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Music (Schulich School of Music)

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Schulich School of Music

Location

  • Schulich School of Music
  • Strathcona Music Building
  • 555 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1E3
  • Canada

About Schulich School of Music

The Schulich School of Music of McGill University, ranked Top 10 globally by the Princeton Review, is internationally renowned for its leadership in combining professional conservatory-style musical training, humanities-based scholarship, and scientific-technological research at the highest levels. Its programs encourage musicians and music researchers alike to push boundaries and explore new possibilities. The School’s facilities are a physical affirmation of our commitment and belief in the future of music, artists, creators, and researchers, and they encourage multimedia productions and trans-disciplinary collaborations. Among the most notable facilities are: a music library that houses one of the most important academic music collections in Canada, four concert halls, The Digital Composition Studio, sound recording studios, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), as well as a research network that links the Faculty with many other University departments and research institutes. Nestled in the heart of the city, the School also draws on the rich cultural life of Montreal—a bilingual city with a celebrated symphony orchestra, dozens of annual festivals, and hundreds of live music venues hosting world-class concerts.

The Master of Arts degree (M.A.) is available as a thesis option in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and Theory (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and as a non-thesis option in Music Education, Musicology, and Theory.

The Master of Music degree (M.Mus.) is available in Composition, Performance, and Sound Recording. Specializations offered within the performance option are: piano, guitar, orchestral instruments (including orchestral training), organ and church music, conducting, collaborative piano, opera and voice, early music, and jazz.

The Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance is open to accomplished professional musicians, singers, or established chamber ensembles wishing one year of in-depth studies to complete a specific project.

The Doctor of Music degree (D.Mus.) is offered in Composition and Performance Studies while the Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) is available in Composition, Music – Gender and Women’s Studies, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Interdisciplinary studies are encouraged.

The Schulich School of Music has several sources of funding for graduate students:

Entrance Excellence Scholarships for highly ranked graduate students (including Schulich Scholarships, Max Stern Fellowships, and McGill Excellence Fellowships) typically range in value from $1,500 to $15,000; some two- and three-year multi-year packages are available at the master's and doctoral levels, respectively (see www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs.) A limited number of one-year differential fee waivers are also available for the most highly ranked incoming international students. The Scholarship and Student Aid Office offers information and options for out-of-province, American, and other international students (see www.mcgill.ca/studentaid).

In-course students may compete for a small number of Excellence Scholarships awarded annually to recognize excellence in academic and performance achievement.

The Schulich School of Music also has a renowned mentoring program that helps students develop applications for a wide variety of external funding for national, international, and university competitions (CIRMMT Research, DAAD, Fulbright, NSERC, NSERC Discovery, Connection grants, SSHRC, Vanier, etc.). Some provide for multi-year funding, others funding for individual projects.

Opportunities for funding through Work Study and as paid assistants also provide professional training. Positions for teaching assistantships are advertized each semester by departmental announcement. Typically there are few, if any, positions available for students in their first year of study. Other types of positions can include: invigilators, apprentice writers for program notes, sound recording technicians, library assistants, stage hands, Opera Studio, and front-of-house staff, among others. Posts are advertized through the Music Research and Performance Departments at the beginning of each semester and through the Work Study website.

A variety of research assistantships in selected areas are also available. Inquiries should be directed to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Associate Dean for Research.

Opportunities for paid performances in the community for soloists, choristers, chamber ensembles, organists, orchestral and jazz musicians, and piano collaborators are facilitated through the Booking Office (see www.mcgill.ca/music/about-us/contact-us/booking-office).

The Schulich School of Music also provides travel funding for conferences and special performance and research initiatives. Graduate students may apply once per academic year (see www.mcgill.ca/music/current-students/graduate/forms).

Master's Programs

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Music — Composition (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in the M.Mus. program develop their own individual voices through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members' diverse interests ensure that students will find a suitable mentor/supervisor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer students an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology, including mixed works, interactive composition, gestural controllers, acousmatic works, multichannel audio, computer-assisted composition, and more. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles (e.g., McGill Symphony Orchestra, McGill Contemporary Music Ensemble, etc.) and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations. Graduates have continued their studies at the doctoral level and then gone on to win prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize); they also have successful careers in composition, film, literature, conducting, and teaching.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides an opportunity for studio- and classroom-based teachers, and music educators working in other community settings, to explore current issues in music education and to implement their own research studies. Seminars develop facility in a breadth of research methodologies and examine pertinent research developments in different fields, while simultaneously providing opportunities to link with other departments such as the faculties of Education, Cognitive Psychology, and Physiology. Ties with The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology (CIRMMT), and Teaching and Learning Services provide a strong supportive network for interdisciplinary and multilingual research. Experienced faculty publishes regularly in the field’s leading journals in areas such as musical development, music perception, world and community-based music education, philosophical issues in music education, performance anxiety, music performance adjudication, technological applications, and the physiological bases of musical performance. Graduates of the program continue on to doctoral studies and pursue teaching careers around the world in various settings.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Technology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Music Technology is the only program of its kind in the world to apply cutting-edge scientific research to music and music making. Students are accepted from a wide range of musical backgrounds. Research goals are tied to the work of the area’s five faculty members and include the development of new and flexible strategies for sound analysis, real-time processing, synthesis and gestural control, instrument design, melodic pattern recognition, auditory display, music information retrieval, and symbolic manipulation of formal music representations, as well as the psychoacoustics of musical sounds and structures, among others. Students’ research is supported by the six laboratories forming the large multidisciplinary research infrastructure of The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), and almost unlimited technological resources (e.g., computing power, storage, measuring devices including several motion-capture systems). The Digital Composition Studio and state-of-the-art recording and acoustic environments provide opportunities to collaborate with accomplished performers and researchers in other music disciplines. Graduates hold commercial positions related to media technologies (e.g., gaming and audio industries) and continue their studies at the doctoral level in preparation for academic careers.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is for students interested in developing research projects that bridge traditional methodologies with new critical approaches in musicology. The area’s humanistic orientation emphasizes the importance of political, social, and literary history, while also encouraging students to develop their skills in musical analysis, their sensitivity to different styles and performance practices, and their awareness of issues in aesthetics. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research ranges from medieval and renaissance music to the popular music of today. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics also exist through links with other departments, the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate music history courses. Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level at McGill and other major North American universities; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and archival curation, among others.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Musicology (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Musicology requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Sound Recording (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
This internationally renowned program is a course-based, professional training program designed for musicians who wish to develop the skills required in the music recording and media industries. It is based on the German Tonmeister program and offers extensive, hands-on opportunities to record a broad spectrum of solo recitals, large opera, and symphonic repertoire with soloists and choirs, and complex Jazz Band and pop idioms. McGill’s professional-quality facilities provide state-of-the-art equipment for research and the recording of any size of ensemble in high-resolution multichannel audio and high-definition video, and include a variety of audio recording studios equipped for surround recording, four concert hall recording spaces, a technical ear training lab, an orchestral film scoring stage, an opera studio, and post-production and editing suites. The Faculty includes prominent researchers as well as award-winning recording engineers and producers in the fields of music production, television, and film sound familiar with cutting-edge technologies and new developments. The program also has close ties with industry that facilitate opportunities for internships. Graduates are leaders in the field working in highly respected studios around the world and winning both creative and scientific international competitions.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Theory is for students interested in exploring how specific pieces of music are put together and how this understanding may be generalized to relate to the way other pieces of music are composed. Music theory and elective seminars develop expertise in various analytical models and familiarity with the critical issues that define the discipline as a basis for developing individual research projects. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminar discussions facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics in perception and cognition exist through collaborations with music researchers from the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate theory courses. The Faculty has a breadth of experience in early music theory, formal functions, Schenkerian analysis, mathematical models, theories of rhythm and meter, serialism, and popular music analysis. Graduates have been accepted into doctoral programs at McGill, Yale, Eastman, Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, and Cambridge, among others.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Theory (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Theory requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University.

Master of Arts (M.A.): Music — Music Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits),

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits), and

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This course-based program has options in music education, musicology, and theory. Seminars provide breadth of disciplinary knowledge and understanding of research methodologies and critical issues. Expertise in two areas is developed through two written papers. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research covers a broad spectrum of topics central to each discipline. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking.

The option in Music Education provides an opportunity for studio-, classroom-, and community-based music educators to read, understand, and apply research studies in different fields to their own practices.

The option in Musicology is for students interested in a humanistic orientation to topics in music history and musicology that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches.

The option in Theory develops skill with different analytical models and the ways in which they may be used to explore how specific pieces of music are put together.

Some graduates continue to doctoral studies; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and librarianship, among others.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Vocal Pedagogy (Thesis) (47 credits)
The Master of Music: Vocal Pedagogy is not being offered in the 2014–2015 academic year.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Jazz Performance (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus. in Jazz Performance is flexibly designed to offer specialization in Jazz Composition, Jazz Performance, and Jazz Orchestra training. All students take courses in jazz pedagogy, composition, and arranging, and benefit from close interaction with a diverse, creative, and professionally active faculty. A recital and a CD recording of original music are the principal thesis requirements. Our outstanding ensembles include the McGill Jazz Orchestra, the ten-piece McGill Chamber Ensemble, two more jazz orchestras, a saxophone ensemble, and over twenty jazz combos. Teaching opportunities vary from year to year, but are generally available in Jazz Theory, Jazz Ear Training, Jazz Orchestra 3, Jazz Improvisation, and Jazz Combo. Montreal’s vibrant jazz scene also provides rich opportunities for performance and musical engagement. Graduates have active touring careers, teach in university jazz programs, and have produced recordings that have earned Juno awards.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Early Music (Thesis) (45 credits)
Established in 1975, this program is the longest-standing Early Music program in North America. It offers early music specialists interested in historical performance practices a rich variety of performing experiences, including 15–20 chamber ensembles (vocal, madrigal, viol, and recorder consorts, etc.), the Cappella Antica, and the Baroque Orchestra. McGill is also the only North American music faculty to produce a fully staged performance of an early opera every year. Recent productions include: Handel’s Alcina, Agrippina, and Imeneo, Lully’s Thésée, and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas. Faculty are prominently involved in Montreal’s internationally acclaimed Early Music community. The Schulich School of Music also owns a large collection of early instruments that is available to students. Graduates perform with Montreal-based early music ensembles, including, among others, Les Violons du Roy and the Arion Baroque Orchestra, as well as Aradia and Tafelmusik in Toronto, and various ensembles in Europe (e.g., Concerto Palatino, Centre de musique baroque de Versailles).
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Orchestral Instruments and Guitar (Thesis) (45 credits)
The premiere orchestral training program in Canada, this program is for talented instrumental musicians and guitarists wishing to hone their artistry and expressive, interpretative skills in a flexibly designed curriculum rich in performance opportunities. Ensembles emulate professional settings, and include five orchestras—two full orchestras (the renowned McGill Symphony Orchestra and the McGill Sinfonetta), one opera orchestra, one baroque orchestra, and one contemporary music ensemble—as well as one large wind symphony and one guitar ensemble. Opportunities for chamber music also abound. String players benefit from a rigorous string quartet training program and trail-blazing pedagogical approaches. Brass and wind musicians also perform a wide range of large ensemble repertoire for their instruments; percussionists perform, tour, and record with the esteemed McGill Percussion Ensemble. Thesis recitals foster individual creativity and diversity by offering a range of options important for orchestral musicians—orchestral excerpt exams run like orchestral auditions, chamber music recitals, and concerto competitions—as well as solo recitals, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects including collaborations with composers and the Digital Composition Studio, among others. There is a focus on healthy performance and a broad range of seminars that ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Ensemble conductors are world-class; faculty include the concertmasters and principal players of major Canadian orchestras, including the Montreal Symphony Orchestra; percussion instructors have international profiles and a breadth of experience in world and contemporary repertoires. Graduates have secured positions in orchestras throughout North and South America, and in Europe, and with the Canadian Opera Company, Ensemble Moderne, and others.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Collaborative Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program develop their artistry as collaborative musicians in vocal, instrumental, and opera repetiteur settings. The program is not a chamber music program in that it prepares pianists to assume coaching responsibilities as well as collaborate with other musicians. Candidates need to have excellent technique and interpretative skills, sight-reading abilities, and previous collaborative experience. The program is flexibly defined to allow students to specialize or gain experience in a variety of settings and with a broad cross-section of vocal, instrumental, orchestral, and theatrical repertoire. Concert recitals, choral ensembles, studio lessons with high-quality performers, and opera productions provide professional settings in which students master their craft. Faculty includes internationally renowned collaborative pianists, vocal coaches, conductors, and stage directors. Graduates pursue careers as collaborative pianists, accompanists, opera repetiteurs, studio teachers, and coaches.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus in Piano develops artistic expression and interpretative skills by immersing the advanced pianist in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program revolves around an integrated piano seminar involving all studios and includes collaborative opportunities in instrumental, vocal, and contemporary music performance at a high level, piano pedagogy, and performance practice through fortepiano/harpsichord study as options. Recital options include solo and chamber music performance, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects, including collaborations with strong composition students and the Digital Composition Studio. Dynamic faculty performs internationally and has diverse teaching, coaching, and adjudicating experience in a broad range of solo, chamber, and concerto repertoires. Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level, have been selected for national/international competitions, and pursue careers as collaborative pianists, opera coaches, and as independent studio teachers.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Organ and Church Music (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides talented organists and church music scholars with an opportunity to hone their artistry and interpretive skills. The flexibly designed program combines performance with seminars in historically informed performance practice, music and liturgy, counterpoint, improvisation, continuo playing, and choral conducting, among other options. Thesis performance options allow for creativity and diversity by including options for solo and chamber music recitals, concerto performances, recording projects, church music projects, and opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaborations with strong composers and other departments. Students benefit from excellent facilities that include practice organs built by Beckerath, Casavant, Tsuji, Wilhelm, and Wolff, as well as the famous French classical organ in Redpath Hall. A number of assistantships are available in downtown churches with some of Montreal’s most distinguished church musicians. Graduates have won prizes in major national and international competitions and pursue church music careers around the world.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Conducting (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program specialize in orchestral, wind, or choral conducting. Enrolment is limited to outstanding candidates having highly developed musical skills in voice, instrumental, or piano performance. The program provides for concentrated podium time, interactions with world-class conductors, score study, and the development of rehearsal technique. A range of seminars provides for the in-depth study of performance practice and the development of analytical skills with leading scholars in musicology and theory. Thesis performance projects involve concert recitals with various Schulich School of Music ensembles. Some graduates continue on to doctoral studies; others pursue conducting and teaching positions in schools, orchestras, and as opera assistants.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Opera and Voice (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus in Opera and Voice develops vocal growth and artistic expression by immersing students in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program provides the option for students to specialize in opera performance or to develop artistry in a variety of solo and operatic repertoires. There are three opera productions every year, including one Early Music opera with period instruments. Other performance opportunities include solo recitals, studio concerts, Cappella Antica, oratorios, chamber music ensembles, master classes with leading artists in the field, recording projects, and interdisciplinary collaborations. Performance opportunities emulate professional contexts, including rehearsals in a first-class opera studio and individual repertoire coaching with internationally renowned coaching staff. Voice faculty, stage directors, and set designers are outstanding soloists and creative artists involved with major companies, opera programs, and festivals the world over. McGill singers are selected to participate in various professional young artist programs and have won major national and international auditions including the MET auditions and NATSAA. Recent graduates perform with orchestras and opera companies in Canada, as well as companies in the United States, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and Eastern Europe.

Graduate Diploma

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance (30 credits)
This is a new, one-year postgraduate diploma providing concentrated study for three types of extremely accomplished musicians: the emerging or professional singer, emerging or established chamber ensemble (including jazz combos, piano collaborations), and the individual artist preparing for competition, audition, concerto performance, tour, recording project, etc. The flexibly designed program assumes a high level of performance (doctoral/professional) and involves intensive coaching, performance, and repertoire study/research tied to the artist’s or chamber ensemble’s professional goals, and a media project. Singers have voice coaching and training in movement and acting, with performance opportunities linked to McGill Opera productions. Ensembles develop individual artistry as well as group identity, with respect to sound, communication, skills, and performance practice. The first graduates of the program, the Cecilia String Quartet, won the 2010 International Banff String Quartet Competition and were prizewinners at the Bordeaux 2010 International Chamber Music Competition.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Composition
Students in this program create extended original works of art that push the boundaries of the discipline. Composers refine their musical language and artistic voice through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members have diverse interests that ensure composers will find a suitable mentor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer composers an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated, performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations. Graduates have won prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize, SOCAN competition) and have successful careers in university teaching, (freelance) composition, film, literature, and conducting.
Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Performance Studies
This program is for the artist/scholar. Students perform at a professional or near-professional level and have well-defined research interests linked to their performance. A broad range of seminars ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Seminars encourage the critical thinking and the fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music by providing a forum in which performers can interact with students in other areas. Comprehensive examinations provide students with an opportunity to develop credentials in three areas of expertise in preparation for teaching careers, while articulating the background and critical issues surrounding their thesis work. The latter consists of a lecture/recital and a paper (including a recording of the recital). Students benefit from exceptional mentoring by internationally renowned coaches, the research expertise of faculty from the Department of Music Research, master classes, opportunities to collaborate with strong composition students, and the rich performance life of the Schulich School of Music and Montreal. Students win major fellowships (SSHRC, Fulbright, FRQSC, Canada Council). Graduates have won major national and international competitions and pursue teaching and performing careers in a wide variety of contexts globally.

Ph.D. in Music

Students in the Ph.D. program pursue original research that makes a significant contribution to the fields of Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Seminars, a doctoral colloquium, visiting lecturer series, and international conferences provide forums for students from different areas to interact by encouraging the critical thinking and fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music through listening, performing, cutting-edge technologies, and analytical methods. Opportunities for inter- and cross-disciplinary collaborations exist through the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology; the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas; the Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; the Performance Department; other departmental links across the University and, in the technology areas, with science and industry. Supportive faculty recognized internationally as leaders in their respective disciplines mentor students from admission through job placements. Travel funding exists for students to present papers at conferences; many students win external scholarships (SSHRC, FRQSC, Vanier, Rhodes Scholar, etc.) and national and international awards; students gain valuable pedagogical or technological training through teaching and lab assistantships. Graduates pursue careers in academia, industry, composition, and various other arts-related fields.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — (Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, Theory)
The thesis for the Ph.D. in composition involves the creation of an original large-scale work and research that increases our understanding of music and musical processes. Students in music education investigate a broad spectrum of critical issues through a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The Musicology area adopts a humanistic orientation that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches. Research in Music Technology and Sound Recording can lead to patents, among other outcomes and benefits from unlimited technological resources. Theorists engage with all repertoires and analytical methods.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — Gender and Women's Studies
This program is open to doctoral students who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Music requirements are augmented by participation in a Research Methods course and a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in Opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 29, 2014).

Schulich School of Music Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s Degrees

Applicants for the master's degree must hold a B.Mus. or a B.A. degree with a Major or Honours in music including considerable work done in the area of specialization.

Applicants found to be deficient in their background preparation may be required to take certain additional undergraduate courses.

All applicants (except those for Performance, Musicology, and Sound Recording) will be required to take placement examinations.

All M.Mus. applicants will be required to take a live audition. Conducting and female voice applicants will be required to submit screening material for pre-selection. Following a review of these materials, selected applicants will be invited to attend a live audition (see www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate/audition-requirements).

Specific admission and document requirements for each program are outlined at: www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate.

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance

Applicants for the Graduate Diploma are typically highly accomplished performers who hold an M.Mus. or a B.Mus. degree with equivalent professional experience. All musicians are required to submit screening material (see D.Mus. audition list for repertoire and level at www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate/audition-requirements) and a statement of the proposed performance project (that may be completed within one year) by the application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants will be invited to pass a live entrance audition. Chamber ensembles must apply and complete diploma requirements as a formed ensemble.

D.Mus. Degree

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. degree in Composition, or its equivalent, and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application.

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Performance Studies must hold an M.Mus. degree in Performance, or its equivalent, and are required to submit screening material, samples of written work, and a statement of proposed artistic research interests by the specified application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants with artistic research interests will be invited to pass a live entrance audition and interview.

Ph.D. Degree

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. in Composition or equivalent and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application, and a written description (no more than two pages) of the research path(s) they wish to follow.

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology, Sound Recording, Music – Gender and Women's Studies, or Theory must hold a master's or a bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill degree, in Music Technology, Music Education, Musicology, Theory, or Sound Recording. Applicants with a bachelor's degree will normally be admitted to the M.A. program for the first year and may apply for admittance to the Ph.D. program after the completion of one full year of graduate coursework. Qualified applicants who have already completed an appropriate master's degree will be admitted to the second year of the Ph.D. program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • $61.56 audition fee for Performance degrees

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Schulich School of Music and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Geography

Geography

Location

  • Department of Geography
  • Burnside Hall
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 705
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4111
  • Fax: 514-398-7437
  • Email: grad [dot] geog [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/geography

About Geography

The Department of Geography offers research and thesis-based graduate programs leading to a Master of Arts (M.A.), a Master of Science (M.Sc.), or a doctorate (Ph.D.). In its scope, our program includes the opportunity to conduct field-based studies in both the natural (i.e., biophysical) and the social sciences. Thematic areas of study include Political, Urban, Economic, and Health Geography; Environment and Human Development; Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing; Land Surface Processes; Earth Systems Science; and Environmental Management. Geography houses the Hitschfield Geographic Information Centre, maintains the McGill High Arctic Research Station (Axel Heiburg Island, Nunavut Territory) and the McGill Sub-Arctic Research Station (Schefferville, Quebec), and has strong ties with McGill’s School of Environment and the Centre for Climate and Global Change Research. Faculty and students conduct research in fields as diverse as climate change impacts, periglacial geomorphology, and forest resource history in regions ranging from the Arctic to Southeast Asia and Latin America.

McGill Northern Research Stations

The McGill Sub-Arctic Research Station is located in Schefferville, in the centre of Quebec-Labrador. Facilities exist for research in most areas of physical and some areas of human geography in the subarctic.

McGill University also operates a field station at Expedition Fiord on Axel Heiberg Island in the High Arctic. Facilities are limited to a small lab, dorm building, and cookhouse. Research activities focus on the glacial and geological. For additional information on these stations, contact the Scientific Director, Wayne Pollard, Department of Geography.

Centre for Climate and Global Change Research

The Department of Geography, with the McGill Departments of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Economics, Natural Resource Sciences, and several departments from the Université du Québec à Montréal and Université de Montréal, developed a collaborative research centre that examines climate and global change. There are graduate opportunities through this centre.

For more information contact Professor Nigel Roulet, Director, Centre for Climate and Global Change, McGill University.

Being both a natural and a social science, geography provides a unique opportunity to obtain a broad exposure to modes of analyzing the many environmental and situational problems of contemporary society. Because of this, a geography degree is a fantastic opportunity to obtain a career in one of a diverse range of fields. Our students have gone on to become United Nations field researchers in Laos, environmental consultants in Toronto, science teachers in the U.S., geography professors in many parts of the world, UNHCR volunteers in Malaysia, and policy analysts, as well as health and social policy researchers in Montreal…the list goes on! If you're on Facebook, look for McGill Geography Alumni or visit our website (www.geog.mcgill.ca/other/jobsingeog.html) to learn more about the advantages of having a geography degree from McGill!

Master’s degrees in both the physical (M.Sc.) and social (M.A.) sciences are offered by Geography. The core of both programs for all students is field-based research supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a thesis. The core program consists of the thesis component (30 credits), required (3 credits), and complementary (12 credits) graduate (500- or 600-level) courses.

Geography also offers in association with other McGill departments and programs a number of M.A. and M.Sc. options that students may choose to follow. Students must pass the courses specified for their program, attend such additional courses as the Chair and the student's thesis supervisor think fit, and submit a thesis in an appropriate area of geographical inquiry approved by the adviser.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Geography

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) (45 credits)
Master’s degrees in both the physical (M.Sc.) and social (M.A.) sciences are offered by Geography. The core of both programs for all students is field-based research, supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a thesis. The core program consists of the thesis component (30 credits), required (3 credits), and complementary (12 credits) graduate (500- or 600-level) courses. Geography also offers a number of M.A. and M.Sc. options in association with other McGill departments and programs that students may choose to follow.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is cross-disciplinary in scope within existing master’s programs in Geography, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Economics, and Sociology. Its components include the thesis (30 credits); required International Development and Geography courses (6 credits); and complementary courses (9 credits) from the participating departments. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
The Environment option is offered in association with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) and is composed of a thesis component (24 credits), required (9 credits), and complementary (12 credits) Geography and Environment courses. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or Faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This is an interdisciplinary program for Geography students wishing to focus on gender and women’s studies and issues in feminist research and methods. Included within it are a thesis (30 credits) topically on gender and women’s studies, required (6 credits), and complementary (9 credits) courses from Geography and Women’s Studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (45 credits)
The McGill-STRI Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for master's or Ph.D. students offered in association with several University departments, the McGill School of Environment, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI-Panama). The option includes a thesis (30 credits); required courses (9 credits) in Geography, Environment, and Biology; and complementary courses (6 credits) chosen from Geography, Agriculture Sciences, Biology, Sociology, Environment, and Political Science. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO's educational approach seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
The Social Statistics option focuses on applications of quantitative methods in social science and is composed of the thesis (30 credits); required Geography courses (6 credits); and complementary Geography, Sociology, Economics, and Political Science courses (9 credits). The program complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data (or equivalent). Students will usually complete normal program course requirements supplemented by further statistical courses (as advised by the option adviser and subject to approval by the home department). Students will complete a statistics-based M.A. research paper (Economics, Political Science, Sociology) or thesis (Geography) in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. Acceptance into the program is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee and is contingent on acceptance into the M.A. program in one of the participating departments (Economics, Geography, Political Science, Sociology), which in turn requires meeting Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies admission requirements.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Geography

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) (45 credits)
Master’s degrees in both the physical (M.Sc.) and social (M.A.) sciences are offered by Geography. The core of both programs for all students is field-based research, supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a thesis. The core program consists of the thesis component (30 credits), required (3 credits), and complementary (12 credits) graduate (500- or 600-level) courses. Geography also offers a number of M.A. and M.Sc. options in association with other McGill departments and programs that students may choose to follow.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
The Environment option is offered in association with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) and is composed of a thesis component (24 credits); required Geography and Environment courses (9 credits); and complementary Geography and Environment courses (12 credits). The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or Faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (45 credits)
The McGill-STRI Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for master's students is offered in association with several university departments, the McGill School of Environment, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI-Panama). The option includes a thesis (30 credits); required courses (9 credits) in Geography, Environment, and Biology; and complementary courses (6 credits) chosen from Geography, Agriculture Sciences, Biology, Sociology, Environment, and Political Science. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO's educational approach seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Ph.D. Programs in Geography

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography
The doctoral degree in Geography includes the successful completion of the comprehensive examination, a thesis based on original research, and coursework chosen in collaboration with the student’s supervisor and/or research committee. The main elements of the Ph.D. are the thesis and comprehensive examination, a required Methods of Geographical Research course (3 credits), and a minimum of two complementary courses (6 credits). The Ph.D. in Geography also includes several options.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Environment
The Environment option consists of the thesis and comprehensive examination; required courses (9 credits) from Geography and Environment; and complementary courses (9 credits) in Environment or other fields recommended by the research committee and approved by the Environment Option Committee. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Gender and Women's Studies
This doctoral option is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Geography and who wish to earn 9 credits of approved coursework on gender and women’s studies and issues in feminist research and methods. It includes a thesis centrally related to gender and/or women’s studies; the comprehensive examination; required courses (9 credits) in Geography and Women’s Studies; and complementary courses (6 credits), one of which must pertain to gender and/or women’s issues.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Neotropical Environment
The McGill-STRI Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for Ph.D. students offered in association with several university departments, the McGill School of Environment, and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI-Panama) and includes the thesis; comprehensive examination; required courses (9 credits) in Geography, Environment and Biology; and complementary courses (3 credits) chosen from Geography, Agriculture Sciences, Biology, Sociology, Environment, and Political Science. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO's educational approach seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 27, 2014).

Geography Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A. and M.Sc. Degrees

Applicants not satisfying the conditions in Graduate Admissions and Application Procedures, but with primary undergraduate specialization in a cognate field, may be admitted to the M.A. or M.Sc. degree in Geography in certain circumstances. In general, they, and others who have deficiencies in their preparation but are otherwise judged to be acceptable, will be required to register for a Qualifying program or to undertake additional courses.

Ph.D. Degree

Students who have completed a master's degree in Geography (with high standing) may be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level.

On rare occasions, a student may be admitted to the Ph.D. degree without having first taken the master's degree. They, and others who have deficiencies in their preparation but are otherwise acceptable, will be required to register for a year of coursework and/or be required to take extra courses. The normal duration of a program, including field work where required, is three years.

Normally, the Department will restrict admission to the Ph.D. program to students prepared to work in one of the fields of human or physical geography in which specialized supervision is offered. These, which cover a wide range of systematic areas, are listed in documents available from the Department.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Further departmental application information is listed at www.mcgill.ca/geography/graduate.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal
  • Letters of Reference – three references required for Ph.D. program

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Geography Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 31 Fall: Jan. 31 Fall: Jan. 31
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Location

  • Department of Art History and Communication Studies
  • Arts Building, W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
  • 853 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0G5
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4933
  • Fax: 514-398-7247
  • Email: graduate [dot] ahcs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs

About Communication Studies

The graduate program in Communication Studies offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. The program is concerned with the study of communication phenomena through interdisciplinary training that draws on a variety of fields including cultural studies, critical media and technology studies, public policy and governance, film, and sound studies. The program strives to offer a balance of humanities and social sciences approaches to the analysis of communication, and its orientation is primarily qualitative (rather than quantitative) in nature. The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are academic in character, and do not include professional training in journalism, organizational communication, or media production. The Communication Studies program offers courses and directs project research in preparation for the M.A. Thesis and Ph.D. in Communication Studies. The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is available as a program option, and students benefit from the resources and activity of Media@McGill, a hub of research and public outreach on critical issues in media, culture, and emerging technology.

McGill is situated in one of the most vibrant cities in North America, and Montreal offers myriad opportunities for graduate students to engage with local arts institutions, either officially, through internships and research fellowships, or unofficially, through volunteering. Local institutions range from large-scale public museums (such as the Musée d'art contemporain, the Musée des beaux-arts, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa) to smaller alternative galleries (such as feminist arts spaces La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse and Studio XX). There are also university-based venues such as the Redpath Museum on campus and the McCord Museum of Canadian History (which houses the McGill University Archives), and independent contemporary art galleries such as DHC and the Darling Foundry. The Canadian Centre for Architecture, with its archives and exhibitions and the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec also offer grants and research opportunities for local graduate students. A close relationship with the other three major universities in Montreal (Concordia University, Université de Montréal, and Université du Québec à Montréal) affords students access to a broad network of additional courses, lectures, and colleagues across the city.

To obtain financial aid information, please consult the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs or email graduate [dot] fellowships [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

For programs in Art History and Communication Studies, refer to our website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs.

Master's and Ph.D. Degrees

The master's program requires a three-semester residency, the successful completion of a total of seven courses (21 credits, including the Pro-Seminar course), and a thesis (equivalent to 24 credits). Three years of residence are normally required for the Ph.D. degree (candidates with an M.A. will be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level of the doctoral program, thereby gaining credit for one year of resident study). The Ph.D. program of study is comprised of five courses (15 credits), the Pro-Seminar (3 credits), a comprehensive examination (0 credits), a dissertation proposal, and a written dissertation with its defense. Ph.D. students who have selected the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies are required to take 9 credits (within the total credits that are required for the Ph.D. degree); WMST 601 AND WMST 602 are required, plus one 3-credit complementary Art History course related to gender and women’s studies. All course selections must first be approved by the supervisor/Graduate Program Director.

Students enter our graduate programs from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, though all have a history of documented academic excellence and aptitude for advanced scholarly research. Over the past 30 years, the Graduate Program in Communication Studies has trained many of Canada's leading communications scholars. Graduates of the program may be found working in all levels of government, within the cultural industries, and in dozens of university Communication Studies departments around the world.

For the language requirement for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, please see: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/graduate/language-requirement.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Communication Studies offers advanced training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in GWS will appear on a student’s transcript along with the M.A. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this non-thesis option.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies
The Ph.D. in Communication Studies offers in-depth training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy. Doctoral students pursue coursework, submit a comprehensive exam and thesis proposal, with the goal of writing a dissertation that makes an original contribution to knowledge in Communication Studies. The Ph.D. degree is academic in character, and does not include professional training in media production.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies will appear on a student’s transcript along with the Ph.D. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Communication Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A.

An honours bachelor's degree or equivalent is required of applicants to the M.A. program, with a minimum CGPA of 3.3 out of 4.0, or equivalent, i.e., B+ (75%). In whichever case, the transcript must show breadth or depth in related areas of study.

Ph.D.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program are expected to have completed the equivalent of an M.A. degree. Admission will be based on academic achievement and evidence of talent and strong motivation in Communication Studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications will be considered by the deadline of January 15.

Inquiries regarding the program should be addressed to the Graduate Administrative Coordinator, Department of Art History and Communication Studies.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal – at least 500 words
  • Written Work – two examples

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Art History and Communication Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: There are no Winter or Summer term admissions for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Anthropology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Anthropology

Location

  • Department of Anthropology
  • Stephen Leacock Building
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 718
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4300
  • Fax: 514-398-7476
  • Email: gradprogram [dot] anthropology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/anthropology

About Anthropology

Our Department places high priority on research and on maintaining a distinguished graduate program. Each year, we admit only a small number of very highly qualified applicants for studies leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology. Thus, our students benefit from close supervision by their committees and from high-quality peer exchange. By maintaining a high staff-student ratio, we are able to offer our graduate students an unusual degree of flexibility and personalized attention in designing their programs according to their specific interests. There are no comprehensive examinations, and the program is particularly congenial to students who are self-directed.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) (48 credits)
The purpose of the M.A. program is to provide advanced-level training in socio-cultural anthropology and archaeology to prepare students for research at the Ph.D. level.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Development Studies (48 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program that is unique in Canada, if not the world, because it is designed to provide students with a strong practical and theoretical foundation for engaging in genuinely cross-disciplinary research. The option is offered within existing M.A. and Ph.D. programs in the departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. or Ph.D. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. or Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
The Environment option is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interaction with students from a wide range of different disciplines. Through research, seminars, and two courses, this option adds an interdisciplinary layer that will challenge students to defend their research and think in a broader context. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (48 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet degree requirements in Anthropology (and other participating departments and faculties), who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is currently not being offered.

The purpose of the M.A. program is to provide advanced-level training in anthropology and to prepare students for research at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Medical Anthropology (Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.A. program in Medical Anthropology is given jointly by the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine (SSOM). The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Anthropology
The purpose of the Ph.D. program is to enable students to make original contributions to research in socio-cultural anthropology, archaeology, and medical anthropology in the form of a doctoral thesis. The program offers fieldwork-based doctoral training for students wishing to concentrate on different geographic areas (including Africa, Latin America, Europe, North America, and Asia).
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Anthropology — Neotropical Environment
The Ph.D. program in Neotropical Environment (NEO) is a specialized, interdisciplinary program made possible by collaborating institutions in Canada, Panama, and the United States. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the neotropics and Latin American countries. Students work under the supervision of researchers from McGill and/or the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). This is a research-based option for Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Anthropology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Our Department places high priority on research and on maintaining a distinguished graduate program. Each year, we admit only a small number of very highly qualified applicants for studies leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology.

For graduate applicants whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), a minimum TOEFL score of 600 on the paper-based or 100 on the Internet-based test (iBT), with each component score not less than 20, is required.

Application information is available on the Department website: www.mcgill.ca/anthropology/graduate/admissions.

Master's

Admission to the M.A. program is open competitively to students holding an Honours or Major B.A. in Anthropology. Outstanding candidates with B.A. degrees in other disciplines but with substantial background related to anthropology are sometimes admitted on the condition that they complete a specified number of additional courses in Anthropology.

The applicants admitted usually have undergraduate grade point averages of 3.5 or above on a 4.0-point scale.

Ph.D.

Admission to the Ph.D. program is open competitively to students with a master’s degree in Anthropology. In very special circumstances, candidates with a master’s degree in related disciplines may be admitted.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE results – for international applicants only
  • TOEFL – for non-anglophone and non-francophone applicants
  • Writing Sample – a recent sample of the applicant's written work, on any topic (not necessarily within the desired field of graduate study), not necessarily previously submitted for evaluation or publication in English or French, and no more than 15 pages in length
  • Personal Statement – an essay in which the applicant describes reasons for applying to graduate studies and indicates qualifications, qualities, or circumstances the applicant feels to be significant. Applicants usually provide information about educational and professional goals, and discuss their interest in the desired field of study.
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Anthropology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department Admissions Committee announces its selections by mid-March.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

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