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Management (doctoral programs)

Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the Joint Ph.D. in Management

  • Ph.D. Program Office
  • Desautels Faculty of Management
  • McGill University
  • 1001 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1G5
  • Canada
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management
The Ph.D. program in Management is offered jointly by the four Montreal universities: Concordia University, École des Hautes Études Commerciales (affiliated with the Université de Montréal), McGill University, and Université du Québec à Montréal. The program is intended to educate competent researchers and to stimulate research on management issues.

The addresses of the three other institutions are:

  • Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Département des Sciences Administratives
  • 315 Ste-Catherine Est
  • Montreal, QC H2X 3X2
  • Canada
  • Website: www.phdadm.esg.uqam.ca

The program represents a number of innovations in doctoral work in the field of administration. First, by cooperating, the four universities are able to make available to the program's students a diverse pool of approximately 250 professors qualified to direct doctoral-level study and research. Second, the program has been carefully developed to encourage independent, creative work on the part of its students, with close, personal contact with the professors. This program will appeal especially to the mature, experienced candidate with relatively well-defined interests. Across the four member universities, some courses are offered in English and some in French. (All papers may, however, be written in English or French.) This is viewed as a definite advantage of the program for those students who expect to work in Canada or francophone countries after graduation.

The program places considerable emphasis on the theoretical foundations of management and its underlying disciplines. Graduates of the program are expected to have: (1) some knowledge of all the main areas of management, (2) a thorough knowledge of one applied area of management, and one support discipline, (3) a complete command of the research methodologies used in management, and (4) some familiarity with modern theories and methods of the pedagogy of management.

The program consists of three phases: preparation, specialization, and dissertation.

Phase I – Preparation

Before entering the program, the student will have selected the area of specialization from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management
  • Organizational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Organization
  • NSERC CREATE*

* NSERC CREATE Ph.D. option in Healthcare Operations and Information Management – Offered jointly by six Canadian universities: McGill, British Columbia, Ottawa, Queen's, Toronto, and Montréal, this Ph.D. program brings together expertise on healthcare processes, operations research, information systems, and telecommunications engineering.

Some students—notably those with strong master's degrees in administration or related disciplines—have a minimum of work in Phase I; others require up to one academic year of work.

Phase II – Specialization

In Phase II, students probe deeply into their chosen area of specialization. With their Advisory Committee, students work out an individual program of study, which takes about 18 months. The phase focuses on a specialization area and a support field. The specialization area could be one of the basic ones listed in Phase I (for example, marketing or operations management), a sub-area within one of these (such as organizational development within organizational behaviour), or an interdisciplinary area that combines two or more of these (such as behaviour aspects of accounting or international marketing).

The support field is selected to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge in a fundamental discipline that underlies the theory in administration. For example, a student in marketing might select psychology, sociology, or statistics. One in management policy might select political science or general systems theory, or perhaps even philosophy. Other choices are possible.

Students officially enter Phase II of the program when their Advisory Committee has been established and, together with the student, formally agrees on a proposal for the work to be done in Phase II. Phase II must be approved by the McGill and the Joint Doctoral Committees. This includes the following:

  • Doctoral seminars in the specialization area; minimum four courses
  • Any other existing graduate-level courses in the specialization area and support field deemed appropriate by the Advisory Committee; minimum two courses in support field
  • Seminar on Research Methodology (MGMT 707, 3 credits) or equivalent approved graduate-level course
  • Seminar in Pedagogy (MGMT 706, 3 credits) or Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDPH 689, 3 credits)
  • Comprehensive Examination (MGMT 701, 0 credits)
  • A publishable research paper (MGMT 720, 3 credits)

The Advisory Committee will normally consist of at least three or four persons; a Chair and others decided upon jointly by the Chair and the student. One of these members will typically come from the support field. Every student's Advisory Committee must have representation from at least two universities in the joint program.

Phase III – Dissertation

The third phase of the program consists of the dissertation in the course of which the student probes deeply into a well-defined research topic. The topic is developed with the Thesis Committee (at least three members), which may be the same as the Phase II Advisory Committee or may be reconstituted, again with representation from at least one of the other participating universities. The topic is approved formally by the Thesis Committee and, once the research is completed and the dissertation written, the student publicly defends the completed thesis.

Admission Requirements

Candidates normally hold a master's-level degree, with a strong academic record from a recognized university. Individuals possessing a qualified undergraduate degree with a high GPA will also be considered, and will be required to take additional management graduate courses during their first year in the Ph.D. program.

GMAT (or GRE-General Test) results are required for applications to the doctoral program; this includes McGill master's students applying to the Ph.D. The minimum score required is 600. Tests must have been written within the past five years.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. A minimum score of 100 for the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, is required for admission. A minimum score of 7 for IELTS is required. Tests must have been written within the past two years.

Files will not be considered unless GMAT (or GRE-General Test) and TOEFL scores are received by the Application Deadlines.

Students may apply for admission to one or more of the participating universities. These applications will be processed by the individual university to which the applicant has applied and by the Joint Committee of the four schools. Students' preferences will prevail when more than one participating university is prepared to accept them. The Ph.D. degree will be granted by the university that admits the student. The program requires a minimum full-time residency of six terms.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GMAT (or GRE-General Test) written within the past 5 years
  • answers to Personal Background Information questions
  • one recent passport-size photo
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/desautels/programs/phd/admissions/deadline.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Universitas 21

Program Info: 

Universitas 21 is an international network of 23 leading research-intensive universities in fifteen countries. The network’s purpose is to facilitate collaboration and cooperation between the member universities.

Classified as

Music (Schulich School of Music)

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Please note that the application deadline for Canadian and international graduate applicants for programs in Music  is December 15, 2013. 

Schulich School of Music

Location

  • Schulich School of Music
  • Strathcona Music Building
  • 555 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1E3
  • Canada

About Schulich School of Music

The Schulich School of Music of McGill University, ranked Top 10 globally by the Princeton Review, is internationally renowned for its leadership in combining professional conservatory-style musical training, humanities-based scholarship, and scientific-technological research at the highest levels. Its programs encourage musicians and music researchers alike to push boundaries and explore new possibilities. The School’s facilities are a physical affirmation of our commitment and belief in the future of music, artists, creators, and researchers, and they encourage multimedia productions and trans-disciplinary collaborations. Among the most notable facilities are: a music library that houses one of the most important academic music collections in Canada, four concert halls, The Digital Composition Studio, sound recording studios, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), as well as a research network that links the Faculty with many other University departments and research institutes. Nestled in the heart of the city, the School also draws on the rich cultural life of Montreal—a bilingual city with a celebrated symphony orchestra, dozens of annual festivals, and hundreds of live music venues hosting world-class concerts.

The Master of Arts degree (M.A.) is available as a thesis option in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and Theory (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and as a non-thesis option in Music Education, Musicology, and Theory.

The Master of Music degree (M. Mus.) is available in Composition, Performance, and Sound Recording. Specializations offered within the performance option are: piano, guitar, orchestral instruments (including orchestral training), organ and church music, conducting, collaborative piano, opera and voice, early music, and jazz.

The Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance is open to accomplished musicians, singers, or established chamber ensembles.

The Doctor of Music degree (D.Mus.) is offered in Composition and Performance Studies while the Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) is available in Composition, Music – Gender and Women’s Studies, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Interdisciplinary studies are encouraged.

The Schulich School of Music has multiple sources of funding for graduate study. Fellowships (including the Schulich Scholarships, Max Stern Fellowships, and McGill Excellence Fellowships) range in value from $1,500 to $12,000; some are renewable for multiple years of study (see www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs).

There are also multiple opportunities for graduate students to obtain funding and experience as paid assistants at the Schulich School of Music. Positions are available as teaching assistants, invigilators, apprentice writers for program notes, sound recording technicians, library assistants, stage hands, and front-of-house staff. More advanced students can obtain positions as instructors. A variety of research assistantships in selected areas are also available. Inquiries should be directed to the Chairs of the Departments of Performance and Music Research, as appropriate.

Master's Programs

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Music — Composition (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in the M.Mus. program develop their own individual voices through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members' diverse interests ensure that students will find a suitable mentor/supervisor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer students an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology, including mixed works, interactive composition, gestural controllers, acousmatic works, multichannel audio, computer-assisted composition, and more. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles (e.g., McGill Symphony Orchestra, McGill Contemporary Music Ensemble, etc.) and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations. Graduates have continued their studies at the doctoral level and then gone on to win prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize); they also have successful careers in composition, film, literature, conducting, and teaching.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides an opportunity for studio- and classroom-based teachers, and music educators working in other community settings, to explore current issues in music education and to implement their own research studies. Seminars develop facility in a breadth of research methodologies and examine pertinent research developments in different fields, while simultaneously providing opportunities to link with other departments such as the faculties of Education, Cognitive Psychology, and Physiology. Ties with The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology (CIRMMT), and Teaching and Learning Services provide a strong supportive network for interdisciplinary and multilingual research. Experienced faculty publishes regularly in the field’s leading journals in areas such as musical development, music perception, world and community-based music education, philosophical issues in music education, performance anxiety, music performance adjudication, technological applications, and the physiological bases of musical performance. Graduates of the program continue on to doctoral studies and pursue teaching careers around the world in various settings.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Technology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Music Technology is the only program of its kind in the world to apply cutting-edge scientific research to music and music making. Students are accepted from a wide range of musical backgrounds. Research goals are tied to the work of the area’s five faculty members and include the development of new and flexible strategies for sound analysis, real-time processing, synthesis and gestural control, instrument design, melodic pattern recognition, auditory display, music information retrieval, and symbolic manipulation of formal music representations, as well as the psychoacoustics of musical sounds and structures, among others. Students’ research is supported by the six laboratories forming the large multidisciplinary research infrastructure of The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), and almost unlimited technological resources (e.g., computing power, storage, measuring devices including several motion-capture systems). The Digital Composition Studio and state-of-the-art recording and acoustic environments provide opportunities to collaborate with accomplished performers and researchers in other music disciplines. Graduates hold commercial positions related to media technologies (e.g., gaming and audio industries) and continue their studies at the doctoral level in preparation for academic careers.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is for students interested in developing research projects that bridge traditional methodologies with new critical approaches in musicology. The area’s humanistic orientation emphasizes the importance of political, social, and literary history, while also encouraging students to develop their skills in musical analysis, their sensitivity to different styles and performance practices, and their awareness of issues in aesthetics. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research ranges from medieval and renaissance music to the popular music of today. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics also exist through links with other departments, the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate music history courses. Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level at McGill and other major North American universities; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and archival curation, among others.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Musicology (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Musicology requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Sound Recording (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
This internationally renowned program is a course-based, professional training program designed for musicians who wish to develop the skills required in the music recording and media industries. It is based on the German Tonmeister program and offers extensive, hands-on opportunities to record a broad spectrum of solo recitals, large opera, and symphonic repertoire with soloists and choirs, and complex Jazz Band and pop idioms. McGill’s professional-quality facilities provide state-of-the-art equipment for research and the recording of any size of ensemble in high-resolution multichannel audio and high-definition video, and include a variety of audio recording studios equipped for surround recording, four concert hall recording spaces, a technical ear training lab, an orchestral film scoring stage, an opera studio, and post-production and editing suites. The Faculty includes prominent researchers as well as award-winning recording engineers and producers in the fields of music production, television, and film sound familiar with cutting-edge technologies and new developments. The program also has close ties with industry that facilitate opportunities for internships. Graduates are leaders in the field working in highly respected studios around the world and winning both creative and scientific international competitions.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Theory is for students interested in exploring how specific pieces of music are put together and how this understanding may be generalized to relate to the way other pieces of music are composed. Music theory and elective seminars develop expertise in various analytical models and familiarity with the critical issues that define the discipline as a basis for developing individual research projects. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminar discussions facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics in perception and cognition exist through collaborations with music researchers from the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate theory courses. The Faculty has a breadth of experience in early music theory, formal functions, Schenkerian analysis, mathematical models, theories of rhythm and meter, serialism, and popular music analysis. Graduates have been accepted into doctoral programs at McGill, Yale, Eastman, Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, and Cambridge, among others.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Theory (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Theory requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University.

Master of Arts (M.A.): Music — Music Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits),

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits), and

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This course-based program has options in music education, musicology, and theory. Seminars provide breadth of disciplinary knowledge and understanding of research methodologies and critical issues. Expertise in two areas is developed through two written papers. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research covers a broad spectrum of topics central to each discipline. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking.

The option in Music Education provides an opportunity for studio-, classroom-, and community-based music educators to read, understand, and apply research studies in different fields to their own practices.

The option in Musicology is for students interested in a humanistic orientation to topics in music history and musicology that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches.

The option in Theory develops skill with different analytical models and the ways in which they may be used to explore how specific pieces of music are put together.

Some graduates continue to doctoral studies; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and librarianship, among others.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Vocal Pedagogy (Thesis) (47 credits)
The Master of Music: Vocal Pedagogy is not being offered in the 2013–2014 academic year.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Jazz Performance (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus. in Jazz Performance is flexibly designed to offer specialization in Jazz Composition, Jazz Performance, and Jazz Orchestra training. All students take courses in jazz pedagogy, composition, and arranging, and benefit from close interaction with a diverse, creative, and professionally active faculty. A recital and a CD recording of original music are the principal thesis requirements. Our outstanding ensembles include the McGill Jazz Orchestra, the ten-piece McGill Chamber Ensemble, two more jazz orchestras, a saxophone ensemble, and over twenty jazz combos. Teaching opportunities vary from year to year, but are generally available in Jazz Theory, Jazz Ear Training, Jazz Orchestra 3, Jazz Improvisation, and Jazz Combo. Montreal’s vibrant jazz scene also provides rich opportunities for performance and musical engagement. Graduates have active touring careers, teach in university jazz programs, and have produced recordings that have earned Juno awards.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Early Music (Thesis) (45 credits)
Established in 1975, this program is the longest-standing Early Music program in North America. It offers early music specialists interested in historical performance practices a rich variety of performing experiences, including 15–20 chamber ensembles (vocal, madrigal, viol, and recorder consorts, etc.), the Cappella Antica, and the Baroque Orchestra. McGill is also the only North American music faculty to produce a fully staged performance of an early opera every year. Recent productions include: Handel’s Alcina, Agrippina, and Imeneo, Lully’s Thésée, and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas. Faculty are prominently involved in Montreal’s internationally acclaimed Early Music community. The Schulich School of Music also owns a large collection of early instruments that is available to students. Graduates perform with Montreal-based early music ensembles, including, among others, Les Violons du Roy and the Arion Baroque Orchestra, as well as Aradia and Tafelmusik in Toronto, and various ensembles in Europe (e.g., Concerto Palatino, Centre de musique baroque de Versailles).
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Orchestral Instruments and Guitar (Thesis) (45 credits)
The premiere orchestral training program in Canada, this program is for talented instrumental musicians and guitarists wishing to hone their artistry and expressive, interpretative skills in a flexibly designed curriculum rich in performance opportunities. Ensembles emulate professional settings, and include five orchestras—two full orchestras (the renowned McGill Symphony Orchestra and the McGill Sinfonetta), one opera orchestra, one baroque orchestra, and one contemporary music ensemble—as well as one large wind symphony and one guitar ensemble. Opportunities for chamber music also abound. String players benefit from a rigorous string quartet training program and trail-blazing pedagogical approaches. Brass and wind musicians also perform a wide range of large ensemble repertoire for their instruments; percussionists perform, tour, and record with the esteemed McGill Percussion Ensemble. Thesis recitals foster individual creativity and diversity by offering a range of options important for orchestral musicians—orchestral excerpt exams run like orchestral auditions, chamber music recitals, and concerto competitions—as well as solo recitals, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects including collaborations with composers and the Digital Composition Studio, among others. There is a focus on healthy performance and a broad range of seminars that ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Ensemble conductors are world-class; faculty include the concertmasters and principal players of major Canadian orchestras, including the Montreal Symphony Orchestra; percussion instructors have international profiles and a breadth of experience in world and contemporary repertoires. Graduates have secured positions in orchestras throughout North and South America, and in Europe, and with the Canadian Opera Company, Ensemble Moderne, and others.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Collaborative Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program develop their artistry as collaborative musicians in vocal, instrumental, and opera repetiteur settings. The program is not a chamber music program in that it prepares pianists to assume coaching responsibilities as well as collaborate with other musicians. Candidates need to have excellent technique and interpretative skills, sight-reading abilities, and previous collaborative experience. The program is flexibly defined to allow students to specialize or gain experience in a variety of settings and with a broad cross-section of vocal, instrumental, orchestral, and theatrical repertoire. Concert recitals, choral ensembles, studio lessons with high-quality performers, and opera productions provide professional settings in which students master their craft. Faculty includes internationally renowned collaborative pianists, vocal coaches, conductors, and stage directors. Graduates pursue careers as collaborative pianists, accompanists, opera repetiteurs, studio teachers, and coaches.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus in Piano develops artistic expression and interpretative skills by immersing the advanced pianist in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program revolves around an integrated piano seminar involving all studios and includes collaborative opportunities in instrumental, vocal, and contemporary music performance at a high level, piano pedagogy, and performance practice through fortepiano/harpsichord study as options. Recital options include solo and chamber music performance, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects, including collaborations with strong composition students and the Digital Composition Studio. Dynamic faculty performs internationally and has diverse teaching, coaching, and adjudicating experience in a broad range of solo, chamber, and concerto repertoires. Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level, have been selected for national/international competitions, and pursue careers as collaborative pianists, opera coaches, and as independent studio teachers.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Organ and Church Music (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides talented organists and church music scholars with an opportunity to hone their artistry and interpretive skills. The flexibly designed program combines performance with seminars in historically informed performance practice, music and liturgy, counterpoint, improvisation, continuo playing, and choral conducting, among other options. Thesis performance options allow for creativity and diversity by including options for solo and chamber music recitals, concerto performances, recording projects, church music projects, and opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaborations with strong composers and other departments. Students benefit from excellent facilities that include practice organs built by Beckerath, Casavant, Tsuji, Wilhelm, and Wolff, as well as the famous French classical organ in Redpath Hall. A number of assistantships are available in downtown churches with some of Montreal’s most distinguished church musicians. Graduates have won prizes in major national and international competitions and pursue church music careers around the world.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Conducting (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program specialize in orchestral, wind, or choral conducting. Enrolment is limited to outstanding candidates having highly developed musical skills in voice, instrumental, or piano performance. The program provides for concentrated podium time, interactions with world-class conductors, score study, and the development of rehearsal technique. A range of seminars provides for the in-depth study of performance practice and the development of analytical skills with leading scholars in musicology and theory. Thesis performance projects involve concert recitals with various Schulich School of Music ensembles. Some graduates continue on to doctoral studies; others pursue conducting and teaching positions in schools, orchestras, and as opera assistants.
Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Opera and Voice (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Mus in Opera and Voice develops vocal growth and artistic expression by immersing students in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program provides the option for students to specialize in opera performance or to develop artistry in a variety of solo and operatic repertoires. There are three opera productions every year, including one Early Music opera with period instruments. Other performance opportunities include solo recitals, studio concerts, Cappella Antica, oratorios, chamber music ensembles, master classes with leading artists in the field, recording projects, and interdisciplinary collaborations. Performance opportunities emulate professional contexts, including rehearsals in a first-class opera studio and individual repertoire coaching with internationally renowned coaching staff. Voice faculty, stage directors, and set designers are outstanding soloists and creative artists involved with major companies, opera programs, and festivals the world over. McGill singers are selected to participate in various professional young artist programs and have won major national and international auditions including the MET auditions and NATSAA. Recent graduates perform with orchestras and opera companies in Canada, as well as companies in the United States, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and Eastern Europe.

Graduate Diploma

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance (30 credits)
This is a new, one-year postgraduate diploma providing concentrated study for three types of extremely accomplished musicians: the emerging or professional singer, emerging or established chamber ensemble (including jazz combos, piano collaborations), and the individual artist preparing for competition, audition, concerto performance, tour, recording project, etc. The flexibly designed program assumes a high level of performance (doctoral/professional) and involves intensive coaching, performance, and repertoire study/research tied to the artist’s or chamber ensemble’s professional goals, and a media project. Singers have voice coaching and training in movement and acting, with performance opportunities linked to McGill Opera productions. Ensembles develop individual artistry as well as group identity, with respect to sound, communication, skills, and performance practice. The first graduates of the program, the Cecilia String Quartet, won the 2010 International Banff String Quartet Competition and were prizewinners at the Bordeaux 2010 International Chamber Music Competition.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Composition
Students in this program create extended original works of art that push the boundaries of the discipline. Composers refine their musical language and artistic voice through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members have diverse interests that ensure composers will find a suitable mentor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer composers an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated, performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations. Graduates have won prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize, SOCAN competition) and have successful careers in university teaching, (freelance) composition, film, literature, and conducting.
Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Performance Studies
This program is for the artist/scholar. Students perform at a professional or near-professional level and have well-defined research interests linked to their performance. A broad range of seminars ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Seminars encourage the critical thinking and the fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music by providing a forum in which performers can interact with students in other areas. Comprehensive examinations provide students with an opportunity to develop credentials in three areas of expertise in preparation for teaching careers, while articulating the background and critical issues surrounding their thesis work. The latter consists of a lecture/recital and a paper (including a recording of the recital). Students benefit from exceptional mentoring by internationally renowned coaches, the research expertise of faculty from the Department of Music Research, master classes, opportunities to collaborate with strong composition students, and the rich performance life of the Schulich School of Music and Montreal. Students win major fellowships (SSHRC, Fulbright, FRQSC, Canada Council). Graduates have won major national and international competitions and pursue teaching and performing careers in a wide variety of contexts globally.

Ph.D. in Music

Students in the Ph.D. program pursue original research that makes a significant contribution to the fields of Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Seminars, a doctoral colloquium, visiting lecturer series, and international conferences provide forums for students from different areas to interact by encouraging the critical thinking and fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music through listening, performing, cutting-edge technologies, and analytical methods. Opportunities for inter- and cross-disciplinary collaborations exist through the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology; the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas; the Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies; the Performance Department; other departmental links across the University and, in the technology areas, with science and industry. Supportive faculty recognized internationally as leaders in their respective disciplines mentor students from admission through job placements. Travel funding exists for students to present papers at conferences; many students win external scholarships (SSHRC, FRQSC, Vanier, Rhodes Scholar, etc.) and national and international awards; students gain valuable pedagogical or technological training through teaching and lab assistantships. Graduates pursue careers in academia, industry, composition, and various other arts-related fields.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — (Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, Theory)
The thesis for the Ph.D. in composition involves the creation of an original large-scale work and research that increases our understanding of music and musical processes. Students in music education investigate a broad spectrum of critical issues through a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The Musicology area adopts a humanistic orientation that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches. Research in Music Technology and Sound Recording can lead to patents, among other outcomes and benefits from unlimited technological resources. Theorists engage with all repertoires and analytical methods.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — Gender and Women's Studies
This program is open to doctoral students who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Music requirements are augmented by participation in a Research Methods course and a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in Opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Schulich School of Music Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s Degrees

Applicants for the master's degree must hold a B.Mus. or a B.A. degree with a Major or Honours in music including considerable work done in the area of specialization.

Applicants found to be deficient in their background preparation may be required to take certain additional undergraduate courses.

All applicants (except those for Performance, Musicology, and Sound Recording) will be required to take placement examinations.

All M.Mus. applicants will be required to take a live audition. Conducting and female voice applicants will be required to submit screening material for pre-selection. Following a review of these materials, selected applicants will be invited to attend a live audition (see www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate/audition-requirements).

Specific admission and document requirements for each program are outlined at: www.mcgill.ca/music/future-students/graduate.

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance

Applicants for the Graduate Diploma must hold an M.Mus. or B.Mus. degree with equivalent professional experience. All musicians must be highly accomplished performers and are required to submit screening material and a statement of performance interests by the application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants will be invited to pass a live entrance audition. Chamber ensembles must apply and complete diploma requirements as a formed ensemble.

D.Mus. Degree

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. degree in Composition, or its equivalent, and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application.

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Performance Studies must hold an M.Mus. degree in Performance, or its equivalent, and are required to submit screening material, samples of written work, and a statement of research interests by the specified application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants will be invited to pass a live entrance audition and interview.

Ph.D. Degree

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. in Composition or equivalent and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application, and a written description (no more than two pages) of the research path(s) they wish to follow.

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology, Sound Recording, Music – Gender and Women's Studies, or Theory must hold a master's or a bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill degree, in Music Technology, Music Education, Musicology, Theory, or Sound Recording. Applicants with a bachelor's degree will normally be admitted to the M.A. program for the first year and may apply for admittance to the Ph.D. program after the completion of one full year of graduate coursework. Qualified applicants who have already completed an appropriate master's degree will be admitted to the second year of the Ph.D. program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • $60 audition fee for Performance degrees

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

Location

  • Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
  • Jewish General Hospital
  • 3755 Chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Suite E-903
  • Montreal, QC H3T 1E2
  • Canada

About Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

The Master of Science degree in Otolaryngology trains otolaryngologists and physicians for clinical or basic science research in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. Master's programs can include research on normal function and disease of head and neck structures: otology, neuro-otology, laryngology, rhinology, oncology, surgery, auditory-vestibular sciences, middle-ear modelling, oto-toxicity, genomics, infection, thyroid disease, or genetics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Otolaryngology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The master's program is intended for otolaryngologists or for physicians with a strong interest in otolaryngology research. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) may be considered. The program addresses research questions using an interdisciplinary approach, combining methodologies of both the clinical sciences and the basic sciences. The master's program is unique in Canada and rare elsewhere. Medical professionals graduating from the program can better treat ear-nose-throat diseases; they are better positioned to do, and to evaluate, research in Otolaryngology. They typically obtain the most highly sought positions in their fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Otolaryngology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the M.Sc. program requires acceptance by a research supervisor, and the proposed program must be approved by the Department.

Applicants should be otolaryngologists, or they should be currently enrolled in a residency program leading to certification in Otolaryngology, or they should be physicians. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) with a strong interest in Otolaryngology Research will be considered.

The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (minimum of 550 on the paper-based test or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20) is required for applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Prospective students should contact research supervisors individually.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Location

  • School of Communication Sciences and Disorders
  • Beatty Hall
  • 1266 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal, QC H3G 1A8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4137
  • Fax: 514-398-8123
  • Email: scsd [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/scsd

About Communication Sciences and Disorders

The School provides both professional and research training in communication sciences and disorders at the graduate level through its M.Sc. (Applied), M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees. We were the first department in Canada to provide both clinical and research degrees. Our M.Sc.A. program aims to educate the next generation of well-prepared and innovative speech-language pathology professionals by providing enriched classroom training, clinical laboratory activities that enhance the transition from theory to practice, and outstanding clinical practicum experiences. Our research degrees are designed to develop leading researchers and scholars, who will go on to train future investigators in the field of communication sciences and disorders and who, through their research, will advance our understanding of the processes of human communication and its breakdown. Interdisciplinary interactions are at the core of our research training approach, which includes preparation to conduct both fundamental and clinically applied investigations. Our professors have collaborative ties with many departments and institutes of McGill (psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, otolaryngology, biomedical engineering, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital) as well as other Montreal universities, and they maintain national and international collaborations. Students can access this rich collaborative network via the McGill Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, a world-class interdisciplinary research centre established and directed by the School. The multilingual context in which we reside provides a unique environment for language research.

The School offers a professional degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the M.Sc. (Applied) level with specialization in Speech Language Pathology and two research degrees: an M.Sc. (Research) and a Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Requirements for Licensure

The majority of provinces in Canada and certain states in the U.S. require that those intending to practise as speech-language pathologists within their borders comply with special provincial or state licensing regulations. Graduates wishing to practise in the province of Quebec must be members of the Ordre des Orthophonistes et Audiologistes du Québec (OOAQ) in order to call themselves speech-language pathologists. Further information is available from the OOAQ, 235 boulevard René-Lévesque est, bureau 601, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 1N8; telephone: 514-282-9123; website: www.ooaq.qc.ca.

Quebec law requires that candidates seeking licensure in provincially recognized professions demonstrate a verbal and written working knowledge of the French language. See the Language Requirements for Professions in the General University Information and Regulations section of the Health Sciences Calendar available at www.mcgill.ca/study.

Funding

The IODE Provincial Chapter of Quebec funds two $1,000 “Silence to Sound” awards for studies in hearing impairment. These in-course awards are based on academic merit, financial need, and potential for excellence, and are awarded by the School.

Montreal League for the Hard of Hearing Award – Candidates must be enrolled at the graduate level in the School and working in the area of hearing impairment. Awarded by the School. Value: up to $1,000.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Communication Sciences & Disorders (Non-Thesis) — Speech-Language Pathology (81 credits)

The professional degree leads to a Master of Science (Applied) with a specialization in Speech Language Pathology. The program involves two academic years of full-time study and related practical work followed by a Summer internship. To prepare students as creative professionals, the program emphasizes the understanding of principles and theories, and their present or potential clinical applications, in addition to the teaching of specific techniques for assessment and intervention. Active participation in the learning process is encouraged.

The profession of speech-language pathology concerns assessment and intervention in speech and language disorders. In particular, the speech-language pathologist is concerned with two major parameters of communication sciences and disorders: language and speech. At present, most speech-language pathologists in Canada work in hospitals, public school systems, rehabilitation centres, and in special education facilities.

Students pursuing the M.Sc.A. complete the basic academic content and clinical practica required in preparation for clinical practice as outlined by the Canadian Association of Speech Language Pathologist and Audiologists (CASLPA). Our M.Sc.A. program is completed in two years whereas some other programs require three years to complete. The emphasis on bridging theory and clinical practice is very strong in our program. Our admission requirements emphasize basic sciences and do not require completion of a specific undergraduate degree. This flexible entry accommodates students with undergraduate degrees in different fields and promotes diversity within our student body. Our goal is to recruit and train skillful therapists and problem-solvers who can rely on strong foundation in theory to address challenging clinical issues. Our M.Sc.A. graduates typically pursue a professional career working in schools, hospitals, rehabilitation centres, or in private practices. A subset of our graduates will enter a doctoral program (immediately or after a period of clinical employment) to pursue a research career.

Research Degrees – M.Sc. and Ph.D.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Communication Sciences and Disorders (Thesis) (45 credits)

Selected candidates may be accepted for the M.Sc. research degree. Each student's thesis supervisor and Thesis Committee design an individualized program of study in collaboration with the student. The program can include graduate courses offered by the School and by other departments at McGill.

This program is designed for students who wish to combine research training with their clinical (M.Sc.A.) program or students from related fields who wish to gain research experience in communication sciences to prepare for doctoral studies. Students are required to take two semesters (6 credits) of statistics and complete a thesis. Admission to the M.Sc. research program requires identification of an SCSD professor(s) with relevant expertise to mentor the student through the thesis process. Graduates of our M.Sc. research program follow diverse career paths working in clinical settings (if they also have a clinical degree) or settings that combine clinical and research activities or continuing their research training at the doctoral level.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Sciences and Disorders

Selected candidates may be accepted for the Ph.D. research degree. Each student's thesis supervisor and Thesis Committee design an individualized program of study in collaboration with the student. The program can include graduate courses offered by the School and by other departments at McGill.

Students pursuing a Ph.D. in SCSD have varied educational backgrounds, including both clinical and related non-clinical fields. Students who enter the program from a related field (e.g., Psychology, Linguistics) or without a master’s thesis complete a Qualifying year, which includes coursework and a research project. This flexible entry attracts independent scholars with diverse backgrounds and interests, which creates a stimulating and enriched training environment. The main component of the Ph.D. program (beyond the Qualifying year) has minimal required coursework and is structured to support students as they develop and pursue an innovative, individualized program of doctoral studies. Admission to the doctoral program requires identification of a SCSD professor(s) with relevant expertise to mentor the student in this process. Ph.D. students have the opportunity to pursue an interdisciplinary specialization in language acquisition through the McGill Language Acquisition Program, which intersects with McGill departments of Linguistics, Psychology, and Education. Our Ph.D. graduates typically pursue academic careers in universities or research institutes, but some work in settings that combine research and professional activities.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Sciences and Disorders — Language Acquisition
Information about this option is available from the School and at www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html. This unique interdisciplinary Ph.D. program is available for doctoral students across four departments at McGill including SCSD, Linguistics, Psychology, and Integrated Studies in Education. The program is designed to provide enriched training focused on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition Program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology. In addition to the SCSD Ph.D. requirements, students in this program must complete 6 credits of coursework in language acquisition (including at least one course that is not in their home department), and four interdisciplinary seminars (2 credits each) and must include a faculty member in the Language Acquisition Program on their thesis committee.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Communication Sciences and Disorders Admission Requirements and Applications Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. (Applied)

An applicant must hold an undergraduate degree with a minimum B average (3.0 on a 4.0-point scale) or better in areas relevant to the selected field of specialization. Specific requirements are 6 credits in statistics, a total of 18 credits across the disciplines of psychology and linguistics (with a minimum of 6 credits in each discipline). Knowledge of physiology is also desirable.

M.Sc. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

The M.Sc. provides research training for:

  1. students who are also taking courses for professional qualification;
  2. students who have a non-thesis professional degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders; and
  3. students with degrees in related fields who wish to do research but not obtain professional qualification in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Applicants should normally have a master's degree with thesis or its equivalent in Communication Sciences and Disorders or a related field (e.g., psychology, linguistics).

Students who possess an appropriate bachelor’s degree or master’s degree without thesis will also be considered for the Ph.D. program, but, if admitted, must first complete a Qualifying year of coursework and a research project.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission: the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 587 (paper-based) or 95 on the Internet-based test with minimum component scores of 24 in both Speaking and Writing and 21 in both Reading and Listening, or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 7.0.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please see the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders website at www.mcgill.ca/scsd/programs for required application materials.

M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs

All applications received by the application deadlines are automatically considered for any internal funding or awards made available to the Department for recruitment purposes. Students who apply for Fall admission generally have the most options with respect to applying for external funding as well as for being considered for internal support.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

M.Sc. (Applied)
  • Prerequisite Form
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Reference letters – one professional and one academic
M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D.
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • Writing Sample
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor

Applications will be considered upon receipt of supporting documents as outlined above. All applicants are strongly encouraged to submit reports of their performance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Law

Law

Location

  • Faculty of Law
  • Graduate Programs in Law
  • New Chancellor Day Hall
  • 3644 Peel Street, Room 406
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1W9
  • Canada

Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) – Angela Campbell

About Law

Graduate students in Law at McGill have one thing in common: a sharp curiosity to explore ideas and projects in an environment that is uniquely comparative and pluralist.

The extensive and impressive history of graduate teaching and supervision at McGill, combined with the innovations in legal pedagogy for which the Faculty of Law is celebrated, create an unrivaled quality and experience for graduate students. Grounded in Montreal, a city that embodies a lively mix of languages, cultures, and communities, the Faculty of Law invites students pursuing their D.C.L. and LL.M. degrees to discover and write within a community of legal scholars that is internationally renowned and engaging.

McGill Law is a meeting place for the major languages of North America, for the world’s legal traditions, and for students who wish to participate in the graduate life of a truly outstanding, prestigious, and intellectually vibrant Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law offers a range of programs at the graduate level. These include the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), as well as graduate certificates.

Students may choose to pursue either the LL.M. or the D.C.L. in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL), or the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL). Graduate certificates may only be completed within either the IASL or the ICL.

The Faculty of Law promotes study and research in private, commercial, international, and public law, as well as legal theory, from the perspectives of diverse legal traditions. In collaboration with the McGill School of Environment, the Faculty offers an LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis option in Environment. The Faculty also offers two other options within the LL.M. degree, a cross-disciplinary European Studies Option (ESO; availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year) in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts, and a specialization in Bioethics. The D.C.L. degree always involves a substantial thesis.

The Institute of Air and Space Law operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute offers a curriculum exploring legal issues that arise from international civil aviation and new technologies in space. It provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal processes regulating worldwide aerospace activities. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law.

The Institute of Comparative Law operates within the Faculty of Law as a centre of comparative legal studies. It accommodates national, international, and transnational studies and encourages openness to diverse legal cultures in teaching and research. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law.

Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degrees

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education primarily through research, as the program concentrates on the production of a 30,000-word thesis, as well as some graduate-level coursework.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Bioethics (45 credits)
The master’s specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes both the conceptual and practical aspects of Bioethics. Students apply through either the Faculty of Law, Medicine, Religious Studies, or the Department of Philosophy. Students entering pursuing an LL.M., Bioethics, are bound by the requirements of the Faculty of Law’s LL.M. program. This program is offered in the thesis option only.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of the Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis), providing students with an appreciation for the role of science, politics, and ethics in informed decision-making in the environment sector.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); European Studies (46 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within the existing LL.M. Thesis program. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood.
Note: Availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education largely through graduate-level coursework. The program requires two terms of coursework as well as a 15,000-word research project.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis) providing students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environment sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.

Institute of Air and Space Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to focus on original scholarly research and writing under the supervision of a law professor. This program involves 20 credits in coursework and 25 research credits (a thesis of 100–150 pages). The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent analysis, writing skills, and organization.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to gain a wide exposure to a range of taught courses within, and related to, the domain of Air and Space Law. The Non-Thesis option requires a substantial Supervised Research Project (18 credits), with the remaining 27 credits earned in courses.

Institute of Comparative Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their master’s thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their individual master’s supervised research project (for LL.M. Master’s Non-Thesis students). Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) Degrees

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.)
The Doctor of Civil Law program is centred around the doctoral thesis, which develops a substantive and original contribution to legal research and knowledge under the supervision of a faculty member. Many doctoral candidates intend on pursuing an academic career, and develop their approach to pedagogy, research, and writing while at McGill.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Air and Space Law
The Doctor of Civil Law in the Institute of Air and Space Law is a research degree ideal for scholars intent on deepening and broadening their critical understanding of the law, as well as their original engagement with it. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination to be done at the end of the first year, or during the second year of the D.C.L. program. The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidenced in concept and execution the original work of the candidate.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Comparative Law
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes doctoral students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their doctoral thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Graduate Certificates in Law

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a coursework program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis. This certificate is particularly appropriate for jurists and other professionals who wish to pursue graduate-level legal studies in aviation, air and space law, government regulations, conventions, and treaties dealing with these areas.
Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) to candidates who do not wish to undertake the master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Law Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law reviews applications and makes recommendations regarding admission. Final admission decisions are determined by admissions policies set by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

For information and application forms, please consult the Faculty website www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions or contact the Graduate Programs Office in Law, McGill University, at the Departmental address, or via email at grad [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca, and telephone 514-398-6635.

Language Requirement

Graduate-level courses are generally offered in English, and English-language abilities must be demonstrated for admission. In order to communicate fully with all law students at McGill, and to understand all course materials, the ability to speak and read French is an asset. At McGill's Faculty of Law, all students may choose to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or French.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian or American (English or French) institution, must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, ESOL, or EDEXCEL offices. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. For an application to be considered, a TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, ESOL, or EDEXCEL test result, McGill Certificate of Proficiency in English or McGill Certificate of Proficiency – English for Professional Communication must be available.

Generally, successful applicants to our LL.M. and D.C.L. programs typically report scores of at least 100 on the TOEFL (iBT), 600 on the TOEFL (PBT), a band score of 7.0 or greater on the IELTS, a grade of 85 or higher on the MELAB, a grade of “A” (Excellent) on the ESOL (CAE), a grade of “B” (Good) or higher on the ESOL (CPE), an overall grade of at least “Distinction” on the EDEXCEL (Level 4) or an overall grade of at least “Merit” on the EDEXCEL (Level 5).

In all programs, non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is French must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 567 (86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) or an IELTS score of 7.0 overall band. This is because McGill students can write essays, examinations and theses in French, even where the course is taught in English. Note that the majority of courses in Graduate Programs in Law are taught in English.

For information about the TOEFL, and to register to take the test, see www.ets.org/toefl. For information about the IELTS, see www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and it takes approximately 40 days to communicate the results. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institution to Graduate Programs in Law. For the TOEFL, McGill’s institutional code is 0935 and Law’s departmental code is 03. These codes must be provided to TOEFL when requesting a test report form. For the IELTS, applicants must ask for an official report to be sent to Graduate Programs in Law at the Graduate Programs’ departmental address. These tests must be taken sufficiently early for results to reach McGill no later than January 15 of the year of admission. Application files must be completed by that date to be considered.

French: The ability to speak or read French is an asset but not a necessity. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential. Applicants should indicate their knowledge of French on the admissions questionnaire; they will be notified if French is essential to the area of study.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the D.C.L. program occurs only when:
  1. the candidate has completed a graduate law degree with thesis at McGill or at another university, and
  2. the Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of his or her previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a doctoral program.

Review of the completed master’s thesis is normally part of the admission decision–making process. Exceptionally, a candidate with a non-thesis master's degree with an outstanding file may be admitted to the doctoral program.

Master’s Degrees

Candidates for admission to the LL.M. program must hold a Bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.), with at least Upper Second Class honours or the equivalent of 3.0/4.0 cumulative grade point average. However, this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire file, including the applicant's references and the quality of the research proposal.

Furthermore, in the case of thesis programs, the Committee must consider the availability of a supervisor. If a supervisor is not available in the applicant's preferred field of study, the applicant may be refused admission or else offered admission pending a change of field of study.

LL.M. Interdisciplinary Options in Environment and European Studies

Students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis program at the Faculty of Law may specify an interest in these options.

LL.M. Specialization in Bioethics

Requirements for admission to the Master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information, see the Bioethics section of this publication, or contact the Chair, Master’s Specialization in Bioethics, Biomedical Ethics Unit, 3647 Peel Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 1W9. Telephone: 514-398-6980; fax: 514-398-8349; email: kathleen [dot] glass [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the graduate certificate programs are essentially the same as for the master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience.

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law

Candidates desiring a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law who do not hold a law degree may be admitted if they have earned an undergraduate university degree in another discipline and possess sufficient professional experience to compensate for the lack of a law degree (as determined by the Graduate Admissions Committee).

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after one full-time term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 academic credits of law courses. Those credits must include the three Air and Space law courses obligatory for master's students (ASPL 633 Public International Air Law, ASPL 636 Private International Air Law, and ASPL 637 Space Law: General Principles), which are all offered in the Fall term. Students may take courses beyond the minimum of 15 credits, and these additional courses may be non-law courses.

Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after one full-time term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 course credits. In every case, the program is structured to meet individual needs and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies).

Note: ALL international students must obtain permission to study from the governments of Quebec and Canada. Immigration Quebec issues the Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada issues federal Study Permits. You may also wish to contact www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents for assistance.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The application deadline to all graduate law programs (LL.M., D.C.L., Graduate Certificates) is January 15. Although McGill continues to accept applications until June 30 (April 30 for international applicants) for the Fall term, the Faculty of Law will not consider applications received on or after January 16.

McGill Graduate Law offers Fall term admission only; the Faculty is not willing to consider applications for Winter and Summer. Applications submitted for the Winter and Summer terms will be cancelled by the Faculty of Law WITHOUT reimbursement of the application fee.

Note: The application fee remains non-refundable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Mining and Materials Engineering

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines 

Mining and Materials Engineering

Location

  • Department of Mining and Materials Engineering
  • M.H. Wong Building
  • 3610 University Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 0C5
  • Canada
  • Mining Engineering
  • Telephone: 514-398-2215
  • Fax: 514-398-7099
  • Materials Engineering
  • Telephone: 514-398-4383
  • Fax: 514-398-4492

About Mining and Materials Engineering

Graduate programs leading to M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D. research degrees are available in the areas of Geomechanics; Mining Environments; Strategic Mine Planning and Optimization; Stochastic Modelling; Operations Research; Mineral Economics; Materials Handling; Process Metallurgy; Computational Thermodynamics; Hydrometallurgy; Effluent and Waste Treatment; Mineral Processing; Metal Casting and CFD Modelling; Surface Engineering; Composites; Ceramics; Electron Microscopy; Automotive and Aerospace Materials; Biomaterials; Nanomaterials; Nanoelectronic Materials; Multiscale Modelling of Materials; and Electronic and Solar Cell Materials.

Course programs leading to the M.Eng. (Project) degree in Mining or Materials Engineering and the Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering are also available.

Special programs are available for those holding degrees in subjects other than Materials or Mining Engineering (e.g., Chemical, Civil, or Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, Geology).

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Eng. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Eng. degree or its equivalent in Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering, or other related engineering fields.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Sc. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Sc. degree in Chemistry, Materials Science, Physics, Geology, or related fields.

Direct Transfer from a Master's to a Ph.D. – Students enrolled in a master's program (thesis) may transfer into the Ph.D. program without obtaining a master's degree if they have satisfied the following:

  1. they have a minimum CGPA of 3.3 for the last two full-time undergraduate years;
  2. they have been in the master's program for less than 15 months;
  3. they have passed with the minimum CGPA of 3.6 at least three of the required master's courses, and given one seminar with a minimum grade of A-;
  4. they have obtained a letter of recommendation from their supervisor.

Direct Entry from B.Eng. to Ph.D.

Exceptional B.Eng. graduates may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. The Ph.D. 1 students admitted through this process are required to complete at least four graduate-level courses.

M.Eng. (Project) Degrees

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Materials option) is primarily designed to train people with appropriate engineering or scientific backgrounds to allow them to work effectively in the metals and materials industries. The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Mining option) is primarily designed for graduates from mining engineering programs who have received adequate academic training in modern mining technology, mineral economics, computer programming, and probabilities and statistics.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
This interdepartmental graduate program leads to a master’s degree in Environmental Engineering. The objective of the program is to train environmental professionals at an advanced level. The program is designed for individuals with an undergraduate degree in engineering. This non-thesis degree falls within the M.Eng. and M.Sc. programs, which are offered in the Departments of Bioresource, Chemical, Civil, and Mining and Materials Engineering. The Environmental Engineering program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge, practical perspectives, and awareness of environmental issues through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with the Graduate Program Director prior to enrolling in the program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mining and Materials Engineering
Please consult the Department for more information about the Ph.D.
Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering (30 credits)
This program normally requires one academic year of full-time study to complete. Candidates are required to take an integrated group of courses based on their academic background.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Mining and Materials Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering is open to graduates with suitable academic standing in any branch of engineering or science. It is designed to provide a sound technical mining engineering background to candidates intending to work in the minerals industry.

The M.Eng. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Eng. degree or its equivalent in Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering, or other related engineering fields.

The M.Sc. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Sc. degree in Chemistry, Materials Science, Physics, Geology, or related fields.

The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Materials option) is primarily designed to train people with appropriate engineering or scientific backgrounds to allow them to work effectively in the metals and materials industries. Industrial experience is favourably viewed for entrance into the program, but is not considered a necessity.

The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Mining option) is primarily designed for graduates from mining engineering programs who have received adequate academic training in modern mining technology, mineral economics, computer programming, and probabilities and statistics. Students without this academic training must follow a Qualifying term. Industrial experience is favourably viewed for entrance into the program, but is not considered a necessity.

The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Environmental Engineering option) is also offered.

Ph.D. degree applicants may either be “directly transferred” from the M.Eng. or M.Sc. program (see below) or hold an acceptable master's degree in Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering, or other related fields, or under exceptional circumstances may be admitted directly from the bachelor's degree. In the latter case they are admitted to Ph.D. 1 as opposed to those holding a master's degree that are admitted to Ph.D. 2.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Social Work

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Social Work

Location

  • School of Social Work
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street, Suite 300
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7070
  • Fax: 514-398-4760
  • Email: graduate [dot] socialwork [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/socialwork

About Social Work

The School of Social Work offers dynamic M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, designed to explore cutting-edge knowledge on social work theory, practice, policy, and research. We have an exciting and growing faculty with a variety of research and practice expertise in the fields of: child welfare; health, mental health, and disability; poverty; aging; First Peoples; marginalized groups (e.g., immigrants and refugees, war affected populations, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people); loss and bereavement; domestic violence; and international social work. Our approaches to practice and research cover all levels of intervention from individuals, families, groups, and communities. Located within the School of Social Work are specialized centres devoted to research and training in the areas of domestic violence; children and families; and international human rights. Graduate students also have access to workstations equipped with computers, and many professional development workshops and seminars. Several research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available each year.

The McGill School of Social Work is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW), the Canadian Association for Social Work Education – l'Association Canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE-ACFTS), and of the Regroupement des unités de formation universitaire en travail social du Québec (RUFUTS).

The School of Social Work is a professional school with the primary objective of preparing students for careers and for leadership in the fields of social work and social welfare.

Qualifying Year Entry into the M.S.W. Program

Applicants demonstrating academic excellence and a minimum of one year of social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional) are considered for admission to the one-year, full-time (only) Qualifying year of study in preparation for entry to the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program. The objective of this preparatory year is to provide students with essential foundation social work knowledge that will provide a basis upon which to embark on graduate-level studies in social work.

M.S.W. Program

The overarching objective of the master's program is the provision of advanced professional training by means of integrated learning experiences. Specifically, the educational goals are to:

  1. develop a deepened and advanced competence in practice and research;
  2. embrace a capacity for critical understanding of social theories, social problems, and emergent issues; and
  3. understand population groups in need, institutional structures, and policy initiatives and processes.

The M.S.W. degree can be pursued via two options: thesis and non-thesis. Both options carry a weight of 45 credits, and, taken on a full-time basis, both options involve three terms of study. In both options, part-time study can be arranged.

There are two points of entry into the M.S.W.: one for those who hold a B.S.W. degree; and one for those who have completed the one-year Qualifying year of study offered by the School of Social Work.

Ph.D. Program in Social Work

The School of Social Work offers a dynamic Ph.D. program in social work/social policy in order to promote the development of scholarship on social issues within Canada and Quebec. Courses are offered in English at McGill. A parallel stream is offered in French at Université de Montréal. Students have the option of taking courses at either university.

The program aims to:

  1. prepare graduates for careers in university teaching and research, policy development, implementation and evaluation, practice and program evaluation, leadership and management of human services;
  2. offer students the opportunity to acquire research methodology skills and to apply these to a range of areas relevant to social work; and
  3. stimulate original research on important social problems and issues.
Note: While not a prerequisite for admission, possession of a working knowledge of the French language is important not only to candidates who intend to seek admission to the Quebec professional Ordre after graduation but also to those who wish to maximize their field placement opportunities during their program. In consultation with the Field Education Coordinator, students may have the option of completing their field requirements at an approved social service agency outside of Quebec.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of research skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. Program requirements consist of a thesis and six courses (two of which are required), taken over an extended period of three to four terms of full-time study. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional). Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Non-Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of practice skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. This program includes three semesters of full-time study that consist of coursework, professional education in a supervised field placement, and an independent study project. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional), or will have successfully completed the Qualifying year entry into the M.S.W. Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Joint Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with Integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) (132 credits)
The School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law offer a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law/Bachelor of Laws (B.C.L./LL.B.) designed to transcend academic boundaries in social justice issues. Lawyers and social workers often operate in the same fields, whether in public policy, child protection, family law, poverty law, or domestic violence situations, yet each profession has been constrained by internal limitations. The joint M.S.W. (non-thesis option)/Law program requires students to complete 132 credits (45 credits in M.S.W., 87 credits in Law). Students should take three and a half to four years to complete the M.S.W./B.C.L./LL.B. program. It is possible, however, to complete the program in three years, by doing work for credit over the summer and by carrying heavier course loads throughout the program. The joint program leads to conferral of the B.C.L./LL.B. law degrees and the master’s degree in social work. Prospective students possess a B.S.W. degree with prior practice experience.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Social Work (offered jointly by McGill and Université de Montréal)
As one of the top Ph.D. programs in Canada, the School of Social Work promotes leading scholarship on social policy and practice. Over the course of three to four years, working closely with their supervisor, students pursue individualized programs of study, which include coursework, research, and professional development. Faculty have expertise in a variety of areas such as aging; social exclusion; child welfare; international social welfare; psychosocial approaches to intervention; Aboriginal people and communities; violence against women and children; health and disability; poverty and social development; migration and community organizing. Students normally take two semesters of coursework after which they complete a comprehensive exam. In the second year of the program students begin their thesis work and take a course designed to facilitate the research process. Research and writing usually takes between one and two years to complete. McGill offers entrance fellowships, access to computers and library resources, and active student networks. There are many opportunities to be involved in faculty research projects and sessional teaching. Students go on to careers in teaching, organizational leadership, and social policy analysis.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

M.Sc.(A) in Couple and Family Therapy  (60 credits)

Biotechnology

Biotechnology

Location

  • Institute of Parasitology
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Biotechnology

Non-thesis Graduate Certificate and M.Sc.(Applied) degree in Biotechnology.

The non-thesis program in Biotechnology offers a course-based curriculum with practical training in laboratory courses and internships offered through the Institute of Parasitology. The Institute is housed on Macdonald Campus of McGill University in beautiful Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue about 30 kilometers from the Montreal main campus downtown.

Graduates typically enter the biotechnology sector in research, management, or sales, or accept government positions.

BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Biotechnology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in the biological/molecular sciences or an equivalent program. This applied master's program is unique in Quebec. It aims to prepare students for entry into the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry or to pursue further graduate studies in biomedicine, agriculture, or the environment. Students can choose from a wide range of complementary courses given throughout the McGill campuses to “design” their own program toward a future career choice. The program provides in-house training in molecular biology with a strong focus on the molecular/biochemical sciences. Concurrently, it provides teaching in management and gives students the opportunity to look at the business aspect of biotechnology. A research internship of four to eight months is carried out in an active laboratory, and students learn to present and write research results. Graduates will find jobs ranging from positions as research assistants and/or technicians in biomedical or pharmaceutical laboratories to managerial or supervisory positions. They may also pursue a career in the business of biotechnology including patent and intellectual property management.
Graduate Certificate in Biotechnology (16 credits)
Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in the biological/molecular sciences or an equivalent program. This is a short, intense program for students wishing to deepen their understanding of biotechnology and gain hands-on experience via an intensive laboratory course using the latest molecular biology techniques. Students can choose from a wide range of complementary courses given throughout the McGill campuses to “design” their own program toward a future career choice. Graduates will find employment in research or industrial laboratories as assistants and/or technicians.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Biotechnology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for the Graduate Certificate and the M.Sc.(Applied) in Biotechnology must possess a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences or equivalent with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.0 GPA in the last two full-time years of university study for the Graduate Certificate, and a minimum of 3.2/4.0 CGPA for the M.Sc.(A.), as well as prerequisites or equivalents. Prerequisites or equivalents: applicants are required to have sufficient background in biochemistry, cellular biology, and molecular biology, preferably at an advanced level for the Master's Applied.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected, may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying Program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Support – Financial support for Biotechnology programs is very limited. Students must secure funding from governmental agencies or be self-sufficient. International students are strongly encouraged to secure funding from their home country or international agencies. More information is found at www.mcgill.ca/biotechgradprog/admissions/tuition.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Other Supporting Documents – Other documents may be required for the admission process. Please consult the Biotechnology website at www.mcgill.ca/biotechgradprog/admissions for full details of the admission process.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant’s file until the following admittance period if application materials including supporting documents are received after the application deadlines. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

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