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History and Classical Studies

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

History and Classical Studies

Location

  • Department of History and Classical Studies
  • Stephen Leacock Building, 7th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About History and Classical Studies

The Department of History and Classical Studies has particular strengths in Canadian history, British and European history, East Asian history, the history of medicine, the history of science, and newer fields such as the history of gender and sexuality, the history of the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds, and global history. The Department offers interdisciplinary options in European studies, developmental studies, and women’s studies at the M.A. level. Both M.A. and Ph.D. students can also write their thesis or research paper on the History of Medicine. The Department is composed of 39 full-time faculty members as well as a strong complement of visiting professors, faculty lecturers, and postdoctoral fellows. This array of dedicated teachers and scholars supports high-quality instruction and research across the periods of history and regions of the globe. Our professors have won many prizes for their books and articles, and their ongoing investigations are supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the FQRSC, CFI, the Killam Trust, and the Mellon Foundation. The Department is home to a number of major collaborative research projects, all of which also include students. Among these are the Montreal History Group; the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC); Quelques arpents de neige, an environmental history group; and the French Atlantic History Group.

Classics was among the first disciplines taught at McGill College. Our students benefit from the resources of closely related disciplines and draw on the academic expertise of scholars from various backgrounds. Many awards and prizes are available for students who excel in the classroom, and both undergraduates and graduates can join professors on study tours and field projects. Students can also become members of the Classics Students Association and publish their work in the McGill Journal of Classical Studies, aptly titled Hirundo—Latin for “swallow,” like the martlets found on the McGill coat-of-arms, ever soaring in search of knowledge.

We offer prospective students the chance to study with leading scholars in a variety of fields.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed regulations and information (www.mcgill.ca/history).

Degrees in History

The M.A. program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year (Fall, Winter, and Summer). Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. The M.A. in History offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of history in a variety of fields. The McGill History degree carries international prestige and cachet and contributes meaningfully to success on the job market. Careers pursued by our graduates, aside from those who have sought and found places on the faculties of colleges and universities, have included positions in the area of public history at museums and other public institutions, in libraries and archives, in the diplomatic and other branches of the civil service, and in a variety of NGOs.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. Preparation of a thesis provides an opportunity for the preparation of a sustained project under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The seminars, in particular, provide an opportunity to analyze primary sources under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues and write their research paper on a topic approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. Degree in the History of Medicine does not have a thesis option. This non-thesis degree is normally completed in one year. Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The curriculum is intended to provide students with a strong disciplinary competence in history and a distinctively interdisciplinary perspective. Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History, or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); History
The Ph.D. in History is a professional degree program that prepares students for participation in the academy as historians. They gain competence in historical methods and good control over at least three fields of study. The dissertation is a work of primary research that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. Candidates in the field of Medical History will prepare the major field for the comprehensive examination with a member of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the two minor fields with members of the Department of History and Classical Studies. The thesis will normally be directed by the director of the major field. In all other respects, the same rules will apply to candidates in this area as apply to other Ph.D. students in History.

Degrees in Classics

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Classics offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of classical studies in a variety of fields. The program emphasizes proficiency both in technical areas of the discipline, especially Greek and Latin language, and in critical reading, writing, and research skills. The McGill M.A. in Classics is designed to prepare students to enter doctoral programs and, eventually, an academic career in any of the related fields of classical studies. Graduates have also pursued successful careers in teaching, law, museum science, and branches of civil service. This program can be completed in one year, though it is normally completed in two years.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Classics
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

History and Classical Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General: minimum CGPA of 3.3 on 4.0; minimum TOEFL of 550 on the paper-based test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score no less than 20.

Master in History

Normally, candidates are required to possess a B.A. (Honours) in History consisting of 60 credits in history. Students with other undergraduate history degrees (normally including serious research components) may be considered eligible. Applicants not satisfying these conditions but otherwise judged worthy of serious consideration will be asked to register in a Qualifying program in which they will undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Master in History – Development Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – European Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – Gender and Women's Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either History—B.A. (Honours) or equivalent—or a degree in one of the health professions with some background in history. Candidates with a willingness to do preparatory work in history are also encouraged to apply.

Ph.D. in History

Normally, an M.A. in History (Students choosing the field of History of Medicine normally enter with an M.A. in History of Medicine).

Master in Classics

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. in Classics

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed information (www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate).

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of History and Classical Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

Location

  • Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
  • Jewish General Hospital
  • 3755 Chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Suite E-903
  • Montreal QC H3T 1E2
  • Canada

About Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

The Master of Science degree in Otolaryngology trains otolaryngologists and physicians for clinical or basic science research in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. Master's programs can include research on normal function and disease of head and neck structures: otology, neuro-otology, laryngology, rhinology, oncology, surgery, auditory-vestibular sciences, middle-ear modelling, oto-toxicity, genomics, infection, thyroid disease, or genetics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Otolaryngology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The master's program is intended for otolaryngologists or for physicians with a strong interest in otolaryngology research. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) may be considered. The program addresses research questions using an interdisciplinary approach, combining methodologies of both the clinical sciences and the basic sciences. The master's program is unique in Canada and rare elsewhere. Medical professionals graduating from the program can better treat ear-nose-throat diseases; they are better positioned to do, and to evaluate, research in Otolaryngology. They typically obtain the most highly sought positions in their fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Otolaryngology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the M.Sc. program requires acceptance by a research supervisor, and the proposed program must be approved by the Department.

Applicants should be otolaryngologists, or they should be currently enrolled in a residency program leading to certification in Otolaryngology, or they should be physicians. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) with a strong interest in Otolaryngology Research will be considered.

The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (minimum of 550 on the paper-based test or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20) is required for applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Prospective students should contact research supervisors individually.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Otolaryngology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Occupational Health

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Occupational Health

Location

  • Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health
  • Purvis Hall
  • 1020 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1A2
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6258
  • Email: graduate [dot] eboh [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/occh

About Occupational Health

The Department of Occupational Health offers two graduate degree programs: a doctorate (Ph.D.) and master (M.Sc.(A.)) in occupational health sciences. The master's program is available on campus or in distance education format. Special Student status may be granted to students who wish to take only specific courses from our M.Sc. program. There is a maximum of 12 credits overall, with a maximum of 6 credits per semester.

Students are required to have access to a computer and the Internet as some of the course material is most readily available by accessing the web.

Note: We are not accepting applications for the Occupational Health Ph.D. or the M.Sc.A. (Distance) programs until further notice.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Occupational Health (Resident) (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
A one-year program in health and hygiene appropriate for physicians, nurses, and graduates from engineering and basic sciences. Occupational health training allows candidates to evaluate work environments and attenuate work hazards using prevention and control.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Occupational Health (Distance) (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is not accepting applicants for 2014–2015.

A three-and-a-half-year program completed mostly over the Internet.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Occupational Health

This program is not accepting applicants for 2014–2015.

The objective of this program is to train independent researchers in the field of work environment and health.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Occupational Health Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum score of 550, or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20.

M.Sc. Applied Program (Resident) (on campus)

Candidates should have completed, with a standing equivalent to a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, one of the requisites below:

  • a Bachelor of Science degree or its equivalent, in a discipline relevant to occupational health or hygiene such as: chemistry, engineering, environmental sciences, physics
  • an M.D. (medicine)
  • a B.Sc. in health sciences or nursing

Distance Education

Note: We are not accepting applications for the Occupational Health Distance program until further notice.

Candidates should have completed, with a standing equivalent to a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, one of the requisites below:

  • a Bachelor of Science degree, or its equivalent, in a discipline relevant to occupational health or hygiene such as: chemistry, engineering, environmental sciences, physics
  • an M.D. (medicine)
  • a B.Sc. in health sciences or nursing

Candidates should have at least three years of experience in industrial hygiene and/or in safety.

For medical doctors and nurses, priority will be given to candidates with at least three years of experience in occupational health.

Ph.D. Program

Note: We are not accepting applications for the Occupational Health Ph.D. program until further notice.

Candidates must hold an M.Sc. degree or its equivalent in occupational health sciences, or in a relevant discipline, such as: community health, environmental health, epidemiology, chemistry, engineering, physics, or health sciences (medicine, nursing, etc.).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Resident (on campus)

Eligible candidates may be invited for an interview with members of the Admissions Committee of the Department.

Applications are considered for Fall term only. Applications for Winter/Summer term admission will not be considered, with the exception of admission as Special Students in the Winter term.

Distance Education

Students are required to have access to a computer and the Internet as the course material is available through the web.

Ph.D. Program

Each student will be assigned to one academic staff member of the Department, who will act as his/her supervisor, and who will guide him/her in the preparation of a definite research protocol.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

M.Sc. Applied (Resident)

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement

M.Sc. Applied (Distance Education)

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement

Ph.D. Program

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Apr. 30
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter/Summer term admission will not be considered, with the exception of admission as Special Students in the Winter term.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

 

Human Genetics

Human Genetics

Location

  • Department of Human Genetics
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, N5/13
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
Administration
Kandace Springer – Administrative Assistant
  • Email: kandace [dot] springer [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Ross Mackay – Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: ross [dot] mackay [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Laura Benner (On Leave) – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
Kailee Bialaszewski (Acting) – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: dept [dot] humangenetics [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Human Genetics

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees in Human Genetics

The Department of Human Genetics offers a clinical master’s program in Genetic Counselling, as well as research training at both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels. Both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs require the completion of a thesis, which is the major focus of the student's effort. A minimal amount of coursework is required, but specific course choices are flexible and vary according to the student's previous training and current research interest. The Department also offers a Bioinformatics option. Information on the Bioinformatics option can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/mcb/academic/graduate.

Most of the faculty of the Human Genetics Department are located in McGill teaching hospitals, reflecting the medically learned knowledge at the core of human genetic studies.

Faculty have a wide variety of research interests, which embrace: cancer genetics, cytogenetics, reproductive biology, neurogenetics, and genomic and genetic basis of human diseases. Detailed information regarding faculty research interest can be found on the Department web page at www.mcgill.ca/humangenetics/prospective-students/supervision.

Students accepted into the Human Genetics research graduate program will receive a minimum stipend of $15,000, plus tuition and fees.

Tuition Differential Fee Waivers

A certain number of tuition differential fee waivers will be offered to incoming out-of-province/international students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. Students who have a CGPA of 3.5 out of 4.0 or above (as converted by McGill GPS guidelines) and who submit online application and documents by March 31 (Fall), Sept. 30 (Winter) will automatically be considered for a tuition waiver.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
McGill University offers specialized education in bioethics to graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Religious Studies, and Law, and the Department of Philosophy. The Master's degree Specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Genetic Counselling (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program provides the academic foundation and clinical training required for the contemporary practice of genetic counselling. Genetic counsellors are health professionals who provide information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorders and to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited conditions. Genetic counsellors investigate the problem present in the family, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence, and review available options with the family. Some counsellors also work in administrative and academic capacities, and many engage in research activities. The curriculum includes a variety of required courses in human genetics and other departments, and 40 weeks of supervised clinical training spread over four semesters. Graduates will be eligible to sit for both the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors and the American Board of Genetic Counselling certification examinations. Upon completion of the M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program, students will demonstrate competence in, or satisfactory knowledge of: principles of human genetics, including cytogenetics, biochemical, molecular, and population genetics; methods of interviewing and counselling, and the dynamics of human behaviour in relation to genetic disease; and social, legal, and ethical issues in genetics. Enrolment will be limited to four students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics — Bioinformatics

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and have the capability of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Human Genetics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling

Prerequisites: Bachelor's or medical degree – minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, or 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Recent (five years or less) university-level courses in basic sciences (molecular/cell biology, biochemistry, advanced genetics (preferably human), and statistics) and a minimum of two in psychology.

Applicants must have obtained some experience (either paid or volunteer) working with adults in a counselling or advisory capacity, ideally in a crisis setting.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Human Genetics

Prerequisites: B.Sc. – minimum CGPA 3.0 out of 4.0, or 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Applicants must have a minimum of 6 credits in cellular and molecular biology or biochemistry, 3 credits in mathematics or statistics, and 3 credits in genetics. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

Admission is based on acceptance by a research director who has agreed to provide adequate funding for the duration of the academic program and on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee.

Prospective graduate students should complete the online application form and indicate at least three faculty members they are interested in working with.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Human Genetics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs  
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Applications for thesis programs submitted after these deadlines may be considered, if a suitable supervisor can be secured. However, these applications will not be considered for departmental funding or entrance awards.

* The M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program accepts applications for the Fall term only. No late applications or applications for Summer or Winter terms for the Genetic Counselling program will be considered under any circumstances.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Integrated Studies in Education

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Integrated Studies in Education

Location

  • Department of Integrated Studies in Education
  • Education Building, Room 244
  • 3700 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1Y2
  • Canada
  • Graduate Programs (Graduate Certificate, M.A., MATL, and Ph.D.):
  • Education Building, Room 244
  • Telephone: 514-398-1591 (Ph.D. / M.A.) / 514-398-7149 (MATL)
  • Fax: 514-398-4529

The administrative office is open Monday to Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

About Integrated Studies in Education

The Department offers graduate students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge related to specific areas of inquiry in the field of education through our M.A. degrees (thesis or non-thesis options), including our MATL leading to teacher certification, Ph.D. in Educational Studies, and graduate certificates.

The Department offers the following programs:

Four graduate certificates (15 credits):

  • Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 1
  • Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2
  • Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language
  • Certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif

Three M.A. Thesis and Non-Thesis degree programs (45 credits) in the following areas:

  • Education and Society
  • Educational Leadership
  • Second Language Education

The Department offers an M.A. in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (60 credits) in the following areas:

  • Social Sciences
  • English Language Arts
  • Science and Technology
  • Mathematics
  • English or French Second Language
    Note: The French Second Language program is not being offered in 2014-2015.

The Department also offers a Ph.D. in Educational Studies.

Master of Arts in Education and Society

The M.A. in Education and Society consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. The two streams—Culture and Values in Education and Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum—reflect distinct but overlapping areas of educational inquiry. Study in Culture and Values in Education may focus on critical theory, philosophy, art and aesthetics, race/class/gender issues in education, or international and comparative education. The Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum stream emphasizes current perspectives on pedagogy and curriculum, teacher education, in-and-out-of-school learning, practitioner research, and classroom practice. Through both of these streams, the program brings to bear diverse applied theoretical perspectives, including philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, policy studies, gender studies, critical pedagogy, and multi-literacies. Graduates of the program go onto doctoral programs or work in education and non-profit settings. Many in-service teachers take this program for professional development.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research (24 credits). The balance of the program is coursework.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Thesis) — Mathematics and Science Education (45 credits)
This MA concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option consists mostly of coursework, but includes a project worth 6 credits. This option is less research-oriented than the thesis option and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Non-Thesis) — Jewish Education (45 credits)
This program is designed to offer a graduate-level point of entry into the teaching profession for students who typically will have completed a B.A. with a minor or major in Jewish Studies. The M.A. will not provide (Quebec Government) Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) teacher certification (in Quebec, certification is at the B.Ed. level), but at the present time, Jewish schools may hire non-certified teachers of Jewish Studies at their discretion.

Students interested in doing a research-focused M.A. in the area of Jewish education should follow one of the other graduate degree offerings within the area of Education and Society.

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership

The M.A. in Educational Leadership consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. This program is designed to prepare leaders in the field of education, and in other centres of formal or informal learning, who are committed to personal and institutional improvement. The program fosters the ongoing development of reflective practitioners who have a sense of educational action, the capacity to anticipate needs, the ability to exercise professional judgment within the realities of policy frameworks, and the ability to both lead and support institutional and organizational change at all levels. A central theme of the program is the impact of policy on educational practice at local, national, and international levels.

Local and international students are practising and aspiring school principals and leaders from other organizations. Graduates fulfil Quebec Ministry requirements for school leadership and find positions as school leaders, as well as opportunities in other managerial settings.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research (24 credits). The balance of the program is coursework.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis) — Coursework (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of coursework, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option – Project consists of both coursework and a project, which is worth 12 credits of the total program. It is less research-oriented than the thesis option and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis) — Project — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the project must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Master of Arts in Second Language Education

The M.A. in Second Language Education consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. It provides an overview of the state of the art in second-language acquisition, assessment and evaluation, and research methods, including quantitative and qualitative approaches. The program covers a wide range of current topics in applied linguistics and offers opportunities to specialize in educational sociolinguistics, curricular/methods and program planning areas (for example, content-based second-language teaching or “immersion”), language testing, language policy and planning, and critical applied linguistics. Graduates may go on to doctoral work in applied linguistics. They may also seek employment at ministry, school board, or other sites of active research on second languages. Many graduates also continue active careers in school contexts as second-language teaching practitioners, program administrators, or evaluators.

From a range of pedagogical, linguistic, cognitive, political, and sociocultural perspectives, this program combines theoretical and applied studies of how second and foreign languages are learned and used.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Second Language Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research (24 credits). The balance of the program is coursework.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Second Language Education (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Second Language Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of coursework, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning is a professional program leading to Quebec teacher certification for those already holding an undergraduate degree in a MELS-identified teachable subject area (Mathematics, Science & Technology, Social Sciences, English, TESL, TFSL). This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Throughout the MATL, emphasis will be on the attainment of the QEP professional competencies, and evidence of mastery of these will be demonstrated in order for students to successfully complete the program. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — English or French Second Language (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach English or French Second Language.
Note: The French Second Language program is not being offered in 2014-2015.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — English Language Arts Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach English Language Arts.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — Mathematics Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach Mathematics.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — Social Sciences Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach Social Sciences.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — Science and Technology Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach Science and Technology.

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Studies

The Ph.D. in Educational Studies prepares graduates for careers in a variety of education-related fields. The Ph.D.’s core areas are curriculum and literacy, cultural and international studies in education, educational leadership, and second-language education. The program has been designed to ensure flexibility, and students experience both multidisciplinary and discipline-specific research opportunities. The program begins with a set of common courses and proceeds to specialization through advanced coursework and dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members. Graduates find work as researchers, teachers, consultants, curriculum developers, and administrators in a wide range of settings, including universities, school boards, government agencies, and international NGOs.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies
The Ph.D. in Educational Studies provides an integrative perspective on education by drawing on a range of related disciplines and research orientations. Students develop scholarly and innovative expertise in at least one of three contexts of inquiry and awareness of all three: a) the broad context of culture and society; b) the international, national, and local contexts of educational leadership and policy studies; and c) the more specific contexts of schools and other sites of teaching and learning. Students begin with a set of common core courses and proceed to specialization through advanced coursework and dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies — Language Acquisition
Students must satisfy all program requirements for the Ph.D. in Educational Studies. The Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to language acquisition, approved by the LAP committee.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies — Mathematics and Science Education
This Ph.D. concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas. Applicants for the Ph.D. concentration in mathematics and science education would be expected to already have a Master's degree that included educational research.

Graduate Certificates

Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 1 (15 credits)
This 15-credit program addresses the needs of experienced and aspiring school leaders who are taking increased responsibility for the students and communities they serve. The management of schools is increasingly seen as making a major contribution to the learning and personal development of students. The professional development of school leaders, educational reform, and school partnership form the basis for the program. Course selection to be approved by Graduate Certificate Program Director.
Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2 (15 credits)

This 15-credit program explores more deeply leadership theory and educational issues and applications in a practicum. Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2 should normally have completed the first certificate. In combination, the two certificates allow school administrators to acquire the 30 graduate credits in the field of educational leadership required by the MELS. Course selection to be approved by Graduate Certificate Program Director.

No course taken in Certificate 1 can be repeated in Certificate 2.

Graduate Certificate; Teaching English as a Second Language (15 credits)
This 15-credit program is designed as professional development for in-service teachers and candidates with a background in education, language studies, linguistics, or a related field, or as preparation for application to our M.A. in Second Language Education. The five courses that comprise the certificate provide a solid background and offer in-depth study in the field of second-language education from a range of perspectives and with a focus on research and applications to teaching. Please note that this certificate does not lead to teacher certification. The Graduate Certificate in TESL is designed to be available to students worldwide. Courses are offered in a combination of online and face-to-face formats, and are sequenced in such a way that students can complete the certificate in one year. The maximum time for completion is three years. The first three courses are offered online, and can be undertaken anywhere an Internet connection is available. The final two courses are offered face-to-face in the Summer semester either on-site at McGill or at off-site locations with collaborative partners, if numbers warrant.
Certificat d’études supérieures en enseignement immersif (15 crédits) (15 credits)
Le certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif vise à faire la formation des enseignants en immersion française tout en abordant les défis pédagogiques reliés à l'enseignement ciblé conjointement sur la langue et le contenu. Ce certificat est destiné à la formation aux enseignants des niveaux primaire et secondaire. À cette fin, il amène d'abord l'étudiant à comprendre les causes à la fois linguistiques et cognitives des difficultés qu'éprouvent les élèves en immersion. Il propose ensuite une variété de stratégies d'enseignement propices à répondre à ces difficultés et de situations d'apprentissage étayées par les enseignants de manière à dépasser le cloisonnement entre langue et contenu. Il comporte cinq cours obligatoires. La réussite d'un test de français est obligatoire lors de la demande d'admission.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Integrated Studies in Education Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Graduate Certificates, M.A., and Ph.D. Programs

  1. Applicants to the Certificate and M.A. programs must hold a bachelor's degree from a recognized university. A minimum standing equivalent to a CGPA of 3.0/4.0, or 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years, is required. A concentration of courses related to the area chosen for graduate work is usually required. (See #5 below.)

    Applicants to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.A. in Education or a recognized equivalent degree from a recognized university. The applicant's record should indicate high academic standing (a minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0) and evidence of research competence in the proposed area of doctoral research.

  2. Applicants to the Certificate and M.A. programs must submit:
    • A current curriculum vitae
    • A letter of intent specifying academic and professional experience and interests (specifically, research interests for the Thesis option or project interests for the Non-Thesis Project option)

    Applicants to the Ph.D. in Educational Studies program must submit:

    • A current curriculum vitae
    • A letter of intent identifying the applicant's proposed research topic, potential supervisor, and expected professional direction. Please note that it is the Ph.D. applicant's responsibility to secure a supervisor as part of the admission process.
    • A four- to five-page summary of the proposed research topic identifying the applicant's main research questions, the research trends that have led to the questions, ways in which the research could be conducted, and relevant references
  3. Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation, at least one of which must be from a university-level instructor; the other may be from an administrator in an educationally relevant context.
  4. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must meet one of the following English proficiency criteria:
    • IELTS with a minimum overall band of 7.0 with a minimum writing score of 7.0; or
    • TOEFL:
      • iBT (Internet-based test) – total score of 92 with a minimum score of 22 each for the Writing and Speaking sections and a minimum of 20 each for the Reading and Listening sections
      • PBT (paper-based test) – 580

    The Department reserves the right to evaluate the applicant's language proficiency before initial registration.

  5. Further requirements applicable to specific options:

    Graduate Certificates in Educational Leadership 1 and 2 – Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant educational experience (in leadership roles or related professional experience).

    Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language – Applicants are required to pass a written and oral English language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Master of Arts in Second Language Education – Normally, applicants are required to have a minimum of 36 credits including a combination of relevant courses in education and language studies.

    Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant professional experience in education.

    Master of Arts in Educational Leadership – Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant leadership experience (teaching or related professional experience).

    Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (Non-Thesis) – Please see the Departmental website for additional admission requirements: www.mcgill.ca/dise/progs/matl. Applicants to the MATL TESL option are required to pass a written and oral English language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif – Applicants are required to pass a written and oral French language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Applicants are required to have experience in educational settings (formal or informal).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal (for Ph.D. applicants)
  • Ph.D. applicants must secure a Thesis Supervisor as part of the application process.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Integrated Studies in Education and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Integrated Studies in Education (M.A. - Second Language Education, M.A. - Educational Leadership, M.A. - Education and Society, Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Integrated Studies in Education (MATL)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: N/A Fall: N/A Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: Dec. 15 Summer: Dec. 15 Summer: N/A
Integrated Studies in Education (Certificate in Educational Leadership and Certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: N/A
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Integrated Studies in Education (Certifcate in Teaching English as a Second Language)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: Jan 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Grad certificate application dates:

Grad Cert Educational Leadership 

Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Please note: there have been changes in the required documents for the admission and application procedures. Please consult the link http://www.psych.mcgill.ca/grad/program/application_admission.htm for additional requirements.

Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program depends on an evaluation of students' research interests and their aptitude for original contributions to knowledge and, if applicable, for professional contributions in the applied field.

The usual requirement for admission is an Honours or majors degree (B.A. or B.Sc.) in Psychology. This usually includes an introductory course plus twelve courses in psychology (each equivalent to three term hours). Courses in experimental psychology, the theoretical development of modern ideas in psychology, and statistical methods as applied to psychological problems (equivalent to an introductory course) are essential. Applicants' knowledge of relevant biological, physical, and social sciences is considered. Students applying to the clinical program are advised to complete 42 specific undergraduate credits in psychology as specified by the Order of Psychologists of Quebec.

Applicants who hold a bachelor's degree but who have not met these usual requirements should consult the Graduate Program Director to determine which (if any) courses must be completed before an application can be considered. Students with insufficient preparation for graduate work may register as Special Students (undergraduate level) in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science, and follow an appropriate course of study. Such registration requires the permission of the Department but carries no advantage with respect to a student's eventual admission to graduate studies.

Applicants should note that the deadline for many scholarships and fellowships is about four months earlier than the application deadlines and that applications for scholarships and fellowships should be submitted through their home university.

Applicants with little or no background in psychology are not required to submit scores on the subject component of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). We highly recommend to all other students to submit scores on the subject component of the GRE. If you did not take the GRE subject test and are accepted into the program, you may be asked to take it in April. All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Three letters of reference
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Philosophy

Philosophy

Location

  • Department of Philosophy
  • Leacock Building, 9th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6060
  • Fax: 514-398-7148
  • Email: info [dot] philosophy [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/philosophy

About Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy has particular strength in the following areas: Ancient Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Kant and post-Kantian German Philosophy; Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Mind; Aesthetics; Moral and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Contemporary European Philosophy.

The Department offers assistance to students in every aspect of placement. Our Placement Officer counsels students about coursework and areas of competence, helps to establish evidence of teaching ability, administers the dossier for job applications, and provides advice and follow-up in the interview process. Many of our graduates have gone on to do postdoctoral research and over 80% are now in tenure track or sessional appointments.

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. in Philosophy. It also offers, in conjunction with the Biomedical Ethics Unit, a course of study leading to the M.A. degree in Bioethics.

Students with an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 1 level. Students who hold an M.A. degree in Philosophy, or equivalent, from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 2 level. Students entering the Ph.D. program (at Ph.D. 1 or Ph.D. 2) will be required to complete two years of coursework. (N.B. At present, we do not normally consider applicants for an M.A. in Philosophy, with the exception of the specialty M.A. in Biomedical Ethics.) The Department considers an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy to be one that furnishes a student with:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval, and Modern.
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in 1 and 2.

Ph.D. Program

By December 15 of their third year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 1 and August 15 in their second year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 2, students must submit a research paper (the “candidacy paper” [3 credits]), which may be worked up from a paper written to fulfil the requirements of a graduate course, to a Thesis Advancement Committee consisting of a least two members of the staff of the Department. The membership of this committee will be determined by the Graduate Director in consultation with the student; it is anticipated that members of this committee would, in principle, direct the student's thesis. This committee assigns a grade to the student's paper and reviews her or his graduate performance; on the basis of its assessment and review, it recommends to the Department as a whole either to permit the student to continue with the Ph.D. program and undertake a thesis or to decline to permit the student to continue. Two necessary conditions for a positive recommendation are that the student (a) receive a grade of at least B+ on the candidacy paper, and (b) have at least a 3.5 GPA (on the undergraduate Grade Point scale) in the coursework required for the program. The Department as a whole, taking into account the Thesis Advancement Committee's recommendation and the student's overall academic record in the program, decides whether to permit the student to continue. Students who do not receive a positive recommendation but who satisfy Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements (no courses below a B- and completion of 45 credits) will be recommended to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by the Department to transfer from the Ph.D. program to the M.A. program.

Graduate students are expected to continue to contribute to the intellectual life of the Department after being promoted to candidacy. They can do so by participating in reading and discussion groups and, most of all, by auditing seminars both within and outside their areas of specialty.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Philosophy (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The Master's in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics. Ordinarily, it takes at least two years to complete, although some students have completed it in 18 months. The first year is devoted to coursework (including a clinical practicum), and the second year is devoted to a master's thesis on a topic in bioethics that also satisfies the requirements of the base discipline. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (6 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required, including the thesis. Students graduate with a master's degree from the faculty of their base discipline (M.A., M.Sc., or LL.M.) with a specialization in bioethics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy
The program is intended for students with a B.A. or M.A. in Philosophy, though some exceptions may be possible. It is a pluralist Department with an excellent professor-to-student ratio, strong preparation for dissertation work, and guaranteed full funding for four years for all admitted Ph.D. students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Philosophy who wish to earn 9 additional credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women's studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Philosophy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ph.D.

Students with an Honours B.A. degree in Philosophy, or the equivalent, are normally admitted to the Ph.D. program directly at the Ph.D. 1 level. The Department considers an Honours B.A. degree to include:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western philosophy: Greek, Medieval, Modern
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in (1) and (2)

To demonstrate their competence in these areas, applicants must submit transcripts of academic work, three letters of recommendation from persons with whom they have studied, and at least one substantial example (approximately 15–20 typewritten pages) of their written philosophical work.

In addition, applicants from North America whose first language is English are strongly encouraged to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English (TOEFL score).

Students who hold an M.A. degree from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. 2 level.

M.A. (Bioethics)

Students applying to the Bioethics Specialty program must write an M.A. thesis proposal. All applications to this program must also receive the approval of the Director of the Specialty program. Students who apply for this program should note that they must participate in a practicum, which continues beyond the end of their second term of classes.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letters of Reference – three (3) original letters of reference
  • Writing Sample (15–20 pages)
  • Personal Statement (2–3 pages)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Philosophy and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the Department
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department considers admissions for the Fall term only. Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Linguistics

Linguistics

Location

  • Department of Linguistics
  • 1085 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4222
  • Fax: 514-398-7088
  • Email: gradprogram [dot] linguistics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/linguistics

About Linguistics

The aim of the graduate program in Linguistics at McGill is to train researchers in core areas of theoretical linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics) as well as experimental linguistics. Research in experimental areas deals with theoretical questions in light of evidence from another domain (language acquisition, neurolinguistics, processing, language variation, and change). Students have access to a rich research landscape in cognitive science; for example, most members of the Department are associated with the Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music (CRBLM). The Department has two labs for conducting experiments, each fitted with a soundproof booth. Members of the Department also have access to other facilities through the CRBLM. We normally fund all full-time graduate students in good standing; our funding package covers living expenses, tuition, and fees. M.A. students are funded for one year and eight months, and Ph.D. students for five years.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Linguistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
We offer an M.A. (non-thesis) degree in Linguistics. The M.A. involves intensive coursework in year 1, followed by additional coursework and completion of a major research paper in year 2. This program is intended for students who wish to gain coursework and research experience in Linguistics beyond the B.A. level. After completion of the M.A., students may choose to continue on to a Ph.D. or pursue a career in a related field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Linguistics
We offer a Ph.D. degree in Linguistics. We offer two streams at the Ph.D. level: theoretical and experimental. The Ph.D. degree involves intensive coursework in year 1, additional coursework and completion of two evaluation papers in years 2 and 3, and thesis research and writing in years 4 and 5. This program is principally intended for students who wish to pursue a career in academia.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Linguistics — Language Acquisition
The Language Acquisition Program (LAP) is a cross-disciplinary option available to Ph.D. students in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Linguistics, Psychology, and Second Language Education who intend to pursue graduate studies, including writing their thesis, in language acquisition. In addition to meeting the degree requirements for Linguistics, students must complete four interdisciplinary LAP seminars, two graduate-level courses in language acquisition (one from outside the student’s home department), a course in statistics, and they must have a faculty member from outside their home department on their thesis committee. Information about this option is available from the Department and on the following website: www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Linguistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the M.A. or Ph.D. should have completed a B.A. with a specialization in linguistics. Applications are also invited from students with a background in other disciplines. Strong candidates who do not satisfy all requirements may be required to take additional undergraduate courses or may be admitted to a Qualifying year program, which permits them to make up the gaps in their background.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal
  • Writing Sample

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Linguistics Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

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