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Management (doctoral programs)

Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the Joint Ph.D. in Management

  • Ph.D. Program Office
  • Desautels Faculty of Management
  • McGill University
  • 1001 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1G5
  • Canada
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management
The Ph.D. program in Management is offered jointly by the four Montreal universities: Concordia University, École des Hautes Études Commerciales (affiliated with the Université de Montréal), McGill University, and Université du Québec à Montréal. The program is intended to educate competent researchers and to stimulate research on management issues.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management — Environment
The Ph.D. program option in Environment is intended to develop an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment. It provides a forum whereby students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

The Ph.D. program is offered jointly with three other institutions:

  • Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Département des Sciences Administratives
  • 315 Ste-Catherine Est
  • Montreal QC H2X 3X2
  • Canada
  • Website: http://phdadm.esg.uqam.ca

The program represents a number of innovations in doctoral work in the field of administration. First, by cooperating, the four universities are able to make available to the program's students a diverse pool of approximately 250 professors qualified to direct doctoral-level study and research. Second, the program has been carefully developed to encourage independent, creative work on the part of its students, with close, personal contact with the professors. This program will appeal especially to the mature, experienced candidate with relatively well-defined interests. Across the four member universities, some courses are offered in English and some in French. (All papers may, however, be written in English or French.) This is viewed as a definite advantage of the program for those students who expect to work in Canada or francophone countries after graduation.

The program places considerable emphasis on the theoretical foundations of management and its underlying disciplines. Graduates of the program are expected to have: (1) some knowledge of all the main areas of management, (2) a thorough knowledge of one applied area of management, and one support discipline, (3) a complete command of the research methodologies used in management, and (4) some familiarity with modern theories and methods of the pedagogy of management.

The program consists of three phases: preparation, specialization, and dissertation.

Phase I – Preparation

Before entering the program, the student will have selected the area of specialization from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management
  • Organizational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Organization
  • NSERC CREATE*

Some students—notably those with strong master's degrees in administration or related disciplines—have a minimum of work in Phase I; others require up to one academic year of work.

Phase II – Specialization

In Phase II, students probe deeply into their chosen area of specialization. With their Advisory Committee, students work out an individual program of study, which takes about 18 months. The phase focuses on a specialization area and a support field. The specialization area could be one of the basic ones listed in Phase I (for example, marketing or operations management), a sub-area within one of these (such as organizational development within organizational behaviour), or an interdisciplinary area that combines two or more of these (such as behaviour aspects of accounting or international marketing).

The support field is selected to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge in a fundamental discipline that underlies the theory in administration. For example, a student in marketing might select psychology, sociology, or statistics. One in management policy might select political science or general systems theory, or perhaps even philosophy. Other choices are possible.

Students officially enter Phase II of the program when their Advisory Committee has been established and, together with the student, formally agrees on a proposal for the work to be done in Phase II. Phase II must be approved by the McGill and the Joint Doctoral Committees. This includes the following:

  • Doctoral seminars in the specialization area; minimum four courses
  • Any other existing graduate-level courses in the specialization area and support field deemed appropriate by the Advisory Committee; minimum two courses in support field
  • Seminar on Research Methodology (MGMT 707, 3 credits) or equivalent approved graduate-level course
  • Seminar in Pedagogy (MGMT 706, 3 credits) or Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDPH 689, 3 credits)
  • Comprehensive Examination (MGMT 701, 0 credits)
  • A publishable research paper (MGMT 720, 3 credits)

The Advisory Committee will normally consist of at least three or four persons; a Chair and others decided upon jointly by the Chair and the student. One of these members will typically come from the support field. Every student's Advisory Committee must have representation from at least two universities in the joint program.

Phase III – Dissertation

The third phase of the program consists of the dissertation in the course of which the student probes deeply into a well-defined research topic. The topic is developed with the Thesis Committee (at least three members), which may be the same as the Phase II Advisory Committee or may be reconstituted, again with representation from at least one of the other participating universities. The topic is approved formally by the Thesis Committee and, once the research is completed and the dissertation written, the student publicly defends the completed thesis.

* NSERC CREATE Ph.D. option in Healthcare Operations and Information Management – Offered jointly by six Canadian universities: McGill, British Columbia, Ottawa, Queen's, Toronto, and Montréal; this Ph.D. program brings together expertise on healthcare processes, operations research, information systems, and telecommunications engineering.

Admission Requirements

Candidates normally hold a master's-level degree, with a strong academic record from a recognized university.

GMAT (or GRE-General Test) results are required for applications to the doctoral program; this includes McGill master's students applying to the Ph.D. The minimum score required is 600. Tests must have been written within the past five years.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. A minimum score of 100 for the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, is required for admission. A minimum score of 7 for IELTS is required. Tests must have been written within the past two years.

Files will not be considered unless GMAT (or GRE-General Test) and TOEFL scores are received by the Application Deadlines.

Students may apply for admission to one or more of the participating universities. These applications will be processed by the individual university to which the applicant has applied and by the Joint Committee of the four schools. Students' preferences will prevail when more than one participating university is prepared to accept them. The Ph.D. degree will be granted by the university that admits the student. The program requires a minimum full-time residency of six terms.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GMAT (or GRE-General Test) written within the past 5 years
  • Answers to Personal Statement questions
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/desautels/programs/phd/admissions/deadline.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Environment

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Environment

Location

  • Downtown Campus
  • McGill School of Environment
  • 3534 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-2827
  • Fax: 514-398-1643
  • Macdonald Campus
  • McGill School of Environment
  • Rowles House
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7559
  • Fax: 514-398-7846

About Environment

Resolving environmental issues requires a dialogue between pure and applied sciences, the social sciences, and humanities. The degradation of the biological and biophysical environment has roots in the structure of human societies while solutions to environmental problems have an impact on human livelihoods.

A number of academic departments and institutes at McGill promote graduate-level research and training on environmental topics and have faculty members whose main research interest falls in this domain. As such, environmental research is widespread throughout the McGill community. The Environment option provides a vehicle whereby discipline-based graduate programs can easily and effectively incorporate collaborations from at least one other discipline into their research.

Goals of the Option

  • To provide thesis or non-thesis students in existing graduate programs with an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment;
  • To develop an appreciation of the role of scientific, political, socioeconomic, and ethical judgments in influencing that process;
  • To provide a forum whereby graduate students in environment throughout the University bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

Students admitted into the Environment option will be supervised or co-supervised by an accredited McGill faculty member. Their Advisory Committee will include at least one individual from outside the home department. It is expected that the thesis, dissertation, or project, as well as the final seminar presentation, will contain an environmental component and will include a discussion of the applied implications of the research findings. Together with the courses common to the Environment option, specific course requirements for each program are given within the departmental listings cited below.

Program List

The Environment option is currently available with the following graduate programs:

Anthropology
M.A. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Anthropology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Biology
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment
Bioresource Engineering
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
M.Sc. (Applied) – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment
Earth and Planetary Sciences
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Earth and Planetary Sciences — Environment
Entomology
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Environment
Epidemiology
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Epidemiology and Biostatics > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Environment (60 credits)
Geography
M.A. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Environment
Law
LL.M. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law > Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
LL.M. (Non-Thesis) – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law > Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
Management
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Desautels Faculty of Mangement > Graduate > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management — Environment
Medicine, Experimental
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Medicine (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Experimental Medicine — Environment
Microbiology
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Environment
Parasitology
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology — Environment
Philosophy
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Philosophy > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
Plant Science
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Environment
Renewable Resources
M.Sc. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see the eCalendar under Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Environment
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Please note that the department of sociology will no longer be offering an option in Environment.

Environment Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates must apply separately to the McGill School of Environment (MSE) for the graduate Environment option. Their acceptability will be based on their academic experience and performance, and availability of a potential MSE-accredited supervisor or co-supervisor for their proposed research. For further information, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines to the graduate Environment option may vary depending on the department you are applying to. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Political Science

Political Science

Location

  • Department of Political Science
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 414
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Political Science

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. (with or without thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. These programs combine depth of specialization in a particular field with breadth of knowledge in related fields. The staff offers courses and supervises research on most of the important areas of political science. Students may specialize in any of the following: Canadian Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, or International Relations.

M.A. graduates gain the scholarly preparation required to proceed to the Ph.D. program at McGill or elsewhere. Alternatively, the M.A. degree prepares graduates for teaching at the college level, for advanced study in other disciplines, or for rewarding jobs in government and in the private sector. Students in the M.A. program may choose either the Research Essay option or the Thesis option. Both options are generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada.

Besides its traditional M.A. program, the Department also offers M.A. options in Social Statistics, Development Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and European Studies. Interested students must apply and be accepted to both the political science M.A. program and to the option program.

Graduate students can benefit from expertise and advanced scholarship in such diverse research areas as Electoral Studies, Comparative Federalism, Constitutional Theory and Practice, International Peace and Security Studies, International Development, Nations and Nationalism, Health and Social Policy, and Identity Politics. For a full list of our affiliated research centres and institutes, please consult our website: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/centres.

Changes may take place after this content is published. Students are advised to contact the Department Office for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.

Master's Programs

Students may select a program with the Thesis or the Non-Thesis (Research Project) option in completing M.A. degree requirements. They may switch from one option to the other while completing their coursework.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. A main purpose of the M.A. degree is to demonstrate an ability to design and execute with competence a major piece of research, comparable to a full‐length article in a scholarly journal. The length will vary with the nature of the topic. A thesis that contains considerable data analysis might be well developed in 50 pages, while an institutional or historical study would generally be longer.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European Studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. Students in the non-thesis program will submit a research essay. The research essay will normally be based on a paper written for a graduate seminar or an independent reading course. The research essay requirement also applies to each of the non-thesis options listed below.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The Gender and Women’s Studies Option offers McGill graduate students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework, a cross‐disciplinary specialization in feminist, and gender and/or women’s studies, deploying a wide array of disciplinary methodologies and modes of inquiry. The student's research paper must be on a topic centrally focused on gender and/or women's studies. See www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
The Social Statistics Option complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data or equivalent. Students complete course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, as advised by the Option Adviser, and subject to approval by the Department, and a statistics‐based M.A. research paper in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. See www.mcgill.ca/socialstatistics. Entrance to this option is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee subsequent to acceptance into the Departmental program. A research paper is required to demonstrate proficiency in research. It is normally about 50 pages in length and involves revision of a paper written for one of the graduate courses completed in the program. The research paper is evaluated by two faculty members in the Department.

Ph.D. Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science
The doctoral program is designed to give students the necessary foundation for making original contributions to knowledge. Graduate courses provide students with analytical and theoretical tools used in particular subfields. This general training includes specialized training in research methods. Recent graduates of our doctoral program are pursuing diverse employment opportunities. See: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/recentplacements.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Political Science and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. This option is a cross-disciplinary specialization run by the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies (see www.mcgill.ca/igsf). The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies. For more information on the option, see: www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Political Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The graduate Admissions Committee only considers applications from those who already have an undergraduate academic degree in political science or a closely related field (e.g., international studies, sociology, philosophy for prospective political theorists, etc.). Those without this required background occasionally enrol as Special Students in the undergraduate program and take upper-level undergraduate courses in order to build the academic record necessary to apply to the graduate program.

Master's

Students holding a B.A. degree may be eligible for admission to the M.A. program. Preparation equivalent to a McGill Honours program in Political Science is desirable.

Ph.D.

Students holding a master’s degree in political science may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program. In some instances, outstanding students with a B.A. in Political Science may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program without having completed an M.A. degree. They will be considered Ph.D. 1 and some previous political science coursework could be applied to the requirements of the program, provided that it did not count toward any other degree.

Reference Letters

All applicants, including those who have done their undergraduate work at McGill, must submit two letters of reference. It is recommended that you contact your referees at least a month in advance of the deadline. Applications that do not have references by January 15 will not be considered.

GRE and TOEFL Exams

GRE results are required for applications to the doctoral program. Use codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 1999. The test should be written well in advance of the application deadline. See www.ets.org/gre for more information on registering for the test. GRE results are not required for students applying to the master's program.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian/American institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) is required for admission. Please use the codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 89 when writing the TOEFL exam. See www.ets.org/toefl for more information on registering for the test. The IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) with a minimum overall band of 6.5 is also acceptable. Files will not be considered unless TOEFL/IELTS scores are received before the application deadline (January 15 for admission in the Fall).

For more information, consult the following websites: www.ets.org/gre and www.ets.org/toefl.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Writing Sample – Ph.D. only
  • GRE – required for applications to the Ph.D.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Political Science Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Completed applications (including all supporting documentation listed above) for all graduate programs in Political Science must be received by January 15. For detailed information, please see the Graduate Applicant Checklist at: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/gradformsdocs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Islamic Studies

Islamic Studies

Location

  • Institute of Islamic Studies
  • Morrice Hall, Room 319
  • 3485 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E1
  • Canada

About Islamic Studies

Opportunities for research are wide and varied, reflecting the interests of both the faculty and students. Students may choose a specialization from the following options: Arabic Literatures; Arab American/Arab Canadian Literatures; Persian Literature; Urdu Literature; South-Asian Literature; Islamic Theology; Islamic Philosophy; Science in Islamic Societies; Islamic History; Safavid History; Shi`i Studies; History of the Modern Middle East; Anthropology and History of Modern Iran; Islam and Politics; Islam in Africa; Islamic Law; and Women and Gender in Islamic Societies. Students have the opportunity to be involved in a number of cutting-edge research projects.

The degrees and specializations offered at the Institute are the M.A. in Islamic Studies (Thesis); M.A. in Islamic Studies (Thesis) with Option in Gender and Women’s Studies; Ph.D. in Islamic Studies; and Ph.D. in Islamic Studies with Option in Gender and Women’s Studies.

The Islamic Studies Library is especially strong in its reference materials and periodical holdings for Islamic regions. The collection, one of the largest in North America, contains over 150,000 volumes in principal European languages as well as in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, and other Islamic languages.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Islamic Studies (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students pursuing the M.A. in Islamic Studies at the Institute normally have an undergraduate specialization in the Humanities or Social Sciences, preferably with a major in Islamic Studies or Middle Eastern Studies. Knowledge of Arabic at the first-year level is an asset. The atmosphere at the Institute is strongly international and the excellent student-teacher ratio is conducive to a high degree of interaction. Subsequent career paths include teaching at the secondary and post-secondary levels, working for NGOs, government agencies, or companies doing business in Islamic countries, and further graduate study in this field.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Islamic Studies (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This option is an interdisciplinary program for students who wish to specialize in Islamic Studies and earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. Students pursuing the degree at the Institute normally have an undergraduate specialization in the Humanities or Social Sciences, preferably with a major in Islamic Studies or Middle Eastern Studies. Knowledge of Arabic at the first-year level is an asset. The student’s master’s thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. Subsequent career paths include teaching at the secondary and post-secondary levels, working for NGOs, government agencies, or companies doing business in Islamic countries, and further graduate study in this field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Islamic Studies
Students pursuing the Ph.D. in Islamic Studies at the Institute normally have a graduate specialization in the Humanities or Social Sciences, preferably in Islamic Studies or Middle Eastern Studies. Knowledge of Arabic at the second-year level is an asset. Admission to the Ph.D. program will be granted on the basis of the Admissions Committee's opinion that the applicant can successfully fulfil the academic requirements of the program within an appropriate span of time (normally six years). The language component of the degree is demanding; students are required to have knowledge of Arabic, a second Islamic language and a research, usually European, language. Our Institute has been extremely successful in placing its Ph.D. graduates in top-ranking academic jobs in North America. Institute alumni now hold positions at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, as well as at leading Canadian universities. Our graduates help to ensure that a plurality of approaches to Islamic civilization is available to the students of today and tomorrow.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Islamic Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
This option is an interdisciplinary program for students who wish to specialize in Islamic Studies and earn 9 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. Students pursuing the Ph.D. in Islamic Studies at the Institute normally have a graduate specialization in the Humanities or Social Sciences, preferably in Islamic Studies or Middle Eastern Studies. Knowledge of Arabic at the second-year level is an asset. Admission to the Ph.D. program will be granted on the basis of the Admissions Committee's opinion that the applicant can successfully fulfil the academic requirements of the program within an appropriate span of time (normally six years). The language component of the degree is demanding; students are required to have knowledge of Arabic, a second Islamic language and a research, usually European, language. Our Institute has been extremely successful in placing its Ph.D. graduates in top-ranking academic jobs in North America. Institute alumni now hold positions at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, as well as at leading Canadian universities. Our graduates help to ensure that a plurality of approaches to Islamic civilization is available to the students of today and tomorrow.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Islamic Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a degree (B.A. or M.A.) from a recognized university, with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 (or equivalent), OR a grade point average (GPA) of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies, according to Canadian standards. The degree should be in the Humanities or Social Sciences, preferably in Islamic or Middle Eastern Studies.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English should refer to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website for more information (www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Reference Letters – three letters required for Ph.D. applicants
  • Writing Sample – optional for M.A. applicants; required for Ph.D. applicants; a copy of entire master's thesis, or completed chapters of master's thesis, or (in cases where these are not available) two substantial research papers
  • Knowledge of Arabic is an asset, as follows: one year of language training for M.A. applicants; two years for Ph.D. applicants
  • Other Additional Documents and Questions, as itemized and explained on the departmental web page for Prospective Students – Applications

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Institute of Islamic Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Location

  • Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
  • 688 Sherbrooke Street West, Suite 425
  • Montreal QC H3A 3R1
  • Canada

About Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

The Department’s graduate programs in German, Hispanic, Italian, and Russian Studies offer a vibrant research environment, combining the rigour of traditional philological inquiry with a range of other theoretical and methodological approaches, many of them informed and/or creatively challenged by broader transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives. The Department is committed to international standards of excellence in graduate student training.

GERMAN STUDIES

Faculty research specializations in German Studies cover philology and literary history from the 18th century to the present, film studies, history of the book, philosophy, intellectual history, and the history of the German Left. Students may specialize in literature, intellectual history, film, and/or German media studies. Students in our Department often spend time abroad in Germany and Austria and take part in conference and workshop organization. Notable facilities and resources connected with German Studies include the Interacting with Print research group and the Moving Image Research Laboratory.

Ph.D. Language Tests

Ph.D. candidates in other disciplines who are required to pass a reading test in German may prepare themselves by taking GERM 200 or GERM 202.

HISPANIC STUDIES

The Department of Hispanic Studies is committed to the disciplined study of all aspects of the literature, intellectual history, and culture of Spain and Latin America, as well as the Spanish and Portuguese languages. Currently, the Department of Hispanic Studies has three outstanding research areas: Colonial and Peninsular Baroque and Enlightenment, with a variety of intellectual and methodological approaches; Queer Studies, particularly focused on contemporary Argentina and Spain; and Film and Literary Studies on contemporary Latin America. The Department has an outstanding Media Resource Centre, whose collection of films and music has over 300 titles from Latin America and Spain, with media in Spanish, Portuguese, and English.

A limited number of language instructorships are available each year and those interested should apply c/o the Graduate Coordinator.

ITALIAN STUDIES

The Department's current areas of expertise and methodological orientations are broadly indicated below. Prospective applicants should also consult individual faculty members' research profiles on the Departmental website for more detailed information. They are also invited to send research inquiries to individual professors.

  • A) 19th, 20th, and 21st century narrative;
  • B) Medieval and Renaissance literature and culture; and
  • C) Italian cinema from post–World War II neorealism to the present.

These areas are approached from the perspective of:

  1. relations with the historical, social, and political contexts;
  2. intertextual relations with contemporary and antecedent works and movements in other European literatures and cultures, with a special attention to questions of identity construction;
  3. gender issues; and
  4. cultural studies.

Master's Programs

The coursework and the thesis and/or research papers must demonstrate that the student possesses a sound knowledge of the language, is familiar with all periods of Italian literature, and has developed the background and skills necessary to carry out scholarly research.

The regulations concerning the M.A. degree are as stated in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies eCalendar under University Regulations and Resources.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program in Italian Studies on an ad hoc basis, or, with the permission of the supervisor and the approval of the Graduate Program Director, exceptional students may transfer from the M.A. to the ad hoc Ph.D. program.

RUSSIAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES

Master's and Ph.D. in Russian

The Department of Russian and Slavic Studies of McGill University offers graduate instruction at both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels. Our faculty specializes in 19th- and 20th-century Russian literature and culture, working in such areas as the Russian Novel, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, the Russian Avant-Garde, Russian Modernism, Russian Opera, Russian Romanticism, High Stalinist Culture, Post-Soviet culture, cultural mythology, and intertextuality. We also offer a broad and flexible range of graduate seminars. Graduate students collaborate with the Department of Art History and Communication Studies; the World Cinemas Department; and the McGill Centre for Research and Teaching on Women (MCRTW). Our small but dynamic program allows for a great deal of personal attention, an atmosphere of collegiality, and a close-knit intellectual community. The candidate for admission must have an aptitude for research work and be able to make an original contribution to knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on working with the original language; credits may be allotted, at the discretion of the Department, to coursework leading to advanced proficiency in this area.

Ph.D. Language Tests

Ph.D. candidates in other departments who require Russian for research and in satisfaction of the language requirement should contact the Department for recommended courses.

Original research work and the scholarly qualities of the thesis are the principal criteria for conferring a graduate degree in Russian.

GERMAN STUDIES

Master of Arts (M.A.); German (Thesis) (48 credits)
Students enrolled in the M.A. with thesis option complete six 3-credit courses and write an M.A. thesis under the direction of one faculty member. Students enrolled in the thesis M.A. in German take fewer courses than non-thesis M.A. students and finish their program by conceiving and executing a substantial research project under the supervision of one professor. M.A. students in this track have gone on to do Ph.D. degrees in German and related fields, and pursue academic careers.
Master of Arts (M.A.); German (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students enrolled in the M.A. with non-thesis option complete nine 3-credit courses and three research papers. This program is geared toward students who may or may not plan to do a Ph.D. in German and therefore do not necessarily need to undertake a major research project, but would like to acquire a broad basis of courses in German culture and media. Non-thesis M.A. students have gone on to pursue a variety of careers inside and outside the academy.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); German
Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in German Studies take courses in literature, film, and media history during their first two years, before designing a set of comprehensive qualifying exams tailored toward their particular research and future teaching interests. After passing their exams (including language examination(s)), students may develop a doctoral dissertation topic in consultation with a Departmental faculty member. Students enrolled in this program have gone on to teach German Studies and related fields in universities, CEGEPs, or high schools, as well as pursuing some careers outside of the academy.

HISPANIC STUDIES

Master of Arts (M.A.); Hispanic Studies (Thesis) (48 credits)

(Currently, students are only admitted to the thesis option in exceptional circumstances.)

The combination of three courses and one Thesis Preparation course will permit these students the 12 credits per term average that is required for most fellowships.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Hispanic Studies (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
All candidates pursuing the M.A. without thesis, both full- and part-time, must successfully complete at least one of their Guided Research projects during the first 12 months. In accordance with the regulations established by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, students in non-thesis programs who do not take at least 12 credits per term for the duration of the program are considered to proceed toward their degree on a part-time basis.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Hispanic Studies
Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Hispanic Studies take courses in literature, film, and intellectual history during their first year, before preparing the comprehensive qualifying exams. After passing their exams, students may develop a doctoral dissertation topic in consultation with a Departmental faculty member. Students enrolled in this program have gone on to teach Hispanic Studies and related fields in universities and CEGEPs, as well as pursuing some careers outside of the academy.

ITALIAN STUDIES

Master of Arts (M.A.); Italian (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students enrolled in the M.A. (thesis) option complete seven 3-credit courses and write an M.A. thesis under the direction of a faculty member.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Italian (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students enrolled in the M.A. (non-thesis) option complete nine 3-credit courses and two in-depth research papers under the direction of a faculty member.

RUSSIAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES

Master of Arts (M.A.); Russian (Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.A. in Russian and Slavic Studies consists of coursework plus a research component, which consists of an M.A. thesis proposal and an M.A. thesis.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Russian
The Ph.D. in Russian and Slavic Studies consists of coursework, multiple examinations, language requirements, and dissertation. It offers graduate instruction (seminar and guided independent reading courses) as well as research and thesis supervision in the fields of Russian culture and literature. Students also take graduate courses offered in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in literary theory, film, and media that allow for broader transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives in their research. They are encouraged and helped to participate in conferences and to publish the results of their ongoing research. Particular emphasis is laid on working with the original language. Doctoral dissertation topics are developed in consultation with the faculty. Graduates from the program have gone on to careers in teaching in Canadian and international universities and institutions, as well as exploring other related fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

TOEFL is required of all graduate studies applicants whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). A minimum score of 86, with each component score not less than 20, is required on the Internet-based TOEFL examination. Proof of TOEFL must be presented at the time of application or shortly thereafter. McGill University's institution code is 0935.

Students also have the option of taking the IELTS (International English Language Testing Service System) examination, for which the minimum score is an overall band average of 6.5 (academic module). Effective for applicants entering the Winter 2015 semester, McGill University only accepts IELTS scores submitted electronically by an IELTS test center. No paper test report forms will be accepted. An institutional code is NOT required; applicants must ask the test center where the test is to be taken to send test scores electronically to McGill using the IELTS system.

GERMAN STUDIES

Master's

In order to be admitted to the M.A. program in German Studies, candidates must have at least a B.A. degree in German from McGill University or an equivalent degree from another college or university of recognized standing.

Applicants with joint degrees or majors degrees may be admitted on individual merit but they may be required to take additional courses. They may also be able to enter the program as Qualifying students for the purpose of completing these preliminary studies.

In order to pursue graduate studies in German, all candidates must have considerable fluency in German, as all courses are given in German.

Graduate students holding a Language Instructorship or who are otherwise employed will normally not be allowed to take more than four courses a year. Students may be required to attend an approved course in English if their knowledge of that language is judged inadequate. All graduate students are expected to attend the staff-student colloquium.

Ph.D.

M.A. or equivalent.

HISPANIC STUDIES

M.A. Degree (Non-Thesis or Thesis)

(Currently, students are only admitted to the thesis option in exceptional circumstances.)

In order to be admitted to graduate work in Hispanic Studies, candidates must fulfil the following prerequisites:

  1. Candidates must possess a B.A. degree with Honours or, in certain cases, Joint Honours in Hispanic Studies from McGill University, or an equivalent degree from another college or university of recognized standing.
  2. Candidates who do not possess the above prerequisites may, with special permission, enter the Department as Qualifying students for the purpose of completing these preliminary studies. They may have to take, among other courses, HISP 550, Comprehensive Examination.

Students may be required to attend an approved course in English or French if their knowledge of either language is deemed inadequate.

Prospective candidates may certainly express their preference, but should note that the Graduate Committee of the Department of Hispanic Studies reserves the right to determine which of the two options (thesis/non-thesis) students admitted to the M.A. program will be permitted to pursue and/or continue to completion.

Ph.D. Degree

Applicants must normally possess an M.A. in Hispanic Studies, or in a related discipline, from a university of recognized standing. These applicants will be admitted to Ph.D. 2 and follow the program requirements listed below. Exceptionally qualified candidates may apply to enter into Ph.D. 1 directly from the B.A. Honours, and will be required to complete an additional six 3-credit courses above those listed below.

Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in Spanish, and when appropriate in Portuguese, plus a working knowledge of either French or English.

Applicants should submit samples of research papers that they have completed during the course of their previous studies. Submission of the results of the Graduate Record Examination is recommended, but not required.

ITALIAN STUDIES

The B.A. degree with Honours or Joint Honours in Italian or its equivalent and a CGPA of 3.2 constitute the minimum requirement. Applicants who do not have these prerequisites may be admitted to a Qualifying year or, in some cases, to a Qualifying term.

RUSSIAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES

The minimum academic requirement is normally a high standing in an undergraduate degree with Honours Russian (or an equivalent specialization). Further, the Department must be convinced that the candidate for admission has an aptitude for research work and will be able to make an original contribution to knowledge.

A working knowledge of French is recommended for the Ph.D. program.

Any necessary preparation to fulfil these requirements will be offered within the Department or elsewhere at McGill. Certain graduate courses may be taken by arrangement at approved universities.

Application Procedures for Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Written Work
  • Additional Writing Sample – for Italian Studies only: a critical essay, written in Italian if the written work submitted is in English
  • Research Proposal – which should include a brief personal statement
  • Interview – for Russian and Slavic Studies only; where appropriate, if necessary by telephone, with members of the Department Graduate Committee

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 30 Fall: Jan. 30 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

East Asian Studies

East Asian Studies

Location

  • Department of East Asian Studies
  • 688 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 425
  • Montreal QC H3A 3R1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3650
  • Email: asian [dot] studies [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/eas

About East Asian Studies

The Department of East Asian Studies is committed to offering a rigorous, innovative, and interdisciplinary environment in which students learn a variety of critical and historical approaches to the study of East Asian arts, cultures, histories, languages, literatures, media, and social practices. The research expertise of our faculty members spans a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds from anthropology; archaeology; art history; ethnic studies; film and media studies; gender and women‘s studies; history and literature; to religion both institutional and popular.

The unique curriculum of East Asian Studies allows students to gain an intellectually rich, historically informed, theoretically sophisticated, and materially grounded understanding of China, Japan, and Korea as spaces of dynamic formation and transformation, all the while developing proficiency in languages of the region. Graduate students may choose from a wide range of courses offered both by the Department and other departments in the Faculty of Arts, and in other faculties that encourage the development of strong intellectual connections with multiple disciplines.

The Centre for East Asian Research (CEAR), affiliated with the Department of East Asian Studies, actively supports and encourages community outreach. It offers a wide range of activities throughout the year such as lectures, presentations, seminars, workshops, speech contests, cultural activities, and additions of new associate members.

Master of Arts (M.A.); East Asian Studies (Thesis) (Ad Hoc) (45 credits)
The M.A. program requires a thesis that engages with current theoretical and methodological issues and uses both primary and secondary sources in East Asian languages. Entering students are expected to have a background and/or degree in disciplines relating to East Asia, and have knowledge of an East Asian language. Graduates of our program are pursuing careers in academia, publishing, government service, the financial industry, media and communications, and other fields.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); East Asian Studies (Ad Hoc)
The Ph.D. program requires a thesis that engages with current theoretical and methodological issues and uses both primary and secondary sources in East Asian languages. Entering students are expected to have a background and/or degree in disciplines relating to East Asia and have knowledge of an East Asian language. Graduates of our program are pursuing careers in academia, publishing, government service, the financial industry, media and communications, and other fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

East Asian Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General

A minimum standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years.

TOEFL, GRE, and IELTS (if applicable).

Applicants who have not studied at a Canadian institution must submit official copies of their Graduate Record Examination (GRE) at the time of application. These scores must come directly from the Educational Testing Service; hard copies and photocopies are not accepted. A minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 577 (paper based test) or an overall score of 86 (with no less than 20 in each of the four component scores) is required of all applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree at a foreign institution where English is the language of instruction, or at a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). Alternatively, students proving their English proficiency may use the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination, for which the minimum score is an overall band score of 6.5 (academic module). For the TOEFL and GRE, you must indicate the McGill University institution code: 0935.

M.A.

Applicants must hold, or expect to hold by September of the year of entry, a bachelor's degree in East Asian Studies or a related field. Applicants are expected to have proficiency in the East Asian language(s) most useful for the proposed graduate work (preferably three years or more of coursework, or equivalent).

Ph.D.

Applicants must hold, or expect to hold by September of the year of entry, a master's degree in East Asian Studies or a related field.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

The application deadline for the September 2015 term is January 9, 2015.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal – approximately 500 words for master's and five pages for Ph.D. applicants. A description of the proposed research project, with brief bibliography, should be included in the Research Proposal.
  • GRE – required for applicants who have not studied at a Canadian university

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of East Asian Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 9 Fall: Jan. 9 Fall: Jan. 9
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Bioresource Engineering

Bioresource Engineering

Location

  • Department of Bioresource Engineering
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/bioeng

About Bioresource Engineering

The Department offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs in various areas of bioresource engineering including: plant and animal environments; ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management, and remediation); water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality); agricultural machinery, mechatronics, and robotics; food engineering and bio-processing; post-harvest technology; waste management and protection of the environment; bio-energy; and artificial intelligence. The Department also offers a Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering (Integrated Water Resources Management). The Department has well equipped laboratories for conducting research in all these areas.

The interdisciplinary nature of bioresource engineering often requires candidates for higher degrees to work in association with, or attend courses given by, a number of other departments at both the McGill University Macdonald campus and the Downtown campus.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) (46 credits)
This option for the M.Sc. degree is oriented toward individuals who intend to develop a career in bioresource engineering research.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
The Environmental option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (46 credits)
This option is a joint offering between McGill University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama. This interdisciplinary option encourages and promotes ethically sound and socially significant learning in the global context of environmental problems. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is a requirement of this program. This program trains students in the socio-political aspects of the Tropical Environment.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Water Resources Management (45 credits)
Integrated Water Resource Management is a one-year program providing an essential approach for sustainable management of our natural watershed resources. The 13-credit internship is a central feature of this master’s program. The degree gives students the unique opportunity to study the biophysical, environmental, legal, institutional, and socio-economic aspects of water use and management, in an integrated context. The degree is directed at practising professionals who wish to upgrade and/or focus their skill set to address water management issues. As a graduate from this program, you will be well suited to opportunities in diverse fields of employment, such as water resources consulting, international development project management, research with governments or universities, public policy and governance development, and climate change impact assessment.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas (soil and water, structures and environment, waste management, environment protection, post-harvest technology, food process engineering, environmental engineering) in order to attain a higher level of engineering qualification. Candidates must be qualified to be members of a Canadian professional engineering association such as the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ) and must maintain contact with their academic adviser in the Department of Bioresource Engineering before registration to clarify objectives, investigate project possibilities, and plan a program of study.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
The non-thesis Environment option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas with the coordination of the McGill School of Environment.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)

The Environmental Engineering program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge, practical perspective, and awareness of environmental issues through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University.

The primary objective of the program is to train environmental professionals at the advanced level. The program is thus designed for individuals with a university undergraduate degree in engineering. Through this program, students will master specialized skills in their home disciplines and acquire a broader perspective and awareness of environmental issues.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Food and Bioprocessing (45 credits)
This graduate program will provide students with the tools to understand how food and agricultural production interact to better manage agricultural, food, and biomass systems for the adequate supply of wholesome food, feed, fiber, biofuel, and any other bio-based material. This course-based program will present students with the skills needed to assess existing production, delivery, and quality management systems; introduce improvements; and communicate effectively with policy makers and with colleagues in multi-disciplinary teams. The goals of this program are to provide up-to-date world class knowledge on techniques for adequate process design and management of biomass production strategies for the delivery of quality food, natural fiber, biochemicals, biomaterials, and biofuels, in a sustainable and environment-friendly way that benefits all. Training activities will include laboratory research and/or industrial/government internships.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (45 credits)
The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas of the Tropical Environment. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is a requirement of this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment
The Ph.D. Bioresource Engineering: Environment – MSE Option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Neotropical Environment
This is a research-based degree with a team of co-advisers from McGill and Latin America with the requirements of a one-year residency in Panama or tropical Latin America, three interdisciplinary courses, at least two of them focusing on North-South issues, proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese, one-time off-campus (Panama) fees, and the possibility of NEO-specific fellowships. Only the accredited professors listed on the NEO website can accept students in the option.
Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering — Integrated Water Resources Management (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Integrated Water Resources Management is for practising professionals who wish to upgrade or focus their skill set to address water management issues. Students are trained in Water Ethics, Law and Policy of Water Management, Freshwater Ecosystems, Health, and Sanitation.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Bioresource Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and Graduate Certificates should indicate in some detail their fields of special interest when applying for admission. An equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study is required at the bachelor's level. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program. Experience after the undergraduate degree is an additional asset.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Bioresource Engineering Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: Mar. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).