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Philosophy

Philosophy

Location

  • Department of Philosophy
  • Leacock Building, 9th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6060
  • Fax: 514-398-7148
  • Email: info [dot] philosophy [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/philosophy

About Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy has particular strength in the following areas: Ancient Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Kant and post-Kantian German Philosophy; Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Mind; Aesthetics; Moral and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Contemporary European Philosophy.

The Department offers assistance to students in every aspect of placement. Our Placement Officer counsels students about coursework and areas of competence, helps to establish evidence of teaching ability, administers the dossier for job applications, and provides advice and follow-up in the interview process. Many of our graduates have gone on to do postdoctoral research and over 80% are now in tenure track or sessional appointments.

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. in Philosophy. It also offers, in conjunction with the Biomedical Ethics Unit, a course of study leading to the M.A. degree in Bioethics.

Students with an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 1 level. Students who hold an M.A. degree in Philosophy, or equivalent, from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 2 level. Students entering the Ph.D. program (at Ph.D. 1 or Ph.D. 2) will be required to complete two years of coursework. (N.B. At present, we do not normally consider applicants for an M.A. in Philosophy, with the exception of the specialty M.A. in Biomedical Ethics.) The Department considers an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy to be one that furnishes a student with:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval, and Modern.
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in 1 and 2.

Ph.D. Program

By December 15 of their third year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 1 and August 15 in their second year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 2, students must submit a research paper (the “candidacy paper” [3 credits]), which may be worked up from a paper written to fulfil the requirements of a graduate course, to a Thesis Advancement Committee consisting of a least two members of the staff of the Department. The membership of this committee will be determined by the Graduate Director in consultation with the student; it is anticipated that members of this committee would, in principle, direct the student's thesis. This committee assigns a grade to the student's paper and reviews her or his graduate performance; on the basis of its assessment and review, it recommends to the Department as a whole either to permit the student to continue with the Ph.D. program and undertake a thesis or to decline to permit the student to continue. Two necessary conditions for a positive recommendation are that the student (a) receive a grade of at least B+ on the candidacy paper, and (b) have at least a 3.5 GPA (on the undergraduate Grade Point scale) in the coursework required for the program. The Department as a whole, taking into account the Thesis Advancement Committee's recommendation and the student's overall academic record in the program, decides whether to permit the student to continue. Students who do not receive a positive recommendation but who satisfy Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements (no courses below a B- and completion of 45 credits) will be recommended to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by the Department to transfer from the Ph.D. program to the M.A. program.

Graduate students are expected to continue to contribute to the intellectual life of the Department after being promoted to candidacy. They can do so by participating in reading and discussion groups and, most of all, by auditing seminars both within and outside their areas of specialty.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Philosophy (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The Master's in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics. Ordinarily, it takes at least two years to complete, although some students have completed it in 18 months. The first year is devoted to coursework (including a clinical practicum), and the second year is devoted to a master's thesis on a topic in bioethics that also satisfies the requirements of the base discipline. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (6 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required, including the thesis. Students graduate with a master's degree from the faculty of their base discipline (M.A., M.Sc., or LL.M.) with a specialization in bioethics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy
The program is intended for students with a B.A. or M.A. in Philosophy, though some exceptions may be possible. It is a pluralist Department with an excellent professor-to-student ratio, strong preparation for dissertation work, and guaranteed full funding for four years for all admitted Ph.D. students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Philosophy who wish to earn 9 additional credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women's studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Philosophy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ph.D.

Students with an Honours B.A. degree in Philosophy, or the equivalent, are normally admitted to the Ph.D. program directly at the Ph.D. 1 level. The Department considers an Honours B.A. degree to include:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western philosophy: Greek, Medieval, Modern
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in (1) and (2)

To demonstrate their competence in these areas, applicants must submit transcripts of academic work, three letters of recommendation from persons with whom they have studied, and at least one substantial example (approximately 15–20 typewritten pages) of their written philosophical work.

In addition, applicants from North America whose first language is English are strongly encouraged to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English (TOEFL score).

Students who hold an M.A. degree from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. 2 level.

M.A. (Bioethics)

Students applying to the Bioethics Specialty program must write an M.A. thesis proposal. All applications to this program must also receive the approval of the Director of the Specialty program. Students who apply for this program should note that they must participate in a practicum, which continues beyond the end of their second term of classes.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letters of Reference – three (3) original letters of reference
  • Writing Sample (15–20 pages)
  • Personal Statement (2–3 pages)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Philosophy and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the Department
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department considers admissions for the Fall term only. Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics and Statistics

Location

  • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3800
  • Fax: 514-398-3899
  • Email: grad [dot] mathstat [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.math.mcgill.ca

About Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs that can be focused on applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to master’s degrees (M.A. or M.Sc.), with program options in Bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE). The research groups are: Algebra Category; Theory and Logic; Geometric Group Theory; Algebraic Geometry; Discrete Mathematics; Mathematical Physics; Analysis and its Applications; Differential Geometry; Number Theory; Applied Mathematics; Differential Equations; and Probability and Statistics. In the basic master’s programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option which requires a project. The Bioinformatics and CSE options require a thesis. In addition to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Statistics, there is a Ph.D. option in Bioinformatics.

The Department website (www.math.mcgill.ca) provides extensive information on the Department and its facilities, including the research activities and the research interests of individual faculty members. It also provides detailed information, supplementary to this eCalendar, concerning our programs, admissions, funding of graduate students, thesis requirements, advice concerning the choice of courses, etc.

Students are urged to consult the website (www.math.uqam.ca/ISM) of the Institut des Sciences Mathématiques (ISM), which coordinates intermediate and advanced-level graduate courses among Montreal and Quebec universities. A list of courses available under the ISM auspices can be obtained from the ISM website. The ISM also offers fellowships and promotes a variety of joint academic activities greatly enhancing the mathematical environment in Montreal and in the province of Quebec.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the Master's degree (M.A.). The thesis option requires a thesis (24 credits) and six approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 21 credits.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The non-thesis option requires a project (16 credits) and eight approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 29 credits.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.). The thesis option requires a thesis (24 credits) and six approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 21 credits.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (47 credits)
CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. Please visit our website for more information: www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/msc_cse_option.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.).The non-thesis option requires a project (16 credits) and eight approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 29 credits.

Ph.D. Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics
The Department offers a course of studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. It differs substantially from the master’s programs in that the student must write a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge. The thesis topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the research supervisor. The thesis must be examined and approved by an internal examiner (normally the research supervisor), an external examiner and the Oral Examination Committee. The student must make an oral defense of the thesis before that Committee. In addition, the student has to pass comprehensive examinations.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mathematics and Statistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements, the Department requirements are as follows:

Master's Degree

The normal entrance requirement for the master's programs is a Canadian honours degree or its equivalent, with high standing, in mathematics or a closely related discipline in the case of applicants intending to concentrate in statistics or applied mathematics.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in pure mathematics should have a strong background in linear algebra, abstract algebra, and real and complex analysis.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in statistics should have a strong background in linear algebra and basic real analysis. A calculus-based course in probability and one in statistics are required, as well as some knowledge of computer programming. Some knowledge of numerical analysis and optimization is desirable.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in applied mathematics should have a strong background in most of the areas of linear algebra, analysis, differential equations, discrete mathematics, and numerical analysis. Some knowledge of computer programming is also desirable.

Students whose preparation is insufficient for the program they wish to enter may, exceptionally, be admitted to a Qualifying year.

Ph.D. Degree

A master's degree with high standing is required, in addition to the requirements listed above for the master’s program. Students may transfer directly from the master’s program to the Ph.D. program under certain conditions. Students without a master's degree, but with exceptionally strong undergraduate training, may be admitted directly to Ph.D. 1.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – In the personal statement, the applicants should clearly explain their choice of preferred research group(s) and preferred area(s) of research, as well as providing relevant information that will not be reflected on their transcripts.
  • Research Proposal (optional) – If applicants have a specific research problem of interest that they want to pursue, they may discuss the details in the research proposal.
  • Applicants in pure and applied mathematics should provide a GRE score report, if available

For more details, please consult the website at www.math.mcgill.ca/students/graduate/application.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

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