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Epidemiology

Epidemiology

The Department offers master's and doctoral programs in both Epidemiology and Biostatistics, as well as a Master's of Science in Public Health. The methods learned in these fields are used not only in the study of diseases, but also in health services research, program planning and evaluation, and policy development. Our faculty members are at the forefront of their research domains and include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, clinician scientists, medical informatics specialists, health economists, medical sociologists, and health geographers. Research in the Department spans all clinical specialties, pharmaco-epidemiology, social epidemiology, infectious diseases, population and public health, environmental and occupational health, clinical and public health informatics, biostatistics, health care delivery and organization, and many cross-disciplinary activities. Faculty members may have funding available for students through their research grants. We provide rich research environments at five university-affiliated hospitals, public health agencies, and university research centres. Graduates pursue careers in academia, clinical settings, government agencies, and industry.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Epidemiology (Thesis) (48 credits)

Applicants to the M.Sc. program should hold a bachelor’s degree in the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography) or social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or hold a degree in one of the health professional sciences (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The program leading to a master’s degree is designed to provide training in both theory and practice in the selected discipline. Courses require intellectual and academic rigour, and the program provides students with an opportunity to synthesize the training in the form of a thesis. Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and applied biostatistics, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, pharmaco-epidemiological, policy, and methodological health-related research. Graduates of the program often go on to do doctoral work or become research associates in public, private, and academic settings. McGill graduates are known for methodological and quantitative rigour, and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
The mission of the M.Sc.P.H. is to train outstanding public health professionals and future leaders by offering a rigorous academic program in methods, research, and practice. This program may be of interest for students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and biostatistics, as applied to public health research and practice, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, policy, and methodological public health-related research. Graduates of the program will serve as public health practitioners, research professionals, and educators, and will possess the competencies and professionalism to carry out broad public health functions in local, provincial, national, and international settings. In exceptional circumstances, the Admissions Committee may take professional experience into account for mid-career or returning/re-entry applicants. The Master's of Public Health program will include a three-month practicum after the first year, which will provide the student with the opportunity to use knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a public health practice or research setting.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Environment (60 credits)
A number of departments and faculties throughout McGill University have joined with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) to provide an Environment Option as part of a variety of existing graduate degrees. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (60 credits)

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered by the Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) as an option within existing master’s and doctoral programs in the Departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. The option is coordinated by the CPD, in partnership with participating academic units.

Thus, in addition to the rigorous training provided in the Department of EBOH, graduate students who choose this option become Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) student trainees. This affiliation notably offers opportunities for interdisciplinary research and supervision. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, a weekly seminar series, and informal discussions and networking.

With interdisciplinary research being increasingly important to understanding complex social and biological processes, CPD student trainees benefit from both a strong disciplinary foundation from their departmental affiliations, as well as from the sharing of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries through CPD activities.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology

This program may be of interest to students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The Ph.D. program prepares students with the advanced epidemiological research skills needed to undertake original contributions to new knowledge related to the determinants of health and disease, prevention, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The program is generally completed in four to five years. Graduates will be prepared to engage in scientific collaboration, and communicate results to other scientists and diverse audiences. They will go on to careers in public health, health planning, and quality monitoring in local, regional, federal, and international health authorities, statistical and technology assessment agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, and in clinical and academic research organizations. McGill graduates are known for their methodological and quantitative rigour and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology — Population Dynamics

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered by the Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) as an option within existing master’s and doctoral programs in the Departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. The option is coordinated by the CPD, in partnership with participating academic units.

Thus, in addition to the rigorous training provided in the Department of EBOH, graduate students who choose this option become Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) student trainees. This affiliation notably offers opportunities for interdisciplinary research and supervision. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, a weekly seminar series, and informal discussions and networking.

With interdisciplinary research being increasingly important to understanding complex social and biological processes, CPD student trainees benefit from both a strong disciplinary foundation from their departmental affiliations, as well as from the sharing of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries through CPD activities.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 29, 2014).
 

Social Work

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Social Work

Location

  • School of Social Work
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street, Suite 300
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7070
  • Fax: 514-398-4760
  • Email: graduate [dot] socialwork [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/socialwork

About Social Work

The School of Social Work offers dynamic M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, designed to explore cutting-edge knowledge on social work theory, practice, policy, and research. We have an exciting and growing faculty with a variety of research and practice expertise in the fields of: child welfare; health, mental health, and disability; poverty; aging; First Peoples; marginalized groups (e.g., immigrants and refugees, war affected populations, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people); loss and bereavement; domestic violence; and international social work. Our approaches to practice and research cover all levels of intervention from individuals, families, groups, and communities. Located within the School of Social Work are specialized centres devoted to research and training in the areas of domestic violence; children and families; and international human rights. Graduate students also have access to workstations equipped with computers, and many professional development workshops and seminars. Several research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available each year.

The McGill School of Social Work is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW), the Canadian Association for Social Work Education – l'Association Canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE-ACFTS), and of the Regroupement des unités de formation universitaire en travail social du Québec (RUFUTS).

The School of Social Work is a professional school with the primary objective of preparing students for careers and for leadership in the fields of social work and social welfare.

Qualifying Year Entry into the M.S.W. Program

Applicants demonstrating academic excellence and a minimum of one year of social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional) are considered for admission to the one-year, full-time (only) Qualifying year of study in preparation for entry to the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program. The objective of this preparatory year is to provide students with essential foundation social work knowledge that will provide a basis upon which to embark on graduate-level studies in social work.

M.S.W. Program

The overarching objective of the master's program is the provision of advanced professional training by means of integrated learning experiences. Specifically, the educational goals are to:

  1. develop a deepened and advanced competence in practice and research;
  2. embrace a capacity for critical understanding of social theories, social problems, and emergent issues; and
  3. understand population groups in need, institutional structures, and policy initiatives and processes.

The M.S.W. degree can be pursued via two options: thesis and non-thesis. Both options carry a weight of 45 credits, and, taken on a full-time basis, both options involve three terms of study. In both options, part-time study can be arranged.

There are two points of entry into the M.S.W.: one for those who hold a B.S.W. degree; and one for those who have completed the one-year Qualifying year of study offered by the School of Social Work.

Ph.D. Program in Social Work

The School of Social Work offers a dynamic Ph.D. program in social work/social policy in order to promote the development of scholarship on social issues within Canada and Quebec. Courses are offered in English at McGill. Parallel streams are offered in French at Université de Montréal and Université du Québec à Montréal. Students have the opportunity of taking courses at all three universities.

The program aims to:

  1. prepare graduates for careers in university teaching and research, policy development, implementation and evaluation, practice and program evaluation, leadership and management of human services;
  2. offer students the opportunity to acquire research methodology skills and to apply these to a range of areas relevant to social work; and
  3. stimulate original research on important social problems and issues.
Note: With respect to M.S.W. and Q.Y. programs, while not a prerequisite for admission, possession of a working knowledge of the French language is important not only to candidates who intend to seek admission to the Quebec professional Ordre after graduation but also to those who wish to maximize their field placement opportunities during their program. In consultation with the Field Education Coordinator, students may have the option of completing their field requirements at an approved social service agency outside of Quebec.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Couple and Family Therapy (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
The Master's program in Couple and Family Therapy is a full-time professional Master's program of 60 credits taken over five terms. Graduates of this program will qualify for two professional permits: the Couple and Family Therapist permit (Ordre des travailleurs sociaux et des thérapeutes conjugaux et familiaux du Québec (OTSTCFQ)); and the Psychotherapist permit (Ordre des Psychologues du Québec (OPQ)). The high standards for admission, course requirements, and clinical supervision will produce highly trained graduates who will be desirable future employees with enhanced career and employment opportunities. Graduating from McGill University's Master of Science, Applied in Couple and Family Therapy will be an esteemed professional credential.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of research skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. Program requirements consist of a thesis and six courses (two of which are required), taken over an extended period of three to four terms of full-time study. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional). Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Non-Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of practice skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. This program entails three semesters of full-time study that consist of coursework, professional education in a supervised field placement, and an independent study project. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional), or will have successfully completed the Qualifying year entry into the M.S.W. Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) — International Partner Program (45 credits)
This program is offered intermittently, based on funding, to a specific cohort of students by invitation only.
Joint Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with Integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) (132 credits)
The School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law offer a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law/Bachelor of Laws (B.C.L./LL.B.) designed to transcend academic boundaries in social justice issues. Lawyers and social workers often operate in the same fields, whether in public policy, child protection, family law, poverty law, or domestic violence situations, yet each profession has been constrained by internal limitations. The joint M.S.W. (non-thesis option)/Law program requires students to complete 132 credits (45 credits in M.S.W., 87 credits in Law). Students should take three and a half to four years to complete the M.S.W./B.C.L./LL.B. program. It is possible, however, to complete the program in three years, by doing work for credit over the summer and by carrying heavier course loads throughout the program. The joint program leads to conferral of the B.C.L./LL.B. law degrees and the master’s degree in social work. Prospective students possess a B.S.W. degree with prior practice experience.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Social Work (offered jointly by McGill and Université de Montréal)
As one of the top Ph.D. programs in Canada, the School of Social Work promotes leading scholarship on social policy and practice. Over the course of three to four years, working closely with their supervisor, students pursue individualized programs of study, which include coursework, research, and professional development. Faculty have expertise in a variety of areas such as aging; social exclusion; child welfare; international social welfare; Aboriginal people and communities; violence against women and children; health and disability; poverty and social development; migration and community organizing. Students normally take two semesters of coursework after which they complete a comprehensive exam. In the second year of the program students begin their thesis work and take a course designed to facilitate the research process. Research and writing usually takes between one and two years to complete. McGill offers entrance fellowships, access to computers and library resources, and active student networks. There are many opportunities to be involved in faculty research projects and sessional teaching. Students go on to careers in teaching, organizational leadership, and social policy analysis.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

M.Sc.(A) in Couple and Family Therapy  (60 credits)

Biostatistics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Biostatistics

Biostatistics involves the development and application of statistical methods to scientific research in areas such as medicine, epidemiology, environmental health, genetics, and ecology. Biostatisticians play key roles in designing studies—from helping to formulate the questions that can be answered by data collection to the decisions on how best to collect the data—and in analyzing the resulting data. They also develop new statistical methods for such data. Students will take courses, and may do research, on topics such as mathematical statistics, statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. The Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health has one of the largest concentrations of Ph.D.-level statisticians in any Canadian Faculty of Medicine.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Thesis) (48 credits)
M.Sc. thesis students study a foundational set of courses, and write a thesis on a topic of their choice. Thesis students should have a strong interest in research. These students are well-placed to either continue in a Ph.D. program or to work in academic research in statistics or medicine; they will also have relevant qualifications for the pharmaceutical industry and government.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. non-thesis program is designed to expose students to a wide range of topics including statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, communication, and report writing are emphasized, and students graduate ready to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, in government, or in academic medical research.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biostatistics
Applicants should hold a master’s degree in mathematics or statistics or its equivalent. Mastery of calculus, linear algebra, real analysis, and mathematical statistics is essential. Exposure to data analysis is an asset. Exceptional students without a master’s degree will be considered for admission, starting with a Qualifying year. Ph.D. students typically work on development of statistical methods, and can specialize in statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, Bayesian methods, survival analysis, longitudinal data, causal inference, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, and report writing are emphasized. Ph.D. graduates typically work as faculty in universities, in research institutes, in government, or in the pharmaceutical industry.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).
 

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Location

  • Department of Art History and Communication Studies
  • Arts Building, W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
  • 853 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0G5
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4933
  • Fax: 514-398-7247
  • Email: graduate [dot] ahcs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs

About Communication Studies

The graduate program in Communication Studies offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. The program is concerned with the study of communication phenomena through interdisciplinary training that draws on a variety of fields including cultural studies, critical media and technology studies, public policy and governance, film, and sound studies. The program strives to offer a balance of humanities and social sciences approaches to the analysis of communication, and its orientation is primarily qualitative (rather than quantitative) in nature. The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are academic in character, and do not include professional training in journalism, organizational communication, or media production. The Communication Studies program offers courses and directs project research in preparation for the M.A. Thesis and Ph.D. in Communication Studies. The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is available as a program option, and students benefit from the resources and activity of Media@McGill, a hub of research and public outreach on critical issues in media, culture, and emerging technology.

McGill is situated in one of the most vibrant cities in North America, and Montreal offers myriad opportunities for graduate students to engage with local arts institutions, either officially, through internships and research fellowships, or unofficially, through volunteering. Local institutions range from large-scale public museums (such as the Musée d'art contemporain, the Musée des beaux-arts, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa) to smaller alternative galleries (such as feminist arts spaces La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse and Studio XX). There are also university-based venues such as the Redpath Museum on campus and the McCord Museum of Canadian History (which houses the McGill University Archives), and independent contemporary art galleries such as DHC and the Darling Foundry. The Canadian Centre for Architecture, with its archives and exhibitions and the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec also offer grants and research opportunities for local graduate students. A close relationship with the other three major universities in Montreal (Concordia University, Université de Montréal, and Université du Québec à Montréal) affords students access to a broad network of additional courses, lectures, and colleagues across the city.

To obtain financial aid information, please consult the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs or email graduate [dot] fellowships [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

For programs in Art History and Communication Studies, refer to our website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs.

Master's and Ph.D. Degrees

The master's program requires a three-semester residency, the successful completion of a total of seven courses (21 credits, including the Pro-Seminar course), and a thesis (equivalent to 24 credits). Three years of residence are normally required for the Ph.D. degree (candidates with an M.A. will be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level of the doctoral program, thereby gaining credit for one year of resident study). The Ph.D. program of study is comprised of five courses (15 credits), the Pro-Seminar (3 credits), a comprehensive examination (0 credits), a dissertation proposal, and a written dissertation with its defense. Ph.D. students who have selected the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies are required to take 9 credits (within the total credits that are required for the Ph.D. degree); WMST 601 AND WMST 602 are required, plus one 3-credit complementary Art History course related to gender and women’s studies. All course selections must first be approved by the supervisor/Graduate Program Director.

Students enter our graduate programs from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, though all have a history of documented academic excellence and aptitude for advanced scholarly research. Over the past 30 years, the Graduate Program in Communication Studies has trained many of Canada's leading communications scholars. Graduates of the program may be found working in all levels of government, within the cultural industries, and in dozens of university Communication Studies departments around the world.

For the language requirement for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, please see: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/graduate/language-requirement.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Communication Studies offers advanced training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in GWS will appear on a student’s transcript along with the M.A. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this non-thesis option.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies
The Ph.D. in Communication Studies offers in-depth training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy. Doctoral students pursue coursework, submit a comprehensive exam and thesis proposal, with the goal of writing a dissertation that makes an original contribution to knowledge in Communication Studies. The Ph.D. degree is academic in character, and does not include professional training in media production.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies will appear on a student’s transcript along with the Ph.D. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Communication Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A.

An honours bachelor's degree or equivalent is required of applicants to the M.A. program, with a minimum CGPA of 3.3 out of 4.0, or equivalent, i.e., B+ (75%). In whichever case, the transcript must show breadth or depth in related areas of study.

Ph.D.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program are expected to have completed the equivalent of an M.A. degree. Admission will be based on academic achievement and evidence of talent and strong motivation in Communication Studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications will be considered by the deadline of January 15.

Inquiries regarding the program should be addressed to the Graduate Administrative Coordinator, Department of Art History and Communication Studies.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal – at least 500 words
  • Written Work – two examples

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Art History and Communication Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: There are no Winter or Summer term admissions for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Natural Resource Sciences

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Natural Resource Sciences

Location

  • Department of Natural Resource Sciences
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/nrs

About Natural Resource Sciences

The Department of Natural Resource Sciences offers programs leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Entomology (includes Environment and Neotropical Environment options), Microbiology (includes Bioinformatics and Environment options), Renewable Resources (includes Forest Science, Micrometeorology, Soil Science, and Wildlife Biology with Environment and Neotropical Environment options available) and an M.Sc. degree in Agricultural Economics. It is also possible for students to pursue doctoral studies in Agricultural/Environmental Economics or with a Ph.D. in Renewable Resources. An interdisciplinary option in Bioinformatics for doctoral students is also available.

The Department possesses, or has access to, excellent facilities for laboratory and field research. Affiliated with the Department are the Lyman Entomological Museum and Research Laboratory, the Molson Nature Reserve, the Morgan Arboretum, and the Ecomuseum of the St. Lawrence Valley Natural History Society.

Master of Science Degrees

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Agricultural Economics (Thesis) (46 credits)

This program provides students with applied economic concepts and tools to identify, define, and analyze economic problems affecting the performance of the agri-food sector and the environment. The ideal prior preparation is an undergraduate degree in Agricultural Economics or Economics, including undergraduate courses in intermediate economic theory (micro and macro), calculus, algebra, statistics, and econometrics.

Attention is given to the development of analytical skills in the broad areas of agricultural, environmental, and ecological economics. Students may specialize, by way of their research program, in agribusiness, development, finance, marketing and trade, policy, and resource economics. The program prepares graduates for rewarding careers in research, analysis, and decision-making in academia, private and NGO sectors, and government.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) (45 credits)
(Including Micrometeorology, Forest Science, Soil Science, and Wildlife Biology as areas of research)
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Assessment (45 credits)
This program is currently not offered.

Ph.D. Degrees in Entomology, Microbiology, or Renewable Resources (Includes Micrometeorology, Forest Science, Soil Science, and Wildlife Biology)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Neotropical Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Bioinformatics
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Neotropical Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Natural Resource Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis (Agricultural Economics)

Direct admission to the M.Sc. requires the completion of a B.Sc. in Agricultural Economics or a closely related area, with the equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

The ideal preparation includes courses in agricultural economics, economic theory (intermediate micro and macro), calculus, linear algebra, and statistics. Students with deficiencies in these areas will be required to take additional courses as part of their degree program.

M.Sc. Thesis (Entomology, Microbiology, Renewable Resources)

Candidates are required to have a bachelor's degree with an equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

M.Sc. in Renewable Resources (Non-Thesis) – Environmental Assessment Option

Applications are not being accepted for the 2014-2015 academic year; the program is currently under review.

Ph.D. Thesis (Entomology, Microbiology, Renewable Resources)

Candidates, normally, are required to hold an M.Sc. degree and will be judged primarily on their ability to conduct an original and independent research study.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Support – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs normally depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Natural Resource Sciences and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Bioresource Engineering

Bioresource Engineering

Location

  • Department of Bioresource Engineering
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/bioeng

About Bioresource Engineering

The Department offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs in various areas of bioresource engineering including: plant and animal environments; ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management, and remediation); water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality); agricultural machinery, mechatronics, and robotics; food engineering and bio-processing; post-harvest technology; waste management and protection of the environment; bio-energy; and artificial intelligence. The Department also offers a Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering (Integrated Water Resources Management). The Department has well equipped laboratories for conducting research in all these areas.

The interdisciplinary nature of bioresource engineering often requires candidates for higher degrees to work in association with, or attend courses given by, a number of other departments at both the McGill University Macdonald campus and the Downtown campus.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) (46 credits)
This option for the M.Sc. degree is oriented toward individuals who intend to develop a career in bioresource engineering research.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
The Environmental option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (46 credits)
This option is a joint offering between McGill University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama. This interdisciplinary option encourages and promotes ethically sound and socially significant learning in the global context of environmental problems. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is a requirement of this program. This program trains students in the socio-political aspects of the Tropical Environment.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Water Resources Management (45 credits)
Integrated Water Resource Management is a one-year program providing an essential approach for sustainable management of our natural watershed resources. The 13-credit internship is a central feature of this master’s program. The degree gives students the unique opportunity to study the biophysical, environmental, legal, institutional, and socio-economic aspects of water use and management, in an integrated context. The degree is directed at practising professionals who wish to upgrade and/or focus their skill set to address water management issues. As a graduate from this program, you will be well suited to opportunities in diverse fields of employment, such as water resources consulting, international development project management, research with governments or universities, public policy and governance development, and climate change impact assessment.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas (soil and water, structures and environment, waste management, environment protection, post-harvest technology, food process engineering, environmental engineering) in order to attain a higher level of engineering qualification. Candidates must be qualified to be members of a Canadian professional engineering association such as the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ) and must maintain contact with their academic adviser in the Department of Bioresource Engineering before registration to clarify objectives, investigate project possibilities, and plan a program of study.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
The non-thesis Environment option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas with the coordination of the McGill School of Environment.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)

The Environmental Engineering program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge, practical perspective, and awareness of environmental issues through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University.

The primary objective of the program is to train environmental professionals at the advanced level. The program is thus designed for individuals with a university undergraduate degree in engineering. Through this program, students will master specialized skills in their home disciplines and acquire a broader perspective and awareness of environmental issues.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Food and Bioprocessing (45 credits)
This graduate program will provide students with the tools to understand how food and agricultural production interact to better manage agricultural, food, and biomass systems for the adequate supply of wholesome food, feed, fiber, biofuel, and any other bio-based material. This course-based program will present students with the skills needed to assess existing production, delivery, and quality management systems; introduce improvements; and communicate effectively with policy makers and with colleagues in multi-disciplinary teams. The goals of this program are to provide up-to-date world class knowledge on techniques for adequate process design and management of biomass production strategies for the delivery of quality food, natural fiber, biochemicals, biomaterials, and biofuels, in a sustainable and environment-friendly way that benefits all. Training activities will include laboratory research and/or industrial/government internships.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (45 credits)
The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas of the Tropical Environment. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is a requirement of this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment
The Ph.D. Bioresource Engineering: Environment – MSE Option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Neotropical Environment
This is a research-based degree with a team of co-advisers from McGill and Latin America with the requirements of a one-year residency in Panama or tropical Latin America, three interdisciplinary courses, at least two of them focusing on North-South issues, proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese, one-time off-campus (Panama) fees, and the possibility of NEO-specific fellowships. Only the accredited professors listed on the NEO website can accept students in the option.
Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering — Integrated Water Resources Management (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Integrated Water Resources Management is for practising professionals who wish to upgrade or focus their skill set to address water management issues. Students are trained in Water Ethics, Law and Policy of Water Management, Freshwater Ecosystems, Health, and Sanitation.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Bioresource Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and Graduate Certificates should indicate in some detail their fields of special interest when applying for admission. An equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study is required at the bachelor's level. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program. Experience after the undergraduate degree is an additional asset.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Bioresource Engineering Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: Mar. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

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