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History and Classical Studies

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

History and Classical Studies

Location

  • Department of History and Classical Studies
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 608
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About History and Classical Studies

The Department of History and Classical Studies has particular strengths in Canadian history, British and European history, East Asian history, the history of medicine, the history of science, and newer fields such as the history of gender and sexuality, the history of the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds, and global history. The Department offers interdisciplinary options in European studies, developmental studies, and women’s studies at the M.A. level. Both M.A. and Ph.D. students can also write their thesis or research paper on the History of Medicine. The Department is composed of 39 full-time faculty members as well as a strong complement of visiting professors, faculty lecturers, and postdoctoral fellows. This array of dedicated teachers and scholars supports high-quality instruction and research across the periods of history and regions of the globe. Our professors have won many prizes for their books and articles, and their ongoing investigations are supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the FQRSC, CFI, the Killam Trust, and the Mellon Foundation. The Department is home to a number of major collaborative research projects, all of which also include students. Among these are the Montreal History Group; the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC); Quelques arpents de neige, an environmental history group; and the French Atlantic History Group.

Classics was among the first disciplines taught at McGill College. Our students benefit from the resources of closely related disciplines and draw on the academic expertise of scholars from various backgrounds. Many awards and prizes are available for students who excel in the classroom, and both undergraduates and graduates can join professors on study tours and field projects. Students can also become members of the Classics Students Association and publish their work in the McGill Journal of Classical Studies, aptly titled Hirundo—Latin for “swallow,” like the martlets found on the McGill coat-of-arms, ever soaring in search of knowledge.

We offer prospective students the chance to study with leading scholars in a variety of fields.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed regulations and information (www.mcgill.ca/history).

Degrees in History

The M.A. program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year (Fall, Winter, and Summer). Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. The M.A. in History offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of history in a variety of fields. The McGill History degree carries international prestige and cachet and contributes meaningfully to success on the job market. Careers pursued by our graduates, aside from those who have sought and found places on the faculties of colleges and universities, have included positions in the area of public history at museums and other public institutions, in libraries and archives, in the diplomatic and other branches of the civil service, and in a variety of NGOs.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. Preparation of a thesis provides an opportunity for the preparation of a sustained project under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The seminars, in particular, provide an opportunity to analyze primary sources under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues and write their research paper on a topic approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. Degree in the History of Medicine does not have a thesis option. This non-thesis degree is normally completed in one year. Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The curriculum is intended to provide students with a strong disciplinary competence in history and a distinctively interdisciplinary perspective. Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History, or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); History
The Ph.D. in History is a professional degree program that prepares students for participation in the academy as historians. They gain competence in historical methods and good control over at least three fields of study. The dissertation is a work of primary research that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. Candidates in the field of Medical History will prepare the major field for the comprehensive examination with a member of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the two minor fields with members of the Department of History and Classical Studies. The thesis will normally be directed by the director of the major field. In all other respects, the same rules will apply to candidates in this area as apply to other Ph.D. students in History.

Degrees in Classics

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Classics offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of classical studies in a variety of fields. The program emphasizes proficiency both in technical areas of the discipline, especially Greek and Latin language, and in critical reading, writing, and research skills. The McGill M.A. in Classics is designed to prepare students to enter doctoral programs and, eventually, an academic career in any of the related fields of classical studies. Graduates have also pursued successful careers in teaching, law, museum science, and branches of civil service. This program can be completed in one year, though it is normally completed in two years.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
(Not offered in 2013–2014.)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Classics
(Not offered in 2013–2014.)
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

History and Classical Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General: minimum CGPA of 3.3 on 4.0; minimum TOEFL of 550 on the paper-based test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score no less than 20.

Master in History

Normally, candidates are required to possess a B.A. (Honours) in History consisting of 60 credits in history. Students with other undergraduate history degrees (normally including serious research components) may be considered eligible. Applicants not satisfying these conditions but otherwise judged worthy of serious consideration will be asked to register in a Qualifying program in which they will undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Master in History – Development Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – European Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – Gender and Women's Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either History—B.A. (Honours) or equivalent—or a degree in one of the health professions with some background in history. Candidates with a willingness to do preparatory work in history are also encouraged to apply.

Ph.D. in History

Normally, an M.A. in History. (Students choosing the field of History of Medicine normally enter with an M.A. in History of Medicine.)

Master in Classics

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. in Classics

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See for detailed application procedures.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed information (www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate).

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

Biology

Biology

Location

  • Department of Biology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W4/8
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-5478
  • Fax: 514-398-5069
  • Email: graduate-admissions [dot] biology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: http://biology.mcgill.ca

About Biology

The Department offers graduate training in many areas of biology with particular strengths in the following areas: Molecular Biology and Genetics; Cell and Developmental Biology; Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation; Evolution; Neurobiology; Bioinformatics; and Plant Biology. In addition to the regular M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs, the Biology Department offers specialized programs, known as “options” in certain specific areas: Neotropical Environment (NEO), Bioinformatics, Environment, and Developmental Biology.

Graduate programs leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees are offered. Both are research-intensive degrees, and the emphasis in both programs is on development of the intellectual and technical skills necessary for independent research. The main component of both degrees is a thesis presenting results of this work and the student’s original contribution to scientific knowledge. Formal coursework, usually in the form of literature-based seminar courses, is minimal and typically completed within the first year. To complement their classroom and laboratory training, students regularly attend other seminar series and journal clubs and present their own work annually in a formal seminar.

In addition to working with world-class researchers, graduate students in Biology have access to top-notch research infrastructure. The recently renovated Stewart Biology Building and the newly constructed Bellini Life Sciences Complex are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for sophisticated imaging, robotic, and genetic techniques, to name a few. These in-house capabilities are complemented by a wide range of field research facilities, which include the Gault Nature Reserve at Mont St. Hilaire (Quebec), the Morgan Arboretum (Quebec), the Huntsman Marine Science Centre (New Brunswick), the Subarctic Research Laboratory (Quebec), the Bellairs Research Institute (Barbados), the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (Panama), and the limnology research station at the Wilder and Helen Penfield Nature Reserve on Lake Memphremagog (Quebec). These resources are also extended by affiliation with other organizations such as the Redpath Museum, the Biotechnology Research Institute of the National Research Council of Canada, the Groupe Interuniversitaire de Recherches Océanographiques du Québec (GIROQ), the McGill Macdonald campus, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the Jewish General Hospital, the Montreal General Hospital, the Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Royal Victoria Hospital.

The Department specifies a minimum level of support for all graduate students. This amount is $15,500 per annum plus tuition fees. The required minimum duration of support is two years for the M.Sc. program, five years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 1 (directly from a bachelor's degree), and four years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 2 (after having completed a master's degree).

The graduate program of each student is established and regularly evaluated by a three-member supervisory committee appointed by the Graduate Training Committee and chaired by the student’s thesis supervisor.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.). Admission is based on an evaluation by the applicant’s potential supervisor, who is the faculty member who will provide supervision and financial support for the student’s research, and by the Biology Graduate Training Committee. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
The Environment graduate option offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this option adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment option will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment option is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of disciplines.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)
The goal of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. The Bioinformatics graduate option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics option. Students in this option will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics option. At the M.Sc. level, students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.). Admission is based on an evaluation by the applicant’s potential supervisor, who is the faculty member who will provide supervision and financial support for the student’s research, and by the Biology Graduate Training Committee. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Developmental Biology
The option in Developmental Biology brings together the strong concentration of outstanding developmental biology researchers at McGill and across Montreal to offer students the opportunity to pursue cutting-edge research in developmental biology in a rich and collaborative environment. This option is intended to provide broad training in developmental biology and offers research opportunities with a variety of vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant model systems, including Drosophila, C. elegans, Arabidopsis, and mice. Participating faculty are drawn from research institutions across Montreal in addition to the Department of Biology, including the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), and the Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Centre. The synergies arising from this network enhance a unique training environment that provides students with outstanding theoretical and practical preparation for a future career in science. This Ph.D. program is distinguished from the graduate program in Biology because entering students will carry out three research “rotations” during their first semester, allowing them to experience a variety of research areas before choosing a supervisor for the remainder of their graduate work. Students enter directly from their undergraduate studies, and the primary criterion for admission to the program is a strong background in research at the undergraduate level. It is also expected that candidates will have a CGPA of 3.5 or better, although exceptions may be made for applicants with outstanding research experience. Students will also participate in courses, retreats, and symposia specific to the program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment
The Environment graduate option offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this option adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment option will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment option is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of different disciplines. This option is available in: Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Bioresource Engineering, Entomology, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Renewable Resources), Arts (Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Sociology), Law, Medicine (Epidemiology and Experimental Medicine), and Science (Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Geography).
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Neotropical Environment

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based option for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program.

NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Bioinformatics

The goal of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

The Bioinformatics graduate option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics option. Students in this option will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics option. At the Ph.D. level students will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will also have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 18, 2013).

Biology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study with an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). A score of 550 on the paper-based TOEFL or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20 or 6.5 on IELTS is the minimum standard for admission. Specific programs may have additional requirements.

Admission is based on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee and on acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact staff members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply. All applicants should read the academic faculty and admission procedure sections on the Biology Department website before completing the application form. These guidelines contain specific information on the application process, summaries of the research areas of staff, and contact information.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

If application materials are received after the application deadlines, review of the applicant’s file may be delayed until the following admittance period. All inquiries pertaining to admission procedures should be directed to the Graduate Admissions Secretary.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 18, 2013).

Physiology

Physiology

Location

  • Department of Physiology
  • McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
  • 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler
  • Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6
  • Canada

About Physiology

The Physiology Department offers training leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. The scope of the ongoing research, and close connections with the McGill teaching hospitals, offer excellent opportunities for collaborations with hospital-based scientists. Research in the Department covers a broad range of topics from systems neuroscience to molecular and cellular biology. Interests include studies of nuclear and membrane receptors, transporters, channels, and signal transduction pathways, to the broader integration of physiological systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, endocrine, immune, and central nervous systems) using an array of molecular and cellular approaches as well as quantitative techniques in data collection, analysis, and mathematical modelling by computational means. All graduate students in Physiology receive financial support. Any faculty member who agrees to supervise a student who does not hold a fellowship is obliged to provide financial support.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physiology (Thesis) (49 credits)
The M.Sc. program is intended for students from an academic background wishing to pursue careers in academia, industry, or in medicine. The multidisciplinary nature of the Department exposes students to a vast array of research interests and experimental approaches. Thesis work is available in a broad range of disciplines from molecular and cellular to systems physiology covering multiple organ systems. Students wishing to continue to the doctoral program have the option of transferring to the Ph.D., and waiving the M.Sc. thesis submission.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physiology (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (49 credits)
The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train M.Sc. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating of bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physiology
The doctoral program is intended for students from a strong academic background wishing to pursue research-intensive careers in academia, industry, or in medicine. The multidisciplinary nature of the Department exposes students to a vast array of research interests and experimental approaches. Thesis work provides in-depth training in a broad range of disciplines from molecular and cellular to systems physiology covering multiple organ systems.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physiology — Bioinformatics
The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train Ph.D. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating of bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option will be fluent in concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Physiology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program is based on an evaluation by the Graduate Student Admissions and Advisory Committee (GSAAC), and on being accepted by a research supervisor. Final acceptance is contingent upon approval of the recommendation of the applicant by Enrolment Services, from whom official notification will be received.

Candidates for the M.Sc. degree must hold a B.Sc. degree or its equivalent. Candidates who have completed an M.Sc. may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. M.Sc. students interested in a Ph.D. may transfer to the Ph.D. program after 12–18 months, following successful completion of the comprehensive exam. The M.Sc. thesis requirement is then waived. Candidates with exceptional academic records may be considered to proceed directly to the Ph.D. degree from the B.Sc. degree.

The GRE General Test is required for anyone who does not have a degree from a North American university.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL): minimum score of 600 on paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20). Only those whose mother tongue is English, who graduated from a North American institution (anglophone or francophone) or who completed an undergraduate or graduate degree at a foreign institution where English is the language of instruction are exempt from providing proof of competency in English.

A minimum CGPA of 3.2 or a GPA of 3.4 in the last two years is required for an application to be considered.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications should be submitted as early as possible in order to facilitate processing. However, no applications will be considered after the application deadlines.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • GRE – for applicants whose undergraduate degree is not from a North American university

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Interested candidates should refer to the Department's website at www.medicine.mcgill.ca/physio for details regarding application procedures, as well as other important information.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Medical Physics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Medical Physics

Location

  • Medical Physics Unit
  • Montreal General Hospital
  • Livingston Hall, Room L5-113
  • 1650 Cedar Avenue
  • Montreal, QC H3G 1A4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-934-1934 ext. 44158
  • Fax: 514-934-8229
  • Email: mak [at] medphys [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.medphys.mcgill.ca

About Medical Physics

The Medical Physics Unit offers an M.Sc. in Medical Radiation Physics. Facilities are available for students to undertake a Ph.D. in Medical Physics through the Department of Physics.

The Unit is a teaching and research unit concerned with the application of physics and related sciences in medicine, especially (but not exclusively) in radiation medicine; i.e., radiation oncology, medical imaging, and nuclear medicine.

The research interests of members of the Unit include various aspects of medical imaging, including 3D imaging, the development of new imaging modalities, and applications of imaging in radiation therapy; radiation dosimetry, Monte Carlo numerical simulation techniques; nuclear cardiology; and applications of radiation biology to therapy.

The M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs in Medical Physics are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs, Inc., sponsored by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the American College of Medical Physics (ACMP), the American College of Radiology (ACR), and the Canadian College of Physicists in Medicine (CCPM).

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Medical Radiation Physics (Thesis) (60 credits)

This two-year program provides a comprehensive introduction to the academic, research, and practical aspects of physics applied to radiation medicine. Students may go on to careers in clinical service as medical physicists in research-oriented hospital settings after clinical residency training; may consider development careers in industry in radiation therapy, diagnostic radiology, or nuclear medicine or nuclear energy; in governmental organizations as radiation safety experts, etc.; or pursue academic careers in university, industry, or government organizations. Our graduate programs are accredited by CAMPEP (Commission for Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs). Medical physicists must go through CAMPEP training (M.Sc. or Ph.D., followed by a residency training) to be eligible to sit certification exams. Certification is becoming a mandatory requirement for eligibility to practise in a clinical environment. The McGill M.Sc. program is research oriented, which has the additional advantage that the roads toward a Ph.D., followed by academic, industry, or clinical careers, are wide open. The practical and laboratory sections of the program are conducted in various McGill teaching hospitals.

The program comprises:

  1. didactic courses in radiation physics, radiation dosimetry, the physics of nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology, medical imaging, medical electronics and computing, radiation biology, and radiation hazards and protection;
  2. seminars in radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology, and miscellaneous aspects of medical physics, e.g., lasers;
  3. laboratory courses in radiation dosimetry and medical imaging;
  4. an individual research thesis.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Medical Physics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates applying to the M.Sc. program must normally hold a B.Sc. degree (honours or major) in Physics or Engineering, with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0/4.0 (minimum of 70%).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

For information regarding the application procedure please go to the Medical Physics Unit admissions website at www.medphys.mcgill.ca and click on Academic and then Admissions Information.

Only complete applications will be considered.
Note: When completing the online application, the following information should be entered in the “Program Information” section to ensure that the application is routed to the correction department:
  • “Program 1” = MSc Med Radiation Physics-T
  • “Major” = Medical Radiation Physics-T
  • “Dept” = Medical Physics Unit

Supporting Documents: All supporting documentation must be uploaded to the online application; any documents sent by mail will be considered unofficial and missing from the application. For detailed instructions on how to upload required supporting documents, please see: www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/ready#docs.

Transcripts: All transcripts and degree certificates in a language other than English or French must be uploaded to the application in both the original language version and an officially certified English or French language version. If the applicant is accepted, original documents must be presented to the University prior to registration.

English Language Proficiency: Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in English by a TOEFL, iBT, or IELTS. The original test report must be sent electronically by the testing centre to McGill University; to ensure successful transmission, the student's name given to the testing centre must be identical to the name used for the McGill online application, otherwise the electronic result will not be applied to the McGill application.
Note: McGill institution code = 0935; Medical Physics Unit = 99 (department not listed).

The test must have been taken within the two years prior to date of application review, i.e., not prior to May 01, 2012 for a graduate application to McGill for Fall 2014. Applicants from some countries are exempt from providing evidence of English language proficiency. For more information, see www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency.

Reference Letters: In order for referees to receive an automated email with instructions to upload their recommendation, applicants must include referees' institutional email addresses in the online application, i.e., addresses such as Gmail or Yahoo will not be accepted.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE is not required for the Medical Physics M.Sc. program.
  • Applicants must either complete the “Applicant Statement” portion of the online application, or alternatively, may submit a one-page Personal Statement.

Application Deadlines

Students are admitted to the M.Sc. program only to start in the Fall term (in September) of a given academic year. Applications must be completed by January 15, 2014 to be considered for the Fall 2014 term. The online application for Fall 2014 will be available by the end of September 2013.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Human Genetics

Human Genetics

Location

  • Department of Human Genetics
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, N5/13
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
Administration
Kandace Springer – Administrative Assistant
  • Email: kandace [dot] springer [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Ross Mackay – Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: ross [dot] mackay [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Laura Benner – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: laura [dot] benner [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Human Genetics

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees in Human Genetics

The Department of Human Genetics offers a clinical master’s program in Genetic Counselling, as well as research training at both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels. Both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs require the completion of a thesis, which is the major focus of the student's effort. A minimal amount of coursework is required, but specific course choices are flexible and vary according to the student's previous training and current research interest. The Department also offers a Bioinformatics option. Information on the Bioinformatics option can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/mcb/academic/graduate.

Most of the faculty of the Human Genetics Department are located in McGill teaching hospitals, reflecting the medically learned knowledge at the core of human genetic studies.

Faculty have a wide variety of research interests, which embrace: cancer genetics, cytogenetics, reproductive biology, neurogenetics, and genomic and genetic basis of human diseases. Detailed information regarding faculty research interest can be found on the Department web page at www.mcgill.ca/humangenetics/prospective-students/supervision.

Students accepted into the Human Genetics research graduate program will receive a minimum stipend of $15,000, plus tuition and fees.

Tuition Differential Fee Waivers

A certain number of tuition differential fee waivers will be offered to incoming out-of-province/international students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. Students who have a CGPA of 3.5/4.0 or above (as converted by McGill GPS guidelines) and who submit online application and documents by Jan. 31 (Summer), March 31 (Fall), Sept. 30 (Winter) will automatically be considered for a tuition waiver.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
McGill University offers specialized education in bioethics to graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Religious Studies, and Law, and the Department of Philosophy. The Master's degree Specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Genetic Counselling (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program provides the academic foundation and clinical training required for the contemporary practice of genetic counselling. Genetic counsellors are health professionals who provide information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorders and to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited conditions. Genetic counsellors investigate the problem present in the family, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence, and review available options with the family. Some counsellors also work in administrative and academic capacities, and many engage in research activities. The curriculum includes a variety of required courses in human genetics and other departments, and 40 weeks of supervised clinical training spread over four semesters. Graduates will be eligible to sit for both the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors and the American Board of Genetic Counselling certification examinations. Upon completion of the M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program, students will demonstrate competence in, or satisfactory knowledge of: principles of human genetics, including cytogenetics, biochemical, molecular, and population genetics; methods of interviewing and counselling, and the dynamics of human behaviour in relation to genetic disease; and social, legal, and ethical issues in genetics. Enrolment will be limited to four students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics — Bioinformatics

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and have the capability of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Human Genetics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling

Prerequisites: Bachelor's or medical degree – minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Recent (five years or less) university-level courses in basic sciences (molecular/cell biology, biochemistry, advanced genetics (preferably human), and statistics) and a minimum of two in psychology.

Applicants must have obtained some experience (either paid or volunteer) working with adults in a counselling or advisory capacity, ideally in a crisis setting.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Human Genetics

Prerequisites: B.Sc. – minimum CGPA 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Applicants must have a minimum of 6 credits in cellular and molecular biology or biochemistry, 3 credits in mathematics or statistics, and 3 credits in genetics. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

Admission is based on acceptance by a research director who has agreed to provide adequate funding for the duration of the academic program and on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee.

Prospective graduate students should complete the online application form and indicate at least three faculty members they are interested in working with.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs  
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A** Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: N/A Summer: N/A** Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: N/A

Applications for thesis programs submitted after these deadlines may be considered, if a suitable supervisor can be secured. However, these applications will not be considered for departmental funding or entrance awards.

* The M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program accepts applications for the Fall term only. No late applications or applications for Summer or Winter terms for the Genetic Counselling program will be considered under any circumstances.

** The Department of Human Genetics is not willing to consider any applications to the M.Sc. (Thesis) for the Summer term.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Biomedical Engineering
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street, Room 316
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada

About Biomedical Engineering

The Department offers graduate training programs leading to master's (M.Eng.) and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Engineering.

We provide instruction and opportunities for interdisciplinary research in the application of engineering, mathematics, and the physical sciences to problems in medicine and the life sciences. Courses are offered for graduate students in the life sciences, engineering, and the physical sciences.

Excellent laboratory facilities for basic and applied research are available in the Department and in the laboratories of associated staff located elsewhere on campus. The Department operates a network of high-performance workstations and well-equipped mechanical and electronics workshops.

Basic research in the Department concentrates on the application of quantitative engineering analysis methods to basic biomedical research problems. Currently active areas of research include: neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. Staff members are also active in more applied research related to the development of quantitative analysis tools and instruments for biomedical research. Areas of activity here include: signal analysis, system identification, modelling, simulation and parameter estimation, image processing, pattern recognition, ultrasound, and biorobotics. A new option in bioinformatics is offered jointly with other University departments.

Graduate students may also be registered through the departments of Medicine, Science, and Engineering, and must then fulfil the requirements for advanced degrees imposed by their respective departments.

In addition, all students are required, through coursework and independent study, to achieve a degree of interdisciplinary competence appropriate to their area of specialization.

M.Eng. Meetings: 1) Initial; 2) Progress; and Fast-Track transfer to the Ph.D. program. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Ph.D. Meetings: 1) Preliminary; 2) Comprehensive Exam Preparation; 3) Thesis Proposal and Comprehensive Exam; 4) Thesis Progress; and 5) Thesis Pre-submission. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME's internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields, and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (M.Eng.) spanning broad themes in biomodelling, biosignal processing, medical imaging, nanotechnology, artificial cells and organs, probiotics, bioinformatics, bioengineering, biomaterials, and orthopaedics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine with a strong emphasis on mathematics, physics, chemistry, and basic physiology, or cell biology. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train M.Eng. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (Ph.D.) spanning broad themes in biomodelling, biosignal processing, medical imaging, nanotechnology, artificial cells and organs, probiotics, bioinformatics, bioengineering, biomaterials, and orthopaedics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine and a master's degree in biomedical engineering, bioengineering, biotechnology, electrical engineering, physiology, chemical engineering, biomaterial, system engineering, imaging, or other related areas. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train Ph.D. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field, and will be capable of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Biomedical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please address enquiries directly to the Department.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Bioethics

Bioethics

Location

  • Biomedical Ethics Unit
  • 3647 Peel Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1X1
  • Canada

For information, contact Jennifer Fishman, Graduate Program Director, at jennifer [dot] fishman [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Bioethics

The Biomedical Ethics Unit was established in 1996 with the aim of supporting scholarly research, clinical services, teaching, and public outreach. Members of the unit have backgrounds in anthropology, history, law, medicine, molecular genetics, philosophy, and sociology. We offer a master's degree specialization in biomedical ethics for selected master's students in the Division of Experimental Medicine, Human Genetics Department, Philosophy Department, Faculty of Religious Studies, and Faculty of Law.

Master's Specialization in Bioethics

The Master's Specialization in Bioethics is sponsored by the:

  • Faculty of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine; Department of Human Genetics;
  • Faculty of Law;
  • Faculty of Religious Studies; and
  • Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.

Students receive an M.A., LL.M., or M.Sc. degree in the discipline chosen with a specialization in Bioethics.

Some applicants are mid-career professionals currently working as physicians, nurses, social workers, other health care providers, or lawyers. Other applicants have recently completed their undergraduate degrees in philosophy, law, religious studies, or other disciplines and wish to pursue specialized master's level training in bioethics before enrolling in doctoral level studies or entering the workplace.

Students pursuing the master's degree specialization normally take two semesters of courses before beginning their master's thesis. Courses offered include Bioethics Theory, Public Health Ethics and Policy, Research Ethics, and a Practicum that includes placement in a clinical or research setting. Research and writing the thesis normally takes one year. Students must also comply with the course and thesis requirements of their home disciplines.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Bioethics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.D., bachelor's-level professional training in a health science, or bachelor's degree in law, philosophy, or religious studies. Other students may be considered on an individual basis.

Enrolment is limited to 12 students.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications for the Master’s Specialization in Bioethics are made initially through the Faculties of Law, Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Human Genetics), Religious Studies, and the Department of Philosophy.

Applicants must satisfy the admission criteria for their chosen discipline and those of the Bioethics Unit, which administers the program and teaches the core courses (see www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters/apply). Once you have completed your online application, send an email to heike [dot] faerber [at] mcgill [dot] ca at the Bioethics Unit stating your chosen base discipline.

Applicants must be accepted by the appropriate Faculty, the Bioethics Graduate Studies Advisory Committee, and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Law

Law

Location

  • Faculty of Law
  • Graduate Programs in Law
  • New Chancellor Day Hall
  • 3644 Peel Street, Room 406
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1W9
  • Canada

Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) – Angela Campbell

About Law

Graduate students in Law at McGill have one thing in common: a sharp curiosity to explore ideas and projects in an environment that is uniquely comparative and pluralist.

The extensive and impressive history of graduate teaching and supervision at McGill, combined with the innovations in legal pedagogy for which the Faculty of Law is celebrated, create an unrivaled quality and experience for graduate students. Grounded in Montreal, a city that embodies a lively mix of languages, cultures, and communities, the Faculty of Law invites students pursuing their D.C.L. and LL.M. degrees to discover and write within a community of legal scholars that is internationally renowned and engaging.

McGill Law is a meeting place for the major languages of North America, for the world’s legal traditions, and for students who wish to participate in the graduate life of a truly outstanding, prestigious, and intellectually vibrant Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law offers a range of programs at the graduate level. These include the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), as well as graduate certificates.

Students may choose to pursue either the LL.M. or the D.C.L. in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL), or the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL). Graduate certificates may only be completed within either the IASL or the ICL.

The Faculty of Law promotes study and research in private, commercial, international, and public law, as well as legal theory, from the perspectives of diverse legal traditions. In collaboration with the McGill School of Environment, the Faculty offers an LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis option in Environment. The Faculty also offers two other options within the LL.M. degree, a cross-disciplinary European Studies Option (ESO; availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year) in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts, and a specialization in Bioethics. The D.C.L. degree always involves a substantial thesis.

The Institute of Air and Space Law operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute offers a curriculum exploring legal issues that arise from international civil aviation and new technologies in space. It provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal processes regulating worldwide aerospace activities. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law.

The Institute of Comparative Law operates within the Faculty of Law as a centre of comparative legal studies. It accommodates national, international, and transnational studies and encourages openness to diverse legal cultures in teaching and research. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law.

Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degrees

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education primarily through research, as the program concentrates on the production of a 30,000-word thesis, as well as some graduate-level coursework.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Bioethics (45 credits)
The master’s specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes both the conceptual and practical aspects of Bioethics. Students apply through either the Faculty of Law, Medicine, Religious Studies, or the Department of Philosophy. Students entering pursuing an LL.M., Bioethics, are bound by the requirements of the Faculty of Law’s LL.M. program. This program is offered in the thesis option only.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of the Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis), providing students with an appreciation for the role of science, politics, and ethics in informed decision-making in the environment sector.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); European Studies (46 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within the existing LL.M. Thesis program. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood.
Note: Availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education largely through graduate-level coursework. The program requires two terms of coursework as well as a 15,000-word research project.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis) providing students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environment sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.

Institute of Air and Space Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to focus on original scholarly research and writing under the supervision of a law professor. This program involves 20 credits in coursework and 25 research credits (a thesis of 100–150 pages). The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent analysis, writing skills, and organization.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to gain a wide exposure to a range of taught courses within, and related to, the domain of Air and Space Law. The Non-Thesis option requires a substantial Supervised Research Project (18 credits), with the remaining 27 credits earned in courses.

Institute of Comparative Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their master’s thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their individual master’s supervised research project (for LL.M. Master’s Non-Thesis students). Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) Degrees

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.)
The Doctor of Civil Law program is centred around the doctoral thesis, which develops a substantive and original contribution to legal research and knowledge under the supervision of a faculty member. Many doctoral candidates intend on pursuing an academic career, and develop their approach to pedagogy, research, and writing while at McGill.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Air and Space Law
The Doctor of Civil Law in the Institute of Air and Space Law is a research degree ideal for scholars intent on deepening and broadening their critical understanding of the law, as well as their original engagement with it. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination to be done at the end of the first year, or during the second year of the D.C.L. program. The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidenced in concept and execution the original work of the candidate.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Comparative Law
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes doctoral students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their doctoral thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Graduate Certificates in Law

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a coursework program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis. This certificate is particularly appropriate for jurists and other professionals who wish to pursue graduate-level legal studies in aviation, air and space law, government regulations, conventions, and treaties dealing with these areas.
Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) to candidates who do not wish to undertake the master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Law Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law reviews applications and makes recommendations regarding admission. Final admission decisions are determined by admissions policies set by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

For information and application forms, please consult the Faculty website www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions or contact the Graduate Programs Office in Law, McGill University, at the Departmental address, or via email at grad [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca, and telephone 514-398-6635.

Language Requirement

Graduate-level courses are generally offered in English, and English-language abilities must be demonstrated for admission. In order to communicate fully with all law students at McGill, and to understand all course materials, the ability to speak and read French is an asset. At McGill's Faculty of Law, all students may choose to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or French.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian or American (English or French) institution, must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, ESOL, or EDEXCEL offices. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. For an application to be considered, a TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, ESOL, or EDEXCEL test result, McGill Certificate of Proficiency in English or McGill Certificate of Proficiency – English for Professional Communication must be available.

Generally, successful applicants to our LL.M. and D.C.L. programs typically report scores of at least 100 on the TOEFL (iBT), 600 on the TOEFL (PBT), a band score of 7.0 or greater on the IELTS, a grade of 85 or higher on the MELAB, a grade of “A” (Excellent) on the ESOL (CAE), a grade of “B” (Good) or higher on the ESOL (CPE), an overall grade of at least “Distinction” on the EDEXCEL (Level 4) or an overall grade of at least “Merit” on the EDEXCEL (Level 5).

In all programs, non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is French must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 567 (86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) or an IELTS score of 7.0 overall band. This is because McGill students can write essays, examinations and theses in French, even where the course is taught in English. Note that the majority of courses in Graduate Programs in Law are taught in English.

For information about the TOEFL, and to register to take the test, see www.ets.org/toefl. For information about the IELTS, see www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and it takes approximately 40 days to communicate the results. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institution to Graduate Programs in Law. For the TOEFL, McGill’s institutional code is 0935 and Law’s departmental code is 03. These codes must be provided to TOEFL when requesting a test report form. For the IELTS, applicants must ask for an official report to be sent to Graduate Programs in Law at the Graduate Programs’ departmental address. These tests must be taken sufficiently early for results to reach McGill no later than January 15 of the year of admission. Application files must be completed by that date to be considered.

French: The ability to speak or read French is an asset but not a necessity. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential. Applicants should indicate their knowledge of French on the admissions questionnaire; they will be notified if French is essential to the area of study.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the D.C.L. program occurs only when:
  1. the candidate has completed a graduate law degree with thesis at McGill or at another university, and
  2. the Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of his or her previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a doctoral program.

Review of the completed master’s thesis is normally part of the admission decision–making process. Exceptionally, a candidate with a non-thesis master's degree with an outstanding file may be admitted to the doctoral program.

Master’s Degrees

Candidates for admission to the LL.M. program must hold a Bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.), with at least Upper Second Class honours or the equivalent of 3.0/4.0 cumulative grade point average. However, this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire file, including the applicant's references and the quality of the research proposal.

Furthermore, in the case of thesis programs, the Committee must consider the availability of a supervisor. If a supervisor is not available in the applicant's preferred field of study, the applicant may be refused admission or else offered admission pending a change of field of study.

LL.M. Interdisciplinary Options in Environment and European Studies

Students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis program at the Faculty of Law may specify an interest in these options.

LL.M. Specialization in Bioethics

Requirements for admission to the Master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information, see the Bioethics section of this publication, or contact the Chair, Master’s Specialization in Bioethics, Biomedical Ethics Unit, 3647 Peel Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 1W9. Telephone: 514-398-6980; fax: 514-398-8349; email: kathleen [dot] glass [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the graduate certificate programs are essentially the same as for the master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience.

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law

Candidates desiring a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law who do not hold a law degree may be admitted if they have earned an undergraduate university degree in another discipline and possess sufficient professional experience to compensate for the lack of a law degree (as determined by the Graduate Admissions Committee).

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after one full-time term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 academic credits of law courses. Those credits must include the three Air and Space law courses obligatory for master's students (ASPL 633 Public International Air Law, ASPL 636 Private International Air Law, and ASPL 637 Space Law: General Principles), which are all offered in the Fall term. Students may take courses beyond the minimum of 15 credits, and these additional courses may be non-law courses.

Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after one full-time term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 course credits. In every case, the program is structured to meet individual needs and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies).

Note: ALL international students must obtain permission to study from the governments of Quebec and Canada. Immigration Quebec issues the Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada issues federal Study Permits. You may also wish to contact www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents for assistance.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The application deadline to all graduate law programs (LL.M., D.C.L., Graduate Certificates) is January 15. Although McGill continues to accept applications until June 30 (April 30 for international applicants) for the Fall term, the Faculty of Law will not consider applications received on or after January 16.

McGill Graduate Law offers Fall term admission only; the Faculty is not willing to consider applications for Winter and Summer. Applications submitted for the Winter and Summer terms will be cancelled by the Faculty of Law WITHOUT reimbursement of the application fee.

Note: The application fee remains non-refundable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Environment

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Environment

Location

  • McGill School of Environment
  • Downtown Campus
  • 3534 University Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-2827
  • Fax: 514-398-1643
  • McGill School of Environment
  • Macdonald Campus
  • Rowles House
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7559
  • Fax: 514-398-7846

About Environment

Resolving environmental issues requires a dialogue between pure and applied sciences, the social sciences, and humanities. The degradation of the biological and biophysical environment has roots in the structure of human societies while solutions to environmental problems have an impact on human livelihoods.

A number of academic departments and institutes at McGill promote graduate-level research and training on environmental topics and have faculty members whose main research interest falls in this domain. As such, environmental research is widespread throughout the McGill community. The Environment option provides a vehicle whereby discipline-based graduate programs can easily and effectively incorporate collaborations from at least one other discipline into their research.

Goals of the Option

  • To provide thesis or non-thesis students in existing graduate programs with an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment;
  • To develop an appreciation of the role of scientific, political, socioeconomic, and ethical judgments in influencing that process;
  • To provide a forum whereby graduate students in environment throughout the University bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

Students admitted into the Environment option will be supervised or co-supervised by an accredited McGill faculty member. Their Advisory Committee will include at least one individual from outside the home department. It is expected that the thesis, dissertation, or project, as well as the final seminar presentation, will contain an environmental component and will include a discussion of the applied implications of the research findings. Together with the courses common to the Environment option, specific course requirements for each program are given within the departmental listings cited below.

Program List

The Environment option is currently available with the following graduate programs:

Anthropology
M.A. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Anthropology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Biology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment
Bioresource Engineering
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
M.Sc. (Applied) – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment
Earth and Planetary Sciences
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Earth and Planetary Sciences — Environment
Entomology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Environment
Epidemiology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Epidemiology and Biostatics > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Environment (60 credits)
Geography
M.A. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Environment
Law
LL.M. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law > Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
LL.M. (Non-Thesis) – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law > Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
Medicine, Experimental
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Medicine (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Experimental Medicine — Environment
Microbiology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Environment
Parasitology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology — Environment
Philosophy
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Philosophy > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
Plant Science
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Environment
Renewable Resources
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Environment
Sociology
M.A. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Sociology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Sociology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Environment
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 29, 2013).

Please note that the department of sociology will no longer be offering an option in Environment.

Environment Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates must apply separately to the McGill School of Environment (MSE) for the graduate Environment option. Their acceptability will be based on their academic experience and performance, and availability of a potential MSE-accredited supervisor or co-supervisor for their proposed research. For further information, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines to the graduate Environment option may vary depending on the department you are applying to. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

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