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Redpath Museum

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Redpath Museum

Location

  • Redpath Museum
  • 859 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C4
  • Canada

About Redpath Museum

The Redpath Museum is a unique interdisciplinary unit within the Faculty of Science offering graduate training in research devoted to biodiversity, ecology, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology, leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. It is an institution with extensive collections of ancient and modern organisms, minerals, and ethnological artifacts. Research and teaching are centred on collections-based study, object-oriented investigation, and fieldwork.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Redpath Museum Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Redpath Museum does not have its own graduate program. All graduate students of the professors in the Redpath Museum have affiliations with either Biology, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Anthropology, Natural Resource Sciences, or Education. Admission requirements are subject to those home departments' regulations.

Application Procedures

Students in the Redpath Museum may enrol in McGill's Department of Biology or other units, including the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Natural Resource Sciences, or the Faculty of Education. Anyone interested should contact the unit concerned.

Application Deadlines

For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Psychology

Location

  • Department of Psychology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W8/33A
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6124/514-398-6100
  • Fax: 514-398-4896
  • Email: gradsec [at] ego [dot] psych [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.psych.mcgill.ca

About Psychology

The aim of the Experimental program is to provide students with an environment in which they are free to develop skills and expertise that will serve during a professional career of teaching and research as a psychologist. Coursework and other requirements are at a minimum. Success in the program depends on the student's ability to organize unscheduled time for self education. Continuous involvement in research planning and execution is considered a very important component of the student's activities. Students are normally expected to do both master’s and doctoral study.

M.A. and M.Sc. degrees may be awarded in Experimental Psychology, but only as a step to the Ph.D.—students undergo formal evaluation beginning with the submission of their master's requirements (thesis or fast-track paper) to enter Ph.D. 2.

The Clinical program adheres to the scientist practitioner model and as such is designed to train students for careers in university teaching or clinical research, and for service careers (working with children or adults in hospital, clinical, or educational settings). Most of our clinical graduates combine service and research roles. While there are necessarily many more course requirements than in the Experimental program, the emphasis is again on research training. There is no master’s program in Clinical Psychology; students are expected to complete the full program leading to a doctoral degree.

Research interests of members of the Psychology Department include animal learning, behavioural neuroscience, clinical, child development, cognitive science, health psychology, psychology of language, perception, quantitative psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology.

Facilities for advanced research in a variety of fields are available within the Department itself. In addition, arrangements exist with the Departments of Psychology at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Allan Memorial Institute, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Montreal General Hospital, to permit graduate students to undertake research in a hospital setting. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.)

Students interested in neuroscience may apply to graduate programs in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience (IPN) department and work with an IPN supervisor from the Department of Psychology. For information about programs offered by the IPN department, see the eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Neuroscience (Integrated Program in) and www.mcgill.ca/ipn.

For full information about all programs and financial aid, and for application forms, contact the Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Psychology.

Ph.D. Option in Language Acquisition (LAP)

Information about this option is available from the Department and at: www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html.

Ph.D. Option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSO)

A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology is offered within the existing Ph.D. program in Psychology. Information about this option is available from the Department and at: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/oncology/programs/programs_psychosocialoncology.asp.

Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.
Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Language Acquisition
This unique interdisciplinary program focuses on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition Program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Psychosocial Oncology
The Department of Oncology, in conjunction with the Ingram School of Nursing, the Department of Psychology and the School of Social Work, has developed the cross-disciplinary Psychosocial Oncology Option (PSOO). This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Please note: there have been changes in the required documents for the admission and application procedures. Please consult the link http://www.psych.mcgill.ca/grad/program/application_admission.htm for additional requirements.

Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program depends on an evaluation of students' research interests and their aptitude for original contributions to knowledge and, if applicable, for professional contributions in the applied field.

The usual requirement for admission is an Honours or majors degree (B.A. or B.Sc.) in Psychology. This usually includes an introductory course plus twelve courses in psychology (each equivalent to three term hours). Courses in experimental psychology, the theoretical development of modern ideas in psychology, and statistical methods as applied to psychological problems (equivalent to an introductory course) are essential. Applicants' knowledge of relevant biological, physical, and social sciences is considered. Students applying to the clinical program are advised to complete 42 specific undergraduate credits in psychology as specified by the Order of Psychologists of Quebec.

Applicants who hold a bachelor's degree but who have not met these usual requirements should consult the Graduate Program Director to determine which (if any) courses must be completed before an application can be considered. Students with insufficient preparation for graduate work may register as Special Students (undergraduate level) in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science, and follow an appropriate course of study. Such registration requires the permission of the Department but carries no advantage with respect to a student's eventual admission to graduate studies.

Applicants should note that the deadline for many scholarships and fellowships is about four months earlier than the application deadlines and that applications for scholarships and fellowships should be submitted through their home university.

Applicants with little or no background in psychology are not required to submit scores on the subject component of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). We highly recommend to all other students to submit scores on the subject component of the GRE. If you did not take the GRE subject test and are accepted into the program, you may be asked to take it in April. All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Three letters of reference
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Philosophy

Philosophy

Location

  • Department of Philosophy
  • Leacock Building, 9th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6060
  • Fax: 514-398-7148
  • Email: info [dot] philosophy [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/philosophy

About Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy has particular strength in the following areas: Ancient Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Kant and post-Kantian German Philosophy; Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Mind; Aesthetics; Moral and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Contemporary European Philosophy.

The Department offers assistance to students in every aspect of placement. Our Placement Officer counsels students about coursework and areas of competence, helps to establish evidence of teaching ability, administers the dossier for job applications, and provides advice and follow-up in the interview process. Many of our graduates have gone on to do postdoctoral research and over 80% are now in tenure track or sessional appointments.

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. in Philosophy. It also offers, in conjunction with the Biomedical Ethics Unit, a course of study leading to the M.A. degree in Bioethics.

Students with an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 1 level. Students who hold an M.A. degree in Philosophy, or equivalent, from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 2 level. Students entering the Ph.D. program (at Ph.D. 1 or Ph.D. 2) will be required to complete two years of coursework. (N.B. At present, we do not normally consider applicants for an M.A. in Philosophy, with the exception of the specialty M.A. in Biomedical Ethics.) The Department considers an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy to be one that furnishes a student with:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval, and Modern.
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in 1 and 2.

Ph.D. Program

By December 15 of their third year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 1 and August 15 in their second year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 2, students must submit a research paper (the “candidacy paper” [3 credits]), which may be worked up from a paper written to fulfil the requirements of a graduate course, to a Thesis Advancement Committee consisting of a least two members of the staff of the Department. The membership of this committee will be determined by the Graduate Director in consultation with the student; it is anticipated that members of this committee would, in principle, direct the student's thesis. This committee assigns a grade to the student's paper and reviews her or his graduate performance; on the basis of its assessment and review, it recommends to the Department as a whole either to permit the student to continue with the Ph.D. program and undertake a thesis or to decline to permit the student to continue. Two necessary conditions for a positive recommendation are that the student (a) receive a grade of at least B+ on the candidacy paper, and (b) have at least a 3.5 GPA (on the undergraduate Grade Point scale) in the coursework required for the program. The Department as a whole, taking into account the Thesis Advancement Committee's recommendation and the student's overall academic record in the program, decides whether to permit the student to continue. Students who do not receive a positive recommendation but who satisfy Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements (no courses below a B- and completion of 45 credits) will be recommended to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by the Department to transfer from the Ph.D. program to the M.A. program.

Graduate students are expected to continue to contribute to the intellectual life of the Department after being promoted to candidacy. They can do so by participating in reading and discussion groups and, most of all, by auditing seminars both within and outside their areas of specialty.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Philosophy (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The Master's in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics. Ordinarily, it takes at least two years to complete, although some students have completed it in 18 months. The first year is devoted to coursework (including a clinical practicum), and the second year is devoted to a master's thesis on a topic in bioethics that also satisfies the requirements of the base discipline. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (6 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required, including the thesis. Students graduate with a master's degree from the faculty of their base discipline (M.A., M.Sc., or LL.M.) with a specialization in bioethics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy
The program is intended for students with a B.A. or M.A. in Philosophy, though some exceptions may be possible. It is a pluralist Department with an excellent professor-to-student ratio, strong preparation for dissertation work, and guaranteed full funding for four years for all admitted Ph.D. students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Philosophy who wish to earn 9 additional credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women's studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 27, 2014).

Philosophy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ph.D.

Students with an Honours B.A. degree in Philosophy, or the equivalent, are normally admitted to the Ph.D. program directly at the Ph.D. 1 level. The Department considers an Honours B.A. degree to include:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western philosophy: Greek, Medieval, Modern
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in (1) and (2)

To demonstrate their competence in these areas, applicants must submit transcripts of academic work, three letters of recommendation from persons with whom they have studied, and at least one substantial example (approximately 15–20 typewritten pages) of their written philosophical work.

In addition, applicants from North America whose first language is English are strongly encouraged to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English (TOEFL score).

Students who hold an M.A. degree from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. 2 level.

M.A. (Bioethics)

Students applying to the Bioethics Specialty program must write an M.A. thesis proposal. All applications to this program must also receive the approval of the Director of the Specialty program. Students who apply for this program should note that they must participate in a practicum, which continues beyond the end of their second term of classes.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letters of Reference – three (3) original letters of reference
  • Writing Sample (15–20 pages)
  • Personal Statement (2–3 pages)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Philosophy and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the Department
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department considers admissions for the Fall term only. Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 27, 2014).

Jewish Studies

Jewish Studies

Location

  • Department of Jewish Studies
  • 855 Sherbrooke West, Leacock Building, 7th floor
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Jewish Studies

The Department of Jewish Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Judaica. It welcomes students interested in deepening their knowledge of Jewish history and Jewish texts. Students have the choice of a thesis or non-thesis M.A. in Jewish Studies and may choose to complete the thesis M.A. with a stream in the History of the Jewish Interpretation of the Bible. An ad hoc Ph.D. is also available. We have particular research and teaching strengths in the following areas: Hebrew Bible and its interpretation; rabbinics and codes; medieval and modern Jewish thought; Eastern European Jewish history; Jewish literature (Hebrew, Yiddish, English); and contemporary North American Jewish life. These areas are broadly construed to accommodate the range of research interests in the Department. Students develop close relationships with their supervisors and benefit from the diverse expertise available in our Department and in the University at large.

While the thesis option is designed for students undertaking advanced research in one of the areas above, the non-thesis option offers a generalist degree in Jewish studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Jewish Studies (Thesis) (45 credits)

This option is aimed at students who have acquired a rich background in Jewish studies through their B.A. and who are now ready to focus their study on one period and/or discipline within the broad field of Jewish civilizational studies. Students choosing Eastern European studies, Jewish thought, or Hebrew literature must enter the program with a good command of either Hebrew or Yiddish according to their chosen specialization.

Students may also choose to complete the M.A. (Thesis) program with a stream in the History of the Jewish Interpretation of the Bible. This stream is aimed at students who have acquired a rich background in Bible and Jewish studies through their B.A. and who now wish to study the Bible and its interpretation within Jewish circles at an advanced level. Students choosing this path must enter the program with a good command of Hebrew.

The degree is normally completed within two years. Subsequent career paths are varied, but could include work in Jewish communal agencies, Jewish schools, Jewish foundations, the rabbinate, or further graduate study in a related field.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Jewish Studies (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This option is aimed at students who have acquired some background in Jewish studies through their B.A. and who wish to add to their knowledge without having to concentrate on one period or discipline within the broad field of Jewish civilizational studies. Students may take courses in related disciplines outside of Jewish Studies if appropriate. The degree is normally completed within two years. Students must demonstrate good command of Yiddish or Hebrew prior to graduation. Subsequent career paths are varied, but could include work in Jewish communal agencies, Jewish schools, Jewish foundations, the rabbinate, or further graduate study in a related field.
Ph.D. in Jewish Studies
This is an ad hoc program. Please contact the Department for further information on this option.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Jewish Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ideally, applicants would have completed a B.A. in Jewish Studies. If an applicant is otherwise deemed acceptable, it is possible to be admitted to a Qualifying year. Students seeking admission to the History of the Jewish Interpretation of the Bible stream must demonstrate competence in Hebrew prior to beginning the program.

In addition to the appropriate references, transcripts, and examination scores, applicants should send samples of their academic work in their field of interest. Personal interviews are strongly recommended.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Written Work

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Jewish Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: Feb. 1
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).