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Political Science

Political Science

Location

  • Department of Political Science
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 414
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Political Science

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. (with or without thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. These programs combine depth of specialization in a particular field with breadth of knowledge in related fields. The staff offers courses and supervises research on most of the important areas of political science. Students may specialize in any of the following: Canadian Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, or International Relations.

M.A. graduates gain the scholarly preparation required to proceed to the Ph.D. program at McGill or elsewhere. Alternatively, the M.A. degree prepares graduates for teaching at the college level, for advanced study in other disciplines, or for rewarding jobs in government and in the private sector. Students in the M.A. program may choose either the Research Essay option or the Thesis option. Both options are generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada.

Besides its traditional M.A. program, the Department also offers M.A. options in Social Statistics, Development Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and European Studies. Interested students must apply and be accepted to both the political science M.A. program and to the option program.

Graduate students can benefit from expertise and advanced scholarship in such diverse research areas as Electoral Studies, Comparative Federalism, Constitutional Theory and Practice, International Peace and Security Studies, International Development, Nations and Nationalism, Health and Social Policy, and Identity Politics. For a full list of our affiliated research centres and institutes, please consult our website: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/centres.

Changes may take place after this content is published. Students are advised to contact the Department Office for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.

Master's Programs

Students may select a program with the Thesis or the Non-Thesis (Research Project) option in completing M.A. degree requirements. They may switch from one option to the other while completing their coursework.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. A main purpose of the M.A. degree is to demonstrate an ability to design and execute with competence a major piece of research, comparable to a full‐length article in a scholarly journal. The length will vary with the nature of the topic. A thesis that contains considerable data analysis might be well developed in 50 pages, while an institutional or historical study would generally be longer.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/studies/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European Studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. Students in the non-thesis program will submit a research essay. The research essay will normally be based on a paper written for a graduate seminar or an independent reading course. The research essay requirement also applies to each of the non-thesis options listed below.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/studies/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The Gender and Women’s Studies Option offers McGill graduate students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework, a cross‐disciplinary specialization in feminist, and gender and/or women’s studies, deploying a wide array of disciplinary methodologies and modes of inquiry. The student's research paper must be on a topic centrally focused on gender and/or women's studies. See www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
The Social Statistics Option complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data or equivalent. Students complete course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, as advised by the Option Adviser, and subject to approval by the Department, and a statistics‐based M.A. research paper in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. See www.mcgill.ca/socialstatistics. Entrance to this option is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee subsequent to acceptance into the Departmental program. A research paper is required to demonstrate proficiency in research. It is normally about 50 pages in length and involves revision of a paper written for one of the graduate courses completed in the program. The research paper is evaluated by two faculty members in the Department.

Ph.D. Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science
The doctoral program is designed to give students the necessary foundation for making original contributions to knowledge. Graduate courses provide students with analytical and theoretical tools used in particular subfields. This general training includes specialized training in research methods. Recent graduates of our doctoral program are pursuing diverse employment opportunities. See: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/recentplacements.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Political Science and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. This option is a cross-disciplinary specialization run by the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies (see www.mcgill.ca/igsf). The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies. For more information on the option, see: www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

Political Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The graduate Admissions Committee only considers applications from those who already have an undergraduate academic degree in political science or a closely related field (e.g., international studies, sociology, philosophy for prospective political theorists, etc.). Those without this required background occasionally enrol as Special Students in the undergraduate program and take upper-level undergraduate courses in order to build the academic record necessary to apply to the graduate program.

Master's

Students holding a B.A. degree may be eligible for admission to the M.A. program. Preparation equivalent to a McGill Honours program in Political Science is desirable.

Ph.D.

Students holding a master’s degree in political science may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program. In some instances, outstanding students with a B.A. in Political Science may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program without having completed an M.A. degree. They will be considered Ph.D. 1 and some previous political science coursework could be applied to the requirements of the program, provided that it did not count toward any other degree.

Reference Letters

All applicants, including those who have done their undergraduate work at McGill, must submit two letters of reference. It is recommended that you contact your referees at least a month in advance of the deadline. Applications that do not have references by January 15 will not be considered.

GRE and TOEFL Exams

GRE results are required for applications to the doctoral program. Use codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 1999. The test should be written well in advance of the application deadline. See www.ets.org/gre for more information on registering for the test. GRE results are not required for students applying to the master's program.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian/American institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) is required for admission. Please use the codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 89 when writing the TOEFL exam. See www.ets.org/toefl for more information on registering for the test. The IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) with a minimum overall band of 6.5 is also acceptable. Files will not be considered unless TOEFL/IELTS scores are received before the application deadline (January 15 for admission in the Fall).

For more information, consult the following websites: www.ets.org/gre and www.ets.org/toefl.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Writing Sample – Ph.D. only
  • GRE – required for applications to the Ph.D.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Completed applications (including all supporting documentation listed above) for all graduate programs in Political Science must be received by January 15. For detailed information, please see the Graduate Applicant Checklist at: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/gradformsdocs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

Economics

Economics

Location

  • Department of Economics
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 443
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3030
  • Fax: 514-398-4938
  • Email: graduate [dot] economics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/economics

About Economics

The Department of Economics offers M.A. and Ph.D. programs that attract students from all over the world. Faculty members conduct research in numerous areas of economics, with particularly strong representation in the fields of econometrics, empirical microeconomics including development, and natural resources. The Department counts among its members a holder of a Canada Research Chair, two James McGill Professors, two William Dawson Scholars, and an Officer of the Order of Canada (who is also a Bank of Canada Research Fellow), and two Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada.

Lectures and examinations in the graduate program (M.A. and Ph.D.) in Economics are given in the core areas of macroeconomics, microeconomics, econometrics, and several fields including economic development, financial econometrics, industrial organization, health economics, international economics, labour economics, monetary economics, mathematical economics, and advanced theory.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Economics (Thesis) (48 credits)
The Master of Arts program in Economics (Thesis) serves students preparing for a Ph.D. in Economics. For students who wish to complement disciplinary training in Economics with research experience in applying statistical methods across the social sciences, the Department offers the Social Statistics Option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Economics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Master of Arts program in Economics (Non-Thesis) serves students seeking to solidify and deepen their understanding of economics prior to a career in government or the private non-academic sector, and those preparing for a Ph.D. in Economics. For students who wish to complement disciplinary training in Economics with research experience in applying statistical methods across the social sciences, the Department offers the Social Statistics Option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Economics (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
For those students interested in the interdisciplinary study of development, anchored in Economics, the Department offers the Development Studies Option (DSO). This program is offered as an option within existing M.A. and Ph.D. programs in the departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in Development Studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. or Ph.D. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. or Ph.D. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Economics (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
For students who wish to complement disciplinary training in Economics with research experience in applying statistical methods across the social sciences, the Department offers the Social Statistics Option. Students will normally complete the usual program course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, chosen in consultation with the option adviser, and subject to approval by the home department. Students will complete a statistics-based M.A. research paper (Economics, Political Science, Sociology) or thesis (Geography) in conjunction with an interdisciplinary “capstone seminar.” Acceptance into the program is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee and is contingent on acceptance into the M.A. program in one of the participating departments (Economics, Geography, Political Science, Sociology), which in turn requires meeting Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies admission requirements.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Economics
The Ph.D. program in Economics is designed to prepare students for research, whether in an academic or government setting, and teaching. The Department's faculty members conduct research in numerous areas of economics. The low student-faculty ratio ensures students receive individual attention to their own research, and are able to act as research assistants to the Faculty. The Department collaborates with the four other Economics departments in Montreal to extend the Ph.D.-level course offerings and to offer numerous external speakers and conferences.
Note: Changes may take place after this information has been published. Students are advised to contact the Department for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

Economics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

An Honours B.A. in Economics is the normal requirement, although students holding an ordinary B.A., whether in economics or another discipline, may also be eligible for admission. Students judged by the Admissions Committee to have deficiencies in their preparation in economics may be admitted to a Qualifying year in which they undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Students who have not previously passed a suitable course in statistics must take the undergraduate Honours Statistics course, ECON 257D1/ECON 257D2. Students are also expected to have completed or to complete three terms of introductory calculus and at least one term of linear algebra.

If your education has been interrupted or if you do not have an undergraduate or graduate degree in Economics from a Canadian university, you must take the Graduate Record Examination (General Test) and arrange for your scores to be sent to us. Note that the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) cannot be substituted for the GRE. McGill University’s institutional code is 0935. The Department of Economics’ code is 1801. For more information about the GRE, please visit this website.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Information can be accessed on the Economics Department website at www.mcgill.ca/economics.

Additional Requirements

  • GRE – mandatory if your education was interrupted or you do not have a degree in Economics from a Canadian university
  • Personal Statement

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

East Asian Studies

East Asian Studies

Location

  • Department of East Asian Studies
  • 688 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 425
  • Montreal, QC H3A 3R1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6742
  • Email: asian [dot] studies [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/eas

About East Asian Studies

The Department of East Asian Studies specializes in: modern and literary Chinese and Japanese; modern Korean; and in emerging fields of cultural analysis including cultural studies, women's literature, and the history of medicine, science, and technology. Research concentrations include East Asian literature, popular culture and religion, aesthetics, performance and politics, gender studies, film and media studies, early Chinese philosophy and newly excavated texts, and Chinese historical archaeology. The Department provides graduate training in the China and Japan fields at both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels. Candidates may study with Associate Members in other departments and faculties specializing in East Asia. Library holdings exceed 80,000 volumes and are being continually expanded. Candidates are expected to use primary and secondary sources in their theses and to spend time in Asia gathering data for their research topics. East Asian Studies provides excellent preparation for a future career in professions such as international business management, education, law, journalism, and communications, in addition to the necessary training for advanced study at the graduate level.

Members of the Department of East Asian Studies are recognized as being leading international experts in their chosen fields and disciplines, with numerous publications and honours to their credit.

The Centre for East Asian Research (CEAR), affiliated with the Department of East Asian Studies, actively supports and encourages community outreach. It offers a wide range of activities throughout the year such as lectures, presentations, seminars, workshops, speech contests, cultural activities, and additions of new associate members.

Master of Arts (M.A.); East Asian Studies (Thesis) (Ad Hoc) (45 credits)
The M.A. program requires a thesis that engages with current theoretical and methodological issues and uses both primary and secondary sources in East Asian languages. Entering students are expected to have a background and/or degree in disciplines relating to East Asia, and have knowledge of an East Asian language. Graduates of our program are pursuing careers in academia, publishing, government service, the financial industry, media and communications, and other fields.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); East Asian Studies (Ad Hoc)
The Ph.D. program requires a thesis that engages with current theoretical and methodological issues and uses both primary and secondary sources in East Asian languages. Entering students are expected to have a background and/or degree in disciplines relating to East Asia and have knowledge of an East Asian language. Graduates of our program are pursuing careers in academia, publishing, government service, the financial industry, media and communications, and other fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

East Asian Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General

A minimum standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years.

TOEFL, GRE, and IELTS (if applicable).

Applicants who have not studied at a Canadian institution must submit official copies of their Graduate Record Examination (GRE) at the time of application. These scores must come directly from the Educational Testing Service; photocopies are not accepted. A minimum TOEFL score of 577 is required of all applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree at a foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or at a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). Alternatively, students proving their English proficiency may use the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) examination, for which the minimum score is an overall band average of 6.5.

M.A.

Applicants must hold, or expect to hold by September of the year of entry, a bachelor's degree in East Asian Studies or a related field. Applicants are expected to have proficiency in the East Asian language(s) most useful for the proposed graduate work (preferably three years or more of coursework, or equivalent).

Ph.D.

Applicants must hold, or expect to hold by September of the year of entry, a master's degree in East Asian Studies or a related field.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

The application deadline for the September 2014 term is January 6, 2014.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal – approximately 500 words for master's and five pages for Ph.D. applicants. A description of the proposed research project, with brief bibliography, should be included in the Research Proposal.
  • GRE – required for applicants who have not studied at a Canadian university

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 6 Fall: Jan. 6 Fall: Jan. 6
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Location

  • School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition
  • Macdonald-Stewart Building, Room MS2-039
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7762
  • Fax: 514-398-7739
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/dietetics

About Dietetics and Human Nutrition

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, cutting-edge nutrition research is conducted by its nine tenure-track professors and six faculty lecturers in all areas recommended by North American Nutrition Societies. These include molecular and cellular nutrition, clinical, community, and international nutrition. Domains emphasized by School researchers include: epigenetics; proteomics; metabolomics; embryonic and fetal origins of health and disease; the development of improved recommendations and policies for optimizing health in at-risk populations including Aboriginal populations, mothers and children, and the elderly; and the development of novel nutritional and/or nutraceutical approaches for treatment during surgery and recovery from disease.

Research is conducted in our on-site research labs, the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), the Mary Emily Clinical Nutrition Research unit, and the MUHC Teaching Hospitals. Students can conduct research or participate in clinical rotations with the BITS – Barbados, IDRC – Ghana and field sites in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Nutrition (Thesis) (45 credits)
A master’s degree in Human Nutrition offers advanced Nutrition courses in a broad range of research areas. The program is suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in nutritional sciences, exercise physiology, kinesiology, food science, biochemistry, medicine, or another closely related field. Students are required to complete 14 credits in advanced nutrition coursework plus 31 credits related to their thesis research. Graduates of our M.Sc. thesis degree have pursued successful careers in research, international health agencies, government agencies, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Practicum (45 credits) and Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program is a course-based master’s program. It allows students to further develop knowledge and expertise in nutrition. Students are required to complete 29 credits in advanced Nutrition courses plus 16 credits related to a research project or an advanced practicum (reserved for registered dietitians). Careers include managerial positions for practising dietitians, and careers in nutrition programs, government, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Dietetics Credentialing (83 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program in Dietetics Credentialing is a course-based master's program with a dietetics Stage (internship) included. At the end of the program, students are qualified to be licensed with one of the provincial regulatory bodies in Canada, as well as in other countries, and practise in the areas of clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and foodservice management; French competency is an asset. The program is preceded by a Qualifying year, if necessary, to complete certain courses required for licensure. This is followed by three semesters of graduate-level courses (46 credits) and 3 semesters of Stage (37 credits), which include a practice-based graduate project.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Nutrition
A Ph.D. degree in Human Nutrition is suitable for students with an M.Sc. degree in Nutritional Sciences or related areas who wish to become independent researchers and/or leaders in the field of nutritional sciences. The School offers a stimulating research environment with opportunities in a wide range of areas of basic science, clinical research with our many hospital clinicians, as well as population health in Canada and abroad. Careers include academic, senior government, and industry positions within Canada and internationally.
Graduate Diploma in Registered Dietitian Credentialing (30 credits)
In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill, students pursuing a graduate degree in nutrition have the opportunity to apply to our Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing, upon completion of the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program and upon completion of the undergraduate courses required by l'Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ). This Diploma consists of two semesters of Stage (internship) in Clinical Nutrition, Community Nutrition, and Foodservice Systems Management. Upon completion of the Diploma, the recipient is eligible to register and practice as a Dietitian in Quebec, as well as in other Canadian provinces and other countries.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis and M.Sc. Applied (Project or Practicum)

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University’s credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) for the M.Sc. Thesis and 3.5/4.0 for the M.Sc. Applied during their bachelor's degree program. All eligible candidates to the M.Sc. (Applied) program may select the project option; those who have completed a dietetic internship and six months' work experience are eligible to apply for a practicum option.

Ph.D.

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. and M.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University's credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) during their bachelor's and master's degree programs.

Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing

For information on admission requirements, applicants must contact Dr. Maureen Rose in the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and Standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the School's minimum CGPA of 3.2 out of 4.0. The courses to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year (two terms) is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program. Students must re-apply for admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. While the school cannot guarantee financial support, teaching assistantships and other scholarships may be available.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Final acceptance to the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor. A supervisor is not required for acceptance to the M.Sc. (Applied) program.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – The GRE is required for all applicants to the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition who are submitting non-Canadian and non-U.S. transcripts.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Dec. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant’s file until the following admittance period if application materials including supporting documents are received after the application deadlines. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Student Experience

Graduate students make up roughly 23% of McGill’s 36,500 students, with the highest proportion of doctoral students among Canada’s top research universities.

The educational and personal contacts made at McGill yield lifetime benefits. As part of the most international student body in Canada, you’ll be exposed to a breadth of global perspectives that will enrich your research and your life.

Resources for graduate students

Services for graduate students

At McGill, we want to provide you with the best possible graduate student experience. Our full range of student services and resources aim to support your life, learning, personal and academic achievement.

Applying for External Funding

All prospective students, both Canadian and International are encouraged to apply for external funding. This includes fellowships and awards allocated by government departments and agencies, foundations and private companies.

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