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History and Classical Studies

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

History and Classical Studies

Location

  • Department of History and Classical Studies
  • Stephen Leacock Building, 7th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About History and Classical Studies

The Department of History and Classical Studies has particular strengths in Canadian history, British and European history, East Asian history, the history of medicine, the history of science, and newer fields such as the history of gender and sexuality, the history of the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds, and global history. The Department offers interdisciplinary options in European studies, developmental studies, and women’s studies at the M.A. level. Both M.A. and Ph.D. students can also write their thesis or research paper on the History of Medicine. The Department is composed of 39 full-time faculty members as well as a strong complement of visiting professors, faculty lecturers, and postdoctoral fellows. This array of dedicated teachers and scholars supports high-quality instruction and research across the periods of history and regions of the globe. Our professors have won many prizes for their books and articles, and their ongoing investigations are supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the FQRSC, CFI, the Killam Trust, and the Mellon Foundation. The Department is home to a number of major collaborative research projects, all of which also include students. Among these are the Montreal History Group; the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC); Quelques arpents de neige, an environmental history group; and the French Atlantic History Group.

Classics was among the first disciplines taught at McGill College. Our students benefit from the resources of closely related disciplines and draw on the academic expertise of scholars from various backgrounds. Many awards and prizes are available for students who excel in the classroom, and both undergraduates and graduates can join professors on study tours and field projects. Students can also become members of the Classics Students Association and publish their work in the McGill Journal of Classical Studies, aptly titled Hirundo—Latin for “swallow,” like the martlets found on the McGill coat-of-arms, ever soaring in search of knowledge.

We offer prospective students the chance to study with leading scholars in a variety of fields.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed regulations and information (www.mcgill.ca/history).

Degrees in History

The M.A. program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year (Fall, Winter, and Summer). Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. The M.A. in History offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of history in a variety of fields. The McGill History degree carries international prestige and cachet and contributes meaningfully to success on the job market. Careers pursued by our graduates, aside from those who have sought and found places on the faculties of colleges and universities, have included positions in the area of public history at museums and other public institutions, in libraries and archives, in the diplomatic and other branches of the civil service, and in a variety of NGOs.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. Preparation of a thesis provides an opportunity for the preparation of a sustained project under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The seminars, in particular, provide an opportunity to analyze primary sources under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues and write their research paper on a topic approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. Degree in the History of Medicine does not have a thesis option. This non-thesis degree is normally completed in one year. Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The curriculum is intended to provide students with a strong disciplinary competence in history and a distinctively interdisciplinary perspective. Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History, or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); History
The Ph.D. in History is a professional degree program that prepares students for participation in the academy as historians. They gain competence in historical methods and good control over at least three fields of study. The dissertation is a work of primary research that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. Candidates in the field of Medical History will prepare the major field for the comprehensive examination with a member of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the two minor fields with members of the Department of History and Classical Studies. The thesis will normally be directed by the director of the major field. In all other respects, the same rules will apply to candidates in this area as apply to other Ph.D. students in History.

Degrees in Classics

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Classics offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of classical studies in a variety of fields. The program emphasizes proficiency both in technical areas of the discipline, especially Greek and Latin language, and in critical reading, writing, and research skills. The McGill M.A. in Classics is designed to prepare students to enter doctoral programs and, eventually, an academic career in any of the related fields of classical studies. Graduates have also pursued successful careers in teaching, law, museum science, and branches of civil service. This program can be completed in one year, though it is normally completed in two years.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Classics
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

History and Classical Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General: minimum CGPA of 3.3 on 4.0; minimum TOEFL of 550 on the paper-based test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score no less than 20.

Master in History

Normally, candidates are required to possess a B.A. (Honours) in History consisting of 60 credits in history. Students with other undergraduate history degrees (normally including serious research components) may be considered eligible. Applicants not satisfying these conditions but otherwise judged worthy of serious consideration will be asked to register in a Qualifying program in which they will undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Master in History – Development Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – European Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – Gender and Women's Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either History—B.A. (Honours) or equivalent—or a degree in one of the health professions with some background in history. Candidates with a willingness to do preparatory work in history are also encouraged to apply.

Ph.D. in History

Normally, an M.A. in History (Students choosing the field of History of Medicine normally enter with an M.A. in History of Medicine).

Master in Classics

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. in Classics

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed information (www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate).

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of History and Classical Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Information Studies

School of Information Studies

Location

  • School of Information Studies
  • 3661 Peel Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1X1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4204
  • Fax: 514-398-7193
  • Email: sis [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/sis

About Information Studies

The School of Information Studies (SIS) at McGill University is a dynamic teaching and research unit engaged in the education of information professionals and scholars. At the School, we educate individuals who make a difference in the management and design of information resources, services, and systems from a human-centred perspective, and find better ways to organize, access, disseminate, use, and preserve information and recorded knowledge. As the pioneer school of its kind in Canada, SIS has been offering programs at McGill since 1897, with continuous accreditation by the American Library Association (ALA) since 1929. The School offers a Master of Information Studies (M.I.St.), post-M.I.St. certificate and diploma programs, and a Ph.D. in Information Studies.

Information Studies is the name assigned to a wide-ranging discipline. Faculty members are all engaged in the broad research area of Human-Information Interaction (HII), which includes our core research areas of Human-Computer Interaction, Information Behaviour and Services, and Information and Knowledge Management, with projects in areas such as: data mining, digital curation, information classification, information preservation, knowledge management, multisensory information, and user experience.

For complete information about the School of Information Studies, please see our website at www.mcgill.ca/sis.

For complete information about our programs, please see the Programs & courses section of our website.

Master of Information Studies (M.I.St.); Information Studies (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The Master of Information Studies is a 48-credit non-thesis program, accredited by the American Library Association (ALA). This program is designed to prepare graduates for the broad field of Information Studies. Courses are offered in areas of specialization including: Archival Studies, Information and Computer Technologies, Knowledge Management, and Library Studies, among others. The program begins with a set of common courses followed by two streams: students may chose either a stream comprised of courses in areas of specialization, or another stream to conduct a major research project. The program provides the intellectual foundation for careers as information professionals; fosters competencies in managing information and knowledge resources; promotes the appropriate use of technology in meeting information needs; promotes research in information studies; advocates access to information as a fundamental human right; and educates service-oriented professionals.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Information Studies
The Ph.D. in Information Studies provides an opportunity for exceptional candidates to study interdisciplinary research topics at the doctoral level. The program offers a thorough grounding in both current theory and methods of research to ensure that students develop knowledge and critical awareness of relevant theories, principles, and methods in Information Studies and acquire the expertise to conduct and promote scholarly research in the context of Information Studies. The program begins with a set of common courses and proceeds to specialization through dissertation topics focused on areas of expertise that are supported by the research interests of current faculty members. Students develop scholarly and innovative expertise in Human-Information Interaction (HII) in one of three research areas: Human-Computer Interaction; Information Behaviour and Services; and Information and Knowledge Management. The program prepares graduates for a wide range of settings in research, teaching, and senior administrative positions, in Quebec, Canada, and internationally; contributes to the development of knowledge and to teaching/learning in Information Studies; and builds national and international visibility of Information Studies from a research perspective.
Graduate Certificate in Library and Information Studies (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate 15-credit program is designed to assist library and information professionals currently holding an American Library Association (ALA)-accredited (or equivalent) master's degree to update their qualifications for advanced responsibility. The program may be completed in one or two academic terms, or on a part-time basis to a maximum of five years.
Graduate Diploma in Library and Information Studies (30 credits)
The Graduate Diploma 30-credit program provides professional librarians and information specialists currently holding an American Library Association (ALA)-accredited (or equivalent) master's degree with formal opportunities to update, specialize, and redirect their careers for advanced responsibility. For those considering admission into the doctoral program, it will provide an opportunity to further develop their research interests. The program may be completed in one calendar year, or on a part-time basis to a maximum of five years.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Sep. 3, 2014).

Information Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master of Information Studies (M.I.St.)

  1. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree from a recognized university. Academic Standing of at least B, or second class – upper division, or a CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 is required. Courses in library and/or information studies taken before or as part of an undergraduate degree, or such courses taken in a school with a program not accredited by the American Library Association, cannot be accepted as credit toward the McGill M.I.St.
  2. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission. Such proof normally comprises the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 600 (paper-based test), 100 (iBT Internet-based TOEFL) with a written score of at least 25 and a reading, speaking, and listening score not less than 20, or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 7.5. Applicants whose mother tongue is not English may be asked to demonstrate English-language competency beyond the submission of the TOEFL or IELTS scores. For more information about proof of proficiency, refer to the Admissions section of the School's website.
  3. Competency in the use of computers is expected. Applicants should have a thorough knowledge of the Windows operating system, particularly file management and word processing, and presentation software such as PowerPoint.
  4. Previous library work experience, while not essential, will be given consideration in assessing an application, but this experience cannot replace academic criteria.

Ph.D. in Information Studies

  1. Applicants should normally have a master's degree in Library and Information Studies (or equivalent). Master's degrees in other fields will be considered in relation to the proposed research.

    An applicant with a master's degree in Library and Information Studies (or equivalent) will normally be admitted to Ph.D. 2.

    An applicant with a master's degree in another field may be considered for admission to Ph.D. 2, but may need to register for courses to upgrade background knowledge in library and information studies.

    An applicant who holds only a bachelor’s degree from McGill University or an approved institution in Information Studies (or equivalent) in exceptional circumstances may be admitted to Ph.D. 1.

    A CGPA of at least 3.0 out of 4.0 at both the undergraduate and graduate levels is required.

  2. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission. Such proof normally comprises the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 600 (paper-based test), 100 (iBT Internet-based TOEFL) with a written score of at least 25 and a reading, speaking, and listening score not less than 20, or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 7.5. Applicants whose mother tongue is not English may be asked to demonstrate English-language competency beyond the submission of the TOEFL or IELTS scores. For more information about proof of proficiency, refer to the Admissions section of the School's website.

Graduate Certificate in Library and Information Studies

  1. Applicants should have a master's degree in Library and Information Studies from a program accredited by the American Library Association (or equivalent). Candidates will normally have at least three years' professional experience following completion of their master's degree.
  2. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission. Such proof normally comprises the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 600 (paper-based test), 100 (iBT Internet-based TOEFL) with a written score of at least 25 and a reading, speaking, and listening score not less than 20, or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 7.5. Applicants whose mother tongue is not English may be asked to demonstrate English-language competency beyond the submission of the TOEFL or IELTS scores. For more information about proof of proficiency, refer the Admissions section of the School's website.

Graduate Diploma in Library and Information Studies

  1. Applicants should have a master's degree in Library and Information Studies from a program accredited by the American Library Association (or equivalent). Admission of students with overseas degrees will be guided by the M.L.I.S. equivalency standards of the A.L.A. Applicants will normally have at least three years' professional experience following completion of the M.L.I.S.
  2. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission. Such proof normally comprises the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 600 (paper-based test), 100 (iBT Internet-based TOEFL) with a written score of at least 25 and a reading, speaking, and listening score not less than 20, or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 7.5. Applicants whose mother tongue is not English may be asked to demonstrate English-language competency beyond the submission of the TOEFL or IELTS scores. For more information about proof of proficiency, refer to the Admissions section of the School's website.

Application Procedures

Detailed graduate application procedures and McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Two academic reference letters; if degree was awarded more than five years ago, two employer letters of recommendation instead of academic letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal – Ph.D. only

Ph.D. applicants are encouraged to review the Faculty and Research sections of the School's website to assist in identifying possible dissertation supervisors and to become familiar with the School's research areas before applying to the program. Questions can be addressed to the Ph.D. Program Director.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Information Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

M.I.St., Graduate Certificate, and Graduate Diploma
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Mar. 1 Fall: Feb. 15 Fall: Contact the School's Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: Contact the School's Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: Contact the School's Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator
Ph.D.
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the School's Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: Contact the School's Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: Contact the School's Administrative & Student Affairs Coordinator

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete application are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Sep. 3, 2014).

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