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Music (Schulich School of Music)

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Schulich School of Music

Location

  • Schulich School of Music
  • Strathcona Music Building
  • 555 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1E3
  • Canada

About Schulich School of Music

The Schulich School of Music of McGill University, ranked Top 10 globally by the Princeton Review, is internationally renowned for its leadership in combining professional conservatory-style musical training, humanities-based scholarship, and scientific-technological research at the highest levels. Its programs encourage musicians and music researchers alike to push boundaries and explore new possibilities. The School’s facilities are a physical affirmation of our commitment and belief in the future of music, artists, creators, and researchers, and they encourage multimedia productions and trans-disciplinary collaborations. Among the most notable facilities are: a music library that houses one of the most important academic music collections in Canada, four concert halls, The Digital Composition Studio, sound recording studios, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), as well as a research network that links the Faculty with many other University departments and research institutes. Nestled in the heart of the city, the School also draws on the rich cultural life of Montreal—a bilingual city with a celebrated symphony orchestra, dozens of annual festivals, and hundreds of live music venues hosting world-class concerts.

The Master of Arts degree (M.A.) is available as a thesis option in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and Theory (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and as a non-thesis option in Music Education, Musicology, and Theory.

The Master of Music degree (M.Mus.) is available in Composition, Performance, and Sound Recording. Specializations offered within the performance option are: piano, guitar, orchestral instruments (including orchestral training), organ and church music, conducting, collaborative piano, opera and voice, early music, and jazz.

The Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance is open to accomplished professional musicians, singers, or established chamber ensembles wishing one year of in-depth studies to complete a specific project.

The Doctor of Music degree (D.Mus.) is offered in Composition and Performance Studies while the Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) is available in Composition, Music – Gender and Women’s Studies, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Interdisciplinary studies are encouraged.

The Schulich School of Music has several sources of funding for graduate students:

Entrance Excellence Scholarships for highly ranked graduate students (including Schulich Scholarships, Max Stern Fellowships, and McGill Excellence Fellowships) typically range in value from $1,500 to $15,000; some two- and three-year multi-year packages are available at the master's and doctoral levels, respectively (see www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs.) A limited number of one-year differential fee waivers are also available for the most highly ranked incoming international students. The Scholarship and Student Aid Office offers information and options for out-of-province, American, and other international students (see www.mcgill.ca/studentaid).

In-course students may compete for a small number of Excellence Scholarships awarded annually to recognize excellence in academic and performance achievement.

The Schulich School of Music also has a renowned mentoring program that helps students develop applications for a wide variety of external funding for national, international, and university competitions (CIRMMT Research, DAAD, Fulbright, NSERC, NSERC Discovery, Connection grants, SSHRC, Vanier, etc.). Some provide for multi-year funding, others funding for individual projects.

Opportunities for funding through Work Study and as paid assistants also provide professional training. Positions for teaching assistantships are advertized each semester by departmental announcement. Typically there are few, if any, positions available for students in their first year of study. Other types of positions can include: invigilators, apprentice writers for program notes, sound recording technicians, library assistants, stage hands, Opera Studio, and front-of-house staff, among others. Posts are advertized through the Music Research and Performance Departments at the beginning of each semester and through the Work Study website.

A variety of research assistantships in selected areas are also available. Inquiries should be directed to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Associate Dean for Research.

Opportunities for paid performances in the community for soloists, choristers, chamber ensembles, organists, orchestral and jazz musicians, and piano collaborators are facilitated through the Booking Office (see www.mcgill.ca/music/about-us/contact-us/booking-office).

The Schulich School of Music also provides travel funding for conferences and special performance and research initiatives. Graduate students may apply once per academic year (see www.mcgill.ca/music/current-students/graduate/forms).

Master's Programs

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Music — Composition (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in the M.Mus. program develop their own individual voices through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members' diverse interests ensure that students will find a suitable mentor/supervisor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer students an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology, including mixed works, interactive composition, gestural controllers, acousmatic works, multichannel audio, computer-assisted composition, and more. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles (e.g., McGill Symphony Orchestra, McGill Contemporary Music Ensemble, etc.) and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations. Graduates have continued their studies at the doctoral level and then gone on to win prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize); they also have successful careers in composition, film, literature, conducting, and teaching.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides an opportunity for studio- and classroom-based teachers, and music educators working in other community settings, to explore current issues in music education and to implement their own research studies. Seminars develop facility in a breadth of research methodologies and examine pertinent research developments in different fields, while simultaneously providing opportunities to link with other departments such as the faculties of Education, Cognitive Psychology, and Physiology. Ties with The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology (CIRMMT), and Teaching and Learning Services provide a strong supportive network for interdisciplinary and multilingual research. Experienced faculty publishes regularly in the field’s leading journals in areas such as musical development, music perception, world and community-based music education, philosophical issues in music education, performance anxiety, music performance adjudication, technological applications, and the physiological bases of musical performance. Graduates of the program continue on to doctoral studies and pursue teaching careers around the world in various settings.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Technology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Music Technology is the only program of its kind in the world to apply cutting-edge scientific research to music and music making. Students are accepted from a wide range of musical backgrounds. Research goals are tied to the work of the area’s five faculty members and include the development of new and flexible strategies for sound analysis, real-time processing, synthesis and gestural control, instrument design, melodic pattern recognition, auditory display, music information retrieval, and symbolic manipulation of formal music representations, as well as the psychoacoustics of musical sounds and structures, among others. Students’ research is supported by the six laboratories forming the large multidisciplinary research infrastructure of The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), and almost unlimited technological resources (e.g., computing power, storage, measuring devices including several motion-capture systems). The Digital Composition Studio and state-of-the-art recording and acoustic environments provide opportunities to collaborate with accomplished performers and researchers in other music disciplines. Graduates hold commercial positions related to media technologies (e.g., gaming and audio industries) and continue their studies at the doctoral level in preparation for academic careers.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is for students interested in developing research projects that bridge traditional methodologies with new critical approaches in musicology. The area’s humanistic orientation emphasizes the importance of political, social, and literary history, while also encouraging students to develop their skills in musical analysis, their sensitivity to different styles and performance practices, and their awareness of issues in aesthetics. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research ranges from medieval and renaissance music to the popular music of today. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics also exist through links with other departments, the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate music history courses. Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level at McGill and other major North American universities; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and archival curation, among others.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Musicology (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Musicology requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Sound Recording (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
This internationally renowned program is a course-based, professional training program designed for musicians who wish to develop the skills required in the music recording and media industries. It is based on the German Tonmeister program and offers extensive, hands-on opportunities to record a broad spectrum of solo recitals, large opera, and symphonic repertoire with soloists and choirs, and complex Jazz Band and pop idioms. McGill’s professional-quality facilities provide state-of-the-art equipment for research and the recording of any size of ensemble in high-resolution multichannel audio and high-definition video, and include a variety of audio recording studios equipped for surround recording, four concert hall recording spaces, a technical ear training lab, an orchestral film scoring stage, an opera studio, and post-production and editing suites. The Faculty includes prominent researchers as well as award-winning recording engineers and producers in the fields of music production, television, and film sound familiar with cutting-edge technologies and new developments. The program also has close ties with industry that facilitate opportunities for internships. Graduates are leaders in the field working in highly respected studios around the world and winning both creative and scientific international competitions.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Theory is for students interested in exploring how specific pieces of music are put together and how this understanding may be generalized to relate to the way other pieces of music are composed. Music theory and elective seminars develop expertise in various analytical models and familiarity with the critical issues that define the discipline as a basis for developing individual research projects. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminar discussions facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics in perception and cognition exist through collaborations with music researchers from the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate theory courses. The Faculty has a breadth of experience in early music theory, formal functions, Schenkerian analysis, mathematical models, theories of rhythm and meter, serialism, and popular music analysis. Graduates have been accepted into doctoral programs at McGill, Yale, Eastman, Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, and Cambridge, among others.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Theory (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Theory requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University.

Master of Arts (M.A.): Music — Music Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits),

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits), and

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This course-based program has options in music education, musicology, and theory. Seminars provide breadth of disciplinary knowledge and understanding of research methodologies and critical issues. Expertise in two areas is developed through two written papers. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research covers a broad spectrum of topics central to each discipline. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking.

The option in Music Education provides an opportunity for studio-, classroom-, and community-based music educators to read, understand, and apply research studies in different fields to their own practices.

The option in Musicology is for students interested in a humanistic orientation to topics in music history and musicology that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches.

The option in Theory develops skill with different analytical models and the ways in which they may be used to explore how specific pieces of music are put together.

Some graduates continue to doctoral studies; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and librarianship, among others.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Vocal Pedagogy (Thesis) (47 credits)
The Master of Music: Vocal Pedagogy is not being offered in the 2014–2015 academic year.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Jazz Performance (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus. in Jazz Performance is flexibly designed to offer specialization in Jazz Composition, Jazz Performance, and Jazz Orchestra training. All students take courses in jazz pedagogy, composition, and arranging, and benefit from close interaction with a diverse, creative, and professionally active faculty. A recital and a CD recording of original music are the principal thesis requirements. Our outstanding ensembles include the McGill Jazz Orchestra, the ten-piece McGill Chamber Ensemble, two more jazz orchestras, a saxophone ensemble, and over twenty jazz combos. Teaching opportunities vary from year to year, but are generally available in Jazz Theory, Jazz Ear Training, Jazz Orchestra 3, Jazz Improvisation, and Jazz Combo. Montreal’s vibrant jazz scene also provides rich opportunities for performance and musical engagement. Graduates have active touring careers, teach in university jazz programs, and have produced recordings that have earned Juno awards.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Early Music (Thesis) (45 credits)
Established in 1975, this program is the longest-standing Early Music program in North America. It offers early music specialists interested in historical performance practices a rich variety of performing experiences, including 15–20 chamber ensembles (vocal, madrigal, viol, and recorder consorts, etc.), the Cappella Antica, and the Baroque Orchestra. McGill is also the only North American music faculty to produce a fully staged performance of an early opera every year. Recent productions include: Handel’s Alcina, Agrippina, and Imeneo, Lully’s Thésée, and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas. Faculty are prominently involved in Montreal’s internationally acclaimed Early Music community. The Schulich School of Music also owns a large collection of early instruments that is available to students. Graduates perform with Montreal-based early music ensembles, including, among others, Les Violons du Roy and the Arion Baroque Orchestra, as well as Aradia and Tafelmusik in Toronto, and various ensembles in Europe (e.g., Concerto Palatino, Centre de musique baroque de Versailles).
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Orchestral Instruments and Guitar (Thesis) (45 credits)
The premiere orchestral training program in Canada, this program is for talented instrumental musicians and guitarists wishing to hone their artistry and expressive, interpretative skills in a flexibly designed curriculum rich in performance opportunities. Ensembles emulate professional settings, and include five orchestras—two full orchestras (the renowned McGill Symphony Orchestra and the McGill Sinfonetta), one opera orchestra, one baroque orchestra, and one contemporary music ensemble—as well as one large wind symphony and one guitar ensemble. Opportunities for chamber music also abound. String players benefit from a rigorous string quartet training program and trail-blazing pedagogical approaches. Brass and wind musicians also perform a wide range of large ensemble repertoire for their instruments; percussionists perform, tour, and record with the esteemed McGill Percussion Ensemble. Thesis recitals foster individual creativity and diversity by offering a range of options important for orchestral musicians—orchestral excerpt exams run like orchestral auditions, chamber music recitals, and concerto competitions—as well as solo recitals, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects including collaborations with composers and the Digital Composition Studio, among others. There is a focus on healthy performance and a broad range of seminars that ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Ensemble conductors are world-class; faculty include the concertmasters and principal players of major Canadian orchestras, including the Montreal Symphony Orchestra; percussion instructors have international profiles and a breadth of experience in world and contemporary repertoires. Graduates have secured positions in orchestras throughout North and South America, and in Europe, and with the Canadian Opera Company, Ensemble Moderne, and others.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Collaborative Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program develop their artistry as collaborative musicians in vocal, instrumental, and opera repetiteur settings. The program is not a chamber music program in that it prepares pianists to assume coaching responsibilities as well as collaborate with other musicians. Candidates need to have excellent technique and interpretative skills, sight-reading abilities, and previous collaborative experience. The program is flexibly defined to allow students to specialize or gain experience in a variety of settings and with a broad cross-section of vocal, instrumental, orchestral, and theatrical repertoire. Concert recitals, choral ensembles, studio lessons with high-quality performers, and opera productions provide professional settings in which students master their craft. Faculty includes internationally renowned collaborative pianists, vocal coaches, conductors, and stage directors. Graduates pursue careers as collaborative pianists, accompanists, opera repetiteurs, studio teachers, and coaches.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus in Piano develops artistic expression and interpretative skills by immersing the advanced pianist in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program revolves around an integrated piano seminar involving all studios and includes collaborative opportunities in instrumental, vocal, and contemporary music performance at a high level, piano pedagogy, and performance practice through fortepiano/harpsichord study as options. Recital options include solo and chamber music performance, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects, including collaborations with strong composition students and the Digital Composition Studio. Dynamic faculty performs internationally and has diverse teaching, coaching, and adjudicating experience in a broad range of solo, chamber, and concerto repertoires. Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level, have been selected for national/international competitions, and pursue careers as collaborative pianists, opera coaches, and as independent studio teachers.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Organ and Church Music (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides talented organists and church music scholars with an opportunity to hone their artistry and interpretive skills. The flexibly designed program combines performance with seminars in historically informed performance practice, music and liturgy, counterpoint, improvisation, continuo playing, and choral conducting, among other options. Thesis performance options allow for creativity and diversity by including options for solo and chamber music recitals, concerto performances, recording projects, church music projects, and opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaborations with strong composers and other departments. Students benefit from excellent facilities that include practice organs built by Beckerath, Casavant, Tsuji, Wilhelm, and Wolff, as well as the famous French classical organ in Redpath Hall. A number of assistantships are available in downtown churches with some of Montreal’s most distinguished church musicians. Graduates have won prizes in major national and international competitions and pursue church music careers around the world.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Conducting (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program specialize in orchestral, wind, or choral conducting. Enrolment is limited to outstanding candidates having highly developed musical skills in voice, instrumental, or piano performance. The program provides for concentrated podium time, interactions with world-class conductors, score study, and the development of rehearsal technique. A range of seminars provides for the in-depth study of performance practice and the development of analytical skills with leading scholars in musicology and theory. Thesis performance projects involve concert recitals with various Schulich School of Music ensembles. Some graduates continue on to doctoral studies; others pursue conducting and teaching positions in schools, orchestras, and as opera assistants.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Opera and Voice (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus in Opera and Voice develops vocal growth and artistic expression by immersing students in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program provides the option for students to specialize in opera performance or to develop artistry in a variety of solo and operatic repertoires. There are three opera productions every year, including one Early Music opera with period instruments. Other performance opportunities include solo recitals, studio concerts, Cappella Antica, oratorios, chamber music ensembles, master classes with leading artists in the field, recording projects, and interdisciplinary collaborations. Performance opportunities emulate professional contexts, including rehearsals in a first-class opera studio and individual repertoire coaching with internationally renowned coaching staff. Voice faculty, stage directors, and set designers are outstanding soloists and creative artists involved with major companies, opera programs, and festivals the world over. McGill singers are selected to participate in various professional young artist programs and have won major national and international auditions including the MET auditions and NATSAA. Recent graduates perform with orchestras and opera companies in Canada, as well as companies in the United States, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and Eastern Europe.

Graduate Diploma

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance (30 credits)
This is a new, one-year postgraduate diploma providing concentrated study for three types of extremely accomplished musicians: the emerging or professional singer, emerging or established chamber ensemble (including jazz combos, piano collaborations), and the individual artist preparing for competition, audition, concerto performance, tour, recording project, etc. The flexibly designed program assumes a high level of performance (doctoral/professional) and involves intensive coaching, performance, and repertoire study/research tied to the artist’s or chamber ensemble’s professional goals, and a media project. Singers have voice coaching and training in movement and acting, with performance opportunities linked to McGill Opera productions. Ensembles develop individual artistry as well as group identity, with respect to sound, communication, skills, and performance practice. The first graduates of the program, the Cecilia String Quartet, won the 2010 International Banff String Quartet Competition and were prizewinners at the Bordeaux 2010 International Chamber Music Competition.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Composition
Students in this program create extended original works of art that push the boundaries of the discipline. Composers refine their musical language and artistic voice through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members have diverse interests that ensure composers will find a suitable mentor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer composers an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated, performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations. Graduates have won prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize, SOCAN competition) and have successful careers in university teaching, (freelance) composition, film, literature, and conducting.
Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Performance Studies
This program is for the artist/scholar. Students perform at a professional or near-professional level and have well-defined research interests linked to their performance. A broad range of seminars ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Seminars encourage the critical thinking and the fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music by providing a forum in which performers can interact with students in other areas. Comprehensive examinations provide students with an opportunity to develop credentials in three areas of expertise in preparation for teaching careers, while articulating the background and critical issues surrounding their thesis work. The latter consists of a lecture/recital and a paper (including a recording of the recital). Students benefit from exceptional mentoring by internationally renowned coaches, the research expertise of faculty from the Department of Music Research, master classes, opportunities to collaborate with strong composition students, and the rich performance life of the Schulich School of Music and Montreal. Students win major fellowships (SSHRC, Fulbright, FRQSC, Canada Council). Graduates have won major national and international competitions and pursue teaching and performing careers in a wide variety of contexts globally.

Ph.D. in Music

Students in the Ph.D. program pursue original research that makes a significant contribution to the fields of Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Seminars, a doctoral colloquium, visiting lecturer series, and international conferences provide forums for students from different areas to interact by encouraging the critical thinking and fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music through listening, performing, cutting-edge technologies, and analytical methods. Opportunities for inter- and cross-disciplinary collaborations exist through the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology; the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas; the Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; the Performance Department; other departmental links across the University and, in the technology areas, with science and industry. Supportive faculty recognized internationally as leaders in their respective disciplines mentor students from admission through job placements. Travel funding exists for students to present papers at conferences; many students win external scholarships (SSHRC, FRQSC, Vanier, Rhodes Scholar, etc.) and national and international awards; students gain valuable pedagogical or technological training through teaching and lab assistantships. Graduates pursue careers in academia, industry, composition, and various other arts-related fields.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — (Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, Theory)
The thesis for the Ph.D. in composition involves the creation of an original large-scale work and research that increases our understanding of music and musical processes. Students in music education investigate a broad spectrum of critical issues through a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The Musicology area adopts a humanistic orientation that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches. Research in Music Technology and Sound Recording can lead to patents, among other outcomes and benefits from unlimited technological resources. Theorists engage with all repertoires and analytical methods.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — Gender and Women's Studies
This program is open to doctoral students who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Music requirements are augmented by participation in a Research Methods course and a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in Opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Schulich School of Music Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s Degrees

Applicants for the master's degree must hold a B.Mus. or a B.A. degree with a Major or Honours in music including considerable work done in the area of specialization.

Applicants found to be deficient in their background preparation may be required to take certain additional undergraduate courses.

All applicants (except those for Performance, Musicology, and Sound Recording) will be required to take placement examinations.

All M.Mus. applicants will be required to take a live audition. Conducting and female voice applicants will be required to submit screening material for pre-selection. Following a review of these materials, selected applicants will be invited to attend a live audition (see www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate/audition-requirements).

Specific admission and document requirements for each program are outlined at: www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate.

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance

Applicants for the Graduate Diploma are typically highly accomplished performers who hold an M.Mus. or a B.Mus. degree with equivalent professional experience. All musicians are required to submit screening material (see D.Mus. audition list for repertoire and level at www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate/audition-requirements) and a statement of the proposed performance project (that may be completed within one year) by the application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants will be invited to pass a live entrance audition. Chamber ensembles must apply and complete diploma requirements as a formed ensemble.

D.Mus. Degree

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. degree in Composition, or its equivalent, and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application.

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Performance Studies must hold an M.Mus. degree in Performance, or its equivalent, and are required to submit screening material, samples of written work, and a statement of proposed artistic research interests by the specified application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants with artistic research interests will be invited to pass a live entrance audition and interview.

Ph.D. Degree

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. in Composition or equivalent and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application, and a written description (no more than two pages) of the research path(s) they wish to follow.

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology, Sound Recording, Music – Gender and Women's Studies, or Theory must hold a master's or a bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill degree, in Music Technology, Music Education, Musicology, Theory, or Sound Recording. Applicants with a bachelor's degree will normally be admitted to the M.A. program for the first year and may apply for admittance to the Ph.D. program after the completion of one full year of graduate coursework. Qualified applicants who have already completed an appropriate master's degree will be admitted to the second year of the Ph.D. program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • $61.56 audition fee for Performance degrees

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Schulich School of Music and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Physics

Physics

Location

  • Department of Physics
  • Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • 3600 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6485 (Graduate Information)
  • Fax: 514-398-8434
  • Email: graduate [dot] physics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.physics.mcgill.ca

About Physics

The Department of Physics currently has a faculty of approximately 40 members, including several holders of Canada Research Chairs and many other prestigious named Chairs. Additionally, we host an impressive number of postdoctoral fellows and research associates and run one of the largest and most vibrant graduate programs in North America. The graduate student enrolment is currently approximately 150.

Faculty members in the Department of Physics are recognized internationally for their excellence. Our members have received national and international prizes and fellowships including Les Prix Du Quebec, Steacie Prize, Sloan Fellowships, NSERC, and others too many to list here. They are also in constant demand as reviewers and referees. Students who earn advanced degrees from the Department of Physics will not only get an excellent education, they will also receive valuable guidance and network contacts to help with subsequent career steps.

The Department offers full M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs in a wide range of disciplines including astrophysics, atmospheric physics, bio-physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, laser spectroscopy, material physics, non-linear dynamics, nuclear physics, statistical physics, and medical-radiation physics.

Although most of the teaching and research facilities are located in the Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, the Department has space and research facilities in the Wong Materials Science Centre, adjacent to the Rutherford Building on McGill's lower campus. Our groups also conduct research at laboratories around the world including Argonne, CERN, FermiLab, SLAC, and TRIUMF.

Departmental researchers enjoy technical support in the areas of engineering, electronics, and precision machining. The Department maintains an excellent conventional machine shop as well as the McGill Nanotools-Microfab facility. Most of the scientific computing is done with an extensive in-house network of powerful workstations and several Beowulf clusters.

Remote access to supercomputing sites in Canada and the United States is also possible including the McGill HPC super-computing facility which is a part of the nationwide network of High Performance Computing Installations in Quebec.

The Department of Physics currently guarantees financial support of $22,000 per year for every graduate student. This minimum level of support can be supplemented by winning one of McGill's large number of in-house scholarships, worth up to $25,000 per year. For details, see www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/finance.html.

Graduate students in the Department of Physics come from many different countries and cultures from all over the world, providing a stimulating cosmopolitan atmosphere in the Department. This, coupled with the unique opportunities afforded by the city of Montreal, guarantees a quality of life that is second to none among Canadian universities. For graduate admission and application information, please visit www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/application.html.

Fields of Research:

High-Energy Physics

Theoretical: The McGill high energy theorists have interests in a wide range of areas within quantum field theory, string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology. Research areas of the high-energy theory faculty include applications of quantum field theory techniques to relativistic heavy ion collisions, baryogenesis, superstring cosmology, theory of cosmological perturbations, black hole physics, supergravity, three dimensional gravity, and various topics related to the physics and mathematics of superstring theory. The high-energy theorists have close connections to the nuclear theory group, the astrophysics group, the high-energy experimentalists, and to members of the Mathematics Department.

Experimental: The experimental high-energy physics group is engaged in a number of experiments at the research frontiers of the field, both in subatomic physics and in high-energy astrophysics. These include:

  • Electron-positron collisions: a group works on the BaBar experiment at SLAC and R&D for the proposed SuperB experiment at LNF in Italy, with specific interest in CKM matrix elements and physics beyond the Standard Model through studies of rare decays, and on R&D for a future International Linear Collider, with interest in calorimeter development.
  • Electron-proton collisions: a group is studying high-energy lepton-quark interactions using data from the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, with interest in deep inelastic scattering and flavour production.
  • Hadron-hadron collisions: CDF and Dzero groups employ Fermilab's energy frontier Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator to study top and bottom quarks and search for the Higgs boson. A group is also involved in major contributions to the next energy frontier at CERN's LHC, with work on the High Level Trigger for the ATLAS experiment.
  • High-energy particle astrophysics: ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using the newly commissioned VERITAS telescope array and development of the next-generation detector.

Students at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels are offered a strong program of research in a challenging and rapidly advancing field. Short term master's projects are based mainly on instrumentation or data analysis conducted on campus, while Ph.D. research may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Nuclear Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs include transport equations for heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy; nuclear equation of state from heavy ion collisions; fragmentation at intermediate energy; electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy ion collisions; effective Lagrangians for hadronic systems at finite temperature; and Quark-Gluon Plasma, QCD.

Experimental: Current research programs in experimental nuclear physics at McGill are focused on two main axes:

  • The study of heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies to determine the properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. This program is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN.
  • The study of ground state properties of unstable nuclei using laser spectroscopy techniques and ion traps. This work is being carried out using the Canadian Penning trap facility at the Argonne National Laboratory and at the accelerator ISOLDE (CERN), and the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

Furthermore, the Nuclear Physics Group has an active in-house research program that applies the ion trap and laser techniques to the detection of trace quantities of material and contaminants, and to ion spectroscopy.

Condensed Matter Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs involve the nonequilibrium, ab-initio modelling of molecular and nanoelectronic systems and devices; the study of quantum effects in interacting mesoscopic electron systems; nonequilibrium phenomena in extended systems; and applications of statistical mechanics to problems in biophysics.

Experimental: Current research programs involve the study of the time evolution of non-equilibrium systems via x-ray diffraction, fundamental quantum properties of strongly correlated systems at temperatures very near absolute zero, macromolecular interactions in living cells using single-photon and two-photon imaging, molecular electronics and nanoelectronic systems by scanning probe microscopy, dynamics and mechanical properties of soft matter systems and spatial organization and dynamics in living cells, mechanical behaviour of very small systems by high-resolution force microscopy, electronic properties that emerge at the limits of miniaturization and quantum computing, and nuclear methods to study interactions in magnetic materials that lead to exotic magnetic ordering behaviour. This includes studies of novel materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, unconventional superconductors, guantum dots, heterostructures, amorphous systems, and spin glasses.

Astrophysics

Research in the astrophysics group covers a wide range of topics including cosmology, galaxy formation, high-energy astrophysics, and extrasolar planets. This involves observations at all wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays to sub-mm, infrared and radio, using international observatories in space and on the ground. Experimental groups at McGill are involved in development and operation of ground-based high-energy gamma-ray observatories, and cosmic microwave background experiments. Theoretical work includes studies of how astrophysics and observational cosmology can experimentally determine the most important properties of dark matter and dark energy, studies of the diverse physics of neutron stars, and extrasolar planet formation.

Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics

This group studies nonlinear dynamical processes in the atmosphere and other geophysical systems, especially those associated with turbulent, chaotic, and extremely variable behaviour. Emphasis is placed on multifractal analysis and modelling as well as the development of new theories and techniques covering wide ranges of scale in time and space. Data from a variety of in situ and remotely sensed sources are used. This includes satellite data of the Earth's atmosphere and surface as well as high-quality precipitation data from the McGill Radar Weather Observatory.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physics (Thesis) (45 credits)
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physics
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Physics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc.

The normal requirement is a B.Sc. in Physics or equivalent, with high standing.

Ph.D.

The normal requirement is an M.Sc. in Physics or equivalent. On the recommendation of the Departmental Graduate Committee, fast-tracking from the M.Sc. program into the Ph.D. program may be granted after one year, if:

  • the student has fulfilled the M.Sc. coursework requirements, or;
  • the Committee determines that the student qualifies based on the student's academic record.

All students who transfer to the Ph.D. program are required to fulfil Ph.D. coursework requirements in addition to the courses taken as an M.Sc. candidate.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance will be offered to students in the form of a bursary, and teaching and research assistantships. For new students, financial support will be offered at the time of acceptance. Forms are given and filled out on registration day.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Physics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Computer Science

Computer Science

Location

  • School of Computer Science
  • McConnell Engineering, Room 318
  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7071, ext. 00074
  • Fax: 514-398-3883
  • Email: grad [dot] cs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.cs.mcgill.ca

About Computer Science

The School of Computer Science is one of the leading teaching and research centres for computer science in Canada. We offer a Ph.D. program and several M.Sc. programs. All include coursework and research. In the basic M.Sc. programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option, which requires a project. The Ph.D. program includes an option in bioinformatics, and the thesis M.Sc. program includes options in bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering. Students are normally funded by their adviser's research grants; in the case of scholarship students, this typically takes the form of a 'top-up' to the scholarship. Research in the School covers a broad range of areas, including:

  • Theory: algorithms, combinatorial optimization, computational geometry, cryptography, graph theory, logic and computation, programming languages, quantum computing, theory of computation, and scientific computing;
  • Systems: compilers, computer games, distributed systems, embedded and real-time systems, modelling and simulations, networks, software engineering;
  • Applications: bioinformatics, machine learning, robotics, computer animation, graphics, and vision.

All students must consult the graduate program website www.cs.mcgill.ca, where up-to-date information about the graduate programs is posted. Any questions concerning programs should be addressed to the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students with a strong interest in research in computer science who hold at least the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in CS. This program combines a strong course component with a research thesis. It is the usual (but not mandatory) entry point for students who wish to do a Ph.D., but is also the program of choice for students who want to find challenging and exciting jobs after their master's.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (45 credits)
This program option is to train graduates in state-of-the-art applications of numerical and modelling methods and computer technology to scientific and engineering problems. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students who want to obtain broad knowledge of advanced topics in computer science but without the requirement of a thesis. It offers an excellent preparation for the job market, but is not recommended for students interested in eventually pursuing a Ph.D.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science
The Ph.D. program trains students to become strong, independent researchers in the field of their choice. Our graduates take challenging positions in industry or take academic positions at universities and research labs. In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, applicants should normally hold a master's degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university, but exceptional students can be admitted to the Ph.D. program directly without a master's degree.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Computer Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s (M.Sc.)

The minimum requirement for admission is a bachelor's degree (cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 or better, or equivalent) with the coursework in Computer Science as listed on our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/msc_applicants.

The website supplements the information in this publication, and should be consulted by all graduate students.

Ph.D.

In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, normally applicants should hold an M.Sc. degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university. Students who hold a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science but have an exceptionally strong academic record may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program, but they must initially apply to the M.Sc. program. Students who are in the M.Sc. program have the option to be fast-tracked into the Ph.D. program at the end of their first academic year, contingent on excellent performance as judged by the Ph.D. committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae – required for Ph.D. program
  • Statement of Purpose – required for Ph.D. program
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE General Test) – required for degrees from outside Canada. Recommended for Ph.D. program.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Computer Science and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1
Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only)
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

For further details on our admission requirements, please visit our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/applying.

Scholarship Deadlines: January 1 for applicants who wish to be considered for scholarship awards; otherwise, March 1 for admission to the Fall term.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Law

Law

Location

  • Faculty of Law
  • Graduate Programs in Law
  • New Chancellor Day Hall
  • 3644 Peel Street, Room 406
  • Montreal QC H3A 1W9
  • Canada

Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) – Angela Campbell

About Law

Graduate students in Law at McGill have one thing in common: a sharp curiosity to explore ideas and projects in an environment that is uniquely comparative and pluralist.

The extensive and impressive history of graduate teaching and supervision at McGill, combined with the innovations in legal pedagogy for which the Faculty of Law is celebrated, create an unrivaled quality and experience for graduate students. Grounded in Montreal, a city that embodies a lively mix of languages, cultures, and communities, the Faculty of Law invites students pursuing their D.C.L. and LL.M. degrees to discover and write within a community of legal scholars that is internationally renowned and engaging.

McGill Law is a meeting place for the major languages of North America, for the world’s legal traditions, and for students who wish to participate in the graduate life of a truly outstanding, prestigious, and intellectually vibrant Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law offers a range of programs at the graduate level. These include the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), as well as graduate certificates.

Students may choose to pursue either the LL.M. or the D.C.L. in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL), or the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL). Graduate certificates may only be completed within either the IASL or the ICL.

The Faculty of Law promotes study and research in private, commercial, international, and public law, as well as legal theory, from the perspectives of diverse legal traditions. In collaboration with the McGill School of Environment, the Faculty offers an LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis option in Environment. The Faculty also offers two other options within the LL.M. degree, a cross-disciplinary European Studies Option (ESO; availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year) in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts, and a specialization in Bioethics. The D.C.L. degree always involves a substantial thesis.

The Institute of Air and Space Law operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute offers a curriculum exploring legal issues that arise from international civil aviation and new technologies in space. It provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal processes regulating worldwide aerospace activities. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law.

The Institute of Comparative Law operates within the Faculty of Law as a centre of comparative legal studies. It accommodates national, international, and transnational studies and encourages openness to diverse legal cultures in teaching and research. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law.

Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degrees

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education primarily through research, as the program concentrates on the production of a 30,000-word thesis, as well as some graduate-level coursework.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Bioethics (45 credits)
The master’s specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes both the conceptual and practical aspects of Bioethics. Students apply through either the Faculty of Law, Medicine, Religious Studies, or the Department of Philosophy. Students entering pursuing an LL.M., Bioethics, are bound by the requirements of the Faculty of Law’s LL.M. program. This program is offered in the thesis option only.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of the Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis), providing students with an appreciation for the role of science, politics, and ethics in informed decision-making in the environment sector.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); European Studies (46 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within the existing LL.M. Thesis program. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood.
Note: Availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education largely through graduate-level coursework. The program requires two terms of coursework as well as a 15,000-word research project.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis) providing students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environment sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.

Institute of Air and Space Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to focus on original scholarly research and writing under the supervision of a law professor. This program involves 20 credits in coursework and 25 research credits (a thesis of 100–150 pages). The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent analysis, writing skills, and organization.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to gain a wide exposure to a range of taught courses within, and related to, the domain of Air and Space Law. The Non-Thesis option requires a substantial Supervised Research Project (18 credits), with the remaining 27 credits earned in courses.

Institute of Comparative Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their master’s thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their individual master’s supervised research project (for LL.M. Master’s Non-Thesis students). Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) Degrees

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.)
The Doctor of Civil Law program is centred around the doctoral thesis, which develops a substantive and original contribution to legal research and knowledge under the supervision of a faculty member. Many doctoral candidates intend on pursuing an academic career, and develop their approach to pedagogy, research, and writing while at McGill.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Air and Space Law
The Doctor of Civil Law in the Institute of Air and Space Law is a research degree ideal for scholars intent on deepening and broadening their critical understanding of the law, as well as their original engagement with it. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination to be done at the end of the first year, or during the second year of the D.C.L. program. The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidenced in concept and execution the original work of the candidate.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Comparative Law
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes doctoral students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their doctoral thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Graduate Certificates in Law

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a coursework program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis. This certificate is particularly appropriate for jurists and other professionals who wish to pursue graduate-level legal studies in aviation, air and space law, government regulations, conventions, and treaties dealing with these areas.
Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) to candidates who do not wish to undertake the master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Law Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law reviews applications and makes recommendations regarding admission. Final admission decisions are determined by admissions policies set by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

For information and application forms, please visit the Faculty website www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions or contact the Graduate Programs Office in Law, McGill University, at the Departmental address, or via email at grad [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca or telephone at 514-398-6635.

Note that applicants must submit their application through uApply. Any questions regarding the status of an application must be sent via the uApply communication tool.

Language Requirement

Graduate-level courses are generally offered in English, and English-language abilities must be demonstrated for admission. In order to understand all course material, the ability to speak and read French is an asset. At McGill's Faculty of Law, all students may choose to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or French. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian or American (English or French) institution, must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, Cambridge English Language Assessment, or EDEXCEL offices. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. For an application to be considered, a TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, Cambridge English Language Assessment, or EDEXCEL test result, McGill Certificate of Proficiency in English or McGill Certificate of Proficiency – English for Professional Communication must be submitted.

One of the following language requirements must be met: 100 on the TOEFL (iBT) with each component score no less than 25, 600 on the TOEFL (PBT), a band score of 7.0 or greater on the IELTS, a grade of 85 or higher on the MELAB, a grade of “A” (Excellent) on the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CAE), a grade of “B” (Good) or higher on the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CPE), an overall grade of at least “Distinction” on the EDEXCEL (Level 4) or an overall grade of at least “Merit” on the EDEXCEL (Level 5).

For information about the TOEFL, including the registration process, visit www.ets.org/toefl. For information about the IELTS, visit www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and it takes approximately 40 days to communicate the results. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institutions to McGill University. McGill’s institutional code is 0935; this code must be provided to the testing agencies when requesting a test report form. For further information on English proficiency tests, visit www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions/requirements.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the D.C.L. program occurs only when all four of the following conditions are met:
  1. The candidate holds a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.).
  2. The candidate holds a master's degree (or equivalent) in Law with thesis from McGill University or another university. (Review of the master’s thesis is normally part of the admission decision–making process. In exceptional cases, a candidate with a non-thesis master's degree with an outstanding academic record may be admitted to the D.C.L. program.)
  3. The candidate maintained, for each of the above degrees, a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 (or equivalent) or higher. (Note that this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire dossier, including the applicant's reference letters and the quality of the research proposal.)
  4. The Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of the candidate's previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a D.C.L. program.

Admission to the doctoral program is always dependent on the availability of a suitable supervisor.

LL.M. Degrees

Candidates for admission to the master's programs must hold a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.), with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 our of 4.0 (or equivalent). Note that this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire dossier, including the applicant's reference letters and the quality of the research proposal.

LL.M. Interdisciplinary Options

  1. Environment Option: This option is available to students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis program at the Faculty of Law. For further information, see this eCalendar under McGill School of Environment > Graduate > Academic Programs > Environment or visit www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.
  2. European Studies Option: This option is available to students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis program at the Faculty of Law. Note the availability of this option is subject to relevant courses offered in a given year.

LL.M. Specialization in Bioethics

Requirements for admission to the master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information, see this eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioethics or visit www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the graduate certificate programs are essentially the same as for the master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience. For further information, visit www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions/requirements. Graduate certificate programs are available in the following two fields:

  1. Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law
  2. Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law
Note: ALL international students must obtain permission to study from the governments of Quebec and Canada. Immigration Quebec issues the Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada issues federal Study Permits. You may also wish to contact International Student Services at www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents for assistance.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by the Faculty of Law:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Faculty of Law and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The application deadline to all graduate law programs (LL.M., D.C.L., graduate certificates) is December 15. The Faculty of Law will not consider applications received on or after December 16.

The Faculty of Law offers Fall term admission only; the Faculty will not consider applications for Winter or Summer entry. Applications submitted for the Winter and Summer terms will be cancelled WITHOUT reimbursement of the application fee.

Note: The application fee remains non-refundable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 31, 2014).

Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Psychology

Location

  • Department of Psychology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W8/33A
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6124/514-398-6100
  • Fax: 514-398-4896
  • Email: gradsec [at] ego [dot] psych [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.psych.mcgill.ca

About Psychology

The aim of the Experimental program is to provide students with an environment in which they are free to develop skills and expertise that will serve during a professional career of teaching and research as a psychologist. Coursework and other requirements are at a minimum. Success in the program depends on the student's ability to organize unscheduled time for self education. Continuous involvement in research planning and execution is considered a very important component of the student's activities. Students are normally expected to do both master’s and doctoral study.

M.A. and M.Sc. degrees may be awarded in Experimental Psychology, but only as a step to the Ph.D.—students undergo formal evaluation beginning with the submission of their master's requirements (thesis or fast-track paper) to enter Ph.D. 2.

The Clinical program adheres to the scientist practitioner model and as such is designed to train students for careers in university teaching or clinical research, and for service careers (working with children or adults in hospital, clinical, or educational settings). Most of our clinical graduates combine service and research roles. While there are necessarily many more course requirements than in the Experimental program, the emphasis is again on research training. There is no master’s program in Clinical Psychology; students are expected to complete the full program leading to a doctoral degree.

Research interests of members of the Psychology Department include animal learning, behavioural neuroscience, clinical, child development, cognitive science, health psychology, psychology of language, perception, quantitative psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology.

Facilities for advanced research in a variety of fields are available within the Department itself. In addition, arrangements exist with the Departments of Psychology at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Allan Memorial Institute, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Montreal General Hospital, to permit graduate students to undertake research in a hospital setting. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.)

Students interested in neuroscience may apply to graduate programs in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience (IPN) department and work with an IPN supervisor from the Department of Psychology. For information about programs offered by the IPN department, see the eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Neuroscience (Integrated Program in) and www.mcgill.ca/ipn.

For full information about all programs and financial aid, and for application forms, contact the Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Psychology.

Ph.D. Option in Language Acquisition (LAP)

Information about this option is available from the Department and at: www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html.

Ph.D. Option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSO)

A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology is offered within the existing Ph.D. program in Psychology. Information about this option is available from the Department and at: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/oncology/programs/programs_psychosocialoncology.asp.

Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.
Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Language Acquisition
This unique interdisciplinary program focuses on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition Program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Psychosocial Oncology
The Department of Oncology, in conjunction with the Ingram School of Nursing, the Department of Psychology and the School of Social Work, has developed the cross-disciplinary Psychosocial Oncology Option (PSOO). This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Please note: there have been changes in the required documents for the admission and application procedures. Please consult the link http://www.psych.mcgill.ca/grad/program/application_admission.htm for additional requirements.

Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program depends on an evaluation of students' research interests and their aptitude for original contributions to knowledge and, if applicable, for professional contributions in the applied field.

The usual requirement for admission is an Honours or majors degree (B.A. or B.Sc.) in Psychology. This usually includes an introductory course plus twelve courses in psychology (each equivalent to three term hours). Courses in experimental psychology, the theoretical development of modern ideas in psychology, and statistical methods as applied to psychological problems (equivalent to an introductory course) are essential. Applicants' knowledge of relevant biological, physical, and social sciences is considered. Students applying to the clinical program are advised to complete 42 specific undergraduate credits in psychology as specified by the Order of Psychologists of Quebec.

Applicants who hold a bachelor's degree but who have not met these usual requirements should consult the Graduate Program Director to determine which (if any) courses must be completed before an application can be considered. Students with insufficient preparation for graduate work may register as Special Students (undergraduate level) in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science, and follow an appropriate course of study. Such registration requires the permission of the Department but carries no advantage with respect to a student's eventual admission to graduate studies.

Applicants should note that the deadline for many scholarships and fellowships is about four months earlier than the application deadlines and that applications for scholarships and fellowships should be submitted through their home university.

Applicants with little or no background in psychology are not required to submit scores on the subject component of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). We highly recommend to all other students to submit scores on the subject component of the GRE. If you did not take the GRE subject test and are accepted into the program, you may be asked to take it in April. All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Three letters of reference
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Political Science

Political Science

Location

  • Department of Political Science
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 414
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Political Science

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. (with or without thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. These programs combine depth of specialization in a particular field with breadth of knowledge in related fields. The staff offers courses and supervises research on most of the important areas of political science. Students may specialize in any of the following: Canadian Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, or International Relations.

M.A. graduates gain the scholarly preparation required to proceed to the Ph.D. program at McGill or elsewhere. Alternatively, the M.A. degree prepares graduates for teaching at the college level, for advanced study in other disciplines, or for rewarding jobs in government and in the private sector. Students in the M.A. program may choose either the Research Essay option or the Thesis option. Both options are generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada.

Besides its traditional M.A. program, the Department also offers M.A. options in Social Statistics, Development Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and European Studies. Interested students must apply and be accepted to both the political science M.A. program and to the option program.

Graduate students can benefit from expertise and advanced scholarship in such diverse research areas as Electoral Studies, Comparative Federalism, Constitutional Theory and Practice, International Peace and Security Studies, International Development, Nations and Nationalism, Health and Social Policy, and Identity Politics. For a full list of our affiliated research centres and institutes, please consult our website: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/centres.

Changes may take place after this content is published. Students are advised to contact the Department Office for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.

Master's Programs

Students may select a program with the Thesis or the Non-Thesis (Research Project) option in completing M.A. degree requirements. They may switch from one option to the other while completing their coursework.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. A main purpose of the M.A. degree is to demonstrate an ability to design and execute with competence a major piece of research, comparable to a full‐length article in a scholarly journal. The length will vary with the nature of the topic. A thesis that contains considerable data analysis might be well developed in 50 pages, while an institutional or historical study would generally be longer.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European Studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. Students in the non-thesis program will submit a research essay. The research essay will normally be based on a paper written for a graduate seminar or an independent reading course. The research essay requirement also applies to each of the non-thesis options listed below.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The Gender and Women’s Studies Option offers McGill graduate students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework, a cross‐disciplinary specialization in feminist, and gender and/or women’s studies, deploying a wide array of disciplinary methodologies and modes of inquiry. The student's research paper must be on a topic centrally focused on gender and/or women's studies. See www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
The Social Statistics Option complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data or equivalent. Students complete course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, as advised by the Option Adviser, and subject to approval by the Department, and a statistics‐based M.A. research paper in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. See www.mcgill.ca/socialstatistics. Entrance to this option is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee subsequent to acceptance into the Departmental program. A research paper is required to demonstrate proficiency in research. It is normally about 50 pages in length and involves revision of a paper written for one of the graduate courses completed in the program. The research paper is evaluated by two faculty members in the Department.

Ph.D. Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science
The doctoral program is designed to give students the necessary foundation for making original contributions to knowledge. Graduate courses provide students with analytical and theoretical tools used in particular subfields. This general training includes specialized training in research methods. Recent graduates of our doctoral program are pursuing diverse employment opportunities. See: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/recentplacements.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Political Science and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. This option is a cross-disciplinary specialization run by the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies (see www.mcgill.ca/igsf). The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies. For more information on the option, see: www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Political Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The graduate Admissions Committee only considers applications from those who already have an undergraduate academic degree in political science or a closely related field (e.g., international studies, sociology, philosophy for prospective political theorists, etc.). Those without this required background occasionally enrol as Special Students in the undergraduate program and take upper-level undergraduate courses in order to build the academic record necessary to apply to the graduate program.

Master's

Students holding a B.A. degree may be eligible for admission to the M.A. program. Preparation equivalent to a McGill Honours program in Political Science is desirable.

Ph.D.

Students holding a master’s degree in political science may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program. In some instances, outstanding students with a B.A. in Political Science may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program without having completed an M.A. degree. They will be considered Ph.D. 1 and some previous political science coursework could be applied to the requirements of the program, provided that it did not count toward any other degree.

Reference Letters

All applicants, including those who have done their undergraduate work at McGill, must submit two letters of reference. It is recommended that you contact your referees at least a month in advance of the deadline. Applications that do not have references by January 15 will not be considered.

GRE and TOEFL Exams

GRE results are required for applications to the doctoral program. Use codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 1999. The test should be written well in advance of the application deadline. See www.ets.org/gre for more information on registering for the test. GRE results are not required for students applying to the master's program.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian/American institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) is required for admission. Please use the codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 89 when writing the TOEFL exam. See www.ets.org/toefl for more information on registering for the test. The IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) with a minimum overall band of 6.5 is also acceptable. Files will not be considered unless TOEFL/IELTS scores are received before the application deadline (January 15 for admission in the Fall).

For more information, consult the following websites: www.ets.org/gre and www.ets.org/toefl.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Writing Sample – Ph.D. only
  • GRE – required for applications to the Ph.D.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Political Science Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Completed applications (including all supporting documentation listed above) for all graduate programs in Political Science must be received by January 15. For detailed information, please see the Graduate Applicant Checklist at: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/gradformsdocs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics and Statistics

Location

  • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3800
  • Fax: 514-398-3899
  • Email: grad [dot] mathstat [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.math.mcgill.ca

About Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs that can be focused on applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to master’s degrees (M.A. or M.Sc.), with program options in Bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE). The research groups are: Algebra Category; Theory and Logic; Geometric Group Theory; Algebraic Geometry; Discrete Mathematics; Mathematical Physics; Analysis and its Applications; Differential Geometry; Number Theory; Applied Mathematics; Differential Equations; and Probability and Statistics. In the basic master’s programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option which requires a project. The Bioinformatics and CSE options require a thesis. In addition to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Statistics, there is a Ph.D. option in Bioinformatics.

The Department website (www.math.mcgill.ca) provides extensive information on the Department and its facilities, including the research activities and the research interests of individual faculty members. It also provides detailed information, supplementary to this eCalendar, concerning our programs, admissions, funding of graduate students, thesis requirements, advice concerning the choice of courses, etc.

Students are urged to consult the website (www.math.uqam.ca/ISM) of the Institut des Sciences Mathématiques (ISM), which coordinates intermediate and advanced-level graduate courses among Montreal and Quebec universities. A list of courses available under the ISM auspices can be obtained from the ISM website. The ISM also offers fellowships and promotes a variety of joint academic activities greatly enhancing the mathematical environment in Montreal and in the province of Quebec.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the Master's degree (M.A.). The thesis option requires a thesis (24 credits) and six approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 21 credits.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The non-thesis option requires a project (16 credits) and eight approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 29 credits.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.). The thesis option requires a thesis (24 credits) and six approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 21 credits.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (47 credits)
CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. Please visit our website for more information: www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/msc_cse_option.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.).The non-thesis option requires a project (16 credits) and eight approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 29 credits.

Ph.D. Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics
The Department offers a course of studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. It differs substantially from the master’s programs in that the student must write a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge. The thesis topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the research supervisor. The thesis must be examined and approved by an internal examiner (normally the research supervisor), an external examiner and the Oral Examination Committee. The student must make an oral defense of the thesis before that Committee. In addition, the student has to pass comprehensive examinations.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mathematics and Statistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements, the Department requirements are as follows:

Master's Degree

The normal entrance requirement for the master's programs is a Canadian honours degree or its equivalent, with high standing, in mathematics or a closely related discipline in the case of applicants intending to concentrate in statistics or applied mathematics.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in pure mathematics should have a strong background in linear algebra, abstract algebra, and real and complex analysis.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in statistics should have a strong background in linear algebra and basic real analysis. A calculus-based course in probability and one in statistics are required, as well as some knowledge of computer programming. Some knowledge of numerical analysis and optimization is desirable.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in applied mathematics should have a strong background in most of the areas of linear algebra, analysis, differential equations, discrete mathematics, and numerical analysis. Some knowledge of computer programming is also desirable.

Students whose preparation is insufficient for the program they wish to enter may, exceptionally, be admitted to a Qualifying year.

Ph.D. Degree

A master's degree with high standing is required, in addition to the requirements listed above for the master’s program. Students may transfer directly from the master’s program to the Ph.D. program under certain conditions. Students without a master's degree, but with exceptionally strong undergraduate training, may be admitted directly to Ph.D. 1.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – In the personal statement, the applicants should clearly explain their choice of preferred research group(s) and preferred area(s) of research, as well as providing relevant information that will not be reflected on their transcripts.
  • Research Proposal (optional) – If applicants have a specific research problem of interest that they want to pursue, they may discuss the details in the research proposal.
  • Applicants in pure and applied mathematics should provide a GRE score report, if available

For more details, please consult the website at www.math.mcgill.ca/students/graduate/application.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

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