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Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

 

Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location

  • Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics
  • Macdonald Engineering Building, Room 492
  • 817 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C3
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6858
  • Fax: 514-398-7361
  • Email: gradinfo [dot] civil [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/civil

About Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Advanced courses of instruction and laboratory facilities are available for Engineering graduate students who wish to proceed to the degrees of M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D.

Graduate studies and research are at present being conducted in the fields of structures and structural mechanics; infrastructure rehabilitation; risk engineering; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; materials engineering; soil behaviour; soil mechanics and foundations; water resources engineering; environmental engineering; and transportation engineering.

M.Eng. in Civil Engineering

The master's degree can be pursued as a research degree (thesis) or as a coursework-based degree (project). The thesis degree is for those who wish to undertake research while the project degree is for those who wish to have a broader and more specialized training in civil engineering.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Civil Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students obtain a deeper understanding of their area of specialty through courses selected with their supervisor. A two- to three-semester independent research project is undertaken in the field of structures and structural materials; infrastructure rehabilitation; risk engineering; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; materials engineering; soil behaviour; soil mechanics and foundations; water resources engineering; environmental engineering; and transportation engineering.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Civil Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates with a bachelor's degree in a discipline other than Engineering, such as Science or Arts, may be accepted into an M.Sc. program in the Department. Such students would typically study in the fluid mechanics, water resources, environmental engineering, or transportation engineering areas, and would follow the thesis option program.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Civil Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This is primarily a coursework degree with a small independent project.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Civil Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
This program is offered to students with a university undergraduate degree in engineering who desire graduate education in the environmental engineering field. This non-thesis option is within the context of the existing M.Eng. (project option) programs currently offered in the Departments of Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences); Chemical Engineering; Civil Engineering; and Mining, Metals, and Materials Engineering. This program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge courses, practical applications in diverse environmental contexts, and functional skills needed for solving environmental problems through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University. Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in engineering. The Environmental Engineering option is administered by the Faculty of Engineering. Further information may be obtained from the Program Coordinator, Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Civil Engineering
Research can be conducted in the fields of structures and structural mechanics; infrastructure rehabilitation; risk engineering; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; materials engineering; soil behaviour; soil mechanics and foundations; water resources engineering; environmental engineering; and transportation engineering.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The general rules of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies apply and are detailed in Graduate Admissions and Application Procedures. The minimum academic standard for admission is a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 in a recognized program. Alternatively, an equivalent grade point average of no less than 3.2/4.0 over the last two years of the program will be accepted.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must write the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language; preferably the Internet-based test) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). Ph.D. applicants must achieve a minimum overall score of 92 (or minimum 580 on the paper-based test), with a minimum score of 20 for each component (i.e., Writing, Reading, Speaking, Listening); or, achieve a minimum band score of 7 for the IELTS in order to apply. Master's applicants must achieve an overall minimum TOEFL score of 86 (or minimum 567 on the paper-based test), with a minimum score of 20 for each component; or, achieve a minimum band score of 6.5 for the IELTS in order to apply. Test results reach McGill approximately eight weeks after the test is taken; please note that it is the student's responsibility to make the necessary arrangements with the examining board to write the test in his/her country of residence. Full information about the test, and a registration form, may be obtained by consulting the TOEFL or the IELTS websites.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Philosophy

Philosophy

Location

  • Department of Philosophy
  • Leacock Building, 9th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6060
  • Fax: 514-398-7148
  • Email: info [dot] philosophy [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/philosophy

About Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy has particular strength in the following areas: Ancient Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Kant and post-Kantian German Philosophy; Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Mind; Aesthetics; Moral and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Contemporary European Philosophy.

The Department offers assistance to students in every aspect of placement. Our Placement Officer counsels students about coursework and areas of competence, helps to establish evidence of teaching ability, administers the dossier for job applications, and provides advice and follow-up in the interview process. Many of our graduates have gone on to do postdoctoral research and over 80% are now in tenure track or sessional appointments.

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. in Philosophy. It also offers, in conjunction with the Biomedical Ethics Unit, a course of study leading to the M.A. degree in Bioethics.

Students with an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 1 level. Students who hold an M.A. degree in Philosophy, or equivalent, from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 2 level. Students entering the Ph.D. program (at Ph.D. 1 or Ph.D. 2) will be required to complete two years of coursework. (N.B. At present, we do not normally consider applicants for an M.A. in Philosophy, with the exception of the specialty M.A. in Biomedical Ethics.) The Department considers an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy to be one that furnishes a student with:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval, and Modern.
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in 1 and 2.

Ph.D. Program

By December 15 of their third year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 1 and August 15 in their second year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 2, students must submit a research paper (the “candidacy paper” [3 credits]), which may be worked up from a paper written to fulfil the requirements of a graduate course, to a Thesis Advancement Committee consisting of a least two members of the staff of the Department. The membership of this committee will be determined by the Graduate Director in consultation with the student; it is anticipated that members of this committee would, in principle, direct the student's thesis. This committee assigns a grade to the student's paper and reviews her or his graduate performance; on the basis of its assessment and review, it recommends to the Department as a whole either to permit the student to continue with the Ph.D. program and undertake a thesis or to decline to permit the student to continue. Two necessary conditions for a positive recommendation are that the student (a) receive a grade of at least B+ on the candidacy paper, and (b) have at least a 3.5 GPA (on the undergraduate Grade Point scale) in the coursework required for the program. The Department as a whole, taking into account the Thesis Advancement Committee's recommendation and the student's overall academic record in the program, decides whether to permit the student to continue. Students who do not receive a positive recommendation but who satisfy Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements (no courses below a B- and completion of 45 credits) will be recommended to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by the Department to transfer from the Ph.D. program to the M.A. program.

Graduate students are expected to continue to contribute to the intellectual life of the Department after being promoted to candidacy. They can do so by participating in reading and discussion groups and, most of all, by auditing seminars both within and outside their areas of specialty.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Philosophy (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The Master's in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics. Ordinarily, it takes at least two years to complete, although some students have completed it in 18 months. The first year is devoted to coursework (including a clinical practicum), and the second year is devoted to a master's thesis on a topic in bioethics that also satisfies the requirements of the base discipline. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (6 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required, including the thesis. Students graduate with a master's degree from the faculty of their base discipline (M.A., M.Sc., or LL.M.) with a specialization in bioethics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy
The program is intended for students with a B.A. or M.A. in Philosophy, though some exceptions may be possible. It is a pluralist Department with an excellent professor-to-student ratio, strong preparation for dissertation work, and guaranteed full funding for four years for all admitted Ph.D. students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Philosophy who wish to earn 9 additional credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women's studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Philosophy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ph.D.

Students with an Honours B.A. degree in Philosophy, or the equivalent, are normally admitted to the Ph.D. program directly at the Ph.D. 1 level. The Department considers an Honours B.A. degree to include:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western philosophy: Greek, Medieval, Modern
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in (1) and (2)

To demonstrate their competence in these areas, applicants must submit transcripts of academic work, three letters of recommendation from persons with whom they have studied, and at least one substantial example (approximately 15–20 typewritten pages) of their written philosophical work.

In addition, applicants from North America whose first language is English are strongly encouraged to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English (TOEFL score).

Students who hold an M.A. degree from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. 2 level.

M.A. (Bioethics)

Students applying to the Bioethics Specialty program must write an M.A. thesis proposal. All applications to this program must also receive the approval of the Director of the Specialty program. Students who apply for this program should note that they must participate in a practicum, which continues beyond the end of their second term of classes.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letters of Reference – three (3) original letters of reference
  • Writing Sample (15–20 pages)
  • Personal Statement (2–3 pages)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Philosophy and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the Department
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: The Department considers admissions for the Fall term only. Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Institute for the Study of International Development

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Institute for the Study of International Development

Location

  • Institute for the Study of International Development (ISID)
  • Peterson Hall, Room 126
  • 3460 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E6
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3507
  • Fax: 514-398-8432
  • Email: info [dot] isid [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/isid
Administration
Philip Oxhorn – Director
Iain Blair – Administrative Officer
  • Email: iain [dot] blair [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Sherryl Ramsahai – Administrative Coordinator
  • Email: sherryl [dot] ramsahai [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Lisa Stanischewski – Student Affairs Adviser
  • Email: lisa [dot] stanischewski [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Kirsty McKinnon – Student Affairs Coordinator
  • Email: kirsty [dot] mckinnon [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About the Institute for the Study of International Development

ISID is a interdisciplinary institute in the Faculty of Arts with over 40 members from various faculties. It also works with an international community of scholars, development groups, and the public. Interdisciplinary research sponsored by ISID revolves around four themes: democracy and democratization; economic development; states and state-building; and social pluralism and civil society. It organizes seminars and conferences on development issues related to these themes.

Graduate students can register in the Development Studies Option (DSO), a cross-disciplinary M.A. program in which six departments participate: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology. Further information about this option can be found in these departmental sections of this publication and on the ISID website at www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Institute for the Study of International Development Admission Requirements and Applications Procedures

Admission Requirements

Students will ONLY be considered for the Development Studies Option (DSO) once they have been accepted into a master's program in one of the six participating departments (Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology) at McGill.

Application Procedures

Students applying through a participating department must indicate in their application that they want to be considered for the DSO. Final approval on admission to the DSO will be made once the files of successful departmental applicants have been received at ISID.

Application Deadlines

The DSO is a cross-disciplinary program. Please see the application deadlines for the master's program in one of the six participating departments (Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, or Sociology); departmental contact info is available at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Location

  • Department of Art History and Communication Studies
  • Arts Building, W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
  • 853 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0G5
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4933
  • Fax: 514-398-7247
  • Email: graduate [dot] ahcs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs

About Communication Studies

The graduate program in Communication Studies offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. The program is concerned with the study of communication phenomena through interdisciplinary training that draws on a variety of fields including cultural studies, critical media and technology studies, public policy and governance, film, and sound studies. The program strives to offer a balance of humanities and social sciences approaches to the analysis of communication, and its orientation is primarily qualitative (rather than quantitative) in nature. The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are academic in character, and do not include professional training in journalism, organizational communication, or media production. The Communication Studies program offers courses and directs project research in preparation for the M.A. Thesis and Ph.D. in Communication Studies. The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is available as a program option, and students benefit from the resources and activity of Media@McGill, a hub of research and public outreach on critical issues in media, culture, and emerging technology.

McGill is situated in one of the most vibrant cities in North America, and Montreal offers myriad opportunities for graduate students to engage with local arts institutions, either officially, through internships and research fellowships, or unofficially, through volunteering. Local institutions range from large-scale public museums (such as the Musée d'art contemporain, the Musée des beaux-arts, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa) to smaller alternative galleries (such as feminist arts spaces La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse and Studio XX). There are also university-based venues such as the Redpath Museum on campus and the McCord Museum of Canadian History (which houses the McGill University Archives), and independent contemporary art galleries such as DHC and the Darling Foundry. The Canadian Centre for Architecture, with its archives and exhibitions and the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec also offer grants and research opportunities for local graduate students. A close relationship with the other three major universities in Montreal (Concordia University, Université de Montréal, and Université du Québec à Montréal) affords students access to a broad network of additional courses, lectures, and colleagues across the city.

To obtain financial aid information, please consult the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs or email graduate [dot] fellowships [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

For programs in Art History and Communication Studies, refer to our website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs.

Master's and Ph.D. Degrees

The master's program requires a three-semester residency, the successful completion of a total of seven courses (21 credits, including the Pro-Seminar course), and a thesis (equivalent to 24 credits). Three years of residence are normally required for the Ph.D. degree (candidates with an M.A. will be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level of the doctoral program, thereby gaining credit for one year of resident study). The Ph.D. program of study is comprised of five courses (15 credits), the Pro-Seminar (3 credits), a comprehensive examination (0 credits), a dissertation proposal, and a written dissertation with its defense. Ph.D. students who have selected the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies are required to take 9 credits (within the total credits that are required for the Ph.D. degree); WMST 601 AND WMST 602 are required, plus one 3-credit complementary Art History course related to gender and women’s studies. All course selections must first be approved by the supervisor/Graduate Program Director.

Students enter our graduate programs from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, though all have a history of documented academic excellence and aptitude for advanced scholarly research. Over the past 30 years, the Graduate Program in Communication Studies has trained many of Canada's leading communications scholars. Graduates of the program may be found working in all levels of government, within the cultural industries, and in dozens of university Communication Studies departments around the world.

For the language requirement for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, please see: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/graduate/language-requirement.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Communication Studies offers advanced training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in GWS will appear on a student’s transcript along with the M.A. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this non-thesis option.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies
The Ph.D. in Communication Studies offers in-depth training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy. Doctoral students pursue coursework, submit a comprehensive exam and thesis proposal, with the goal of writing a dissertation that makes an original contribution to knowledge in Communication Studies. The Ph.D. degree is academic in character, and does not include professional training in media production.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies will appear on a student’s transcript along with the Ph.D. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Communication Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A.

An honours bachelor's degree or equivalent is required of applicants to the M.A. program, with a minimum CGPA of 3.3 out of 4.0, or equivalent, i.e., B+ (75%). In whichever case, the transcript must show breadth or depth in related areas of study.

Ph.D.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program are expected to have completed the equivalent of an M.A. degree. Admission will be based on academic achievement and evidence of talent and strong motivation in Communication Studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications will be considered by the deadline of January 15.

Inquiries regarding the program should be addressed to the Graduate Administrative Coordinator, Department of Art History and Communication Studies.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal – at least 500 words
  • Written Work – two examples

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Art History and Communication Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: There are no Winter or Summer term admissions for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry

Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry

Location

  • Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry
  • Macdonald-Stewart Building, Room MS1-034
  • Macdonald Campus of McGill University
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry

The Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry offers both M.Sc. (thesis and non-thesis) and Ph.D. programs. These programs provide training in evolving interdisciplinary areas of food quality, food safety, food chemistry, food biotechnology, functional ingredients, applied infrared spectroscopy, food processing, thermal generation of aromas and toxicants, marine biochemistry, and food toxicology. The Department has key infrastructure with all major equipment necessary for conducting research in all these areas. Our graduate program provides strong mentoring/advisory support while maintaining high flexibility for individual research projects.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The program offers advanced food science courses in a broad range of areas. It is suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in food science or a closely related discipline. Entry is possible from other disciplines; however, students will be expected to complete a Qualifying term or year to pick up relevant courses to orient themselves to food science. Students are required to complete a total of 45 credits (10 graduate-level courses, a seminar course, and a research project). Subsequent career paths include work within the food industry and government agencies.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry — Food Safety (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This 45-credit program is offered to candidates who seek further specialization in the area of food safety but do not wish to pursue independent research. These credits are obtained through a combination of graduate-level courses. The residence time for the M.Sc. (Non-Thesis) degree is three academic terms.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is a research-based degree in various areas related to food science for candidates entering the M.Sc. program without restrictions (i.e., not requiring a Qualifying term/year). The M.Sc. degree consists of 45 graduate credits; these credits are obtained through a combination of graduate courses (15 credits) and a research thesis (30 credits). Entry into the M.Sc. (Thesis) program also hinges on the availability of supervisory staff and financing. Therefore, it is advisable that the applicant for the M.Sc. (Thesis) degree select the M.Sc. (Non-Thesis) as a second choice in the application form, to ensure admission to the Food Science graduate program. Subsequent career paths include work within the food industry, government agencies, and in research.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry
A Ph.D. in food science is suitable for students with an M.Sc. degree in food science or related areas who wish to become independent researchers and/or leaders in the field of food science. Candidates with a B.Sc. degree applying for the Ph.D. need to register first for the M.Sc. degree. In cases where the candidates are performing well during their first year, they may be permitted to fast track to the Ph.D. degree. Entry into the Ph.D. graduate program hinges on the availability of supervisory staff and financing.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the M.Sc. programs must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. in Food Science or a related discipline such as Chemistry, Biochemistry, or Microbiology with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) and 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.Sc. degree in Food Science or related areas with a minimum CGPA of 3.4 in their M.Sc. and 3.2 for the last two years of their B.Sc. degree. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. While the Department cannot guarantee financial support, students can apply for teaching assistantships and other scholarships.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Final acceptance to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor. A supervisor is not required for acceptance to the M.Sc. Non-Thesis program.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Research

Research that knows no bounds

In the laboratory and beyond, we are committed to groundbreaking research and cutting-edge programs. Our interdisciplinary programs cut across academic boundaries to provide you with the opportunity to research in a truly integrated way. McGill’s strong sense of community and global perspective provide the ideal setting for interdisciplinary collaboration.

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