Quick Links

medical

M.D./M.B.A. (Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Programs)

 

M.D./M.B.A. Program Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the M.D./M.B.A. Program

The M.D./M.B.A. program recognizes that there is an increasing demand in the health care sector for physicians with management skills and expertise. This is a five-year program in which the first year is spent in the Desautels Faculty of Management completing the M.B.A. core as well as building a solid background in health care management. Then, students will begin their medical studies, which will be integrated with additional elective courses in management. This will provide the opportunity to train well-rounded physician-managers who can eventually pursue interesting careers in a wide range of health care facilities, from the smallest clinic to the largest tertiary health care facility, from research laboratories to university or hospital medical departments. Our graduates will also have career opportunities in the health insurance sector, which is a significant layer of the health care system in a number of countries, including the United States.

Upon graduation, students receive an M.B.A. from the Desautels Faculty of Management and an M.D.,C.M. degree from the Faculty of Medicine.

Note: Students will have to follow the M.B.A. Base Camp (Statistics, Math for Finance, Financial Accounting) prior to commencement of the M.B.A.
M.D./M.B.A.; Management (Non-Thesis) (51 credits)
Offered in cooperation with the Faculty of Medicine.

For more information, contact:

  • Program Administrator, M.D./M.B.A. Program
  • McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
  • 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler
  • Montreal QC H3G 1Y6
  • Canada

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements for the M.B.A. program can be found in M.B.A. Program.

For the Faculty of Medicine admission requirements, please visit www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/programs/mdcm-mba.

Application Procedures

Following the evaluation of the completed application requirements, selected candidates are invited to interviews, after which final admissions decisions are made.

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

See www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions for M.D.,C.M. program application procedures.

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Physics

Physics

Location

  • Department of Physics
  • Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • 3600 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6485 (Graduate Information)
  • Fax: 514-398-8434
  • Email: graduate [dot] physics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.physics.mcgill.ca

About Physics

The Department of Physics currently has a faculty of approximately 40 members, including several holders of Canada Research Chairs and many other prestigious named Chairs. Additionally, we host an impressive number of postdoctoral fellows and research associates and run one of the largest and most vibrant graduate programs in North America. The graduate student enrolment is currently approximately 150.

Faculty members in the Department of Physics are recognized internationally for their excellence. Our members have received national and international prizes and fellowships including Les Prix Du Quebec, Steacie Prize, Sloan Fellowships, NSERC, and others too many to list here. They are also in constant demand as reviewers and referees. Students who earn advanced degrees from the Department of Physics will not only get an excellent education, they will also receive valuable guidance and network contacts to help with subsequent career steps.

The Department offers full M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs in a wide range of disciplines including astrophysics, atmospheric physics, bio-physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, laser spectroscopy, material physics, non-linear dynamics, nuclear physics, statistical physics, and medical-radiation physics.

Although most of the teaching and research facilities are located in the Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, the Department has space and research facilities in the Wong Materials Science Centre, adjacent to the Rutherford Building on McGill's lower campus. Our groups also conduct research at laboratories around the world including Argonne, CERN, FermiLab, SLAC, and TRIUMF.

Departmental researchers enjoy technical support in the areas of engineering, electronics, and precision machining. The Department maintains an excellent conventional machine shop as well as the McGill Nanotools-Microfab facility. Most of the scientific computing is done with an extensive in-house network of powerful workstations and several Beowulf clusters.

Remote access to supercomputing sites in Canada and the United States is also possible including the McGill HPC super-computing facility which is a part of the nationwide network of High Performance Computing Installations in Quebec.

The Department of Physics currently guarantees financial support of $22,000 per year for every graduate student. This minimum level of support can be supplemented by winning one of McGill's large number of in-house scholarships, worth up to $25,000 per year. For details, see www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/finance.html.

Graduate students in the Department of Physics come from many different countries and cultures from all over the world, providing a stimulating cosmopolitan atmosphere in the Department. This, coupled with the unique opportunities afforded by the city of Montreal, guarantees a quality of life that is second to none among Canadian universities. For graduate admission and application information, please visit www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/application.html.

Fields of Research:

High-Energy Physics

Theoretical: The McGill high energy theorists have interests in a wide range of areas within quantum field theory, string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology. Research areas of the high-energy theory faculty include applications of quantum field theory techniques to relativistic heavy ion collisions, baryogenesis, superstring cosmology, theory of cosmological perturbations, black hole physics, supergravity, three dimensional gravity, and various topics related to the physics and mathematics of superstring theory. The high-energy theorists have close connections to the nuclear theory group, the astrophysics group, the high-energy experimentalists, and to members of the Mathematics Department.

Experimental: The experimental high-energy physics group is engaged in a number of experiments at the research frontiers of the field, both in subatomic physics and in high-energy astrophysics. These include:

  • Electron-positron collisions: a group works on the BaBar experiment at SLAC and R&D for the proposed SuperB experiment at LNF in Italy, with specific interest in CKM matrix elements and physics beyond the Standard Model through studies of rare decays, and on R&D for a future International Linear Collider, with interest in calorimeter development.
  • Electron-proton collisions: a group is studying high-energy lepton-quark interactions using data from the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, with interest in deep inelastic scattering and flavour production.
  • Hadron-hadron collisions: CDF and Dzero groups employ Fermilab's energy frontier Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator to study top and bottom quarks and search for the Higgs boson. A group is also involved in major contributions to the next energy frontier at CERN's LHC, with work on the High Level Trigger for the ATLAS experiment.
  • High-energy particle astrophysics: ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using the newly commissioned VERITAS telescope array and development of the next-generation detector.

Students at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels are offered a strong program of research in a challenging and rapidly advancing field. Short term master's projects are based mainly on instrumentation or data analysis conducted on campus, while Ph.D. research may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Nuclear Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs include transport equations for heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy; nuclear equation of state from heavy ion collisions; fragmentation at intermediate energy; electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy ion collisions; effective Lagrangians for hadronic systems at finite temperature; and Quark-Gluon Plasma, QCD.

Experimental: Current research programs in experimental nuclear physics at McGill are focused on two main axes:

  • The study of heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies to determine the properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. This program is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN.
  • The study of ground state properties of unstable nuclei using laser spectroscopy techniques and ion traps. This work is being carried out using the Canadian Penning trap facility at the Argonne National Laboratory and at the accelerator ISOLDE (CERN), and the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

Furthermore, the Nuclear Physics Group has an active in-house research program that applies the ion trap and laser techniques to the detection of trace quantities of material and contaminants, and to ion spectroscopy.

Condensed Matter Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs involve the nonequilibrium, ab-initio modelling of molecular and nanoelectronic systems and devices; the study of quantum effects in interacting mesoscopic electron systems; nonequilibrium phenomena in extended systems; and applications of statistical mechanics to problems in biophysics.

Experimental: Current research programs involve the study of the time evolution of non-equilibrium systems via x-ray diffraction, fundamental quantum properties of strongly correlated systems at temperatures very near absolute zero, macromolecular interactions in living cells using single-photon and two-photon imaging, molecular electronics and nanoelectronic systems by scanning probe microscopy, dynamics and mechanical properties of soft matter systems and spatial organization and dynamics in living cells, mechanical behaviour of very small systems by high-resolution force microscopy, electronic properties that emerge at the limits of miniaturization and quantum computing, and nuclear methods to study interactions in magnetic materials that lead to exotic magnetic ordering behaviour. This includes studies of novel materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, unconventional superconductors, guantum dots, heterostructures, amorphous systems, and spin glasses.

Astrophysics

Research in the astrophysics group covers a wide range of topics including cosmology, galaxy formation, high-energy astrophysics, and extrasolar planets. This involves observations at all wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays to sub-mm, infrared and radio, using international observatories in space and on the ground. Experimental groups at McGill are involved in development and operation of ground-based high-energy gamma-ray observatories, and cosmic microwave background experiments. Theoretical work includes studies of how astrophysics and observational cosmology can experimentally determine the most important properties of dark matter and dark energy, studies of the diverse physics of neutron stars, and extrasolar planet formation.

Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics

This group studies nonlinear dynamical processes in the atmosphere and other geophysical systems, especially those associated with turbulent, chaotic, and extremely variable behaviour. Emphasis is placed on multifractal analysis and modelling as well as the development of new theories and techniques covering wide ranges of scale in time and space. Data from a variety of in situ and remotely sensed sources are used. This includes satellite data of the Earth's atmosphere and surface as well as high-quality precipitation data from the McGill Radar Weather Observatory.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physics (Thesis) (45 credits)
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physics
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Physics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc.

The normal requirement is a B.Sc. in Physics or equivalent, with high standing.

Ph.D.

The normal requirement is an M.Sc. in Physics or equivalent. On the recommendation of the Departmental Graduate Committee, fast-tracking from the M.Sc. program into the Ph.D. program may be granted after one year, if:

  • the student has fulfilled the M.Sc. coursework requirements, or;
  • the Committee determines that the student qualifies based on the student's academic record.

All students who transfer to the Ph.D. program are required to fulfil Ph.D. coursework requirements in addition to the courses taken as an M.Sc. candidate.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance will be offered to students in the form of a bursary, and teaching and research assistantships. For new students, financial support will be offered at the time of acceptance. Forms are given and filled out on registration day.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Physics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Computer Science

Computer Science

Location

  • School of Computer Science
  • McConnell Engineering, Room 318
  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7071, ext. 00074
  • Fax: 514-398-3883
  • Email: grad [dot] cs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.cs.mcgill.ca

About Computer Science

The School of Computer Science is one of the leading teaching and research centres for computer science in Canada. We offer a Ph.D. program and several M.Sc. programs. All include coursework and research. In the basic M.Sc. programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option, which requires a project. The Ph.D. program includes an option in bioinformatics, and the thesis M.Sc. program includes options in bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering. Students are normally funded by their adviser's research grants; in the case of scholarship students, this typically takes the form of a 'top-up' to the scholarship. Research in the School covers a broad range of areas, including:

  • Theory: algorithms, combinatorial optimization, computational geometry, cryptography, graph theory, logic and computation, programming languages, quantum computing, theory of computation, and scientific computing;
  • Systems: compilers, computer games, distributed systems, embedded and real-time systems, modelling and simulations, networks, software engineering;
  • Applications: bioinformatics, machine learning, robotics, computer animation, graphics, and vision.

All students must consult the graduate program website www.cs.mcgill.ca, where up-to-date information about the graduate programs is posted. Any questions concerning programs should be addressed to the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students with a strong interest in research in computer science who hold at least the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in CS. This program combines a strong course component with a research thesis. It is the usual (but not mandatory) entry point for students who wish to do a Ph.D., but is also the program of choice for students who want to find challenging and exciting jobs after their master's.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (45 credits)
This program option is to train graduates in state-of-the-art applications of numerical and modelling methods and computer technology to scientific and engineering problems. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students who want to obtain broad knowledge of advanced topics in computer science but without the requirement of a thesis. It offers an excellent preparation for the job market, but is not recommended for students interested in eventually pursuing a Ph.D.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science
The Ph.D. program trains students to become strong, independent researchers in the field of their choice. Our graduates take challenging positions in industry or take academic positions at universities and research labs. In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, applicants should normally hold a master's degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university, but exceptional students can be admitted to the Ph.D. program directly without a master's degree.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Computer Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s (M.Sc.)

The minimum requirement for admission is a bachelor's degree (cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 or better, or equivalent) with the coursework in Computer Science as listed on our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/msc_applicants.

The website supplements the information in this publication, and should be consulted by all graduate students.

Ph.D.

In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, normally applicants should hold an M.Sc. degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university. Students who hold a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science but have an exceptionally strong academic record may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program, but they must initially apply to the M.Sc. program. Students who are in the M.Sc. program have the option to be fast-tracked into the Ph.D. program at the end of their first academic year, contingent on excellent performance as judged by the Ph.D. committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae – required for Ph.D. program
  • Statement of Purpose – required for Ph.D. program
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE General Test) – required for degrees from outside Canada. Recommended for Ph.D. program.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Computer Science and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1
Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only)
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

For further details on our admission requirements, please visit our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/applying.

Scholarship Deadlines: January 1 for applicants who wish to be considered for scholarship awards; otherwise, March 1 for admission to the Fall term.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Location

  • Department of Psychiatry
  • 1033 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1A1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4176
  • Fax: 514-398-4370
  • Email: graduate [dot] psychiatry [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/psychiatry

About Psychiatry

McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry is one the most prestigious in the world. In the 1950s and 60s, Heinz Lehmann conducted the first North American clinical trials for antipsychotic and antidepressant medications. Theodore Sourkes identified the core neurobiological features of Parkinson’s disease, and Eric Wittkower and Jack Fried brought together scholars from Anthropology and Psychiatry to create Transcultural Psychiatric Studies. Since then, faculty members and graduate students continue outstanding research in addictions; Alzheimer’s and childhood disorders; eating, personality, and mood disorders; stress; trauma; and psychosis. The work is conducted in people and animal models, and also benefits from expertise ranging from neuroimaging and epigenetics to mental health services and public policy. Our work remains at the cutting edge of research on health, disease, and recovery.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Psychiatry also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program on an ad hoc basis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychiatry (Thesis) (45 credits)
The graduate program in Psychiatry is designed to provide advanced research training in the basic, applied, and social sciences relevant to issues in psychiatry. Applicants are admitted from a wide range of backgrounds, including undergraduate degrees in relevant areas (e.g., psychology, neuroscience, sociology, medical anthropology, nursing, and medicine), and those who are pursuing their psychiatry residency at McGill. Most, though not all students, continue to a Ph.D. program. The graduate program does not provide clinical training.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Psychiatry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

  • A B.Sc., B.A., B.N., or M.D. degree.
  • A strong background in science and/or social science, as demonstrated by academic achievement equivalent to a GPA of 3.3 (on a 4-point scale) or 3.5 in the last two years.
  • A written agreement from the proposed research supervisor, and student's statement of purpose for seeking an M.Sc.
  • An outline of the proposed thesis research, to be written by the prospective student in collaboration with an appropriate research supervisor.
  • Two letters of reference.
  • TOEFL or IELTS certificate of proficiency in English for non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue and language of education is not English, with a minimum score of 550 on the written TOEFL test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, or 6.5 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – describing the specific reasons for seeking a Master of Science degree in Psychiatry
  • Letters of Reference – with Applicant Evaluation checklist forms (see Department website)
  • Written Confirmation of Supervision form (see Department website) from the proposed research supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychiatry and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Microbiology and Immunology

Microbiology and Immunology

Location

  • Department of Microbiology and Immunology
  • 3775 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3061
  • Fax: 514-398-7052
  • Email: grad [dot] microimm [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/microimm

About Microbiology and Immunology

The Department offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of M.Sc. and Ph.D. Each program is tailored to fit the needs and backgrounds of individual students. The graduate program is designed to offer students state-of-the-art training, concentrating on four key areas of research: cellular and molecular immunology, microbial physiology and genetics, molecular biology of viruses, and medical microbiology. Basic research discoveries in microbiology may lead to improved drug design and vaccine development to treat and prevent diseases. The Department has many notable facilities and resources, including a cell sorter, ultra centrifuges, confocal microscope, real-time PCR facilities, cryostat for immunocytochemistry, and facilities for radio-isotope studies and infectious diseases. We foster close ties with McGill’s teaching hospitals and research centres to promote multidisciplinary research.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology and Immunology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The primary goal of this program is to provide students with unique opportunities to learn experimental designs and fundamental research techniques, and objectively synthesize information from scientific literature. These tools enable the students to focus on major research topics offered by the Department: molecular microbiology, mycology, microbial physiology, virology, genetics, immunology, drug design, and aspects of host-parasite relationships. Each M.Sc. student chooses their preferred major research area and research supervisor. Following an interview, the student is presented with a research topic and offered a studentship (amounts vary). Each student then must register for our graduate courses (two seminars, two reading and conference courses, and three current topics). If pertinent to the student’s research program, the research adviser may advise the student to take additional courses. Most of our students, after one year, are proficient researchers, and some first authors of a research publication. About 70% of the M.Sc. students elect to enter into our Ph.D. program. The remaining students advance their microbiology background by opting to enter into medicine, epidemiology, biotechnology, or pharmaceutical disciplines.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology and Immunology
The primary goal of the Ph.D. program is to create a self-propelled researcher, proficient in experimental designs and advanced methodologies applicable to the varied and rapidly changing disciplines in microbiology and immunology. Close research supervision and bi-weekly laboratory sessions impart the requisite research discipline and objective assessment of acquired or published research data. A Ph.D. student, if promoted from our M.Sc. program, without submitting the thesis, is required to register for one graduate seminar and one reading and conference course, but the bulk of his/her time is devoted to research. Other requirements include a yearly presentation of the accumulated research data to the Ph.D. supervisory committee, successfully clearing the Ph.D. comprehensive examination, two years after registration into the Ph.D. program, and finally submission of a thesis. The research theme must be original, and the acquired data and hypothesis must be defended orally by the student. Each student receives a stipend for the entire duration and a minimum six-semester residency is required for the completion of the program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Microbiology and Immunology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master's

Candidates are required to hold a B.Sc. degree in microbiology and immunology, biology, biochemistry, or another related discipline; those with the M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees are also eligible to apply. The minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) for acceptance into the program is 3.2 out of 4.0. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available.

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL):

  • Paper-Based Test (PBT): a minimum score of 567
  • Internet-Based Test (iBT): a minimum overall score of 86 (no less than 20 in each in the four components)
  • The International English Language Testing System (IELTS): a minimum overall band score of 6.5

The TOEFL Institution Code for McGill University is 0935.

Ph.D.

Students who have satisfactorily completed an M.Sc. degree in microbiology and immunology, a biological science, or biochemistry, or highly qualified students enrolled in the departmental M.Sc. program, may be accepted into the Ph.D. program provided they meet its standards.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

All applicants are encouraged to approach academic staff members during or before the application process since no applicants are accepted without a supervisor.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letter from a prospective supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Sept. 3 Winter: Sept. 3 Winter: Sept. 3
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Human Genetics

Human Genetics

Location

  • Department of Human Genetics
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, N5/13
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
Administration
Kandace Springer – Administrative Assistant
  • Email: kandace [dot] springer [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Ross Mackay – Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: ross [dot] mackay [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Laura Benner (On Leave) – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
Kailee Bialaszewski (Acting) – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: dept [dot] humangenetics [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Human Genetics

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees in Human Genetics

The Department of Human Genetics offers a clinical master’s program in Genetic Counselling, as well as research training at both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels. Both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs require the completion of a thesis, which is the major focus of the student's effort. A minimal amount of coursework is required, but specific course choices are flexible and vary according to the student's previous training and current research interest. The Department also offers a Bioinformatics option. Information on the Bioinformatics option can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/mcb/academic/graduate.

Most of the faculty of the Human Genetics Department are located in McGill teaching hospitals, reflecting the medically learned knowledge at the core of human genetic studies.

Faculty have a wide variety of research interests, which embrace: cancer genetics, cytogenetics, reproductive biology, neurogenetics, and genomic and genetic basis of human diseases. Detailed information regarding faculty research interest can be found on the Department web page at www.mcgill.ca/humangenetics/prospective-students/supervision.

Students accepted into the Human Genetics research graduate program will receive a minimum stipend of $15,000, plus tuition and fees.

Tuition Differential Fee Waivers

A certain number of tuition differential fee waivers will be offered to incoming out-of-province/international students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. Students who have a CGPA of 3.5 out of 4.0 or above (as converted by McGill GPS guidelines) and who submit online application and documents by March 31 (Fall), Sept. 30 (Winter) will automatically be considered for a tuition waiver.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
McGill University offers specialized education in bioethics to graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Religious Studies, and Law, and the Department of Philosophy. The Master's degree Specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Genetic Counselling (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program provides the academic foundation and clinical training required for the contemporary practice of genetic counselling. Genetic counsellors are health professionals who provide information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorders and to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited conditions. Genetic counsellors investigate the problem present in the family, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence, and review available options with the family. Some counsellors also work in administrative and academic capacities, and many engage in research activities. The curriculum includes a variety of required courses in human genetics and other departments, and 40 weeks of supervised clinical training spread over four semesters. Graduates will be eligible to sit for both the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors and the American Board of Genetic Counselling certification examinations. Upon completion of the M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program, students will demonstrate competence in, or satisfactory knowledge of: principles of human genetics, including cytogenetics, biochemical, molecular, and population genetics; methods of interviewing and counselling, and the dynamics of human behaviour in relation to genetic disease; and social, legal, and ethical issues in genetics. Enrolment will be limited to four students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics — Bioinformatics

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and have the capability of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Human Genetics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling

Prerequisites: Bachelor's or medical degree – minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, or 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Recent (five years or less) university-level courses in basic sciences (molecular/cell biology, biochemistry, advanced genetics (preferably human), and statistics) and a minimum of two in psychology.

Applicants must have obtained some experience (either paid or volunteer) working with adults in a counselling or advisory capacity, ideally in a crisis setting.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Human Genetics

Prerequisites: B.Sc. – minimum CGPA 3.0 out of 4.0, or 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Applicants must have a minimum of 6 credits in cellular and molecular biology or biochemistry, 3 credits in mathematics or statistics, and 3 credits in genetics. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

Admission is based on acceptance by a research director who has agreed to provide adequate funding for the duration of the academic program and on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee.

Prospective graduate students should complete the online application form and indicate at least three faculty members they are interested in working with.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Human Genetics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs  
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Applications for thesis programs submitted after these deadlines may be considered, if a suitable supervisor can be secured. However, these applications will not be considered for departmental funding or entrance awards.

* The M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program accepts applications for the Fall term only. No late applications or applications for Summer or Winter terms for the Genetic Counselling program will be considered under any circumstances.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mechanical Engineering

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

 

Mechanical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Macdonald Engineering Building
  • 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Room MD-270
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C3
  • Canada
  • Telephone (Admissions & Scholarships): 514-398-8869
  • Telephone (All other inquiries): 514-398-6281
  • Fax: 514-398-7365
  • Email (Admissions & Scholarships): grad [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Email (All other inquiries): gradcoordinator [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad

About Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are traditionally concerned with the conception, design, implementation, and operation of mechanical systems. Common fields of work include aerospace, energy, manufacturing, machinery, and transportation. Due to the broad nature of the discipline, there is usually a high demand for mechanical engineers with advanced training.

The Department includes more than 30 faculty members and 200 graduate students, and is housed primarily within the recently renovated Macdonald Engineering building. The Department contains state-of-the-art experimental facilities (including a major wind tunnel facility) and has extensive computational facilities. Professors within the Department collaborate widely with professors in other units, often through research centres including the Centre for Intelligent Machines (CIM); the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM); and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (MNI). The research interests within the Department are very broad and fall largely within the following five areas:

  • aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering
  • mechanics of materials and structures
  • dynamics and control
  • design and manufacturing
  • bioengineering

Within these areas, specific topics of research are given in the following:

Aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering

Experimental fluid mechanics and aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and aeroacoustics; theoretical fluid mechanics; turbulence; mixing in turbulent flows; fluid flow control; fluid-structure interactions; computational fluid dynamics, multidisciplinary optimization, and computer flow visualization; heat transfer; combustion, shock wave physics, energetic materials, high-speed reacting flows, hypersonic propulsion, and alternative fuels.

Mechanics of materials and structures

Composite materials: structural design, analysis, manufacturing, and processing; micro/nano mechanics; MEMS/NEMS; adaptronic structures; thermomechanics, wave propagation, and computational mechanics.

Dynamics and control

Multibody systems, legged and wheeled vehicles, compliant mechanisms, and kinematic geometry; tethered systems, lighter-than-air craft, and underwater vehicles; spacecraft dynamics and space robotics; modelling and simulation; fluid-structure interactions, nonlinear and chaotic dynamics; dynamics of bladed assemblies.

Design and manufacturing

Design theory and methodology, design optimization; biomimetics; machine tools and systems, manufacturing processes, and management and control; micro/nano machining; wear and comminution processes.

Bioengineering

Biomechanics, biomaterials, blood and respiratory flows, mechanics of soft tissues, cardiovascular devices, image processing for medical diagnostics, voice production.

Programs Offered

The Department offers programs of study leading to the M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Both M.Eng. (Thesis) and M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) programs are offered.

There are several options for completing master’s degrees that do not involve the completion of a thesis. The M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program has more extensive course requirements and will appeal to students who desire to gain both a broad understanding of subjects within Mechanical Engineering as well as in-depth information in a specific area. Two other non-thesis master’s degree options are described below.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Eng. (Thesis) program requires the completion of 16 credits of technical complementary courses, a seminar course, and a thesis. The thesis involves advanced research supervised by one or more professors who are internationally known in their field. This program prepares students for either an industrial research career or further academic research at the Ph.D. level.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (46 credits)
For students who would like to concentrate on computational work for their research, the M.Eng. (Thesis) – Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) option is available. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. In this program, students choose their complementary courses from within a list of scientific computing courses and courses that involve applications and specialized methods.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program must complete four required courses in addition to 16 credits of complementary courses and a seminar course. They also complete a project that is less involved than a thesis and may involve a limited research project, or a technical or design study. Graduates of this program are well-prepared for carrying out research and development in industry and may also proceed to further research at the Ph.D. level.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Aerospace Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Eng. Aerospace degree is offered to students who wish to specialize in the general area of aerospace engineering. This degree is given in conjunction with Concordia University, École Polytechnique, Université Laval, Université de Sherbrooke, and École de Technologie Supérieure. Students registered at McGill are required to take two courses from two other institutions.

The aerospace industry is strongly established in Quebec. Representatives of the aerospace industry therefore requested that measures be taken to provide for qualified scientists in aerospace. Five universities offering courses in engineering came together to offer a master’s degree program in the field of aeronautics and space technology. This program is offered to students who wish to specialize in these disciplines. The industry’s participation is a special feature of this program. The universities and the participating industries, with the cooperation of the Centre of Aerospace Manpower Activities in Quebec (CAMAQ), have formed a Coordinating Committee, CIMGAS, to arrange for industrial internships and case study courses for the students and to implement specific program developments to meet the needs of the industry.

The M.Eng. (Aerospace) program requires a minimum of 45 credits, including an “Industrial Stage” (i.e., engineering work in an aerospace industry) of four months. Enrolment is limited to the number of industrial stages available, so admission to the program is typically quite competitive. While intended to be a full-time program, the M.Eng. Aerospace program may be completed on a part-time basis over a maximum of five years. By the time of completion of the program, graduates are extremely well-prepared to enter into a career in the aerospace industry.

Depending on their background, students would specialize in one of the four areas:

  1. Aeronautics and Space Engineering
  2. Avionics and Control
  3. Aerospace Materials and Structures
  4. Virtual Environment
Master of Management (M.M.); Manufacturing Management (Non-Thesis) (56 credits)

This program is currently not offered

The Master in Manufacturing Management (M.M.M.) program attracts business professionals from around the world who wish to pursue a career in the effective management of global operations and supply chain. It is a professionally-oriented graduate program offered jointly through the Faculties of Engineering and Management, aimed at those candidates with engineering or science backgrounds.

In just eleven months of academic studies, M.M.M. students sharpen their expertise in supply chain and operations through an intensive program that includes:

  • A challenging curriculum
  • Extensive industrial interaction
  • Innovative research projects

Additionally, students are exposed to the latest trends and developments in management and participate in professional development seminars to leverage their communication and leadership skills. After less than one year of studies, participants complete a paid work term at an industrial location. This is a unique opportunity to work on a real-world project with an M.M.M. partner company in North America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please consult the Department for more information on this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mechanical Engineering
In the Ph.D. program, students are required to demonstrate a significant new contribution to their field of research, as documented in an externally reviewed thesis. The research is carried out under the supervision of professors who are leaders in their field. Since research in Mechanical Engineering is often interdisciplinary in nature, it is common for Ph.D. students to have a co-supervisor in addition to their principle supervisor. Graduates from this program typically proceed to careers in research in either industrial or academic environments.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mechanical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The general rules of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies apply. Candidates who come from other institutions are expected to have an academic background equivalent to the undergraduate curriculum in mechanical engineering at McGill or to make up any deficiencies in a Qualifying year.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering. Applicants who hold an undergraduate degree in a non-Engineering discipline—typically the Physical Sciences—may apply for the M.Sc. (Thesis) program, which is governed by the same regulations as the M.Eng. (Thesis) program.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Mechanical Engineering.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Aerospace) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program must have successfully completed a master's degree program (or equivalent) in Engineering or the Physical Sciences. In exceptional circumstances, students with outstanding performance at the bachelor's level may be offered direct entry into the Ph.D. program (Ph.D. 1).

In the case of all programs, applicants must have successfully completed their prior degree(s) with a minimum CGPA equivalent to 3.3 on a scale of 4.0. Satisfaction of these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit official results of either a TOEFL or an IELTS test. The minimum score required is 92 for the Internet-based TOEFL test, with each component score not less than 20 (or 580 on the paper-based test, with a minimum of 4.0 on the “Test of Written English”); or a minimum overall band of 7.0 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please consult www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad for further details on required application documents.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • two official Referee Reports
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Curriculum Vitae – please include a list of publications, if relevant
  • proof of French proficiency (for Aerospace program only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Oct. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Please also consult the Departmental website for the application deadlines: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad/date.

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 31, 2014).

Sociology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Sociology

Location

  • Department of Sociology
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 713
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Graduate Program and Admission Information:
  • Telephone: 514-398-6847
  • Fax: 514-398-3403
  • Email: graduate [dot] sociology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/sociology

About Sociology

The Department offers training leading to the following degrees:

  • Master of Arts in Sociology (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Development Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Gender and Women’s Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Medical Sociology Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis) with the Social Studies of Medicine Department
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Social Statistics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Gender and Women's Studies Option
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option

We have particular strength in the following fields: states, nationalism, and development; economy and society; social inequality (class, ethnicity, and gender); deviance and social control; and health and society. The Department of Sociology has very high standards and an excellent record of placing students in both academic and non-academic careers in institutions ranging from the University of Chicago and Berkeley to StatsCan and CEGEPs. The Department has a stellar record of research publications and a lively graduate program, and we benefit from many new faculty appointments allowing us to be at the forefront of current issues. A large number of M.A. programs are offered. Fewer are offered at the Ph.D. level (see below). The Department houses the Social Statistics Unit. This has full access to the resources of StatsCan, with additional training for students.

Availability of Funding

The Department offers a limited number of teaching assistantships. A full teaching assistantship consists of a maximum of 180 hours of work per term. Appointments for a full teaching assistantship span 15 weeks and involve an average of 12 hours per week.

M.A. Program Options

Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides excellent methodological training, but is principally designed for students who wish to gain a first experience doing original research. Some students have stopped at this stage; more have gone on to higher degree work. Researching and writing a thesis requires considerable effort, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is both for students who wish to continue from an undergraduate degree in sociology, and those who wish to enter sociology for the first time. McGill is an excellent venue because the program involves rigorous training in methodology. Academically inclined students have gone on to higher degrees, some at McGill and others at other universities; the training offered has allowed others to go to varied careers, not least as teachers in CEGEPs. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Many students from this program have gone on to further research, but several have entered the world of non-governmental organizations—with some going on to work for the U.N. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The research paper must be on a topic related to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the degree requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s research paper must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (45 credits)
The purpose of the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is to provide graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Research Projects must be on a topic relating to population dynamics, approved by the PDO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
This program complements the basic research training with the application of statistical methods to Statistics Canada data (or equivalent). It requires a statistics-based research paper that will normally flow out of a paper written for one of the graduate seminars. Comparable to an article in a professional journal, the paper ought to focus on a clearly defined research problem, demonstrating familiarity with the most important relevant scholarly work and the ability to carry out and organize the results of the research. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.

Ph.D. Program Options

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology
There are two ways to enter the Ph.D. program. Some students are fast-tracked (i.e., from a B.A. degree without having to complete an M.A. in Sociology), as Ph.D. 1 students; they take twelve substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements, and are trained in qualitative and quantitative research methods and in research design. Other students, typically those with an M.A. in Sociology, are considered as Ph.D. 2 students; they typically take six substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements—although further courses may be required if their methodological skills do not meet the standards required by the Department. Our Social Statistics Laboratory allows students to make systematic use of quantitative data sources. All students must pass two area exams and present a thesis proposal before turning to the thesis itself, which may take the form of a single piece of research, or a set of articles on a particular theme.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Gender and Women's Studies
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the Ph.D. requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and on issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis or set of articles must relate to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Population Dynamics
This program aims to provide advanced graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Dissertation topics must be related to population dynamics and approved by the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) coordinating committee.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Sociology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree with a standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.3 or better out of a possible 4.0. The degree may be either in Sociology or in another relevant social science. In the latter case, applicants may be required to take some additional sociology courses to fill gaps in their background.

The strength of an applicant's academic record is of primary importance in consideration of an applicant's dossier. For a detailed description of courses open to graduates and undergraduates, and of preparation required of McGill University honours students, candidates should consult the Undergraduate eCalendar.

All applicants are asked to submit a writing sample. Applicants must submit with their applications the results of the Verbal, Analytical, and Quantitative aptitude tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Arrangements to take the GRE should be made directly with the Educational Testing Service by visiting their website at www.ets.org/gre. Certain students must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL exam is 567 on the paper-based test and 86 overall on the Internet-based test (no less than 20 in each of the four component scores). For more information on whether the TOEFL is required please visit www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency. International students can also contact International Student Services at 514-398-4349 for more information, or visit their website, www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents.

Candidates who lack sufficient preparation in the social sciences, but whose academic record justifies consideration for eventual admission to the master's graduate program, must register for a qualifying year during which they are required to take courses to broaden their knowledge of sociology. Candidates must achieve a final grade of at least a B in these courses and an average in all courses of at least B+; in general, they must, in the opinion of the Department, have achieved sufficient preparation in the subject matter of sociology before they will be allowed to proceed with graduate work. All candidates are expected to have taken courses in statistics, research methods, and sociological theory at the undergraduate level.

Any prospective students are encouraged to contact faculty members that they may wish to work with to ascertain that they will be available and not on leave during the time at which they wish to study. If need be, they may feel free to contact the Graduate Program Director to guide them.

The program of study is designed to give students an advanced understanding of a major field in sociology, of current methods of sociological research, and of some principal theoretic issues in the discipline. Three terms of residence study is the minimum requirement for a master's degree. For the doctoral program, three years is the minimum residency requirement for students entering at the Ph.D. 1 level (those students without an M.A.) and two years for students entering at the Ph.D. 2 level (those with an M.A.).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please note that the dossier must be complete before the applicant will be considered for entrance to the graduate program.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE
  • Personal Statement
  • Writing Sample – can be in the form of a graded paper or a chapter from a thesis and must be at least 15 typewritten pages in length translated into English or French

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Sociology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Social Studies of Medicine

Social Studies of Medicine

Location

  • Department of Social Studies of Medicine
  • 3647 Peel Street, 2nd Floor
  • Montreal QC H3A 1X1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6033
  • Fax: 514-398-1498
  • Email: dept [dot] ssom [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ssom

About Social Studies of Medicine

The Department (SSOM) offers graduate studies in three programs:

  • one in Medical Anthropology, given jointly with the Department of Anthropology;
  • one in History of Medicine, given jointly with the Department of History and Classical Studies; and
  • two in Medical Sociology, given jointly with the Department of Sociology.

In each program, the student may work toward the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. All degrees are awarded by the relevant Faculty of Arts department. For further information regarding those departments, please consult the Anthropology, History, or Sociology sections.

The Department (SSOM) is interdisciplinary, having faculty in the fields of medical anthropology, medical history, and medical sociology. In its programs of graduate studies, it attempts to provide two things: training that is solidly grounded in the discipline of the chosen program, i.e., in anthropology, history, or sociology; and, through seminars and interaction with Department members and other graduate students, exposure to the other disciplines that are represented in the Department. The Department aims to instill in its graduates a combination of disciplinary competence and interdisciplinary perspective.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Medical Anthropology (Thesis) (48 credits)
The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences. The M.A. degree is awarded by the Anthropology Department and admission is granted by a joint Admissions Committee made up of representatives from Anthropology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The program requires the completion of 45 credits, composed of required courses, graduate seminars, plus a major research paper. The program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
This includes 18 credits of coursework and a research thesis that is based on original research (30 credits).
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
This includes 27 credits of coursework and a research paper based on original research (18 credits).

Ph.D. Programs

For information on the doctoral programs, please refer to the appropriate Department – Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Social Studies of Medicine Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A. in Medical Anthropology

The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences.

M.A. in the History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.

M.A. in Medical Sociology

The program is open to students with a background in social sciences, health professions, or health sciences. It aims to prepare candidates for a career of teaching and research in medical sociology, and there is consequently a preference for applicants with the potential to proceed to the doctoral degree.

Ph.D. Programs

Candidates for a Ph.D. will normally have taken their M.A. in the same field. Please refer to the appropriate department: Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

M.A. in Medical Anthropology

Admission is granted by a joint Admissions Committee made up of representatives from Anthropology and SSOM.

For details concerning applications, teaching assistantships, fellowships, etc., see the Department of Anthropology: www.mcgill.ca/anthropology/graduate/ma.

M.A. in the History of Medicine

Application is made directly to the Department of History and Classical Studies. For details, see the Department of History and Classical Studies: www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate/ma.

M.A. in Medical Sociology

Admission is granted by representatives from Sociology and SSOM. For details concerning applications, teaching, assistantships, fellowships, etc., see the Department of Sociology: www.mcgill.ca/sociology/grad/admissions.

Ph.D. Programs

Please refer to the appropriate department: Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines to the Social Studies of Medicine Option may vary depending on the department you are applying to. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Social Media