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Biology

Biology

Location

  • Department of Biology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W4/8
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-5478
  • Fax: 514-398-5069
  • Email: graduate-admissions [dot] biology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: http://biology.mcgill.ca

About Biology

The Department offers graduate training in many areas of biology with particular strengths in the following areas: Molecular Biology and Genetics; Cell and Developmental Biology; Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation; Evolution; Neurobiology; Bioinformatics; and Plant Biology. In addition to the regular M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs, the Biology Department offers specialized programs, known as “concentrations” in certain specific areas: Neotropical Environment (NEO), Bioinformatics, and Environment.

Graduate programs leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees are offered. Both are research-intensive degrees, and the emphasis in both programs is on development of the intellectual and technical skills necessary for independent research. The main component of both degrees is a thesis presenting results of this work and the student’s original contribution to scientific knowledge. Formal coursework, usually in the form of literature-based seminar courses, is minimal and typically completed within the first year. To complement their classroom and laboratory training, students regularly attend other seminar series and journal clubs and present their own work annually in a formal seminar.

In addition to working with world-class researchers, graduate students in Biology have access to top-notch research infrastructure. The recently renovated Stewart Biology Building and the newly constructed Bellini Life Sciences Complex are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for sophisticated imaging, robotic, and genetic techniques, to name a few. These in-house capabilities are complemented by a wide range of field research facilities, which include the Gault Nature Reserve at Mont St. Hilaire (Quebec), the Morgan Arboretum (Quebec), the Huntsman Marine Science Centre (New Brunswick), the Subarctic Research Laboratory (Quebec), the Bellairs Research Institute (Barbados), the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (Panama), and the limnology research station at the Wilder and Helen Penfield Nature Reserve on Lake Memphremagog (Quebec). These resources are also extended by affiliation with other organizations such as the Redpath Museum, the Biotechnology Research Institute of the National Research Council of Canada, the Groupe Interuniversitaire de Recherches Océanographiques du Québec (GIROQ), the McGill Macdonald campus, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the Jewish General Hospital, the Montreal General Hospital, the Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Royal Victoria Hospital. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.)

The Department specifies a minimum level of support for all graduate students. This amount is $15,500 per annum plus tuition fees. The required minimum duration of support is two years for the M.Sc. program, five years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 1 (directly from a bachelor's degree), and four years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 2 (after having completed a master's degree).

The graduate program of each student is established and regularly evaluated by a three-member supervisory committee appointed by the Graduate Training Committee and chaired by the student’s thesis supervisor.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.). Admission is based on an evaluation by the applicant’s potential supervisor, who is the faculty member who will provide supervision and financial support for the student’s research, and by the Biology Graduate Training Committee. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of disciplines.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the M.Sc. level, students successfully completing the Bioinformatics concentration will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.). Admission is based on an evaluation by the applicant’s potential supervisor, who is the faculty member who will provide supervision and financial support for the student’s research, and by the Biology Graduate Training Committee. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of different disciplines. This concentration is available in: Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Bioresource Engineering, Entomology, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Renewable Resources), Arts (Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Sociology), Law, Medicine (Epidemiology and Experimental Medicine), and Science (Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Geography).

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Neotropical Environment

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program.

NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Bioinformatics

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the Ph.D. level students will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will also have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Biology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study with an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). A score of 550 on the paper-based TOEFL or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20 or 6.5 on IELTS is the minimum standard for admission. Specific programs may have additional requirements.

Admission is based on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee and on acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact staff members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply. All applicants should read the academic faculty and admission procedure sections on the Biology Department website before completing the application form. These guidelines contain specific information on the application process, summaries of the research areas of staff, and contact information.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Biology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit. All inquiries pertaining to admission procedures should be directed to the Graduate Admissions Secretary.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Location

  • Department of Psychiatry
  • 1033 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1A1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4176
  • Fax: 514-398-4370
  • Email: graduate [dot] psychiatry [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/psychiatry

About Psychiatry

McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry is one the most prestigious in the world. In the 1950s and 60s, Heinz Lehmann conducted the first North American clinical trials for antipsychotic and antidepressant medications. Theodore Sourkes identified the core neurobiological features of Parkinson’s disease, and Eric Wittkower and Jack Fried brought together scholars from Anthropology and Psychiatry to create Transcultural Psychiatric Studies. Since then, faculty members and graduate students continue outstanding research in addictions; Alzheimer’s and childhood disorders; eating, personality, and mood disorders; stress; trauma; and psychosis. The work is conducted in people and animal models, and also benefits from expertise ranging from neuroimaging and epigenetics to mental health services and public policy. Our work remains at the cutting edge of research on health, disease, and recovery.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Psychiatry also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program on an ad hoc basis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychiatry (Thesis) (45 credits)
The graduate program in Psychiatry is designed to provide advanced research training in the basic, applied, and social sciences relevant to issues in psychiatry. Applicants are admitted from a wide range of backgrounds, including undergraduate degrees in relevant areas (e.g., psychology, neuroscience, sociology, medical anthropology, nursing, and medicine), and those who are pursuing their psychiatry residency at McGill. Most, though not all students, continue to a Ph.D. program. The graduate program does not provide clinical training.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Psychiatry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

  • A B.Sc., B.A., B.N., or M.D. degree.
  • A strong background in science and/or social science, as demonstrated by academic achievement equivalent to a GPA of 3.3 (on a 4-point scale) or 3.5 in the last two years.
  • A written agreement from the proposed research supervisor, and student's statement of purpose for seeking an M.Sc.
  • An outline of the proposed thesis research, to be written by the prospective student in collaboration with an appropriate research supervisor.
  • Two letters of reference.
  • TOEFL or IELTS certificate of proficiency in English for non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue and language of education is not English, with a minimum score of 550 on the written TOEFL test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, or 6.5 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – describing the specific reasons for seeking a Master of Science degree in Psychiatry
  • Letters of Reference – with Applicant Evaluation checklist forms (see Department website)
  • Written Confirmation of Supervision form (see Department website) from the proposed research supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychiatry and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Biochemistry

Biochemistry

Location

  • Department of Biochemistry
  • McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
  • 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler
  • Montreal QC H3G 1Y6
  • Canada

About Biochemistry

The Department of Biochemistry offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs, which emphasize laboratory research. Our research interests include: molecular and cell biology, the regulation of gene and protein expression, signal transduction, protein structure and function, membrane biology, cell death and differentiation, embryonic development, neurobiology, bioinformatics, and many aspects of cancer. Specialized graduate training programs in Chemical Biology, Human Systems Biology (Bioinformatics), Cancer Research/Oncology (http://cancercentre.mcgill.ca/research), and Structural Biology (http://grasp.mcgill.ca) are available. Laboratories are located in the new Bellini Life Sciences Building and Goodman Cancer Research Centre, and the renovated McIntyre Medical Sciences Building, together comprising one of the best-equipped research facilities in Canada. The outstanding quality of our research has been recognized by recent awards including a Gairdner Award, two Killam Prizes, and eight Canada Research Chairs.

Funding

Master's students receive a minimum stipend of $20,000 annually; doctoral students receive $22,000. The Department is committed to helping graduate students secure adequate funding for their research. All students are financially supported either by their supervisor or through fellowships or scholarships. Prospective students are urged to make every effort to secure their own funding. Applications may be made for a variety of fellowships administered by the University or by various federal, provincial, or private agencies. For more information on fellowships and awards, see the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website, www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs.

Departmental Seminars

Visiting scientists and senior doctoral students present their research findings to the Department at a regular seminar series throughout the academic year. All graduate students are required to attend the regular seminars and additional special lectures, and are encouraged to attend scientific conferences and symposia.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biochemistry (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Sc. in Biochemistry introduces students to laboratory-based research at an advanced level. The M.Sc. program offers core courses in advanced biochemistry topics, but focuses on laboratory research. The program provides sophisticated training in the technical as well as theoretical aspects of biochemistry, at one of the leading Biochemistry departments in Canada. The M.Sc. program is an excellent preparation for skilled positions in the biomedical sciences, in industry or the public sector, or for superior research in a Ph.D. program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biochemistry (Thesis) — Chemical Biology (47 credits)

The Chemical Biology Thematic Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics, which span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes that unite the research being performed in this group is the attempt to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems. We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer, and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

The Chemical Biology graduate option is centred on the pursuit of an original research project under the direction of one or more mentors. The program is supported by McGill University and by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) through its Strategic Training Initiatives program.

The program of training incorporates several important features, including a diverse curriculum and programs of seminars, workshops, and discussion groups designed to provide students with a well-rounded exposure to both the chemical and biological aspects of the discipline. The M.Sc. option provides a foundation in the concepts and approaches of Chemical Biology.

Financial support for students in the program is available from a variety of sources, including competitively awarded CIHR-funded Chemical Biology Scholarship awards.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biochemistry (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

M.Sc. level – Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biochemistry
The Ph.D. in Biochemistry trains students in laboratory-based research at the highest level. The Ph.D. program is streamlined to emphasize independent research, and the many areas of biochemistry studied in our Department offer a wide choice of specialties. Students gain in-depth expertise in biochemistry and the biomedical sciences, with the opportunity to carry out research projects at a world-class level and build collaborations with other leading research groups. Graduates of the Ph.D. program are outstandingly prepared for leadership careers in the basic health sciences in industry, the public sector, or academia.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biochemistry — Chemical Biology

The Chemical Biology Thematic Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics which span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes which unite the research being performed in this group is trying to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems. We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

The Chemical Biology graduate option is centred on the pursuit of an original research project under the direction of one or more mentors. The program is supported by McGill University and by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) through its Strategic Training Initiatives program.

The program of training incorporates several important features, including a diverse curriculum and programs of seminars, workshops, and discussion groups designed to provide students with a well-rounded exposure to both the chemical and biological aspects of the discipline. The Ph.D. option provides advanced training in Chemical Biology based on independent research.

Financial support for students in the program is available from a variety of sources, including competitively awarded CIHR-funded Chemical Biology Scholarship awards.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biochemistry — Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Ph.D. level – Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field, and have the capability of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program.

The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Biochemistry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission is based on the candidate’s academic record, letters of recommendation, curriculum vitae, and personal statement. A minimum grade point average of 3.2/4.0 (B+) is required. Once a student has submitted all the required documents, the applicant’s file will be reviewed by the Graduate Admission Committee. Files that do not meet the minimum requirement will not be considered. Applicants must also be accepted by a research supervisor who is a faculty member or associate member of the Department of Biochemistry. Recommendation for admission will be made once the applicant has secured a supervisor and adequate financial support. Financial support should be in the form of a stipend from the supervisor's research grant or a fellowship held by the student.

Master's Program

Candidates for the M.Sc. degree must hold a B.Sc. degree or its equivalent in Biochemistry or in related disciplines (e.g., biology, chemistry, physiology, microbiology).

Doctoral Program

Candidates who have completed their M.Sc. degree may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. Candidates who are admitted to the M.Sc. program and who are interested in the Ph.D. may transfer into the Ph.D. program after successfully completing the transfer seminar (BIOC 701) and all course requirements. The M.Sc. thesis requirement is then waived.

International Applicants

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit the following:

TOEFL: Minimum score of 600, or 86 on an Internet-based test with each component score of not less than 20.

or

IELTS: Minimum overall band score of 6.5.

International students who have received their degree outside North America should submit the following:

GRE: Subject Test in Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology with a minimum score of 550. (Not required, but strongly recommended.)

Admission Requirements – Chemical Biology Option

As for the regular graduate programs of the Biochemistry Department, acceptance into the Chemical Biology option consists of two steps:
  1. Preliminary approval by the Department's Graduate Admission Committee based on the student's transcript, references, and other documents submitted with the application. The criteria for assessment at this level are the same as for the regular graduate programs of the Department.
  2. Acceptance by a Chemical Biology research director. The director must propose a research project for the student that provides training in the methods and philosophy of Chemical Biology. Project proposals are assessed by the Chemical Biology Program Committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

All applicants are advised to contact potential research supervisors during or before the application process since supervisor acceptance is required. Information about the research interests of faculty members can be found at www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/research and www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/about-us/department/faculty-members.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Agreement of a faculty member to act as Thesis Supervisor and to provide adequate financial support
  • Acceptance by a Chemical Biology research director (for Chemical Biology option only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Biochemistry and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Anatomy and Cell Biology

Anatomy and Cell Biology

Location

  • Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
  • Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry Building
  • 3640 University Street, Room 1/59
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C7
  • Canada

About Anatomy and Cell Biology

The Department offers graduate programs leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. Research in the Department investigates the dynamics and organization of molecules, organelles, cells, and tissues in several major systems of the body. The work makes fundamental contributions to a number of established and emerging multidisciplinary fields such as: cell and molecular biology; cellular immunology and hematology; reproductive biology; calcified tissue biology; tumour cell biology; developmental biology; neurobiology; and aging.

The Department offers contemporary facilities for the wide range of techniques currently employed in research. Modern methods of cell and molecular biology, immunology, and biochemistry are used in conjunction with specialized microscopy in a variety of experimental systems.

The Department has one of the largest and best-equipped electron microscope facilities in the world. Currently in use are four modern electron microscopes which include a Tecnai F20 and a Titan Krios. Combined with some of these microscopes are computer-aided analytical equipment capable of elemental microanalysis, histomorphometry, reconstruction, and quantitation. The high-voltage microscope is particularly useful for certain analytical electron optical procedures such as electron diffraction, lattice imaging, and three-dimensional electron microscopy.

Funding

M.Sc. and Ph.D. students receive a minimum yearly stipend of $18,000 and $20,000 respectively. All students are financially supported either by their supervisor or through fellowships or scholarships. Prospective students are urged to make every effort to secure their own funding. Applications may be made for a variety of fellowships administered by the University or by various federal, provincial, or private agencies. For more information on fellowships and awards, see the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs.

Departmental Seminars

Nationally and internationally recognized scientists present their research findings to the Department at a regular seminar series throughout the academic year (see www.mcgill.ca/anatomy/seminar-series). On a regular basis, graduate students also present their own research progress and results to other students, postdoctoral fellows, and researchers in the Department through the Research in Progress Seminar Series.

The Human Systems Biology Stream is offered as a complementary stream to the existing M.Sc. program entailing a multidisciplinary approach to achieving an M.Sc. in Cell Biology and Anatomy. The primary objective of this stream is to offer graduate students academic training in Human Systems Biology. This is an exciting and new multidisciplinary field that aims to understand molecular human diseases at the systems level.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Cell Biology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Graduate research activities leading to the presentation of the M.Sc. Thesis involve original experimental work in one of the areas being actively investigated by the Department's research supervisors. Our graduate program offers training in a personal, unique, and multidisciplinary environment in the top Canadian university with worldwide recognition. The thesis-based Master's training is intended for students with a B.Sc. or B.A. degree in life sciences from a university of recognized reputation. Candidates with an M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degree are also welcome. The students are trained in how to address biological problems with an integrative understanding of cell biology by conducting hypothesis-driven projects. The training provides all the tools required for a competitive career in academic settings as well as in industry or other fields.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Cell Biology
Graduate research activities leading to the presentation of the Ph.D. thesis involve original experimental work in one of the areas being actively investigated by the Department's research supervisors. Our graduate program offers training in a personal, unique, and multidisciplinary environment in the top Canadian university with worldwide recognition. The thesis-based Ph.D. training is intended for students with a B.Sc., B.A., or M.Sc. degree in life sciences from a university of recognized reputation. Candidates with an M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degree are also welcome. The students are trained in how to address biological problems with an integrative understanding of cell biology by conducting hypothesis-driven projects. The training provides all the tools required for a competitive career, in academic settings as well as in industry or other fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Anatomy and Cell Biology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission is based on the candidate’s academic record and letters of recommendation. A minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 is required. Once a student has submitted all the required documents, the applicant’s file will be reviewed by the Graduate Admission Committee. Files that do not meet the minimum requirement will not be considered. Applicants must also be accepted by a research supervisor who is a faculty member or an associate member of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (Adjunct members may serve only as co-supervisors while the primary supervisor must be a full or associate member of the Department). Recommendation for admission will be made once the applicant has secured a supervisor and adequate financial support. Financial support should be in the form of a stipend from the supervisor's research grant or a fellowship held by the student.

Master’s Program (Cell Biology)

1) A B.Sc. degree in life sciences or any of M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees from a university of recognized reputation

2) Evidence of a high academic achievement with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 as indicated in the general guidelines set up by GPS at McGill

Ph.D. Program (Cell Biology)

1) An M.Sc. degree in life sciences or any of M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees from a university of recognized reputation

2) Evidence of a high academic achievement with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 as indicated in the general guidelines set up by GPS at McGill

International Applicants

Graduate studies applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction, or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit the following:

TOEFL: Minimum score of 567, or 86 on an Internet-based test with each component score of not less than 20.

or

IELTS: Minimum overall band score of 6.5.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

All applicants are advised to contact potential research supervisors before the application process since supervisor acceptance is required. Information about the research interests of faculty members can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/anatomy/deparmental-directory.

Program guidelines are detailed at www.mcgill.ca/anatomy/graduate-studies/graduate-programs.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Agreement of a faculty member to act as Thesis Supervisor and to provide adequate financial support

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Biotechnology

Biotechnology

Location

  • Institute of Parasitology
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Biotechnology

Non-thesis Graduate Certificate and M.Sc.(Applied) degree in Biotechnology.

The non-thesis program in Biotechnology offers a course-based curriculum with practical training in laboratory courses and internships offered through the Institute of Parasitology. The Institute is housed on Macdonald Campus of McGill University in beautiful Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue about 30 kilometers from the Montreal main campus downtown.

Graduates typically enter the biotechnology sector in research, management, or sales, or accept government positions.

BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Biotechnology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in the biological/molecular sciences or an equivalent program. This applied master's program is unique in Quebec. It aims to prepare students for entry into the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry or to pursue further graduate studies in biomedicine, agriculture, or the environment. Students can choose from a wide range of complementary courses given throughout the McGill campuses to “design” their own program toward a future career choice. The program provides in-house training in molecular biology with a strong focus on the molecular/biochemical sciences. Concurrently, it provides teaching in management and gives students the opportunity to look at the business aspect of biotechnology. A research internship of four to eight months is carried out in an active laboratory, and students learn to present and write research results. Graduates will find jobs ranging from positions as research assistants and/or technicians in biomedical or pharmaceutical laboratories to managerial or supervisory positions. They may also pursue a career in the business of biotechnology including patent and intellectual property management.
Graduate Certificate in Biotechnology (16 credits)
Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in the biological/molecular sciences or an equivalent program. This is a short, intense program for students wishing to deepen their understanding of biotechnology and gain hands-on experience via an intensive laboratory course using the latest molecular biology techniques. Students can choose from a wide range of complementary courses given throughout the McGill campuses to “design” their own program toward a future career choice. Graduates will find employment in research or industrial laboratories as assistants and/or technicians.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Biotechnology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for the Graduate Certificate and the M.Sc.(Applied) in Biotechnology must possess a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences or equivalent with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.0 GPA in the last two full-time years of university study for the Graduate Certificate, and a minimum of 3.2/4.0 CGPA for the M.Sc.(A.), as well as prerequisites or equivalents. Prerequisites or equivalents: applicants are required to have sufficient background in biochemistry, cellular biology, and molecular biology, preferably at an advanced level for the Master's Applied.

Financial Support – Financial support for Biotechnology programs is very limited. Students must secure funding from governmental agencies or be self-sufficient. International students are strongly encouraged to secure funding from their home country or international agencies. More information is found at www.mcgill.ca/biotechgradprog/admissions/tuition.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • An English Proficiency test is required for most international applicants.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.
  • Other Supporting Documents – Other documents may be required for the admission process. Please consult the Biotechnology website at www.mcgill.ca/biotechgradprog/admissions for full details of the admission process.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Institute of Parasitology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Parasitology

Parasitology

Location

  • Institute of Parasitology
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Parasitology

M.Sc. and Ph.D. thesis research degrees in Parasitology, with Bioinformatics and Environment options; and non-thesis Graduate Certificate and M.Sc. (Applied) degree in Biotechnology.

The Institute of Parasitology teaches and researches the phenomenon of parasitism of humans and livestock. The nutrition/parasitism interface is also examined. Current research involvement includes the biology, biochemistry, bioinformatics, pharmacology, control, ecology, epidemiology, immunology, molecular biology, neurobiology, and population and molecular genetics of parasitic organisms, viruses, and cancer cells. The non-thesis programs in Biotechnology offer a course-based curriculum with practical training in laboratory courses and internships.

The Institute is housed in its own building adjacent to the Macdonald Campus Library and has well-equipped laboratories. A confocal microscopy suite is available on site. Small and large animal facilities are present on the Macdonald campus. The Institute is affiliated with the McGill Centre for Tropical Diseases at the Montreal General Hospital.

Graduates typically go on to become career research scientists, enter the biotechnology sector in research, management, or sales, or accept government positions.

Parasitology Programs

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) (46 credits)
A research project is undertaken in an area of parasitology under the direction of a supervisor, and a thesis is produced. Coursework is minimal. Graduates have gone on to medical school, to teaching positions, or have found employment in scientific fields.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (47 credits)
A research project is undertaken in an area of parasitology under the direction of a supervisor, and a thesis is produced. This option involves additional coursework specializing in bioinformatics, and graduates are highly trained professionals with expertise in bioinformatics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
A research project is undertaken under the direction of a supervisor, and a thesis is produced. This option involves extra coursework in topics relevant to the environment and is suitable for students interested in environmental issues. Graduates find employment in science and/or the environment, such as management or consulting positions in the emerging field of environmental protection, or go on to further graduate studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology
An advanced, original research project is undertaken in an area of parasitology supervised by faculty staff. Coursework is minimal. Graduates are well suited for teaching positions in academia or research careers in a university or private industry laboratory.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology — Bioinformatics
An advanced, original research project in an area of parasitology is undertaken supervised by faculty staff, and a thesis is produced. Additional coursework in the field of bioinformatics is required for this option. Graduates are well suited for a teaching or research career, especially where there is particular emphasis on the science of bioinformatics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology — Environment
An advanced, original research project in an area of parasitology is undertaken supervised by faculty staff, and a thesis is produced. There is additional coursework on environmental topics for this option. Graduates are prepared for careers in academia, industry, or government, especially where the focus is on environmental protection or management of valuable natural resources, such as water.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Parasitology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for either the M.Sc. or the Ph.D. thesis research degree should possess a bachelor's degree in the biological or medical sciences with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division). High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program. Previous experience in parasitology is not essential.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected, may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all thesis research programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • International students are strongly encouraged to secure funding from their home country or international agencies.
  • Other Supporting Documents – Other documents may be required for the admission process. Please consult the Parasitology website at www.mcgill.ca/parasitology/graduatestudies/admission for full details.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Institute of Parasitology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).