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Educational and Counselling Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Educational and Counselling Psychology

Location

  • Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology
  • Education Building, Room 614
  • 3700 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1Y2
  • Canada
  • Telephone – Program Information: 514-398-4242
  • Fax: 514-398-6968
  • Email: ecpinfo [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp

About Educational and Counselling Psychology

The Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology (ECP) programs and research examine the interplay between complex human systems (cognitive, social, emotional, behavioural, and biological) to maximize: (a) learning, (b) wellness (mental and physical), and (c) human development in multiple settings and throughout the lifespan. More specifically, they examine issues pertaining to cognitive processes and developmental neuroscience, assessment and intervention, and the design and evaluation of learning environments and instructional practices, with both typical and atypical populations in mind. While ECP’s primary disciplinary bases are psychology and education, it contributes to and is enriched by extended interdisciplinary collaborations with, among others, medicine and other health professions, neurosciences, computer science, science, social work and policy, and law.

Students in our programs benefit from having access to the McGill Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/about/clinic) and the Departmental Assessment Materials Resource Centre (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/students/amrc). To develop their professional skills in assessment, therapy, and supervision, students are equipped with the latest standardized materials and a state-of-the-art venue within which to conduct psychological and cognitive assessments. Our professional programs also have established connections with world-class public and private organizations, which include health care facilities and school boards where students receive supervised training for internships and practica. Our faculty members are involved in intra- and interdisciplinary collaborative research locally, nationally, and internationally. These networks offer students valuable exposure to, and connection with, different research laboratories, research leaders, and professional organizations. Students benefit from international mobility programs and specialized training offered in specific locations. Working closely with faculty members in their research teams, our students enrolled in research-based M.A. and Ph.D. programs have proven very successful in obtaining major external fellowships from bodies such as SSHRC, FQRSC, FRSQ, and CIHR.

Our graduates secure careers in a varied and rewarding range of settings. These include, but are not limited to: academic and research settings, professional psychology (counselling and school psychology), specialized and innovative teaching, educational research, development and leadership at all levels (e.g., schools, colleges and universities, school boards, ministries of education), staff development, and education in the professions.

Detailed graduate degree descriptions are available in the following sections:

Master of Arts (M.A.) Degrees

Students can obtain an M.A. degree in:

  1. Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) with major concentrations in:
    • Professional/Internship (coursework and internship based)
    • Project (coursework and research based)
  2. Educational Psychology with a Major in:
    • School/Applied Child Psychology
  3. Educational Psychology with concentrations in:
    • Health Professions Education
    • Human Development
    • Learning Sciences

Master of Education (M.Ed.) Degrees

Students can obtain an M.Ed. degree in Educational Psychology. Please note these are all non-thesis options. The M.Ed. program in Educational Psychology offers concentrations in:

  • Family Life Education (admissions to this concentration are currently suspended)
  • General Educational Psychology
  • General Educational Psychology (Project)
  • Inclusive Education
  • Inclusive Education (Project)
  • Learning Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Degrees

Students can obtain a Ph.D. degree in:

  1. Counselling Psychology
  2. Educational Psychology with concentrations in:
    • Human Development
    • Learning Sciences
  3. School/Applied Child Psychology

Postdoctoral Degrees

The Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology offers one postdoctoral diploma:

  • Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

For information about these graduate programs please view our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/prospective or contact the appropriate Program Coordinator/Adviser:

For Educational Psychology programs (excluding School/Applied Child Psychology) contact:

  • Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Mrs. Geri Norton
  • Telephone: 514-398-4244
  • Email: edpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca

For Counselling Psychology and School/Applied Child Psychology contact:

  • Graduate Program Adviser
  • Mr. Alexander Nowak
  • Telephone: 514-398-4245
  • Email: counsellingpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca or schoolpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Professional Accreditation

The Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and is currently under review for accreditation by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA). The Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology is jointly accredited by the CPA and the APA. The Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ) accredits both the Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology and the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology.
Note: The APA will no longer accredit programs outside of the United States of America effective September 1, 2015. The implication of this decision for students is that those who graduate from our programs after this date cannot attest to having graduated from an APA-accredited program. For further information regarding APA accreditation, see: www.apa.org/support/education/accreditation/international.aspx#answer.

Important addresses:

APA – Committee on Accreditation, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC, 20002-4242, U.S.A.; Telephone: 1-800-374-2721

CPA – 151 Slater Street, Suite 205, Ottawa, ON, K1P 5H3, Canada; Telephone: 1-888-472-0657

OCCOQ – 1600 Henri Bourassa Blvd. West, Suite 520, Montreal, QC, H3M 3E2, Canada; Telephone: 514-737-6431

OPQ – 1100 Beaumont, Suite 510, Mount-Royal, QC, H3P 3H5, Canada; Telephone: 514-738-1881

Graduate degrees in Counselling Psychology or School/Applied Child Psychology, and elsewhere in Educational Psychology, do not lead to teaching certification—see the Undergraduate eCalendar for B.Ed. programs. Holders of other undergraduate degrees may apply to enter the B.Ed. with Advanced Standing.

Research/Training Facilities

The Department houses a number of training and research units and maintains working relationships with specialized centres and research groups that offer opportunities for training and research to selected students. For a comprehensive list of such groups, consult our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/research.

Graduate Degrees in Counselling Psychology

Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Professional/Internship (60 credits)

The aim of the M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Counselling Psychology (Professional/Internship) is to produce graduates who:

  1. are trained in the major applied areas of counselling;
  2. will be qualified to work in a variety of settings where educational, vocational, personal, and developmental counselling is offered; and
  3. have had an extensive supervised internship in either a clinical or educational setting.

To do so, the training program emphasizes career and vocational theory and development, individual and group counselling skills, the integration of multicultural, gender, and other diversity theories into practice, and diagnosis and assessment procedures.

Students take a combination of theoretical and practical courses throughout the completion of their degree. Most coursework is taken during their first year (including the Summer term) while also completing a practicum in the Department’s Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic. In their second year, students are on-site at internship placements for three full days per week while attending classes on their remaining two days.

Accredited upon graduation by the Ordre des conseillers et conseillères d’orientation du Québec (OCCOQ), this program prepares students to work in the field as Counsellors in settings such as CLSCs, schools, community, rehabilitation, and vocational guidance centres, governmental, non-governmental, or private settings. All students must also attend weekly case conferences.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Project (60 credits)

The M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Counselling Psychology (Project) is designed to produce graduates with introductory academic preparation for research or clinical careers in counselling psychology. Training is provided in the research domain through coursework in data analysis and a research project. Clinical preparation is initiated in the program through coursework in ethics, intervention, assessment, psychological testing, and multicultural issues and through a practicum. Most coursework is taken during the student's first year of studies while beginning work on their research projects. In their second year, students gain practical experience via a practicum in the Department’s Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic while also completing the majority of their work on the research project. The degree alone does not fulfil the requirements for membership in the orders that certify either guidance counsellors (OCCOQ) or psychologists (OPQ) in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Counselling Psychology

Student pursuing a Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the duration of their degree. It draws upon a number of different sciences (including developmental, social, career and neuropsychology and personality theory) to develop critically astute researchers and exceptionally skilled clinicians. Building on the M.A. in Counselling Psychology (Project concentration), or equivalent, the program offers opportunities in Practicum, Supervision, and full-year Internships to develop clinical skills while also working toward the completion of a doctoral dissertation (thesis). The Ph.D. program, has the following aims:

  1. To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the field of counselling psychology.
  2. To practise from a strong evidence base.
  3. To take a leadership role in community, professional, and university organizations in counselling psychology.

Graduates of the program will be prepared to assume careers in education and community settings, including faculty positions, counselling and psychological positions on the staff of university and college mental health centres, and professional positions in psychological agencies offering preventative mental health services. The program is currently accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ), and American Psychological Association (APA). (Please note that APA accreditation will cease for all Canadian institutions in 2015.) Graduates are eligible for licensure in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Graduate Degrees in School/Applied Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); School/Applied Child Psychology

The Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology is the second degree in a combined M.A. and Ph.D. program with the M.A. (Thesis) in Educational Psychology's School/Applied Child Psychology concentration. Most students in the doctoral program completed their M.A. in the Educational Psychology program although students can apply for direct entry into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree obtained at another institution. At both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels, students take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the course of their degree. Students will produce a thesis at both levels of study.

Extending upon the M.A. degree, the program's focus remains on the improvement of the educational and psychological well-being of children and to educate school psychologists in a manner consistent with the highest international standards in the field. Students explore a variety of topics including mental health, child development, school organization, learning processes, behaviour, motivation, and effective teaching. They are prepared to become inquiring professionals committed to the development of children and youth and receive intensive training of clinical practice with children and families, as well as basic and applied research.

The program develops clinical skills through intensive assessment courses, a Clinic Practicum, Field Placement, and a full-year Internship. Typically, our graduates go on to practise school psychology across a range of environments including private practice, academia, hospitals, and school boards. The Ph.D. program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ). (Please note that APA accreditation will cease for all Canadian institutions in 2015.) Graduates are eligible for licensure in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych.

Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

This post-Ph.D. graduate diploma enables holders of a doctorate in Psychology to pursue further studies in School/Applied Child Psychology. The course of study is adapted to the background of each student. The program includes exceptionally one, or typically two, years of courses and practica, plus a year of Internship. Students register on a per-credit basis (including Internship).

Students are not required to demonstrate knowledge of a second language within this program; however, any student wishing to be licensed as a professional psychologist in Quebec must have a working knowledge of French. Accreditation status may be confirmed by contacting the accrediting bodies.

Professional Accreditation

All elements of this postdoctoral graduate diploma are selected from the professional components of the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology, which is accredited in the School Psychology category by the American Psychological Association (APA). Graduates of a re-specialization program are normally accorded the same recognition as graduates of the accredited program.

The Ph.D. is approved by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ), which has recommended the final stage of professional recognition to the Office des professions of the Government of Quebec. Once this accreditation is confirmed, however, graduates of the postdoctoral graduate diploma will not be automatically eligible for membership in the OPQ and the right to practise professional psychology in Quebec. Candidates wishing to practise in Quebec will be required to apply to the OPQ for the recognition of equivalent qualifications.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych.

Graduate Degrees in Educational Psychology

Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree offers educators and practising professionals advanced professional training in areas where educational psychology can make a practical contribution to the design, delivery, and assessment of educational programs and the impact of these programs on student learning. Courses aim to promote:

  1. a greater understanding of human development, individual differences, and the learning process;
  2. a greater understanding on classroom processes and strategies for teaching diverse learners in a variety of contexts;
  3. the evaluation of student learning, teaching, programs, and educational experimentation and innovation; and
  4. the application of results of educational research.

The program offers the following concentrations of study:

  1. Family Life Education: Admission to this concentration is currently suspended.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Family Life Education (48 credits).

  2. General Educational Psychology: Permits students with very specific experiences and career paths to tailor the program to their particular situations. Students may draw courses from other concentrations within the M.Ed. programs including Inclusive Education, Learning Sciences, or any other general Departmental courses. This program suits students with very unique program needs in Educational Psychology.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — General Educational Psychology (48 credits).

  3. General Educational Psychology (Project) Provides students with an interest in the General Educational Psychology concentration the opportunity to focus on an issue in the field and complete a research project in place of course work (12 credits worth).

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — General Educational Psychology: Project (48 credits).

  4. Inclusive Education: Prepares students to work with diverse individuals in a variety of settings that emphasize inclusive practice. As most professional and educational contexts are becoming more diverse, this program has wide appeal and is relevant to current teachers, consultants, other professionals working in the education system, and to those wishing to understand human development and potential in all inclusive contexts.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Inclusive Education (48 credits).

  5. Inclusive Education (Project): Provides students with an interest in the Inclusive Education concentration the opportunity to focus on an issue in the field and complete a research project in place of course work (12 credits worth).

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Inclusive Education: Project (48 credits).

  6. Learning Sciences: Focuses on the study of learning as it occurs in real-world situations and ways in which learning may be facilitated in designed environments.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Learning Sciences (48 credits).

The M.Ed. program has been developed for students who have a background in education (B.Ed.), psychology, or another related degree. Students have the option of conducting academic or applied research (via a 12-credit Research Project or Special Activity) to enhance the applied experience of learning. The academic staff who teach and supervise within the program understand both research and applied contexts such as the school system. Courses are offered in the evening to accommodate full-time professionals and can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Many of our graduates work in the school system as resource teachers, special education, or educational consultants. Others work in or create special tutorial programs or family/child programs for students with difficulties, or in specialized settings (e.g., hospital programs), and others have moved on into our doctoral program in Human Development.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/mededpsych.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) (48 credits) (Note that the School/Applied Child Psychology Major is 78 credits.)

The aim of the M.A. (Thesis) in Educational Psychology is to produce graduates who:

  1. are broadly trained in educational psychology;
  2. have sufficient research competence to critically evaluate research in educational psychology, and to design, conduct, and report empirical research; and
  3. have experience in applying research methods and findings to the solution of practical problems in varied educational settings.

Candidates are required to select and follow the set of courses in one of three concentrations of study or the Major in School/Applied Child Psychology, select a topic for research, and present the results of such research in a thesis.

The program offers three concentrations and one major:

  1. The Health Professions Education concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions) is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning as they happen in the health professions and throughout the lifespan. The program is for health professionals who are interested in conducting educational research and working on development projects (e.g., program, curriculum, faculty) as well as for educational psychology graduate students who are interested in issues related to medical education and education in other health professions.

    The program will produce a graduate who can recognize the role of education in a health professions context, who has sufficient research competence to conduct empirical research in health education settings, and who can apply research results to solve practical problems in this field. Student admission and supervision is done jointly with the Centre for Medical Education; see website: www.mcgill.ca/centreformeded.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Health Professions Education (48 credits).

  2. The Human Development concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev) is intended to prepare students from education and psychology backgrounds to work in school, institutional, and university settings. The degree prepares candidates to support the educational and psychological well-being of individuals, to use research to critically inform practice, and to be able to conceptualize and conduct applied and theoretical research related to different trajectories of human development and varied educational settings. The program follows a mentorship model that encourages students’ active participation in research and prepares them for academia and leadership roles in the field.

    The program is unique in exploring development including cognitive, language, social, personality, and gender development issues in children and adolescents from the diverse perspectives of our multidisciplinary faculty. For example, students are exposed to clinical and non-clinical perspectives on developmental issues; these perspectives are then employed to better understand issues related to disabilities and individuals’ diverse needs in educational and community settings. Most students in this program go on to pursue studies at the Ph.D. level.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Human Development (45 credits).

  3. The Learning Sciences concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci) aims to develop competent and inquiring professionals who have the skills to understand and improve learning and teaching by way of conceptualizing and conducting applied and theoretical research in different formal and informal educational settings. It is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning in schools, colleges and universities, the workplace and professional practice, as well as virtual learning communities. Students acquire theoretical and practical knowledge through coursework, team-based research assistantships, and apprenticeships where appropriate.

    The profiles of our graduates speak to the flexibility and application of acquired skills and competencies in a range of professions. These include academic positions around the world, positions in school boards and hospital education programs, researchers involved in educational and institutional research and policy development, training and education specialists in business and industry, medical education researchers, and faculty developers.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Learning Sciences (45 credits).

The School/Applied Child Psychology Major (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych) is a combined M.A. and Ph.D. program with the doctoral degree in School/Applied Child Psychology. Most students who enrol in the master’s program continue to pursue studies at the doctoral level, although students can apply for direct entry into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree obtained at another institution.

The program's focus is on the improvement of the educational and psychological well-being of children and educates school psychologists in a manner consistent with the highest international standards in the field. Students explore a variety of topics including mental health, child development, school organization, learning processes, behaviour, motivation, and effective teaching, and are prepared to become inquiring professionals committed to the development of children and youth. Therefore, students receive intensive training of clinical practice with children and families, as well as basic and applied research.

To do so at both the M.A. and Ph.D. level, students take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the course of their degree. Students will produce a thesis at both levels of study. Our students go on to practise school psychology across a range of environments including private practice, academia, hospitals, and school boards.

See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — School/Applied Child Psychology (78 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Educational Psychology is available only to M.A. students admitted to the study sequence leading to the Ph.D. School/Applied Child Psychology, and who wish to transfer after the first semester.

Please note that this program is currently not offered.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology
The aim of the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology emphasizes the development of research skills and supports both basic and applied research pertaining to all domains of educational psychology. It aims to develop graduates who can demonstrate:
  1. broad scholarship in planning and implementing basic and applied research on problems of cognition, teaching, learning, and human development;
  2. mastery of current theoretical issues in educational psychology and their historical development; and
  3. a detailed knowledge of their selected concentration.
The program offers two concentrations:
  1. Human Development concentration: (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev) The Human Development concentration builds upon the M.A. program and is intended to prepare students to work in school, institutional, and university settings. The degree prepares candidates to support the educational and psychological well-being of individuals, to use research to critically inform practice, and to be able to conceptualize and conduct applied and theoretical research related to different trajectories of human development and varied educational settings. The program follows a mentorship model that encourages students’ active participation in research and prepares them for academia and leadership roles in the field.

    The Human Development program is unique in exploring development including cognitive, language, social, personality, and gender development issues in children and adolescents from the diverse perspectives of our multidisciplinary faculty. These perspectives are then employed to better understand issues related to disabilities and individuals’ diverse needs in educational and community settings.

    See Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology — Human Development.

  2. Learning Sciences concentration: (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci) The Learning Sciences concentration builds upon the M.A. program and continues its aim of developing competent and inquiring professionals who have the skills to understand and improve learning and teaching by way of conceptualizing and conducting applied and theoretical research in different formal and informal educational settings. It is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning. The settings could be schools, colleges and universities, the workplace and professional practice, as well as virtual learning communities. Students acquire theoretical and practical knowledge through coursework, team-based research assistantships, and apprenticeships where appropriate.

    See Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology — Learning Sciences.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Educational and Counselling Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

M.A. in Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis)

The M.A. in Counselling Psychology program offers the following two concentrations:

  1. Professional/Internship (coursework and internship based)
  2. Project (research based)

Admission Requirements

Concentration: Professional/Internship

To be eligible, applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree consisting of 18 credits of core courses in specific Psychology domains and 24 credits in related disciplines in the social sciences (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist) and a minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies. For more information please visit our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs.

Concentration: Project

To be eligible, applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree in psychology consisting of 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies at the undergraduate level. For more information please visit our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s) – for applicants to the Project concentration
  • Interview – for applicants to the Professional/Internship concentration
  • M.A. in Counselling Psychology Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Counselling Psychology: Project and Professional/Internship concentrations, can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma.

Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology

Admission Requirements

To be eligible applicants must hold:

A master's degree equivalent to the Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Project (60 credits) or a Master's degree from a directly relevant program (e.g., clinical psychology, other Counselling Psychology programs) along with 42 credits of core courses in specific Psychology domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • Written Work
  • Ph.D. Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd

Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

To be eligible applicants must hold:

A master's degree equivalent to the Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — School/Applied Child Psychology (78 credits) along with 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

All doctoral students must have a research supervisor upon entry to the program. Interested candidates should consult the Departmental website for a list of faculty members and their research interests. A supervisor must be selected from among professors in the School/Applied Child Psychology program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Written Work
  • Ph.D. Pre-Admission Academic Checklist
  • GRE – General and Psychology subject tests
  • A letter from the applicant's prospective supervisor agreeing to act as their Ph.D. supervisor

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology, can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/phd.

Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

An earned doctorate in Educational Psychology, another area of Psychology, or a closely related discipline (to be recognized at the Program Director's discretion).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/postphd.

M.Ed. in Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis)

This program offers six concentrations:

  1. Learning Sciences
  2. General Educational Psychology
  3. General Educational Psychology: Project
  4. Inclusive Education
  5. Inclusive Education: Project
  6. Family Life Education (admission to the Family Life Concentration is currently suspended)

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.Ed. concentrations in Educational Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/mededpsych/med.

M.A. in Educational Psychology (Thesis)

This program offers three concentrations:

  1. Learning Sciences
  2. Health Professions Education
  3. Human Development

and one Major:

  1. School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

Learning Sciences Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Health Professions Education Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

The Health Professions Education program has been conceived and is offered in collaboration with the McGill Centre for Medical Education and affiliated faculty. Student selection is done jointly as is graduate supervision.

Human Development Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology, consisting of 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma).
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Learning Sciences Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Learning Sciences concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci/ma.

Health Professions Education Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Health Professions concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions/ma.

Human Development Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Human Development concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev/ma.

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: School/Applied Child Psychology Major can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/ma.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Learning Sciences Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • Personal Statement

Health Professions Education Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • Personal Statement

Human Development Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • GRE – General and Psychology subject scores
  • Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

M.A. in Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis)

Note: Admission to this program is currently suspended.

Admission Requirements

Same as M.A. (Thesis) Educational Psychology Major in School/Applied Child Psychology.

For application information please refer to instructions listed under M.A. (Thesis) Educational Psychology Major in School/Applied Child Psychology.

For further information about the application process, please consult our Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/ma.

Ph.D. in Educational Psychology

Admission Requirements

All doctoral students must have a research supervisor upon entry to the program. Interested candidates should consult the Departmental website for a faculty list: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp. All applicants must have a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies. Please note: it is essential to clearly identify your desired concentration of study on your application. The two concentrations offered are:

  1. Human Development
  2. Learning Sciences

The specific requirements to be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level are as follows:

Applicants should hold an M.A. in Educational Psychology from McGill or a recognized equivalent degree from a program which requires a thesis, reflecting high overall standing, study within the area of proposed doctoral specialization, and evidence of research competence.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Human Development concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev/phd.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Learning Sciences concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci/phd.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Human Development Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Letter from proposed supervisor indicating their agreement to act as the Thesis Supervisor

Learning Sciences Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Letter from proposed supervisor indicating their agreement to act as the Thesis Supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Counselling Psychology (M.A. or Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Educational Psychology and School/Applied Child Psychology programs (M.A., M.Ed., or Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Sociology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Sociology

Location

  • Department of Sociology
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 713
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Graduate Program and Admission Information:
  • Telephone: 514-398-6847
  • Fax: 514-398-3403
  • Email: graduate [dot] sociology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/sociology

About Sociology

The Department offers training leading to the following degrees:

  • Master of Arts in Sociology (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Development Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Gender and Women’s Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Medical Sociology Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis) with the Social Studies of Medicine Department
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Social Statistics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Gender and Women's Studies Option
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option

We have particular strength in the following fields: states, nationalism, and development; economy and society; social inequality (class, ethnicity, and gender); deviance and social control; and health and society. The Department of Sociology has very high standards and an excellent record of placing students in both academic and non-academic careers in institutions ranging from the University of Chicago and Berkeley to StatsCan and CEGEPs. The Department has a stellar record of research publications and a lively graduate program, and we benefit from many new faculty appointments allowing us to be at the forefront of current issues. A large number of M.A. programs are offered. Fewer are offered at the Ph.D. level (see below). The Department houses the Social Statistics Unit. This has full access to the resources of StatsCan, with additional training for students.

Availability of Funding

The Department offers a limited number of teaching assistantships. A full teaching assistantship consists of a maximum of 180 hours of work per term. Appointments for a full teaching assistantship span 15 weeks and involve an average of 12 hours per week.

M.A. Program Options

Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides excellent methodological training, but is principally designed for students who wish to gain a first experience doing original research. Some students have stopped at this stage; more have gone on to higher degree work. Researching and writing a thesis requires considerable effort, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is both for students who wish to continue from an undergraduate degree in sociology, and those who wish to enter sociology for the first time. McGill is an excellent venue because the program involves rigorous training in methodology. Academically inclined students have gone on to higher degrees, some at McGill and others at other universities; the training offered has allowed others to go to varied careers, not least as teachers in CEGEPs. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Many students from this program have gone on to further research, but several have entered the world of non-governmental organizations—with some going on to work for the U.N. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The research paper must be on a topic related to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the degree requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s research paper must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (45 credits)
The purpose of the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is to provide graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Research Projects must be on a topic relating to population dynamics, approved by the PDO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
This program complements the basic research training with the application of statistical methods to Statistics Canada data (or equivalent). It requires a statistics-based research paper that will normally flow out of a paper written for one of the graduate seminars. Comparable to an article in a professional journal, the paper ought to focus on a clearly defined research problem, demonstrating familiarity with the most important relevant scholarly work and the ability to carry out and organize the results of the research. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.

Ph.D. Program Options

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology
There are two ways to enter the Ph.D. program. Some students are fast-tracked (i.e., from a B.A. degree without having to complete an M.A. in Sociology), as Ph.D. 1 students; they take twelve substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements, and are trained in qualitative and quantitative research methods and in research design. Other students, typically those with an M.A. in Sociology, are considered as Ph.D. 2 students; they typically take six substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements—although further courses may be required if their methodological skills do not meet the standards required by the Department. Our Social Statistics Laboratory allows students to make systematic use of quantitative data sources. All students must pass two area exams and present a thesis proposal before turning to the thesis itself, which may take the form of a single piece of research, or a set of articles on a particular theme.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Gender and Women's Studies
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the Ph.D. requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and on issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis or set of articles must relate to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Population Dynamics
This program aims to provide advanced graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Dissertation topics must be related to population dynamics and approved by the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) coordinating committee.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Sociology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree with a standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.3 or better out of a possible 4.0. The degree may be either in Sociology or in another relevant social science. In the latter case, applicants may be required to take some additional sociology courses to fill gaps in their background.

The strength of an applicant's academic record is of primary importance in consideration of an applicant's dossier. For a detailed description of courses open to graduates and undergraduates, and of preparation required of McGill University honours students, candidates should consult the Undergraduate eCalendar.

All applicants are asked to submit a writing sample. Applicants must submit with their applications the results of the Verbal, Analytical, and Quantitative aptitude tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Arrangements to take the GRE should be made directly with the Educational Testing Service by visiting their website at www.ets.org/gre. Certain students must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL exam is 567 on the paper-based test and 86 overall on the Internet-based test (no less than 20 in each of the four component scores). For more information on whether the TOEFL is required please visit www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency. International students can also contact International Student Services at 514-398-4349 for more information, or visit their website, www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents.

Candidates who lack sufficient preparation in the social sciences, but whose academic record justifies consideration for eventual admission to the master's graduate program, must register for a qualifying year during which they are required to take courses to broaden their knowledge of sociology. Candidates must achieve a final grade of at least a B in these courses and an average in all courses of at least B+; in general, they must, in the opinion of the Department, have achieved sufficient preparation in the subject matter of sociology before they will be allowed to proceed with graduate work. All candidates are expected to have taken courses in statistics, research methods, and sociological theory at the undergraduate level.

Any prospective students are encouraged to contact faculty members that they may wish to work with to ascertain that they will be available and not on leave during the time at which they wish to study. If need be, they may feel free to contact the Graduate Program Director to guide them.

The program of study is designed to give students an advanced understanding of a major field in sociology, of current methods of sociological research, and of some principal theoretic issues in the discipline. Three terms of residence study is the minimum requirement for a master's degree. For the doctoral program, three years is the minimum residency requirement for students entering at the Ph.D. 1 level (those students without an M.A.) and two years for students entering at the Ph.D. 2 level (those with an M.A.).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please note that the dossier must be complete before the applicant will be considered for entrance to the graduate program.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE
  • Personal Statement
  • Writing Sample – can be in the form of a graded paper or a chapter from a thesis and must be at least 15 typewritten pages in length translated into English or French

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Sociology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

East Asian Studies

East Asian Studies

Location

  • Department of East Asian Studies
  • 688 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 425
  • Montreal QC H3A 3R1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3650
  • Email: asian [dot] studies [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/eas

About East Asian Studies

The Department of East Asian Studies is committed to offering a rigorous, innovative, and interdisciplinary environment in which students learn a variety of critical and historical approaches to the study of East Asian arts, cultures, histories, languages, literatures, media, and social practices. The research expertise of our faculty members spans a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds from anthropology; archaeology; art history; ethnic studies; film and media studies; gender and women‘s studies; history and literature; to religion both institutional and popular.

The unique curriculum of East Asian Studies allows students to gain an intellectually rich, historically informed, theoretically sophisticated, and materially grounded understanding of China, Japan, and Korea as spaces of dynamic formation and transformation, all the while developing proficiency in languages of the region. Graduate students may choose from a wide range of courses offered both by the Department and other departments in the Faculty of Arts, and in other faculties that encourage the development of strong intellectual connections with multiple disciplines.

The Centre for East Asian Research (CEAR), affiliated with the Department of East Asian Studies, actively supports and encourages community outreach. It offers a wide range of activities throughout the year such as lectures, presentations, seminars, workshops, speech contests, cultural activities, and additions of new associate members.

Master of Arts (M.A.); East Asian Studies (Thesis) (Ad Hoc) (45 credits)
The M.A. program requires a thesis that engages with current theoretical and methodological issues and uses both primary and secondary sources in East Asian languages. Entering students are expected to have a background and/or degree in disciplines relating to East Asia, and have knowledge of an East Asian language. Graduates of our program are pursuing careers in academia, publishing, government service, the financial industry, media and communications, and other fields.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); East Asian Studies (Ad Hoc)
The Ph.D. program requires a thesis that engages with current theoretical and methodological issues and uses both primary and secondary sources in East Asian languages. Entering students are expected to have a background and/or degree in disciplines relating to East Asia and have knowledge of an East Asian language. Graduates of our program are pursuing careers in academia, publishing, government service, the financial industry, media and communications, and other fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

East Asian Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General

A minimum standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years.

TOEFL, GRE, and IELTS (if applicable).

Applicants who have not studied at a Canadian institution must submit official copies of their Graduate Record Examination (GRE) at the time of application. These scores must come directly from the Educational Testing Service; hard copies and photocopies are not accepted. A minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 577 (paper based test) or an overall score of 86 (with no less than 20 in each of the four component scores) is required of all applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree at a foreign institution where English is the language of instruction, or at a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). Alternatively, students proving their English proficiency may use the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination, for which the minimum score is an overall band score of 6.5 (academic module). For the TOEFL and GRE, you must indicate the McGill University institution code: 0935.

M.A.

Applicants must hold, or expect to hold by September of the year of entry, a bachelor's degree in East Asian Studies or a related field. Applicants are expected to have proficiency in the East Asian language(s) most useful for the proposed graduate work (preferably three years or more of coursework, or equivalent).

Ph.D.

Applicants must hold, or expect to hold by September of the year of entry, a master's degree in East Asian Studies or a related field.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

The application deadline for the September 2015 term is January 9, 2015.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal – approximately 500 words for master's and five pages for Ph.D. applicants. A description of the proposed research project, with brief bibliography, should be included in the Research Proposal.
  • GRE – required for applicants who have not studied at a Canadian university

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of East Asian Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 9 Fall: Jan. 9 Fall: Jan. 9
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Anthropology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Anthropology

Location

  • Department of Anthropology
  • Stephen Leacock Building
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 718
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4300
  • Fax: 514-398-7476
  • Email: gradprogram [dot] anthropology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/anthropology

About Anthropology

Our Department places high priority on research and on maintaining a distinguished graduate program. Each year, we admit only a small number of very highly qualified applicants for studies leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology. Thus, our students benefit from close supervision by their committees and from high-quality peer exchange. By maintaining a high staff-student ratio, we are able to offer our graduate students an unusual degree of flexibility and personalized attention in designing their programs according to their specific interests. There are no comprehensive examinations, and the program is particularly congenial to students who are self-directed.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) (48 credits)
The purpose of the M.A. program is to provide advanced-level training in socio-cultural anthropology and archaeology to prepare students for research at the Ph.D. level.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Development Studies (48 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program that is unique in Canada, if not the world, because it is designed to provide students with a strong practical and theoretical foundation for engaging in genuinely cross-disciplinary research. The option is offered within existing M.A. and Ph.D. programs in the departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. or Ph.D. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. or Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
The Environment option is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interaction with students from a wide range of different disciplines. Through research, seminars, and two courses, this option adds an interdisciplinary layer that will challenge students to defend their research and think in a broader context. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (48 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet degree requirements in Anthropology (and other participating departments and faculties), who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is currently not being offered.

The purpose of the M.A. program is to provide advanced-level training in anthropology and to prepare students for research at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Medical Anthropology (Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.A. program in Medical Anthropology is given jointly by the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine (SSOM). The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Anthropology
The purpose of the Ph.D. program is to enable students to make original contributions to research in socio-cultural anthropology, archaeology, and medical anthropology in the form of a doctoral thesis. The program offers fieldwork-based doctoral training for students wishing to concentrate on different geographic areas (including Africa, Latin America, Europe, North America, and Asia).
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Anthropology — Neotropical Environment
The Ph.D. program in Neotropical Environment (NEO) is a specialized, interdisciplinary program made possible by collaborating institutions in Canada, Panama, and the United States. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the neotropics and Latin American countries. Students work under the supervision of researchers from McGill and/or the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). This is a research-based option for Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Anthropology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Our Department places high priority on research and on maintaining a distinguished graduate program. Each year, we admit only a small number of very highly qualified applicants for studies leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology.

For graduate applicants whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), a minimum TOEFL score of 600 on the paper-based or 100 on the Internet-based test (iBT), with each component score not less than 20, is required.

Application information is available on the Department website: www.mcgill.ca/anthropology/graduate/admissions.

Master's

Admission to the M.A. program is open competitively to students holding an Honours or Major B.A. in Anthropology. Outstanding candidates with B.A. degrees in other disciplines but with substantial background related to anthropology are sometimes admitted on the condition that they complete a specified number of additional courses in Anthropology.

The applicants admitted usually have undergraduate grade point averages of 3.5 or above on a 4.0-point scale.

Ph.D.

Admission to the Ph.D. program is open competitively to students with a master’s degree in Anthropology. In very special circumstances, candidates with a master’s degree in related disciplines may be admitted.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE results – for international applicants only
  • TOEFL – for non-anglophone and non-francophone applicants
  • Writing Sample – a recent sample of the applicant's written work, on any topic (not necessarily within the desired field of graduate study), not necessarily previously submitted for evaluation or publication in English or French, and no more than 15 pages in length
  • Personal Statement – an essay in which the applicant describes reasons for applying to graduate studies and indicates qualifications, qualities, or circumstances the applicant feels to be significant. Applicants usually provide information about educational and professional goals, and discuss their interest in the desired field of study.
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Anthropology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department Admissions Committee announces its selections by mid-March.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Location

  • School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition
  • Macdonald-Stewart Building
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Dietetics and Human Nutrition

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, cutting-edge nutrition research is conducted by its 10 tenure-track professors and four faculty lecturers in all areas recommended by North American Nutrition Societies. These include molecular and cellular nutrition, clinical, community, and international nutrition. Domains emphasized by School researchers include: epigenetics; proteomics; metabolomics; embryonic and fetal origins of health and disease; the development of improved recommendations and policies for optimizing health in at-risk populations including Aboriginal populations, mothers and children, and the elderly; and the development of novel nutritional and/or nutraceutical approaches for treatment during surgery and recovery from disease.

Research is conducted in our on-site research labs, the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), the Institute for Global Food Security, the Mary Emily Clinical Nutrition Research unit, and the MUHC Teaching Hospitals. Students can conduct research or participate in clinical rotations with the BITS – Barbados, IDRC – Ghana and field sites in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Nutrition (Thesis) (45 credits)
A master’s degree in Human Nutrition offers advanced Nutrition courses in a broad range of research areas. The program is suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in nutritional sciences, exercise physiology, kinesiology, food science, biochemistry, medicine, or another closely related field. Students are required to complete 14 credits in advanced nutrition coursework plus 31 credits related to their thesis research. Graduates of our M.Sc. thesis degree have pursued successful careers in research, international health agencies, government agencies, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Practicum (45 credits) and Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program is a course-based master’s program. It allows students to further develop knowledge and expertise in nutrition. Students are required to complete 29 credits in advanced Nutrition courses plus 16 credits related to a research project or an advanced practicum (reserved for registered dietitians). Careers include managerial positions for practising dietitians, and careers in nutrition programs, government, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Dietetics Credentialing (83 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program in Dietetics Credentialing is a course-based master's program with a dietetics Stage (internship) included. At the end of the program, students are qualified to be licensed with one of the provincial regulatory bodies in Canada, as well as in other countries, and practise in the areas of clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and foodservice management; French competency is an asset. The program is preceded by a Qualifying year, if necessary, to complete certain courses required for licensure. This is followed by three semesters of graduate-level courses (46 credits) and 3 semesters of Stage (37 credits), which include a practice-based graduate project.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Nutrition
A Ph.D. degree in Human Nutrition is suitable for students with an M.Sc. degree in Nutritional Sciences or related areas who wish to become independent researchers and/or leaders in the field of nutritional sciences. The School offers a stimulating research environment with opportunities in a wide range of areas of basic science, clinical research with our many hospital clinicians, as well as population health in Canada and abroad. Careers include academic, senior government, and industry positions within Canada and internationally.
Graduate Diploma in Registered Dietitian Credentialing (30 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill, students pursuing a graduate degree in nutrition have the opportunity to apply to our Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing, upon completion of the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program and upon completion of the undergraduate courses required by l'Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ). This Diploma consists of two semesters of Stage (internship) in Clinical Nutrition, Community Nutrition, and Foodservice Systems Management. Upon completion of the Diploma, the recipient is eligible to register and practice as a Dietitian in Quebec, as well as in other Canadian provinces and other countries.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis and M.Sc. Applied (Project, Practicum, and Dietetics Credentialing)

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University’s credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) for the M.Sc. Thesis and 3.5/4.0 for the M.Sc. Applied during their bachelor's degree program. Eligible candidates to the M.Sc. (Applied) program may select one of three options:

  1. The project option;
  2. The practicum option, which is reserved for those who have completed a dietetics internship and six months of work experience and wish to further develop their skills in a particular area of practice through an advanced internship;
  3. The dietetics credentialing option, for those who wish to follow a program combining courses and internship, leading to licensure as a dietitian.

Ph.D.

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. and M.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University's credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) during their bachelor's and master's degree programs.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the School's minimum CGPA of 3.2 out of 4.0. The courses to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year (two terms) is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program. Students must re-apply for admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. While the school cannot guarantee financial support, teaching assistantships and other scholarships may be available.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Final acceptance to the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor. A supervisor is not required for acceptance to the M.Sc. (Applied) program.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – The GRE is required for all Ph.D. applicants to the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition who are submitting non-Canadian and non-U.S. transcripts.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: April 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Animal Science

Animal Science

Location

  • Department of Animal Science
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/animal

About Animal Science

The Department of Animal Science provides exciting challenges to graduate students in the areas of Biotechnology and Molecular Biology, Breeding and Genetics, Nutrition, and Reproductive Physiology as they relate, not only to livestock production, but also leading into the fields of human nutrition and medicine via animal models for human disease, infertility, and obesity. Official options in Biotechnology are also available. Departmental researchers have excellent wet-lab facilities at their disposal; large-animal studies can be carried out at the Large Animal Research Unit on the Macdonald campus farm, where other livestock species are available for research trials as well. Research can make use of the Small Animal Research Unit for studies involving rodent animal models, guinea pigs, neonatal piglets, and rabbits. Expertise is also available in applied information systems, management-software development, and large-scale data analyses. Close collaboration with the Quebec Centre for Expertise in Dairy Production (Valacta) allows for large-scale data-mining projects, software development, and the production of advising tools for the industry. The Department also has significant expertise in food safety, environmental studies related to animal production, and global food security. Our staff's many connections via research networks allow for rich learning environments for our graduate students.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Animal Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
Two one-semester courses and three seminar courses at the postgraduate level complement an area of research (resulting in a thesis) under the supervision of one of our staff—many of whom are leaders in their respective fields. Entrance to this program is highly competitive, requiring an excellent B.Sc. and letters of reference. Graduates of this program are well prepared for careers in the animal industry, the pharmaceutical sector, and many varied fields in biotechnology.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Animal Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This non-thesis degree is oriented to animal scientists already working in industry or government, to undergraduate students inspired by concepts in sustainable and integrated animal agriculture, to project leaders interested in animal resource management, and to veterinarians. The program provides graduate training in applied areas of animal production with a view toward integrating technology and management in animal production with allied areas of agricultural resource utilization.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Animal Science
Since the Ph.D. is primarily a research degree, the amount of coursework required will normally be considerably less than is the case for the M.Sc. It depends on the background of the individual student and must be approved by the student's Advisory Committee. At a minimum, it includes two seminar courses at the graduate level and the Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination as an admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. As with the M.Sc. (Thesis), admission is based on an excellent track record. Suitable candidates are encouraged to contact potential supervisors within their chosen area of interest. Applicants should, however, be aware that no professor is in a position to accept students without formal approval of the application by the Graduate Admissions Committee.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Animal Science — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Animal Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. (Thesis)

Candidates are required to have either a bachelor's degree in Agriculture or a B.Sc. degree in an appropriate, related discipline with an equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

M.Sc. (Applied)

All candidates are required to have a B.Sc. degree or equivalent.

Ph.D.

Candidates are normally required to have an M.Sc. degree in an area related to the chosen field of specialization for the Ph.D. program.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The applications deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Animal Science and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

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