can be extremely useful to lawyers, while lawyers are often the legal system’s most astute observers and critics, and thus can provide anthropologists with invaluable insights into the actual operations of legal systems. These points are illustrated through references to the author’s fieldwork in Palestine and legal practice experience in the United States.
Categories: Comparative Law News

NOTICE: SIHDA 2014 website


The website of the Société Internationale Fernand De Visscher pour l'Histoire des Droits de l'Antiquité-SIHDA 2014 is now active and operational for the registration and the first practical information at the following web address.


Categories: Comparative Law News

WORKSHOP: Recent Research in the History of Public International Law (Ghent, 23 May 2014)


On 23 May 2014, the Ghent Legal History Institute organizes a workshop on recent research in the history of public international law. 
Whereas legal history has traditionally mostly been that of private law, recent decades saw the emergence of separate journals and book series devoted to the study of other branches, such as the history of the law nations. The meeting has been set up at the crossroads between legal history, public international law and diplomatic history. Researchers from Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Germany will present their activities to qualified peers. Starting in the Early Modern Period and running up to the First World War, a representative array of sub-fields within public international law will be considered: the law of treaties, maritime law, legal theory, the laws of war or neutrality. Prof. Randall Lesaffer, an international authority in the field, will comment and conclude the day. 
Participation is free of charge, but registration is mandatory. Please contact Mrs. Karin Pensaert (Karin.Pensaert@UGent.be).

The program, platform text and bio-bibliographical information on the speakers can be found here.
Categories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Prof. George Emile Bisharat on Anthropology and Law as Two Sibling Rivals

Juris Diversitas - Wed, 2014-04-09 08:55
Prof. George Emile Bisharat of University of California Hastings College of the Law on Anthropology and Law as Two Sibling Rivals
 Abstract:  This lecture discusses the relationship between two academic disciplines, law and anthropology, and suggests that the optimal relationship is, on the one hand, competitive and conflictual, and on the other hand, mutually respectful and supportive — something like the relationship between two sibling rivals. The conflictual aspects of this relationship derive from the different orientations of the two fields — instrumental for law, speculative for anthropology — and the fact that anthropology, based on long-term ethnography, often challenges and subverts law’s claims to distinctive authority. The positive aspects of the relationship build on the possibilities that each field can genuinely assist the other, as anthropological understanding can be extremely useful to lawyers, while lawyers are often the legal system’s most astute observers and critics, and thus can provide anthropologists with invaluable insights into the actual operations of legal systems. These points are illustrated through references to the author’s fieldwork in Palestine and legal practice experience in the United States.
Categories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Sir Geoffrey Palmer QC on The hazard of making Constitutions: some Reflections on Comparative Constitutional Law

Juris Diversitas - Wed, 2014-04-09 04:45
The Hazard of making constitutions: some reflections on Comparative Constitutional LawRoles and Perspectives in New Zealand Law: Essays in Honour of Sir Ivor Richardson, David Carter and Matthew Palmer, eds., 2002 (Victoria University of wellington Legal Research Paper Series Palmer Paper No. 4) by Geoffrey Palmer QC, Victoria University of Wellington
Email: geoffrey.palmer@vuw.ac.nz 
Abstract:The organisers of this Conference invited the author to contribute a paper on making constitutions, which drew on his perspectives as a lawyer, academic, and former politician. A number of the observations flow from his experience practicing exclusively in the field of public law, of dealing with governments on a variety of issues on behalf of clients and seeing, on a daily basis, the subtleties, complexities, and mutations that occur constantly within the New Zealand system of government. The second strand of the paper comes from teaching comparative constitutional law in the United States of America, concentrating upon a comparison of the Westminster system and congressional government, or in the more modern characterisation, presidential government as practised in the United States. The degree of suspicion of State power and the manner in which it is exercised is one of the eternal themes of constitutional law in all countries. There are some wonderful harmonies and dissonances between the United States system and the Westminster system. These two systems are the competing model for emerging nations to emulate, at least to some degree, when approaching the task of constitution building.

The paper considers matters such as superior law constitutions, constitutional protection of fundamental rights, constitutional design, and different constitutional examples in the South Pacific. Outcomes do not necessarily flow from constitutional structures, but what they do result from is frequently a mixture of so many variables of such complexity that they cannot be effectively calculated. Economic factors, resources, geography, demography, and history are all likely to be as influential in shaping outcomes as a constitution. Law is a subset of the social system. Social and political conditions determine the law, particularly constitutional law, rather than the other way around. But New Zealand could do with some self-reflective comparison. A comparative perspective may be one way of distancing ourselves from our own dominant legal consciousness. If comparative constitutional law does anything, it forces the analyst to think more deeply about his or her own domestic orthodoxies.
Categories: Comparative Law News

SEMINAR: "La clôture de l'espace public et les biens communs matériels et immatériels: étude de cas internationaux" (Paris, 8 April 2014)


What: La clôture de l'espace public et les biens communs matériels et immatériels: étude de cas internationaux, 6th meeting of the séminaire de casuistique Le Bien commun, les biens communs, les choses communes, la collectivisation des intérêts organized by Emanuele Coccia, Emanuele Conte, Marie-Angèle Hermitte and Paolo Napoli 
Where:  École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Centre d'études des norme juridiques Yan Thomas (CENJ), Salle D & M Lombard, 96 boulevard Raspail, 75006, Paris
When: 8 April 2014, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Speakers:

Daniela Festa, Université de PérouseMaria Rosaria Marella, Université de PérouseGiorgio Resta, Université de Bari
All information here
Categories: Comparative Law News

ARTICLE: Kahn on "Does it Matter How One Opposes Hate Speech Bans? A Critical Commentary on Liberté Pour L’Histoire's Opposition to French Memory Laws"



U of St. Thomas (Minnesota) Legal Studies Research Paper No. 14-16 
Robert A. Kahn, University of St. Thomas School of Law (Minnesota)

Abstract
This paper examines Liberté pour l'Histoire, a group of French historians who led the charge against that nation’s memory laws, in the process raising unique arguments not found elsewhere in the debate over hate speech law. Some of these arguments – such as a focus on how the constitutional structure of the Fifth Republic encouraged memory laws – advance our understanding of the connection between hate speech bans and political institutions. Other arguments, however, are more problematic. In particular, Liberté historians struggle to distinguish the Holocaust (which is illegal to deny) from the Armenian Genocide (which is not). The Liberté historians also quite hostile toward multiculturalism. While this reflects the French culture in which the historians operate, it is normatively quite unappealing. This is especially true given the existence of other, more inclusive European arguments against hate speech regulation, such as those of Danish cartoon publisher Flemming Rose and Maltese Judge Giovanni Bonello. There has to be a better, more inclusive way to oppose French memory laws.
full article here
Categories: Comparative Law News

CFP: " Property Rights, Land and Territory in the European Overseas Empires", (Lisbon, 26-27 June 2014)




What: Property Rights, Land and Territory in the European Overseas Empires, Call for papers
Where: ISCTE-IUL University Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
When: 26-27 June 2014
All information hereDeadline for proposals submission: 20 April 2014
The occupation of territories, the rule over land and the definition of property rights, either de jure or de facto, were major concerns in the making and long-term development of almost every European overseas empire. They were also deeply interrelated with other key aspects of the empire-building process, including sovereignty claims, territorial expansion, settlement, taxation, power relations, social mobility, economic development, and the relationship with indigenous peoples. Therefore, those issues were of interest to all parts involved in the colonial venture - imperial governments, colonial authorities, first and later generations of settlers, native peoples and their elites - who dealt with them through complex and dynamic processes of negotiation and conflict.

The solutions adopted to regulate property rights and other territorial and land-related issues had their roots in legal norms, political concepts, institutions, ideologies and social practices transposed from each European metropole, then reframed and accommodated to each colonial context. Developing from different backgrounds in Europe, these theories and practices combined in a variety of ways with different conditions in the colonies, producing both contrasting and similar outcomes across time and space. 

The research on these topics has already achieved a huge body of results, but, for the most part, it has been pursued in a piecemeal fashion, either by disciplinary fields, empires or regions of the world, thus overlooking their interconnections. How can we compare the way issues of land, territory and property rights were dealt with across a variety of empires (e.g. Portuguese, Spanish, British, Dutch, French) and their different geographies? What can different branches of scholarship (from legal, economic, political, social and cultural history) offer each other? This conference aims to provide answers to these questions, by bringing these previously separate studies together into a common forum and setting them in comparative perspective.


Deadline for proposals submission: 20 April 2014, sent to lands.over.seas@gmail.com.
Paper proposals: please attach a Word file with the title, a 250-words abstract, name, institutional affiliation and a 100-words bio note of the proponent.

Panel proposals: please attach a Word file with the title and a 300-words abstract for the panel, plus the titles of papers (max 4), name, institutional affiliation and a 100-words bio note of the organizer and each presenter.
Notification of acceptance: 5 Mai 2014.

Registration fees: regular 50 €, student 40 €; after 1 June: regular 70 €, student 55 €. 
Venue: ISCTE-IUL (University Institute of Lisbon), 26-27 June 2014.

Scientific Committee:
Allan Greer, António Hespanha, Bas van Bavel, Jorge Flores, José Vicente Serrão, Rosa Congost, Rui Santos, Sanjay Subrahmanyam, Vera Ferllini

Organizing Committee: 
José Vicente Serrão, Bárbara Direito, Eugénia Rodrigues, Susana Münch Miranda

Host Institution: CEHC-IUL
Funding: FCT - Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia
website: http://landsoverseas.wordpress.com/conference/ 

This Conference incorporates the activities of the FCT Research Project (PTDC/HIS-HIS/113654/2009): "Lands Over Seas: Property Rights in the Early Modern Portuguese Empire
Categories: Comparative Law News

CONFERENCE: 33rd Annual ANZLHS Conference, "Law's Empire or Empire's Law?: Legal Discourses of Colonies and Commonwealths", (Coffs Harbour, Australia, 10-13 December 2014)



What: Law's Empire or Empire's Law?: Legal Discourses of Colonies and Commonwealths33rd Annual Conference of the Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society, Call for papers
Where:  BreakFree Aanuka Beach Resort, Coffs Harbour, Australia

When: 10th-13th December 2014

All information here

Conference 10th – 13th December 2014
The University of New England (Australia) is proud to announce the 33rd Annual ANZLHS Conference, 10-13 December 2014. The Conference provides wide scope to discuss law and history in a variety of settings. Although an important context for the conference is the interrelation between imported laws of a parent jurisdiction and their application to other domains, both jurisdictional and geographical, we encourage potential presenters to interpret the conference theme broadly.Call for Papers On behalf of the School of Law of the University of New England, Australia, the organising committee of the 33rd annual conference of the Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society takes pleasure in issuing a call for papers. The conference will be held at the BreakFree Aanuka Beach Resort, Coffs Harbour, on the magnificent mid-north coast of New South Wales, between December 10-13, 2014. Further information will be made available as the conference date approaches.The conference theme is "Law's Empire or Empire's Law?: Legal Discourses of Colonies and Commonwealths". The conference theme provides wide scope to discuss law and history in a variety of settings. Although an important context for the conference is the interrelation between imported laws of a parent jurisdiction and their application to other domains, both jurisdictional and geographical, we encourage potential presenters to interpret the conference theme broadly.The keynote speakers for the conference are Professor Paul Mitchell, of the Faculty of Laws, University College London, and Professor Mike Grossberg, Sally M Reahard Professor of History & Professor of Law, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.  Professor Mitchell and Professor Grossberg have long standing research interests in the conference theme and we are delighted they are able to present keynote addresses.The organising committee would welcome interest from lawyers and historians from any jurisdiction. The call for papers will be open until late June. Inquiries or paper proposals - including a title, brief abstract and brief biography - should be sent to mlunney@une.edu.au.

Bruce Kercher Scholarships - call for applications for 2014 conferenceThe Kercher Scholarships were established by the Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society in recognition of the substantial contribution to legal history and to the Society made by its founding President, Bruce Kercher.Scholarships are open to any postgraduate student currently enrolled in an Australian or New Zealand university wishing to attend the annual Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society Conference, and are awarded on the basis of merit through a process of application to the conference organisers. Each scholarship is valued at AUD$500. This is a contribution towards the cost of an economy class airfare to attend the conference and / or accommodation. Recipients will also have the conference registration fee waived and will be awarded a year's membership of the Society . They will also be given the opportunity to present their work in the conference programme.Scholarships are open to any full-time post-graduate student currently enrolled at an Australian or New Zealand university. If in any year there are insufficient applications by full-time students, part-time students may also be eligible. For this purpose, postgraduate means students enrolled in PhD, any Masters level degree (e.g., but not limited to, MA or LLM) and Honours where that Honours programme consists of a separate additional course taken after the relevant undergraduate studies or where Honours constitutes a separate degree to the regular LLB degree.Applicants should submit a letter which includes:
  • A summary statement of the research project being undertaken;
  • A short statement of the applicant's interest in legal history;
  • A short statement as to their future career aspirations;
  • A current curriculum vitae;
  • A short letter of recommendation from an academic member of the Faculty/School who is familiar with the student and their work, preferably the student's supervisor.
This statement must include information as to any funds to which the applicant has access to at their own institution.Applicants should send their applications to the Chair of the conference organising committee, Professor Mark Lunney (mlunney@une.edu.au) by 31 July 2014. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of August 2014.Conference Committee:Professor Mark Lunney (mlunney@une.edu.au)Mr Ben Livings (ben.livings@une.edu.au)Dr Tristan Taylor (ttaylo33@une.edu.au)Professor Michael Stuckey (hoslaw@une.edu.au)Dr David Roberts (drobert9@une.edu.au)Conference Venue and Accommodation: BreakFree Aanuka Beach Resort, on the magnificent mid-north coast of New South Wales. Accommodation is available at the conference venue on a first-come first-served basis by contacting the resort directly but there is a wide choice accommodation options available in Coffs Harbour to suit a variety of budgets. More details will be provided on the conference webpage closer to the date of the conference. Further details, including keynote speakers and Kercher scholarships will be posted in due course.Please contact Professor Mark Lunney if you have any queries.
Categories: Comparative Law News