Quick Links

mathematics

Physics

Physics

Location

  • Department of Physics
  • Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • 3600 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6485 (Graduate Information)
  • Fax: 514-398-8434
  • Email: graduate [dot] physics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.physics.mcgill.ca

About Physics

The Department of Physics currently has a faculty of approximately 40 members, including several holders of Canada Research Chairs and many other prestigious named Chairs. Additionally, we host an impressive number of postdoctoral fellows and research associates and run one of the largest and most vibrant graduate programs in North America. The graduate student enrolment is currently approximately 150.

Faculty members in the Department of Physics are recognized internationally for their excellence. Our members have received national and international prizes and fellowships including Les Prix Du Quebec, Steacie Prize, Sloan Fellowships, NSERC, and others too many to list here. They are also in constant demand as reviewers and referees. Students who earn advanced degrees from the Department of Physics will not only get an excellent education, they will also receive valuable guidance and network contacts to help with subsequent career steps.

The Department offers full M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs in a wide range of disciplines including astrophysics, atmospheric physics, bio-physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, laser spectroscopy, material physics, non-linear dynamics, nuclear physics, statistical physics, and medical-radiation physics.

Although most of the teaching and research facilities are located in the Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, the Department has space and research facilities in the Wong Materials Science Centre, adjacent to the Rutherford Building on McGill's lower campus. Our groups also conduct research at laboratories around the world including Argonne, CERN, FermiLab, SLAC, and TRIUMF.

Departmental researchers enjoy technical support in the areas of engineering, electronics, and precision machining. The Department maintains an excellent conventional machine shop as well as the McGill Nanotools-Microfab facility. Most of the scientific computing is done with an extensive in-house network of powerful workstations and several Beowulf clusters.

Remote access to supercomputing sites in Canada and the United States is also possible including the McGill HPC super-computing facility which is a part of the nationwide network of High Performance Computing Installations in Quebec.

The Department of Physics currently guarantees financial support of $22,000 per year for every graduate student. This minimum level of support can be supplemented by winning one of McGill's large number of in-house scholarships, worth up to $25,000 per year. For details, see www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/finance.html.

Graduate students in the Department of Physics come from many different countries and cultures from all over the world, providing a stimulating cosmopolitan atmosphere in the Department. This, coupled with the unique opportunities afforded by the city of Montreal, guarantees a quality of life that is second to none among Canadian universities. For graduate admission and application information, please visit www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/application.html.

Fields of Research:

High-Energy Physics

Theoretical: The McGill high energy theorists have interests in a wide range of areas within quantum field theory, string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology. Research areas of the high-energy theory faculty include applications of quantum field theory techniques to relativistic heavy ion collisions, baryogenesis, superstring cosmology, theory of cosmological perturbations, black hole physics, supergravity, three dimensional gravity, and various topics related to the physics and mathematics of superstring theory. The high-energy theorists have close connections to the nuclear theory group, the astrophysics group, the high-energy experimentalists, and to members of the Mathematics Department.

Experimental: The experimental high-energy physics group is engaged in a number of experiments at the research frontiers of the field, both in subatomic physics and in high-energy astrophysics. These include:

  • Electron-positron collisions: a group works on the BaBar experiment at SLAC and R&D for the proposed SuperB experiment at LNF in Italy, with specific interest in CKM matrix elements and physics beyond the Standard Model through studies of rare decays, and on R&D for a future International Linear Collider, with interest in calorimeter development.
  • Electron-proton collisions: a group is studying high-energy lepton-quark interactions using data from the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, with interest in deep inelastic scattering and flavour production.
  • Hadron-hadron collisions: CDF and Dzero groups employ Fermilab's energy frontier Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator to study top and bottom quarks and search for the Higgs boson. A group is also involved in major contributions to the next energy frontier at CERN's LHC, with work on the High Level Trigger for the ATLAS experiment.
  • High-energy particle astrophysics: ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using the newly commissioned VERITAS telescope array and development of the next-generation detector.

Students at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels are offered a strong program of research in a challenging and rapidly advancing field. Short term master's projects are based mainly on instrumentation or data analysis conducted on campus, while Ph.D. research may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Nuclear Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs include transport equations for heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy; nuclear equation of state from heavy ion collisions; fragmentation at intermediate energy; electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy ion collisions; effective Lagrangians for hadronic systems at finite temperature; and Quark-Gluon Plasma, QCD.

Experimental: Current research programs in experimental nuclear physics at McGill are focused on two main axes:

  • The study of heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies to determine the properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. This program is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN.
  • The study of ground state properties of unstable nuclei using laser spectroscopy techniques and ion traps. This work is being carried out using the Canadian Penning trap facility at the Argonne National Laboratory and at the accelerator ISOLDE (CERN), and the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

Furthermore, the Nuclear Physics Group has an active in-house research program that applies the ion trap and laser techniques to the detection of trace quantities of material and contaminants, and to ion spectroscopy.

Condensed Matter Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs involve the nonequilibrium, ab-initio modelling of molecular and nanoelectronic systems and devices; the study of quantum effects in interacting mesoscopic electron systems; nonequilibrium phenomena in extended systems; and applications of statistical mechanics to problems in biophysics.

Experimental: Current research programs involve the study of the time evolution of non-equilibrium systems via x-ray diffraction, fundamental quantum properties of strongly correlated systems at temperatures very near absolute zero, macromolecular interactions in living cells using single-photon and two-photon imaging, molecular electronics and nanoelectronic systems by scanning probe microscopy, dynamics and mechanical properties of soft matter systems and spatial organization and dynamics in living cells, mechanical behaviour of very small systems by high-resolution force microscopy, electronic properties that emerge at the limits of miniaturization and quantum computing, and nuclear methods to study interactions in magnetic materials that lead to exotic magnetic ordering behaviour. This includes studies of novel materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, unconventional superconductors, guantum dots, heterostructures, amorphous systems, and spin glasses.

Astrophysics

Research in the astrophysics group covers a wide range of topics including cosmology, galaxy formation, high-energy astrophysics, and extrasolar planets. This involves observations at all wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays to sub-mm, infrared and radio, using international observatories in space and on the ground. Experimental groups at McGill are involved in development and operation of ground-based high-energy gamma-ray observatories, and cosmic microwave background experiments. Theoretical work includes studies of how astrophysics and observational cosmology can experimentally determine the most important properties of dark matter and dark energy, studies of the diverse physics of neutron stars, and extrasolar planet formation.

Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics

This group studies nonlinear dynamical processes in the atmosphere and other geophysical systems, especially those associated with turbulent, chaotic, and extremely variable behaviour. Emphasis is placed on multifractal analysis and modelling as well as the development of new theories and techniques covering wide ranges of scale in time and space. Data from a variety of in situ and remotely sensed sources are used. This includes satellite data of the Earth's atmosphere and surface as well as high-quality precipitation data from the McGill Radar Weather Observatory.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physics (Thesis) (45 credits)
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physics
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Physics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc.

The normal requirement is a B.Sc. in Physics or equivalent, with high standing.

Ph.D.

The normal requirement is an M.Sc. in Physics or equivalent. On the recommendation of the Departmental Graduate Committee, fast-tracking from the M.Sc. program into the Ph.D. program may be granted after one year, if:

  • the student has fulfilled the M.Sc. coursework requirements, or;
  • the Committee determines that the student qualifies based on the student's academic record.

All students who transfer to the Ph.D. program are required to fulfil Ph.D. coursework requirements in addition to the courses taken as an M.Sc. candidate.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance will be offered to students in the form of a bursary, and teaching and research assistantships. For new students, financial support will be offered at the time of acceptance. Forms are given and filled out on registration day.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Physics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Location

  • Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  • Burnside Hall
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 945
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3764
  • Fax: 514-398-6115
  • Email: gradinfo [at] meteo [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/meteo

About Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences offers courses and research opportunities in atmospheric sciences and physical oceanography leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. Research programs borrow from fundamental fields such as mathematics, statistics, physics, chemistry, and computing to address a broad range of topics relating to weather and climate. Examples include atmospheric chemistry, climate dynamics, cloud and precipitation physics, dynamical oceanography and meteorology, geophysical turbulence, numerical modelling, numerical weather prediction, ocean carbon budgets, and sea ice dynamics, as well as synoptic, mesoscale, and radar and satellite meteorology.

Some faculty members have close ties with other departments, schools, and centres, including the Chemistry, and Mathematics and Statistics Departments; the McGill School of Environment; the Global Environmental and Climate Change Centre (GEC3); ArcticNet; and Quebec Ocean. Facilities include the J. Stewart Marshall Radar Observatory, as well as state-of-the-art field and laboratory equipment for atmospheric chemistry. Graduate students have access to computers, ranging from desktop PCs to the massive parallel machines available to us through CLUMEQ and Compute Canada, and the IBM supercomputer at Environment Canada. In some cases, M.Sc. and Ph.D. research may include a field component. Most students also participate in national and international conferences.

Financial assistance in the form of research stipends and teaching assistantships is available for all qualified graduate students.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) (45 credits)
Our program applies mathematics, physics, computing, and sometimes chemistry to study the atmosphere and/or oceans. The ideal student would therefore have a strong quantitative background in one or more of these fields. Although some of our students have undergraduate knowledge of meteorology or physical oceanography, such background is not necessary to succeed in the program. McGill offers the only program in Canada that includes both atmospheric and oceanic sciences. Students benefit from a large professor-to-student ratio, access to state-of-the-art computing, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry laboratory equipment. The Department also has close ties with Environment Canada's numerical weather prediction centre in Dorval, Quebec. Most of our incoming M.Sc. students choose this (default) option. It allows considerable flexibility as to the choice of research topics, and gives students both a strong classroom knowledge of the subject as well as the opportunity to choose from a variety of thesis research projects. Students who do not choose to continue in academia find employment in a variety of areas and places; for example, working with Environment Canada as research associates or weather forecasters.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students following the Environment option must first be accepted by the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and then by the McGill School of Environment (MSE) before an offer of admission will be made by the University. Environment option students require either a single supervisor with a joint appointment in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and the MSE, or co-supervisors, one each in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and the MSE.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Our program applies mathematics, physics, computing, and sometimes chemistry to study the atmosphere and/or oceans. The ideal student would therefore have a strong quantitative background in one or more of these fields. Although some of our students have undergraduate knowledge of meteorology or physical oceanography, such background is not necessary to succeed in the program. McGill offers the only program in Canada that includes both atmospheric and oceanic sciences. Students benefit from a large professor-to-student ratio, access to state-of-the-art computing, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry laboratory equipment. The Department also has close ties with Environment Canada's numerical weather prediction centre in Dorval, Quebec. Students who do not choose to continue in academia find employment in a variety of areas including research careers at government labs such as Environment Canada.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants for the M.Sc. program must meet the general requirements of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies and hold a bachelor's degree with high standing in atmospheric science, physics, mathematics, engineering, or equivalent.

The normal requirement for admission to the Ph.D. program is a strong background in meteorology, physical oceanography, or related disciplines such as mathematics, physics, and engineering. Many students will have an M.Sc. degree in one of these fields, although this is not a formal requirement. Students without a master's degree in atmospheric science (meteorology) or physical oceanography will enter at the Ph.D. 1 rather than the Ph.D. 2 level, and devote the first year of the program mainly to coursework.

Inquiries should be addressed directly to the Chair of Admissions, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor – required for Ph.D. program
  • GRE – required for applicants who have not studied at a Canadian university

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).



Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Biomedical Engineering
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street, Room 316
  • Montreal QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada

About Biomedical Engineering

The Department offers graduate training programs leading to master's (M.Eng.) and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Engineering.

We provide instruction and opportunities for interdisciplinary research in the application of engineering, mathematics, and the physical sciences to problems in medicine and the life sciences. Courses are offered for graduate students in the life sciences, engineering, and the physical sciences.

Excellent laboratory facilities for basic and applied research are available in the Department and in the laboratories of associated staff located elsewhere on campus. The Department operates a network of high-performance workstations and well-equipped mechanical and electronics workshops.

Basic research in the Department concentrates on the application of quantitative engineering analysis methods to basic biomedical research problems. Currently active areas of research include: neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. Staff members are also active in more applied research related to the development of quantitative analysis tools and instruments for biomedical research. Areas of activity here include: signal analysis, system identification, modelling, simulation and parameter estimation, image processing, pattern recognition, ultrasound, and biorobotics. A new option in bioinformatics is offered jointly with other University departments.

Graduate students may also be registered through the departments of Medicine, Science, and Engineering, and must then fulfil the requirements for advanced degrees imposed by their respective departments.

In addition, all students are required, through coursework and independent study, to achieve a degree of interdisciplinary competence appropriate to their area of specialization.

M.Eng. Meetings: 1) Initial; 2) Progress; and Fast-Track transfer to the Ph.D. program. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Ph.D. Meetings: 1) Preliminary; 2) Comprehensive Exam Preparation; 3) Thesis Proposal and Comprehensive Exam; 4) Thesis Progress; and 5) Thesis Pre-submission. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME's internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields, and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (M.Eng.) spanning broad themes in neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine with a strong emphasis on mathematics, physics, chemistry, and basic physiology, or cell biology. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train M.Eng. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (Ph.D.) spanning broad themes in neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine and a master's degree in biomedical engineering, bioengineering, biotechnology, electrical engineering, physiology, chemical engineering, biomaterial, system engineering, imaging, or other related areas. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train Ph.D. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field, and will be capable of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Biomedical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please address enquiries directly to the Department.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by Biomedical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: April 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Integrated Studies in Education

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Integrated Studies in Education

Location

  • Department of Integrated Studies in Education
  • Education Building, Room 244
  • 3700 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1Y2
  • Canada
  • Graduate Programs (Graduate Certificate, M.A., MATL, and Ph.D.):
  • Education Building, Room 244
  • Telephone: 514-398-1591 (Ph.D. / M.A.) / 514-398-7149 (MATL)
  • Fax: 514-398-4529

The administrative office is open Monday to Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

About Integrated Studies in Education

The Department offers graduate students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge related to specific areas of inquiry in the field of education through our M.A. degrees (thesis or non-thesis options), including our MATL leading to teacher certification, Ph.D. in Educational Studies, and graduate certificates.

The Department offers the following programs:

Four graduate certificates (15 credits):

  • Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 1
  • Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2
  • Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language
  • Certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif

Three M.A. Thesis and Non-Thesis degree programs (45 credits) in the following areas:

  • Education and Society
  • Educational Leadership
  • Second Language Education

The Department offers an M.A. in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (60 credits) in the following areas:

  • Social Sciences
  • English Language Arts
  • Science and Technology
  • Mathematics
  • English or French Second Language
    Note: The French Second Language program is not being offered in 2014-2015.

The Department also offers a Ph.D. in Educational Studies.

Master of Arts in Education and Society

The M.A. in Education and Society consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. The two streams—Culture and Values in Education and Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum—reflect distinct but overlapping areas of educational inquiry. Study in Culture and Values in Education may focus on critical theory, philosophy, art and aesthetics, race/class/gender issues in education, or international and comparative education. The Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum stream emphasizes current perspectives on pedagogy and curriculum, teacher education, in-and-out-of-school learning, practitioner research, and classroom practice. Through both of these streams, the program brings to bear diverse applied theoretical perspectives, including philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, policy studies, gender studies, critical pedagogy, and multi-literacies. Graduates of the program go onto doctoral programs or work in education and non-profit settings. Many in-service teachers take this program for professional development.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research (24 credits). The balance of the program is coursework.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Thesis) — Mathematics and Science Education (45 credits)
This MA concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option consists mostly of coursework, but includes a project worth 6 credits. This option is less research-oriented than the thesis option and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Education and Society (Non-Thesis) — Jewish Education (45 credits)
This program is designed to offer a graduate-level point of entry into the teaching profession for students who typically will have completed a B.A. with a minor or major in Jewish Studies. The M.A. will not provide (Quebec Government) Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) teacher certification (in Quebec, certification is at the B.Ed. level), but at the present time, Jewish schools may hire non-certified teachers of Jewish Studies at their discretion.

Students interested in doing a research-focused M.A. in the area of Jewish education should follow one of the other graduate degree offerings within the area of Education and Society.

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership

The M.A. in Educational Leadership consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. This program is designed to prepare leaders in the field of education, and in other centres of formal or informal learning, who are committed to personal and institutional improvement. The program fosters the ongoing development of reflective practitioners who have a sense of educational action, the capacity to anticipate needs, the ability to exercise professional judgment within the realities of policy frameworks, and the ability to both lead and support institutional and organizational change at all levels. A central theme of the program is the impact of policy on educational practice at local, national, and international levels.

Local and international students are practising and aspiring school principals and leaders from other organizations. Graduates fulfil Quebec Ministry requirements for school leadership and find positions as school leaders, as well as opportunities in other managerial settings.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research (24 credits). The balance of the program is coursework.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis) — Coursework (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of coursework, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option – Project consists of both coursework and a project, which is worth 12 credits of the total program. It is less research-oriented than the thesis option and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Leadership (Non-Thesis) — Project — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the project must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.

Master of Arts in Second Language Education

The M.A. in Second Language Education consists of a 45-credit thesis or non-thesis program. It provides an overview of the state of the art in second-language acquisition, assessment and evaluation, and research methods, including quantitative and qualitative approaches. The program covers a wide range of current topics in applied linguistics and offers opportunities to specialize in educational sociolinguistics, curricular/methods and program planning areas (for example, content-based second-language teaching or “immersion”), language testing, language policy and planning, and critical applied linguistics. Graduates may go on to doctoral work in applied linguistics. They may also seek employment at ministry, school board, or other sites of active research on second languages. Many graduates also continue active careers in school contexts as second-language teaching practitioners, program administrators, or evaluators.

From a range of pedagogical, linguistic, cognitive, political, and sociocultural perspectives, this program combines theoretical and applied studies of how second and foreign languages are learned and used.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Second Language Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. thesis option is a research-oriented degree in which approximately half of the program consists of thesis research (24 credits). The balance of the program is coursework.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Second Language Education (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the M.A. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Second Language Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. non-thesis option, consisting entirely of coursework, is less research-oriented and suitable for practitioners interested in professional development with a theoretical orientation.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL)

The M.A. in Teaching and Learning is a professional program leading to Quebec teacher certification for those already holding an undergraduate degree in a MELS-identified teachable subject area (Mathematics, Science & Technology, Social Sciences, English, TESL, TFSL). This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Throughout the MATL, emphasis will be on the attainment of the QEP professional competencies, and evidence of mastery of these will be demonstrated in order for students to successfully complete the program. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — English or French Second Language (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach English or French Second Language.
Note: The French Second Language program is not being offered in 2014-2015.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — English Language Arts Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach English Language Arts.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — Mathematics Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach Mathematics.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — Social Sciences Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach Social Sciences.
Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching and Learning — Science and Technology Option (60 credits)
This 60-credit degree program is comprised of 45 credits of coursework, coupled with 15 credits of internship. Upon completion, students are recommended to the MELS for certification to teach Science and Technology.

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Studies

The Ph.D. in Educational Studies prepares graduates for careers in a variety of education-related fields. The Ph.D.’s core areas are curriculum and literacy, cultural and international studies in education, educational leadership, and second-language education. The program has been designed to ensure flexibility, and students experience both multidisciplinary and discipline-specific research opportunities. The program begins with a set of common courses and proceeds to specialization through advanced coursework and dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members. Graduates find work as researchers, teachers, consultants, curriculum developers, and administrators in a wide range of settings, including universities, school boards, government agencies, and international NGOs.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies
The Ph.D. in Educational Studies provides an integrative perspective on education by drawing on a range of related disciplines and research orientations. Students develop scholarly and innovative expertise in at least one of three contexts of inquiry and awareness of all three: a) the broad context of culture and society; b) the international, national, and local contexts of educational leadership and policy studies; and c) the more specific contexts of schools and other sites of teaching and learning. Students begin with a set of common core courses and proceed to specialization through advanced coursework and dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. In the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies, the Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies — Language Acquisition
Students must satisfy all program requirements for the Ph.D. in Educational Studies. The Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to language acquisition, approved by the LAP committee.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Studies — Mathematics and Science Education
This Ph.D. concentration emphasizes research in mathematics and science education, including a specific focus on teacher education in the area of math and science. Graduates will gain sufficient research experience to conduct empirical research in math and science education and sufficient teacher education experience to assume roles as teacher educators in university or other settings. The program includes targeted opportunities for candidates to develop skills, knowledge, and practices specific to teaching and learning mathematics and science, mathematics and science teacher preparation, and research in both of these areas. Applicants for the Ph.D. concentration in mathematics and science education would be expected to already have a Master's degree that included educational research.

Graduate Certificates

Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 1 (15 credits)
This 15-credit program addresses the needs of experienced and aspiring school leaders who are taking increased responsibility for the students and communities they serve. The management of schools is increasingly seen as making a major contribution to the learning and personal development of students. The professional development of school leaders, educational reform, and school partnership form the basis for the program. Course selection to be approved by Graduate Certificate Program Director.
Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2 (15 credits)

This 15-credit program explores more deeply leadership theory and educational issues and applications in a practicum. Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership 2 should normally have completed the first certificate. In combination, the two certificates allow school administrators to acquire the 30 graduate credits in the field of educational leadership required by the MELS. Course selection to be approved by Graduate Certificate Program Director.

No course taken in Certificate 1 can be repeated in Certificate 2.

Graduate Certificate; Teaching English as a Second Language (15 credits)
This 15-credit program is designed as professional development for in-service teachers and candidates with a background in education, language studies, linguistics, or a related field, or as preparation for application to our M.A. in Second Language Education. The five courses that comprise the certificate provide a solid background and offer in-depth study in the field of second-language education from a range of perspectives and with a focus on research and applications to teaching. Please note that this certificate does not lead to teacher certification. The Graduate Certificate in TESL is designed to be available to students worldwide. Courses are offered in a combination of online and face-to-face formats, and are sequenced in such a way that students can complete the certificate in one year. The maximum time for completion is three years. The first three courses are offered online, and can be undertaken anywhere an Internet connection is available. The final two courses are offered face-to-face in the Summer semester either on-site at McGill or at off-site locations with collaborative partners, if numbers warrant.
Certificat d’études supérieures en enseignement immersif (15 crédits) (15 credits)
Le certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif vise à faire la formation des enseignants en immersion française tout en abordant les défis pédagogiques reliés à l'enseignement ciblé conjointement sur la langue et le contenu. Ce certificat est destiné à la formation aux enseignants des niveaux primaire et secondaire. À cette fin, il amène d'abord l'étudiant à comprendre les causes à la fois linguistiques et cognitives des difficultés qu'éprouvent les élèves en immersion. Il propose ensuite une variété de stratégies d'enseignement propices à répondre à ces difficultés et de situations d'apprentissage étayées par les enseignants de manière à dépasser le cloisonnement entre langue et contenu. Il comporte cinq cours obligatoires. La réussite d'un test de français est obligatoire lors de la demande d'admission.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Integrated Studies in Education Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Graduate Certificates, M.A., and Ph.D. Programs

  1. Applicants to the Certificate and M.A. programs must hold a bachelor's degree from a recognized university. A minimum standing equivalent to a CGPA of 3.0/4.0, or 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years, is required. A concentration of courses related to the area chosen for graduate work is usually required. (See #5 below.)

    Applicants to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.A. in Education or a recognized equivalent degree from a recognized university. The applicant's record should indicate high academic standing (a minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0) and evidence of research competence in the proposed area of doctoral research.

  2. Applicants to the Certificate and M.A. programs must submit:
    • A current curriculum vitae
    • A letter of intent specifying academic and professional experience and interests (specifically, research interests for the Thesis option or project interests for the Non-Thesis Project option)

    Applicants to the Ph.D. in Educational Studies program must submit:

    • A current curriculum vitae
    • A letter of intent identifying the applicant's proposed research topic, potential supervisor, and expected professional direction. Please note that it is the Ph.D. applicant's responsibility to secure a supervisor as part of the admission process.
    • A four- to five-page summary of the proposed research topic identifying the applicant's main research questions, the research trends that have led to the questions, ways in which the research could be conducted, and relevant references
  3. Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation, at least one of which must be from a university-level instructor; the other may be from an administrator in an educationally relevant context.
  4. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must meet one of the following English proficiency criteria:
    • IELTS with a minimum overall band of 7.0 with a minimum writing score of 7.0; or
    • TOEFL:
      • iBT (Internet-based test) – total score of 92 with a minimum score of 22 each for the Writing and Speaking sections and a minimum of 20 each for the Reading and Listening sections
      • PBT (paper-based test) – 580

    The Department reserves the right to evaluate the applicant's language proficiency before initial registration.

  5. Further requirements applicable to specific options:

    Graduate Certificates in Educational Leadership 1 and 2 – Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant educational experience (in leadership roles or related professional experience).

    Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language – Applicants are required to pass a written and oral English language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Master of Arts in Second Language Education – Normally, applicants are required to have a minimum of 36 credits including a combination of relevant courses in education and language studies.

    Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant professional experience in education.

    Master of Arts in Educational Leadership – Normally, applicants are required to have at least two years of relevant leadership experience (teaching or related professional experience).

    Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL) (Non-Thesis) – Please see the Departmental website for additional admission requirements: www.mcgill.ca/dise/progs/matl. Applicants to the MATL TESL option are required to pass a written and oral English language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif – Applicants are required to pass a written and oral French language proficiency test set by the Department.

    Applicants are required to have experience in educational settings (formal or informal).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal (for Ph.D. applicants)
  • Ph.D. applicants must secure a Thesis Supervisor as part of the application process.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Integrated Studies in Education and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Integrated Studies in Education (M.A. - Second Language Education, M.A. - Educational Leadership, M.A. - Education and Society, Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Integrated Studies in Education (MATL)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: N/A Fall: N/A Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: Dec. 15 Summer: Dec. 15 Summer: N/A
Integrated Studies in Education (Certificate in Educational Leadership and Certificat d'études supérieures en enseignement immersif)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: N/A
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Integrated Studies in Education (Certifcate in Teaching English as a Second Language)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: Jan 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Grad certificate application dates:

Grad Cert Educational Leadership 

Philosophy

Philosophy

Location

  • Department of Philosophy
  • Leacock Building, 9th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6060
  • Fax: 514-398-7148
  • Email: info [dot] philosophy [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/philosophy

About Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy has particular strength in the following areas: Ancient Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Kant and post-Kantian German Philosophy; Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Mind; Aesthetics; Moral and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Contemporary European Philosophy.

The Department offers assistance to students in every aspect of placement. Our Placement Officer counsels students about coursework and areas of competence, helps to establish evidence of teaching ability, administers the dossier for job applications, and provides advice and follow-up in the interview process. Many of our graduates have gone on to do postdoctoral research and over 80% are now in tenure track or sessional appointments.

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. in Philosophy. It also offers, in conjunction with the Biomedical Ethics Unit, a course of study leading to the M.A. degree in Bioethics.

Students with an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 1 level. Students who hold an M.A. degree in Philosophy, or equivalent, from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 2 level. Students entering the Ph.D. program (at Ph.D. 1 or Ph.D. 2) will be required to complete two years of coursework. (N.B. At present, we do not normally consider applicants for an M.A. in Philosophy, with the exception of the specialty M.A. in Biomedical Ethics.) The Department considers an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy to be one that furnishes a student with:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval, and Modern.
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in 1 and 2.

Ph.D. Program

By December 15 of their third year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 1 and August 15 in their second year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 2, students must submit a research paper (the “candidacy paper” [3 credits]), which may be worked up from a paper written to fulfil the requirements of a graduate course, to a Thesis Advancement Committee consisting of a least two members of the staff of the Department. The membership of this committee will be determined by the Graduate Director in consultation with the student; it is anticipated that members of this committee would, in principle, direct the student's thesis. This committee assigns a grade to the student's paper and reviews her or his graduate performance; on the basis of its assessment and review, it recommends to the Department as a whole either to permit the student to continue with the Ph.D. program and undertake a thesis or to decline to permit the student to continue. Two necessary conditions for a positive recommendation are that the student (a) receive a grade of at least B+ on the candidacy paper, and (b) have at least a 3.5 GPA (on the undergraduate Grade Point scale) in the coursework required for the program. The Department as a whole, taking into account the Thesis Advancement Committee's recommendation and the student's overall academic record in the program, decides whether to permit the student to continue. Students who do not receive a positive recommendation but who satisfy Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements (no courses below a B- and completion of 45 credits) will be recommended to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by the Department to transfer from the Ph.D. program to the M.A. program.

Graduate students are expected to continue to contribute to the intellectual life of the Department after being promoted to candidacy. They can do so by participating in reading and discussion groups and, most of all, by auditing seminars both within and outside their areas of specialty.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Philosophy (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The Master's in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics. Ordinarily, it takes at least two years to complete, although some students have completed it in 18 months. The first year is devoted to coursework (including a clinical practicum), and the second year is devoted to a master's thesis on a topic in bioethics that also satisfies the requirements of the base discipline. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (6 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required, including the thesis. Students graduate with a master's degree from the faculty of their base discipline (M.A., M.Sc., or LL.M.) with a specialization in bioethics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy
The program is intended for students with a B.A. or M.A. in Philosophy, though some exceptions may be possible. It is a pluralist Department with an excellent professor-to-student ratio, strong preparation for dissertation work, and guaranteed full funding for four years for all admitted Ph.D. students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Philosophy who wish to earn 9 additional credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women's studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Philosophy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ph.D.

Students with an Honours B.A. degree in Philosophy, or the equivalent, are normally admitted to the Ph.D. program directly at the Ph.D. 1 level. The Department considers an Honours B.A. degree to include:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western philosophy: Greek, Medieval, Modern
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in (1) and (2)

To demonstrate their competence in these areas, applicants must submit transcripts of academic work, three letters of recommendation from persons with whom they have studied, and at least one substantial example (approximately 15–20 typewritten pages) of their written philosophical work.

In addition, applicants from North America whose first language is English are strongly encouraged to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English (TOEFL score).

Students who hold an M.A. degree from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. 2 level.

M.A. (Bioethics)

Students applying to the Bioethics Specialty program must write an M.A. thesis proposal. All applications to this program must also receive the approval of the Director of the Specialty program. Students who apply for this program should note that they must participate in a practicum, which continues beyond the end of their second term of classes.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letters of Reference – three (3) original letters of reference
  • Writing Sample (15–20 pages)
  • Personal Statement (2–3 pages)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Philosophy and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the Department
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department considers admissions for the Fall term only. Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Social Media