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Management (doctoral programs)

Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the Joint Ph.D. in Management

  • Ph.D. Program Office
  • Desautels Faculty of Management
  • McGill University
  • 1001 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1G5
  • Canada
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management
The Ph.D. program in Management is offered jointly by the four Montreal universities: Concordia University, École des Hautes Études Commerciales (affiliated with the Université de Montréal), McGill University, and Université du Québec à Montréal. The program is intended to educate competent researchers and to stimulate research on management issues.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management — Environment
The Ph.D. program option in Environment is intended to develop an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment. It provides a forum whereby students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

The Ph.D. program is offered jointly with three other institutions:

  • Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Département des Sciences Administratives
  • 315 Ste-Catherine Est
  • Montreal QC H2X 3X2
  • Canada
  • Website: http://phdadm.esg.uqam.ca

The program represents a number of innovations in doctoral work in the field of administration. First, by cooperating, the four universities are able to make available to the program's students a diverse pool of approximately 250 professors qualified to direct doctoral-level study and research. Second, the program has been carefully developed to encourage independent, creative work on the part of its students, with close, personal contact with the professors. This program will appeal especially to the mature, experienced candidate with relatively well-defined interests. Across the four member universities, some courses are offered in English and some in French. (All papers may, however, be written in English or French.) This is viewed as a definite advantage of the program for those students who expect to work in Canada or francophone countries after graduation.

The program places considerable emphasis on the theoretical foundations of management and its underlying disciplines. Graduates of the program are expected to have: (1) some knowledge of all the main areas of management, (2) a thorough knowledge of one applied area of management, and one support discipline, (3) a complete command of the research methodologies used in management, and (4) some familiarity with modern theories and methods of the pedagogy of management.

The program consists of three phases: preparation, specialization, and dissertation.

Phase I – Preparation

Before entering the program, the student will have selected the area of specialization from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management
  • Organizational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Organization
  • NSERC CREATE*

Some students—notably those with strong master's degrees in administration or related disciplines—have a minimum of work in Phase I; others require up to one academic year of work.

Phase II – Specialization

In Phase II, students probe deeply into their chosen area of specialization. With their Advisory Committee, students work out an individual program of study, which takes about 18 months. The phase focuses on a specialization area and a support field. The specialization area could be one of the basic ones listed in Phase I (for example, marketing or operations management), a sub-area within one of these (such as organizational development within organizational behaviour), or an interdisciplinary area that combines two or more of these (such as behaviour aspects of accounting or international marketing).

The support field is selected to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge in a fundamental discipline that underlies the theory in administration. For example, a student in marketing might select psychology, sociology, or statistics. One in management policy might select political science or general systems theory, or perhaps even philosophy. Other choices are possible.

Students officially enter Phase II of the program when their Advisory Committee has been established and, together with the student, formally agrees on a proposal for the work to be done in Phase II. Phase II must be approved by the McGill and the Joint Doctoral Committees. This includes the following:

  • Doctoral seminars in the specialization area; minimum four courses
  • Any other existing graduate-level courses in the specialization area and support field deemed appropriate by the Advisory Committee; minimum two courses in support field
  • Seminar on Research Methodology (MGMT 707, 3 credits) or equivalent approved graduate-level course
  • Seminar in Pedagogy (MGMT 706, 3 credits) or Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDPH 689, 3 credits)
  • Comprehensive Examination (MGMT 701, 0 credits)
  • A publishable research paper (MGMT 720, 3 credits)

The Advisory Committee will normally consist of at least three or four persons; a Chair and others decided upon jointly by the Chair and the student. One of these members will typically come from the support field. Every student's Advisory Committee must have representation from at least two universities in the joint program.

Phase III – Dissertation

The third phase of the program consists of the dissertation in the course of which the student probes deeply into a well-defined research topic. The topic is developed with the Thesis Committee (at least three members), which may be the same as the Phase II Advisory Committee or may be reconstituted, again with representation from at least one of the other participating universities. The topic is approved formally by the Thesis Committee and, once the research is completed and the dissertation written, the student publicly defends the completed thesis.

* NSERC CREATE Ph.D. option in Healthcare Operations and Information Management – Offered jointly by six Canadian universities: McGill, British Columbia, Ottawa, Queen's, Toronto, and Montréal; this Ph.D. program brings together expertise on healthcare processes, operations research, information systems, and telecommunications engineering.

Admission Requirements

Candidates normally hold a master's-level degree, with a strong academic record from a recognized university.

GMAT (or GRE-General Test) results are required for applications to the doctoral program; this includes McGill master's students applying to the Ph.D. The minimum score required is 600. Tests must have been written within the past five years.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. A minimum score of 100 for the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, is required for admission. A minimum score of 7 for IELTS is required. Tests must have been written within the past two years.

Files will not be considered unless GMAT (or GRE-General Test) and TOEFL scores are received by the Application Deadlines.

Students may apply for admission to one or more of the participating universities. These applications will be processed by the individual university to which the applicant has applied and by the Joint Committee of the four schools. Students' preferences will prevail when more than one participating university is prepared to accept them. The Ph.D. degree will be granted by the university that admits the student. The program requires a minimum full-time residency of six terms.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GMAT (or GRE-General Test) written within the past 5 years
  • Answers to Personal Statement questions
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/desautels/programs/phd/admissions/deadline.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 27, 2014).

M.D./M.B.A. (Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Programs)

 

M.D./M.B.A. Program Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the M.D./M.B.A. Program

The M.D./M.B.A. program recognizes that there is an increasing demand in the health care sector for physicians with management skills and expertise. This is a five-year program in which the first year is spent in the Desautels Faculty of Management completing the M.B.A. core as well as building a solid background in health care management. Then, students will begin their medical studies, which will be integrated with additional elective courses in management. This will provide the opportunity to train well-rounded physician-managers who can eventually pursue interesting careers in a wide range of health care facilities, from the smallest clinic to the largest tertiary health care facility, from research laboratories to university or hospital medical departments. Our graduates will also have career opportunities in the health insurance sector, which is a significant layer of the health care system in a number of countries, including the United States.

Upon graduation, students receive an M.B.A. from the Desautels Faculty of Management and an M.D.,C.M. degree from the Faculty of Medicine.

Note: Students will have to follow the M.B.A. Base Camp (Statistics, Math for Finance, Financial Accounting) prior to commencement of the M.B.A.
M.D./M.B.A.; Management (Non-Thesis) (51 credits)
Offered in cooperation with the Faculty of Medicine.

For more information, contact:

  • Program Administrator, M.D./M.B.A. Program
  • McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
  • 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler
  • Montreal QC H3G 1Y6
  • Canada

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements for the M.B.A. program can be found in M.B.A. Program.

For the Faculty of Medicine admission requirements, please visit www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/programs/mdcm-mba.

Application Procedures

Following the evaluation of the completed application requirements, selected candidates are invited to interviews, after which final admissions decisions are made.

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

See www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions for M.D.,C.M. program application procedures.

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Physical and Occupational Therapy

Physical and Occupational Therapy

Location

  • School of Physical and Occupational Therapy
  • 3654 Promenade Sir-William-Osler
  • Montreal QC H3G 1Y5
  • Canada
Directors

Director and Associate Dean – Annette Majnemer; B.Sc.(O.T.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)

Email: admincoord [dot] pot [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Director's Academic Associate – Sarah C. Marshall; B.Sc.(P.T.), M.Sc.(McG.)

Email: sarah [dot] marshall [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Academic Director, Physical Therapy – Judith Soicher; B.Sc.(P.T.), B.Sc.(L.S.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)

Email: profmasters [dot] pot [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Academic Associate Director, Physical Therapy – Liliane Asseraf-Pasin; B.Sc.(P.T.), Ph.D.(McG.)

Email: profmasters [dot] pot [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Academic Director, Occupational Therapy – Bernadette Nedelec; B.Sc.(O.T.), Ph.D.(Alta.)

Email: profmasters [dot] pot [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Academic Associate Director, Occupational Therapy – Aliki Thomas; B.Sc.(O.T.), M.Ed., Ph.D.(McG.)

Email: profmasters [dot] pot [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Academic Director, Graduate Programs – Isabelle Gélinas; B.Sc.(O.T.)(Montr.), M.Sc.(Virg.), Ph.D.(Rehab.Sc.)(McG.)

Email: graduate [dot] rehabilitation [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Academic Associate Director, Graduate Program – Laurie Snider; B.Sc.(O.T.)(McG.), M.A.(Br. Col.), Ph.D.(Tor.)

Email: graduate [dot] rehabilitation [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Physical and Occupational Therapy

Part of McGill's Faculty of Medicine, we are proud of the outstanding academic environment that is offered to our students. The School of Physical and Occupational Therapy is situated on McGill University's upper campus in a gracious downtown area of the beautiful city of Montreal, Quebec. The School offers programs in three areas: Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Graduate Studies in Rehabilitation Sciences (master's and doctorate). Two graduate certificate programs are also offered: Driving Rehabilitation and Chronic Pain Management.

The School is internationally recognized for the excellence of its contribution to research in rehabilitation. Excellence in research and teaching is the foundation and tradition of the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy at McGill University. The Faculty educates professionals and, through research, generates the body of knowledge that guides our professions to advance the health, function, and participation of the individual in society.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Rehabilitation Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
The full curriculum consists of approximately two years of study for graduates who hold a B.Sc. degree in one of the medical rehabilitation disciplines or a related field. The program consists of required and elective coursework, a research proposal, and a research thesis.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Rehabilitation Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The program requires three terms of full-time residence study and can usually be completed within three to four terms. It is designed for graduates who hold a B.Sc. (or equivalent) in Physical or Occupational Therapy or related health professions. Two years of clinical experience is recommended. The program trains health professionals to become consumers of research in order to promote evidence-based practice in rehabilitation science. The curriculum is made up of both required and elective courses and may also include a research project.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Physical Therapy (Non-Thesis) (58 credits)
The Master of Science, Applied, in Physical Therapy is a 58-credit program to be completed in 1.5 graduate years over five semesters, and includes four clinical practica of 1,050 hours in total, leading to professional licensure to practice. The educational approach is consistent with adult learning, self-directed learning, reflective clinical practice, and inter-professionalism. Strong links between academic and clinical fieldwork education are emphasized. Courses emphasize client-centred and evidence-based practice across the lifespan and health care continuum, and include health promotion from prevention of disability to rehabilitation. In addition to fieldwork, the program requirements include courses in advanced clinical practice, research methodology, and educational methodology. The master's project prepares the entry-to-practice physiotherapist to become an autonomous and effective professional through the acquisition of research skills.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Occupational Therapy (Non-Thesis) (58 credits)
The Master of Science (Applied) in Occupational Therapy program is a 58-credit program to be completed in 1.5 graduate years over five semesters and includes a clinical practicum of 1,000 hours leading to professional licensure to practise. The educational approach is consistent with adult learning and reflective clinical practice. The curriculum uses a case-based, problem-solving, self-directed approach across the lifespan. Strong links between academic and clinical fieldwork education are emphasized throughout the educational process. Coursework will focus on client-centred and evidence-based practice, clinical reasoning, ethics, and professionalism as essential components for the development of a humanistic, ethical, knowledgeable, competent, critical thinking, and problem-solving Occupational Therapist. The master’s project is designed to develop research and scholarly skills.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Rehabilitation Science
This program consists of three to four years of study, on average, for graduates with master's-level training in one of the medical rehabilitation disciplines or a related field. The program consists of required and elective coursework, a comprehensive written examination, a research proposal, a doctoral thesis, and an oral defence.
Graduate Certificate in Driving Rehabilitation (15 credits)
The 15-credit postgraduate certificate program aims to train Occupational Therapists to assess the driving abilities and performance of at-risk populations, retrain drivers, recommend adaptive vehicles and adapt technical aids that will allow disabled individuals to return to driving and preserve their independence and quality of life. The program comprises five courses. The first two are offered online; the other three are a combination of online and intensive workshops.
Graduate Certificate in Chronic Pain Management (15 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Physical and Occupational Therapy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science (Thesis)

  1. A B.Sc. degree or equivalent in Physical or Occupational Therapy or a related field from a university of recognized reputation;
  2. Evidence of high academic achievement, equivalent to B standing, or a McGill CGPA of 3.0 (70–74%);
  3. Prerequisite courses may be required in statistics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, sociology, neurophysiology, or other areas, depending on the student's anticipated specialization;
  4. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English, by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20 (School requirement), or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum overall band score of 7.0;
  5. A GRE (Graduate Records Examination) Test is recommended for the following applicants: those who do not have a B.Sc. or equivalent from a Canadian university; those who have been out of university for five years or more. Only the GRE General Test is mandatory.

    Applicants must ensure that official test results are sent to McGill University directly by the testing service. Applications cannot be considered if test results are not available.

Note: McGill University's Institutional code for the TOEFL and GRE is 0935.

If a graduate student accepted into the M.Sc. program demonstrates superior performance in the first year, the Graduate Committee, in consultation with the thesis supervisor, may recommend waiving the M.Sc. thesis requirement, and allow the student to proceed directly to the Ph.D. program.

M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science (Non-Thesis)

1 to 5 as above; plus two years of clinical experience is recommended.

Qualifying Year for Entry into M.Sc.A. (O.T.)

  1. An undergraduate degree or equivalent from a university of recognized reputation;
  2. Same as point 2 in M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science (Thesis) above;
  3. No prerequisite courses;
  4. Same as point 4 M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science (Thesis) above;
  5. In the Applicant Statement on the web application, please describe your motivation, preparedness, suitability, and reasons for choosing the O.T. or P.T. Professional program;
  6. Knowledge of French is highly recommended. Variety of clinical placements is severely restricted for students who do not speak French;
  7. Successful completion of an interview to be held in May.

Qualifying Year for Entry into M.Sc.A. (P.T.)

  1. Same as Qualifying Year for Entry into M.Sc.A. (O.T.) above;
  2. Evidence of high academic achievement equivalent to a McGill CGPA of 3.2;
  3. See points 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 under Qualifying Year for Entry into M.Sc.A. (O.T.) above.

M.Sc.A. (O.T.)

A B.Sc. (Rehabilitation Science) majoring in O.T., or evidence of high academic achievement in Qualifying year for entry into M.Sc.A. (O.T.), equivalent to B standing, or a McGill CGPA of 3.0 (70–74%) is required.

M.Sc.A. (P.T.)

A B.Sc. (Rehabilitation Science) majoring in P.T., or evidence of high academic achievement in Qualifying year for entry into M.Sc.A. (P.T.), equivalent to B standing, or a McGill CGPA of 3.0 (70–74%) is required.

Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Science

  1. An M.Sc. degree in a rehabilitation-related discipline from a university of recognized reputation;
  2. Evidence of high academic achievement, equivalent to B+ standing, or a McGill CGPA of 3.3 (75–79%) is required;
  3. Proof of proficiency in English. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English, by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20 (School requirement), or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum overall band score of 7.0.
  4. A GRE (Graduate Records Examination Test) is recommended for the following applicants: those who do not have a B.Sc., M.Sc., or equivalent from a Canadian university; those who have been out of university for five years or more.

    Applicants must ensure that official test results are sent to McGill University directly by the testing service. Applications cannot be considered if test results are not available.

Note: McGill University's Institutional code for the TOEFL and GRE is 0935.

Graduate Certificate in Driving Rehabilitation

  1. A B.Sc. degree or equivalent in Occupational Therapy or a related field from a university of recognized reputation;
  2. Evidence of high academic achievement, equivalent to B standing or a McGill CGPA of 3.0 (70–74%);
  3. See points 3, 4, and 5 under M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science above for more information on prerequisites, TOEFL, and GRE.

Graduate Certificate in Chronic Pain Management

  1. A B.Sc. degree or equivalent in a health-related discipline from a university of recognized reputation;
  2. Evidence of high academic achievement, equivalent to B standing or a McGill CGPA of 3.0 (70–74%);
  3. See points 3, 4, and 5 under M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science above for more information on prerequisites, TOEFL, and GRE.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae – (except for M.Sc.A. (O.T.), M.Sc.A. (P.T.))
  • For M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science (Thesis and Non-Thesis) and Ph.D. in Rehabilitaiton Science: GRE is recommended for those who do not have a B.Sc., or equivalent, from a Canadian university, or those who have been out of university for five years or more. Only the GRE General Test is mandatory.
  • For M.Sc. in Rehabilitation Science (Non-Thesis): two years of clinical experience is recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Physical & Occupational Therapy and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Qualifying Year M.Sc.A.
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Feb. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
M.Sc.A. (O.T.) and M.Sc.A. (P.T.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Feb. 15
Graduate Certificate in Driving Rehabilitation
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: June 1 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Graduate Certificate in Chronic Pain Management
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: June 1 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Rehabilitation Science
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 31 Fall: Jan. 31 Fall: Jan. 31
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter term admission will not be considered (except for Graduate Certificate in Chronic Pain Management).
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Nursing

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Nursing

Location

  • Ingram School of Nursing
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada

About Nursing

The Ingram School of Nursing is a professional School within the Faculty of Medicine that has been educating nurses since 1920. On September 10, 2012 the School was formally renamed the Ingram School of Nursing in recognition of Richard and Satoko Ingram and their exceptional support for Nursing at McGill. The School is internationally recognized for its distinctive vision, leadership in nursing, and the quality of its programs. McGill nursing graduates have earned a reputation as outstanding clinicians, educators, researchers, and leaders in the discipline.

Over the years, the faculty of the School at McGill has worked to formulate a philosophy about the responsibilities and practice of nursing. This philosophy, known as the McGill Model of Nursing, directs the curricula at the School and emphasizes health, the family, learning and development, collaboration with clients, and working with the resources of individuals, families, and communities. Its intent is to actively promote health and well-being in people of all ages and across all situations. The McGill Model of Nursing is also central to the McGill University Health Centre's Department of Nursing.

At the graduate level, the Ingram School of Nursing offers tailored programs in advanced nursing practice that prepare our students to be leaders in their field. The learning experience at the School is geared to foster individual judgment, creativity, and initiative. Led by nationally recognized researchers, students will participate in cutting-edge programs of research related to nursing practice, education, and administration. McGill's Ingram School of Nursing is for you if you want to contribute to the knowledge base of advanced nursing practice and want to be involved actively in changing how healthcare is delivered locally, nationally, and internationally.

The School is located in Wilson Hall, which houses classrooms, computer facilities, faculty offices, and lounges. A recently renovated Nursing Learning Laboratory, located at University Hall Residence, has seven clinical beds, an ICU bed, two examination tables, and AV capacity for distance education. Students registered in the School also take courses in other faculties within the University. Selected experience in nursing is provided in the McGill University Health Centre, other McGill-affiliated hospitals, and in a wide variety of health agencies in Montreal.

For information on undergraduate Nursing programs, please consult the Health Sciences Calendar available at www.mcgill.ca/study.

M.Sc.A. Program and Concentrations

Historically, students entering the master's program selected "areas of study." The clinical stream prepared students for clinical nurse specialist or nurse practitioner roles in selected areas. The adjunct area was available for students who wished to plan an individual program of study in such areas as nursing administration, education, or global health. These have since been replaced by formal concentrations, which are listed in the table below.

Graduate Certificates and Diplomas

Nurse applicants with a Master's degree in Nursing and with the required clinical experience are prepared for nurse practitioner roles through our Certificate and/or Diploma programs. These programs offer our students the necessary biomedical skills and knowledge in either Neonatology or Primary Care to prepare them for the last step to their career, which is the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec) nurse practitioner licensing exam.

Doctoral Program

The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare nurses to contribute to the development of knowledge in the discipline through research and academia. Faculty members are active researchers in many areas, including telehealth, pediatric ethics, family health, psychosocial oncology, palliative care, pain, and chronic illness.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Clinical Nurse Specialist (49 credits)
This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students for full-time (two-year program of study) or part-time studies (three to five years of study). The core content of the CNS concentration prepares students for advanced practice nursing roles in diverse settings and with diverse populations. Content is organized based on the McGill Model of Nursing and focuses on such areas as family intervention, collaborative practice, and working with family strengths and resources. Through clinical courses, students engage in advanced clinical assessments and interventions, and develop greater capacities to reflect purposefully and in-depth on their nursing practice. Research methods, systematic study of clinically-based nursing problems, and dissemination of knowledge relevant to clinical practice are all developed within this program of study.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Direct Entry Nursing (55 credits)
The Direct Entry Nursing concentration remains the only one of its kind in Canada. Students will complete 96 credits over three years, which include 41 credits in the Qualifying Year. This program is tailored to the university graduate with a general Arts or Science degree and no previous preparation in nursing. Candidates complete entry-to-practice preparation in nursing while also completing graduate level studies. Upon completion of the M.Sc.A. Year 2, graduates are eligible to write the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers) licensing exam. This program is accredited by the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN).
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Global Health Clinical Nurse Specialist (51 credits)
This Global Health Clinical Nurse Specialist concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students who wish to include global health content throughout their program of study. It sets out to prepare students for the challenges of working with diverse populations in limited-resource environments with a philosophy stressing the importance of understanding the inherent power dynamics, equity issues, and ethical dilemmas that arise through this work. Students spend one semester in their final year taking clinical- and project-based courses in a global health placement setting.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Global Health Direct Entry (58 credits)
The Global Health Direct Entry concentration is thus labelled for bachelor-prepared non-nurse students who wish to include global health content throughout their program of study. It sets out to prepare students for the challenges of working with diverse populations in limited-resource environments, based on the belief that we have much to learn from one another. Students spend one semester taking clinical- and project-based courses in their final year in a global health placement site. This concentration is managed by the Global Health Committee of the Ingram School of Nursing.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (45 credits)
This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. It prepares students for the multifaceted role of nurse practitioner in intermediate, acute, and critical care in neonatology. The nurse practitioner will acquire the necessary knowledge and understanding required to practice in a collaborative way in providing services designed to deal with the healthcare needs and problems of neonates and their families in a variety of settings. Students who successfully complete this program are eligible to apply to the Graduate Diploma, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner program, which is the last step before the relevant licensing exam of the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec).
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Nursing Education (49 credits)
This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. It was developed to expose graduate-level nurses to instructional and learning theory, to better equip them to lead the movement towards more innovative and effective pedagogical approaches in training nurses working in healthcare establishments or nursing students in academic settings.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Nursing Services Administration (49 credits)
This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. Students in this concentration develop their capacity to assess the factors that affect and determine the nursing workforce. This will enable them to make strategic and effective decisions, and influence policy with regard to the planning and management of the nursing workforce.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (45 credits)
This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. It was developed to train graduate-level nurses to take on this advanced practice role. Primary Care Nurse Practitioners assume responsibility for tasks related to physical assessment, diagnosis, and treatment within legally sanctioned, pre-determined conditions that have traditionally been exclusive to medical practice. This concentration focuses on a wide range of acute and chronic health concerns across the life span. Students who successfully complete this program are eligible to apply to the Graduate Diploma, Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program, which is the last step before the relevant licensing exam of the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec).
Graduate Certificate; Theory in Neonatology (15 credits)
This graduate certificate prepares students with completed graduate studies, comparable to the McGill Master of Science (Applied) Nursing program, and experience in neonatology to continue their studies in the Graduate Diploma in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. The program of study focuses on the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences in the context of the nurse practitioner role. The Graduate Certificate Theory in Neonatology and the Graduate Diploma in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner cannot be taken concurrently.
Graduate Certificate; Theory in Primary Care (15 credits)
This graduate certificate prepares students with completed graduate studies, comparable to the McGill Master of Science (Applied) Nursing program, and experience in primary care to continue their studies in the Graduate Diploma Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. The program of study focuses on the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences in the context of the nurse practitioner role. The Graduate Certificate Theory in Primary Care and the Graduate Diploma in Primary Care Nurse Practitioner cannot be taken concurrently.
Graduate Diploma in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (30 credits)
This diploma is the final step in the student's preparation to assume the new role as nurse practitioner. Students with completed graduate studies in the discipline and experience in neonatology now combine the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences to the application of this knowledge in context. Upon successful completion of the diploma program, candidates are eligible to write the nurse practitioner licensing exam.
Graduate Diploma in Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (30 credits)
This diploma is the final step in the student's preparation to assume the new role as nurse practitioner. Students with completed graduate studies in the discipline and experience in primary care now combine the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences to the application of this knowledge in context. Upon successful completion of the diploma program, candidates are eligible to write the nurse practitioner licensing exam.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Nursing
The Ingram School of Nursing of McGill University and the Faculté des sciences infirmières of the Université de Montréal offer a joint doctorate program leading to a Ph.D. in Nursing. This program is offered in English at McGill. The program is designed to train nurse scientists who will make a contribution to the advancement of knowledge in the discipline of nursing and assume a leadership role both in the profession and in the health care system.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Nursing — Psychosocial Oncology
A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSOO) is offered in collaboration with the Departments of Oncology and Psychology and the Schools of Nursing and Social Work. This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Nursing Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Proficiency in English

The language of instruction at McGill University is English. Students must write term papers, examinations, and theses in English or in French. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. TOEFL exam requirements: a minimum score of 600 (paper-based) or 100 with each component score no less than 20 (Internet-based). IELTS exam requirements: a minimum overall score of 7.5 is required.

For information about the Language Policy at McGill University, please refer to Language Policy in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies University Regulations and Resources available at www.mcgill.ca/study.

GRE (Graduate Record Examination) general test results may be required in individual circumstances.

Students who have not completed their studies in North America may be asked to arrange for an interview as part of the application process.

Master's, Graduate Certificate, and Graduate Diploma Programs

Nurse applicants to the master’s program may complete their studies on a part-time basis (with the exception of those in the Nurse Practitioner areas of study where only the first year may be taken part-time), i.e., minimum of 3 credits per term to a maximum of five years. Applicants to the Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas should consult with their advisor concerning course load.

All nurse applicants are expected to hold current registration in the province or country from which they come. Nurses who are not licensed in Quebec must be registered (immatriculé(e)) with the Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec upon the start of their graduate studies. Nurse applicants to the Nurse Practitioner areas of study must hold current and full licensure with the OIIQ.

International nurse applicants are required to have had experience as nurses in their country of origin and in North America.

B.A./B.Sc. Applicants to the Master's Program (Direct Entry – DE)

Applicants holding a general B.A. or B.Sc., including a number of prerequisite courses, may be admitted to a Qualifying year. A minimum CGPA (cumulative grade point average) of 3.0 (3.2 is strongly preferred) on a scale of 4.0 is required in order to be considered for entry. Upon successful completion of the Qualifying year, candidates apply to the master’s program.

Direct-Entry applicants must complete their Qualifying year and the master’s program of study on a full-time basis, i.e., a total of three years. The School considers admissions to this program for the Fall term only.

Note: For further information about the required courses in the Qualifying year of the Direct-Entry program, please see the Nursing website at www.mcgill.ca/nursing/programs/msca-direct-entry.

Nurse Applicants (Nurse Bachelor's Entry – NBE) to the Master's Program

Applicants for the master's degree must have completed a bachelor's degree in nursing with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0. This preparation must be comparable to that offered in the bachelor's in nursing programs at McGill, which is a minimum of 66 university credits including 12 credits in the biological sciences. Applicants must also have completed an Introductory Statistics course (3 credits) prior to entry. Prospective applicants whose undergraduate degree differs from the McGill degree are encouraged to contact the Ingram School of Nursing to have the eligibility of their degree assessed. Experience in nursing is strongly recommended.

Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas in Nurse Practitioner

Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a master’s degree in nursing comparable to McGill (the bachelor program must have a minimum of 66 credits including 12 credits in the biological sciences) with a minimum CGPA of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale required. Prior to entry, applicants are required to have a minimum of two years of experience in Canada in the specialty area over the previous five years.

Students in the Nurse Practitioner program are required to hold a “carte de stage” allowing them to participate in the required clinical practicum at the end of the second year of the program. The “carte de stage” is granted by the Quebec Order of Nurses (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec – OIIQ) to Nurse Practitioner candidates that are licensed in Quebec.

International students must therefore obtain current and full licensure from the OIIQ before submitting their application to the Neonatology or Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program. Please note that in order to obtain a nursing licence in Quebec, one must be proficient in the French language. For more information regarding the OIIQ licensure eligibility criteria, please contact the OIIQ at 514-935-2505.

The Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program delivers some courses in French, making proficiency in French a requirement for this program as well.

Ph.D. Program

Applicants admitted to the doctoral program through McGill University must have completed master’s-level studies with either their undergraduate or graduate degree in nursing comparable to McGill. Applicants must have a CGPA of 3.3 on a scale of 4.0 or a B+ standing. Highly qualified nurse bachelor's entry students enrolled in the M.Sc.(A.) in the nursing program may be accepted into the Ph.D. program provided they meet its standards.

The School considers admissions to the doctoral program for the Fall term only. The nursing courses in the doctoral program are offered every two years and incoming students may begin with Schedule A or Schedule B (see Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Nursing for details) depending upon their admission year.

Registration and Regulations

Official registration through Minerva must be completed by August 14. Students registering late for reasons unrelated to the admission procedure are subject to the late payment fee.

Orientation for new students will be held in class during the first week of lectures. Students should contact their academic adviser for approval of complementary courses before the add/drop deadline.

Returning students are responsible for ensuring that registration is completed according to the University timetable deadlines.

Course Requirements

Students are provided with the course objectives, requirements, and methods of evaluation at the beginning of each course. Students will not be permitted to write an examination in any course unless they have fulfilled the requirements, including attendance.

OIIQ Registration or Proof of Licensure

Please visit www.mcgill.ca/nursing/students/clinical for further details.

Vaccination/Immunization and Mask-Fitting Requirements

New students in the Ingram School of Nursing must refer to the Vaccination/Immunization Requirements for Health Sciences Programs outlined in the General University Information and Regulations of the Health Sciences Calendar (available at www.mcgill.ca/study under Faculties & Schools). A copy of the immunization form outlining requirements can be found at www.mcgill.ca/studenthealth/immunize/forms. Annual flu vaccination is strongly recommended to all health science students. Entry into the McGill University Teaching Hospital Network is dependent on having met the immunization requirements. All students must have immunizations completed (or in process for Hepatitis B) and mask fitting done by the start of clinical placement in September.

CPR and First Aid Requirements

Valid First Aid and CPR Certification Health Care Provider (HCP) and Automated External Defibrillation (AED) is required no later than September 15th for all graduate nursing students except for those in the Ph.D. program. Students are responsible for maintaining this certification up-to-date throughout their program of study.

Achievement Builders – Student Services

Any student who is experiencing difficulty in meeting course requirements must take advantage of the Achievement Builders program offered through Student Services. Information is available at: www.mcgill.ca/firstyear/studentlife/workshops1.

Regulations Concerning Clinical Placement Courses

  • Students must be registered with the OIIQ before they can have access to clinical placements. Students who have not completed the registration procedure cannot commence clinical studies.
  • Students must have met the vaccination/immunization requirements prior to commencing clinical studies in September.
  • Students are required to purchase equipment such as a stethoscope and physical-assessment equipment. Information is provided at registration or within specific courses.
  • Students are expected to demonstrate professional behaviour at all times. The Code of Ethics for Nurses and the McGill University Code of Student Conduct (as outlined in the Handbook on Student Rights and Responsibilities) provide guidelines. Professional behaviour is expected in relation to classmates, teachers, patients, and the institutions within which studies take place.
  • In any formal documentation, students must identify themselves as a McGill Nursing Student with the respective year of study noted.
  • Name badges must be worn at all times in clinical studies. These are ordered in the Fall semester of the first year of studies and the cost is charged directly to the student's fee account. Name badges are ordered through the Ingram School of Nursing and students will be required to purchase two sets of name badges in early Fall prior to starting clinical placement. Students must comply with the uniform policy during clinical placements.
  • Students must have a photo I.D. taken at the MUHC for their clinical placements there.
  • Attendance in clinical courses is mandatory and absences must be discussed with the instructor. Students with repeat absences may be asked to defer clinical studies if progress in the clinical course is compromised.
  • Students whose performance in clinical studies does not meet the course objectives will be informed in writing and a learning plan will be developed. Students whose performance is below expectations or who are unsafe in clinical studies may be required to withdraw from the course at any time.
  • Students whose academic performance is below expectation or considered to be incompetent or unsafe in clinical studies can be required to withdraw from the course at any time—in such cases the student will receive a grade of WF or F.
  • While an effort is made to place students within reasonable travelling distance for clinical studies, each student must budget a sum of money to travel to and from a patient home and clinical institutions.
  • Clinical courses that are offered during the Summer session may require that students study during the day or evening.
  • Clinical agencies may require students entering their facility to undergo a Criminal Reference Check prior to being granted permission to enter their facility.

Requirements for Licensure

Following completion of a first-level program in nursing, graduates must obtain licensure from the professional organization in the province or state in which they complete their studies. Visit www.mcgill.ca/nursing/students/graduation for further information.

Application Procedures

McGill's online application for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

For information on the application process as well as the supporting documents required in addition to the uApply online application, please visit our Nursing website at www.mcgill.ca/nursing/programs/applying-graduate-programs, then search for your program of study.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Students who have not completed their studies in North America may be asked to arrange for an interview as part of the application process.
  • GRE (Graduate Record Examination) general test results may be required in individual circumstances.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Ingram School of Nursing and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Term of Entry Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall:
  • Qualifying for the M.Sc.A. Nursing
  • M.Sc.A. Nursing – all concentrations (Special Students, visit website: www.mcgill.ca/nursing/programs)
  • Ph.D. Nursing
Feb. 15 Jan. 15 Feb. 15 (Canadian)/Jan. 15 (International)
Winter:
  • M.Sc.A. Nurse Bachelor Entry, part-time studies in all concentrations (except for Global Health and Nurse Practitioner) must contact the Graduate Admissions Coordinator prior to applying
  • Graduate Certificate; Theory in Neonatology
  • Graduate Certificate; Theory in Nurse Practitioner Primary Care
  • Graduate Diploma; Neonatology Nurse Practitioner
Sept. 30 N/A Sept. 30
Summer:
  • Graduate Diploma; Nurse Practitioner Primary Care
Dec. 15 N/A N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Educational and Counselling Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Educational and Counselling Psychology

Location

  • Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology
  • Education Building, Room 614
  • 3700 McTavish Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1Y2
  • Canada
  • Telephone – Program Information: 514-398-4242
  • Fax: 514-398-6968
  • Email: ecpinfo [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp

About Educational and Counselling Psychology

The Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology (ECP) programs and research examine the interplay between complex human systems (cognitive, social, emotional, behavioural, and biological) to maximize: (a) learning, (b) wellness (mental and physical), and (c) human development in multiple settings and throughout the lifespan. More specifically, they examine issues pertaining to cognitive processes and developmental neuroscience, assessment and intervention, and the design and evaluation of learning environments and instructional practices, with both typical and atypical populations in mind. While ECP’s primary disciplinary bases are psychology and education, it contributes to and is enriched by extended interdisciplinary collaborations with, among others, medicine and other health professions, neurosciences, computer science, science, social work and policy, and law.

Students in our programs benefit from having access to the McGill Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/about/clinic) and the Departmental Assessment Materials Resource Centre (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/students/amrc). To develop their professional skills in assessment, therapy, and supervision, students are equipped with the latest standardized materials and a state-of-the-art venue within which to conduct psychological and cognitive assessments. Our professional programs also have established connections with world-class public and private organizations, which include health care facilities and school boards where students receive supervised training for internships and practica. Our faculty members are involved in intra- and interdisciplinary collaborative research locally, nationally, and internationally. These networks offer students valuable exposure to, and connection with, different research laboratories, research leaders, and professional organizations. Students benefit from international mobility programs and specialized training offered in specific locations. Working closely with faculty members in their research teams, our students enrolled in research-based M.A. and Ph.D. programs have proven very successful in obtaining major external fellowships from bodies such as SSHRC, FQRSC, FRSQ, and CIHR.

Our graduates secure careers in a varied and rewarding range of settings. These include, but are not limited to: academic and research settings, professional psychology (counselling and school psychology), specialized and innovative teaching, educational research, development and leadership at all levels (e.g., schools, colleges and universities, school boards, ministries of education), staff development, and education in the professions.

Detailed graduate degree descriptions are available in the following sections:

Master of Arts (M.A.) Degrees

Students can obtain an M.A. degree in:

  1. Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) with major concentrations in:
    • Professional/Internship (coursework and internship based)
    • Project (coursework and research based)
  2. Educational Psychology with a Major in:
    • School/Applied Child Psychology
  3. Educational Psychology with concentrations in:
    • Health Professions Education
    • Human Development
    • Learning Sciences

Master of Education (M.Ed.) Degrees

Students can obtain an M.Ed. degree in Educational Psychology. Please note these are all non-thesis options. The M.Ed. program in Educational Psychology offers concentrations in:

  • Family Life Education (admissions to this concentration are currently suspended)
  • General Educational Psychology
  • General Educational Psychology (Project)
  • Inclusive Education
  • Inclusive Education (Project)
  • Learning Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Degrees

Students can obtain a Ph.D. degree in:

  1. Counselling Psychology
  2. Educational Psychology with concentrations in:
    • Human Development
    • Learning Sciences
  3. School/Applied Child Psychology

Postdoctoral Degrees

The Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology offers one postdoctoral diploma:

  • Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

For information about these graduate programs please view our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/prospective or contact the appropriate Program Coordinator/Adviser:

For Educational Psychology programs (excluding School/Applied Child Psychology) contact:

  • Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Mrs. Geri Norton
  • Telephone: 514-398-4244
  • Email: edpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca

For Counselling Psychology and School/Applied Child Psychology contact:

  • Graduate Program Adviser
  • Mr. Alexander Nowak
  • Telephone: 514-398-4245
  • Email: counsellingpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca or schoolpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Professional Accreditation

The Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and is currently under review for accreditation by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA). The Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology is jointly accredited by the CPA and the APA. The Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ) accredits both the Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology and the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology.
Note: The APA will no longer accredit programs outside of the United States of America effective September 1, 2015. The implication of this decision for students is that those who graduate from our programs after this date cannot attest to having graduated from an APA-accredited program. For further information regarding APA accreditation, see: www.apa.org/support/education/accreditation/international.aspx#answer.

Important addresses:

APA – Committee on Accreditation, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC, 20002-4242, U.S.A.; Telephone: 1-800-374-2721

CPA – 151 Slater Street, Suite 205, Ottawa, ON, K1P 5H3, Canada; Telephone: 1-888-472-0657

OCCOQ – 1600 Henri Bourassa Blvd. West, Suite 520, Montreal, QC, H3M 3E2, Canada; Telephone: 514-737-6431

OPQ – 1100 Beaumont, Suite 510, Mount-Royal, QC, H3P 3H5, Canada; Telephone: 514-738-1881

Graduate degrees in Counselling Psychology or School/Applied Child Psychology, and elsewhere in Educational Psychology, do not lead to teaching certification—see the Undergraduate eCalendar for B.Ed. programs. Holders of other undergraduate degrees may apply to enter the B.Ed. with Advanced Standing.

Research/Training Facilities

The Department houses a number of training and research units and maintains working relationships with specialized centres and research groups that offer opportunities for training and research to selected students. For a comprehensive list of such groups, consult our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/research.

Graduate Degrees in Counselling Psychology

Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Professional/Internship (60 credits)

The aim of the M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Counselling Psychology (Professional/Internship) is to produce graduates who:

  1. are trained in the major applied areas of counselling;
  2. will be qualified to work in a variety of settings where educational, vocational, personal, and developmental counselling is offered; and
  3. have had an extensive supervised internship in either a clinical or educational setting.

To do so, the training program emphasizes career and vocational theory and development, individual and group counselling skills, the integration of multicultural, gender, and other diversity theories into practice, and diagnosis and assessment procedures.

Students take a combination of theoretical and practical courses throughout the completion of their degree. Most coursework is taken during their first year (including the Summer term) while also completing a practicum in the Department’s Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic. In their second year, students are on-site at internship placements for three full days per week while attending classes on their remaining two days.

Accredited upon graduation by the Ordre des conseillers et conseillères d’orientation du Québec (OCCOQ), this program prepares students to work in the field as Counsellors in settings such as CLSCs, schools, community, rehabilitation, and vocational guidance centres, governmental, non-governmental, or private settings. All students must also attend weekly case conferences.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Project (60 credits)

The M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Counselling Psychology (Project) is designed to produce graduates with introductory academic preparation for research or clinical careers in counselling psychology. Training is provided in the research domain through coursework in data analysis and a research project. Clinical preparation is initiated in the program through coursework in ethics, intervention, assessment, psychological testing, and multicultural issues and through a practicum. Most coursework is taken during the student's first year of studies while beginning work on their research projects. In their second year, students gain practical experience via a practicum in the Department’s Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic while also completing the majority of their work on the research project. The degree alone does not fulfil the requirements for membership in the orders that certify either guidance counsellors (OCCOQ) or psychologists (OPQ) in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Counselling Psychology

Student pursuing a Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the duration of their degree. It draws upon a number of different sciences (including developmental, social, career and neuropsychology and personality theory) to develop critically astute researchers and exceptionally skilled clinicians. Building on the M.A. in Counselling Psychology (Project concentration), or equivalent, the program offers opportunities in Practicum, Supervision, and full-year Internships to develop clinical skills while also working toward the completion of a doctoral dissertation (thesis). The Ph.D. program, has the following aims:

  1. To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the field of counselling psychology.
  2. To practise from a strong evidence base.
  3. To take a leadership role in community, professional, and university organizations in counselling psychology.

Graduates of the program will be prepared to assume careers in education and community settings, including faculty positions, counselling and psychological positions on the staff of university and college mental health centres, and professional positions in psychological agencies offering preventative mental health services. The program is currently accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ), and American Psychological Association (APA). (Please note that APA accreditation will cease for all Canadian institutions in 2015.) Graduates are eligible for licensure in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Graduate Degrees in School/Applied Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); School/Applied Child Psychology

The Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology is the second degree in a combined M.A. and Ph.D. program with the M.A. (Thesis) in Educational Psychology's School/Applied Child Psychology concentration. Most students in the doctoral program completed their M.A. in the Educational Psychology program although students can apply for direct entry into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree obtained at another institution. At both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels, students take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the course of their degree. Students will produce a thesis at both levels of study.

Extending upon the M.A. degree, the program's focus remains on the improvement of the educational and psychological well-being of children and to educate school psychologists in a manner consistent with the highest international standards in the field. Students explore a variety of topics including mental health, child development, school organization, learning processes, behaviour, motivation, and effective teaching. They are prepared to become inquiring professionals committed to the development of children and youth and receive intensive training of clinical practice with children and families, as well as basic and applied research.

The program develops clinical skills through intensive assessment courses, a Clinic Practicum, Field Placement, and a full-year Internship. Typically, our graduates go on to practise school psychology across a range of environments including private practice, academia, hospitals, and school boards. The Ph.D. program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ). (Please note that APA accreditation will cease for all Canadian institutions in 2015.) Graduates are eligible for licensure in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych.

Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

This post-Ph.D. graduate diploma enables holders of a doctorate in Psychology to pursue further studies in School/Applied Child Psychology. The course of study is adapted to the background of each student. The program includes exceptionally one, or typically two, years of courses and practica, plus a year of Internship. Students register on a per-credit basis (including Internship).

Students are not required to demonstrate knowledge of a second language within this program; however, any student wishing to be licensed as a professional psychologist in Quebec must have a working knowledge of French. Accreditation status may be confirmed by contacting the accrediting bodies.

Professional Accreditation

All elements of this postdoctoral graduate diploma are selected from the professional components of the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology, which is accredited in the School Psychology category by the American Psychological Association (APA). Graduates of a re-specialization program are normally accorded the same recognition as graduates of the accredited program.

The Ph.D. is approved by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ), which has recommended the final stage of professional recognition to the Office des professions of the Government of Quebec. Once this accreditation is confirmed, however, graduates of the postdoctoral graduate diploma will not be automatically eligible for membership in the OPQ and the right to practise professional psychology in Quebec. Candidates wishing to practise in Quebec will be required to apply to the OPQ for the recognition of equivalent qualifications.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych.

Graduate Degrees in Educational Psychology

Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree offers educators and practising professionals advanced professional training in areas where educational psychology can make a practical contribution to the design, delivery, and assessment of educational programs and the impact of these programs on student learning. Courses aim to promote:

  1. a greater understanding of human development, individual differences, and the learning process;
  2. a greater understanding on classroom processes and strategies for teaching diverse learners in a variety of contexts;
  3. the evaluation of student learning, teaching, programs, and educational experimentation and innovation; and
  4. the application of results of educational research.

The program offers the following concentrations of study:

  1. Family Life Education: Admission to this concentration is currently suspended.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Family Life Education (48 credits).

  2. General Educational Psychology: Permits students with very specific experiences and career paths to tailor the program to their particular situations. Students may draw courses from other concentrations within the M.Ed. programs including Inclusive Education, Learning Sciences, or any other general Departmental courses. This program suits students with very unique program needs in Educational Psychology.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — General Educational Psychology (48 credits).

  3. General Educational Psychology (Project) Provides students with an interest in the General Educational Psychology concentration the opportunity to focus on an issue in the field and complete a research project in place of course work (12 credits worth).

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — General Educational Psychology: Project (48 credits).

  4. Inclusive Education: Prepares students to work with diverse individuals in a variety of settings that emphasize inclusive practice. As most professional and educational contexts are becoming more diverse, this program has wide appeal and is relevant to current teachers, consultants, other professionals working in the education system, and to those wishing to understand human development and potential in all inclusive contexts.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Inclusive Education (48 credits).

  5. Inclusive Education (Project): Provides students with an interest in the Inclusive Education concentration the opportunity to focus on an issue in the field and complete a research project in place of course work (12 credits worth).

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Inclusive Education: Project (48 credits).

  6. Learning Sciences: Focuses on the study of learning as it occurs in real-world situations and ways in which learning may be facilitated in designed environments.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Learning Sciences (48 credits).

The M.Ed. program has been developed for students who have a background in education (B.Ed.), psychology, or another related degree. Students have the option of conducting academic or applied research (via a 12-credit Research Project or Special Activity) to enhance the applied experience of learning. The academic staff who teach and supervise within the program understand both research and applied contexts such as the school system. Courses are offered in the evening to accommodate full-time professionals and can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Many of our graduates work in the school system as resource teachers, special education, or educational consultants. Others work in or create special tutorial programs or family/child programs for students with difficulties, or in specialized settings (e.g., hospital programs), and others have moved on into our doctoral program in Human Development.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/mededpsych.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) (48 credits) (Note that the School/Applied Child Psychology Major is 78 credits.)

The aim of the M.A. (Thesis) in Educational Psychology is to produce graduates who:

  1. are broadly trained in educational psychology;
  2. have sufficient research competence to critically evaluate research in educational psychology, and to design, conduct, and report empirical research; and
  3. have experience in applying research methods and findings to the solution of practical problems in varied educational settings.

Candidates are required to select and follow the set of courses in one of three concentrations of study or the Major in School/Applied Child Psychology, select a topic for research, and present the results of such research in a thesis.

The program offers three concentrations and one major:

  1. The Health Professions Education concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions) is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning as they happen in the health professions and throughout the lifespan. The program is for health professionals who are interested in conducting educational research and working on development projects (e.g., program, curriculum, faculty) as well as for educational psychology graduate students who are interested in issues related to medical education and education in other health professions.

    The program will produce a graduate who can recognize the role of education in a health professions context, who has sufficient research competence to conduct empirical research in health education settings, and who can apply research results to solve practical problems in this field. Student admission and supervision is done jointly with the Centre for Medical Education; see website: www.mcgill.ca/centreformeded.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Health Professions Education (48 credits).

  2. The Human Development concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev) is intended to prepare students from education and psychology backgrounds to work in school, institutional, and university settings. The degree prepares candidates to support the educational and psychological well-being of individuals, to use research to critically inform practice, and to be able to conceptualize and conduct applied and theoretical research related to different trajectories of human development and varied educational settings. The program follows a mentorship model that encourages students’ active participation in research and prepares them for academia and leadership roles in the field.

    The program is unique in exploring development including cognitive, language, social, personality, and gender development issues in children and adolescents from the diverse perspectives of our multidisciplinary faculty. For example, students are exposed to clinical and non-clinical perspectives on developmental issues; these perspectives are then employed to better understand issues related to disabilities and individuals’ diverse needs in educational and community settings. Most students in this program go on to pursue studies at the Ph.D. level.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Human Development (45 credits).

  3. The Learning Sciences concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci) aims to develop competent and inquiring professionals who have the skills to understand and improve learning and teaching by way of conceptualizing and conducting applied and theoretical research in different formal and informal educational settings. It is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning in schools, colleges and universities, the workplace and professional practice, as well as virtual learning communities. Students acquire theoretical and practical knowledge through coursework, team-based research assistantships, and apprenticeships where appropriate.

    The profiles of our graduates speak to the flexibility and application of acquired skills and competencies in a range of professions. These include academic positions around the world, positions in school boards and hospital education programs, researchers involved in educational and institutional research and policy development, training and education specialists in business and industry, medical education researchers, and faculty developers.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Learning Sciences (45 credits).

The School/Applied Child Psychology Major (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych) is a combined M.A. and Ph.D. program with the doctoral degree in School/Applied Child Psychology. Most students who enrol in the master’s program continue to pursue studies at the doctoral level, although students can apply for direct entry into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree obtained at another institution.

The program's focus is on the improvement of the educational and psychological well-being of children and educates school psychologists in a manner consistent with the highest international standards in the field. Students explore a variety of topics including mental health, child development, school organization, learning processes, behaviour, motivation, and effective teaching, and are prepared to become inquiring professionals committed to the development of children and youth. Therefore, students receive intensive training of clinical practice with children and families, as well as basic and applied research.

To do so at both the M.A. and Ph.D. level, students take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the course of their degree. Students will produce a thesis at both levels of study. Our students go on to practise school psychology across a range of environments including private practice, academia, hospitals, and school boards.

See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — School/Applied Child Psychology (78 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Educational Psychology is available only to M.A. students admitted to the study sequence leading to the Ph.D. School/Applied Child Psychology, and who wish to transfer after the first semester.

Please note that this program is currently not offered.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology
The aim of the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology emphasizes the development of research skills and supports both basic and applied research pertaining to all domains of educational psychology. It aims to develop graduates who can demonstrate:
  1. broad scholarship in planning and implementing basic and applied research on problems of cognition, teaching, learning, and human development;
  2. mastery of current theoretical issues in educational psychology and their historical development; and
  3. a detailed knowledge of their selected concentration.
The program offers two concentrations:
  1. Human Development concentration: (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev) The Human Development concentration builds upon the M.A. program and is intended to prepare students to work in school, institutional, and university settings. The degree prepares candidates to support the educational and psychological well-being of individuals, to use research to critically inform practice, and to be able to conceptualize and conduct applied and theoretical research related to different trajectories of human development and varied educational settings. The program follows a mentorship model that encourages students’ active participation in research and prepares them for academia and leadership roles in the field.

    The Human Development program is unique in exploring development including cognitive, language, social, personality, and gender development issues in children and adolescents from the diverse perspectives of our multidisciplinary faculty. These perspectives are then employed to better understand issues related to disabilities and individuals’ diverse needs in educational and community settings.

    See Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology — Human Development.

  2. Learning Sciences concentration: (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci) The Learning Sciences concentration builds upon the M.A. program and continues its aim of developing competent and inquiring professionals who have the skills to understand and improve learning and teaching by way of conceptualizing and conducting applied and theoretical research in different formal and informal educational settings. It is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning. The settings could be schools, colleges and universities, the workplace and professional practice, as well as virtual learning communities. Students acquire theoretical and practical knowledge through coursework, team-based research assistantships, and apprenticeships where appropriate.

    See Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology — Learning Sciences.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Educational and Counselling Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

M.A. in Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis)

The M.A. in Counselling Psychology program offers the following two concentrations:

  1. Professional/Internship (coursework and internship based)
  2. Project (research based)

Admission Requirements

Concentration: Professional/Internship

To be eligible, applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree consisting of 18 credits of core courses in specific Psychology domains and 24 credits in related disciplines in the social sciences (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist) and a minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies. For more information please visit our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs.

Concentration: Project

To be eligible, applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree in psychology consisting of 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies at the undergraduate level. For more information please visit our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s) – for applicants to the Project concentration
  • Interview – for applicants to the Professional/Internship concentration
  • M.A. in Counselling Psychology Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Counselling Psychology: Project and Professional/Internship concentrations, can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma.

Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology

Admission Requirements

To be eligible applicants must hold:

A master's degree equivalent to the Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Project (60 credits) or a Master's degree from a directly relevant program (e.g., clinical psychology, other Counselling Psychology programs) along with 42 credits of core courses in specific Psychology domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • Written Work
  • Ph.D. Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd

Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

To be eligible applicants must hold:

A master's degree equivalent to the Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — School/Applied Child Psychology (78 credits) along with 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

All doctoral students must have a research supervisor upon entry to the program. Interested candidates should consult the Departmental website for a list of faculty members and their research interests. A supervisor must be selected from among professors in the School/Applied Child Psychology program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Written Work
  • Ph.D. Pre-Admission Academic Checklist
  • GRE – General and Psychology subject tests
  • A letter from the applicant's prospective supervisor agreeing to act as their Ph.D. supervisor

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology, can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/phd.

Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

An earned doctorate in Educational Psychology, another area of Psychology, or a closely related discipline (to be recognized at the Program Director's discretion).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/postphd.

M.Ed. in Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis)

This program offers six concentrations:

  1. Learning Sciences
  2. General Educational Psychology
  3. General Educational Psychology: Project
  4. Inclusive Education
  5. Inclusive Education: Project
  6. Family Life Education (admission to the Family Life Concentration is currently suspended)

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.Ed. concentrations in Educational Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/mededpsych/med.

M.A. in Educational Psychology (Thesis)

This program offers three concentrations:

  1. Learning Sciences
  2. Health Professions Education
  3. Human Development

and one Major:

  1. School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

Learning Sciences Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Health Professions Education Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

The Health Professions Education program has been conceived and is offered in collaboration with the McGill Centre for Medical Education and affiliated faculty. Student selection is done jointly as is graduate supervision.

Human Development Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology, consisting of 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist, found at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma).
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Learning Sciences Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Learning Sciences concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci/ma.

Health Professions Education Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Health Professions concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions/ma.

Human Development Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Human Development concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev/ma.

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: School/Applied Child Psychology Major can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/ma.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Learning Sciences Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • Personal Statement

Health Professions Education Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • Personal Statement

Human Development Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Statement of Research Interest and Preferred Supervisor(s)
  • GRE – General and Psychology subject scores
  • Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

M.A. in Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis)

Note: Admission to this program is currently suspended.

Admission Requirements

Same as M.A. (Thesis) Educational Psychology Major in School/Applied Child Psychology.

For application information please refer to instructions listed under M.A. (Thesis) Educational Psychology Major in School/Applied Child Psychology.

For further information about the application process, please consult our Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/ma.

Ph.D. in Educational Psychology

Admission Requirements

All doctoral students must have a research supervisor upon entry to the program. Interested candidates should consult the Departmental website for a faculty list: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp. All applicants must have a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies. Please note: it is essential to clearly identify your desired concentration of study on your application. The two concentrations offered are:

  1. Human Development
  2. Learning Sciences

The specific requirements to be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level are as follows:

Applicants should hold an M.A. in Educational Psychology from McGill or a recognized equivalent degree from a program which requires a thesis, reflecting high overall standing, study within the area of proposed doctoral specialization, and evidence of research competence.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Human Development concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev/phd.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Learning Sciences concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci/phd.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Human Development Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Letter from proposed supervisor indicating their agreement to act as the Thesis Supervisor

Learning Sciences Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Letter from proposed supervisor indicating their agreement to act as the Thesis Supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Counselling Psychology (M.A. or Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Educational Psychology and School/Applied Child Psychology programs (M.A., M.Ed., or Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Sociology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Sociology

Location

  • Department of Sociology
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 713
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Graduate Program and Admission Information:
  • Telephone: 514-398-6847
  • Fax: 514-398-3403
  • Email: graduate [dot] sociology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/sociology

About Sociology

The Department offers training leading to the following degrees:

  • Master of Arts in Sociology (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Development Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Gender and Women’s Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Medical Sociology Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis) with the Social Studies of Medicine Department
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Social Statistics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Gender and Women's Studies Option
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option

We have particular strength in the following fields: states, nationalism, and development; economy and society; social inequality (class, ethnicity, and gender); deviance and social control; and health and society. The Department of Sociology has very high standards and an excellent record of placing students in both academic and non-academic careers in institutions ranging from the University of Chicago and Berkeley to StatsCan and CEGEPs. The Department has a stellar record of research publications and a lively graduate program, and we benefit from many new faculty appointments allowing us to be at the forefront of current issues. A large number of M.A. programs are offered. Fewer are offered at the Ph.D. level (see below). The Department houses the Social Statistics Unit. This has full access to the resources of StatsCan, with additional training for students.

Availability of Funding

The Department offers a limited number of teaching assistantships. A full teaching assistantship consists of a maximum of 180 hours of work per term. Appointments for a full teaching assistantship span 15 weeks and involve an average of 12 hours per week.

M.A. Program Options

Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides excellent methodological training, but is principally designed for students who wish to gain a first experience doing original research. Some students have stopped at this stage; more have gone on to higher degree work. Researching and writing a thesis requires considerable effort, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is both for students who wish to continue from an undergraduate degree in sociology, and those who wish to enter sociology for the first time. McGill is an excellent venue because the program involves rigorous training in methodology. Academically inclined students have gone on to higher degrees, some at McGill and others at other universities; the training offered has allowed others to go to varied careers, not least as teachers in CEGEPs. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Many students from this program have gone on to further research, but several have entered the world of non-governmental organizations—with some going on to work for the U.N. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The research paper must be on a topic related to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the degree requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s research paper must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (45 credits)
The purpose of the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is to provide graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Research Projects must be on a topic relating to population dynamics, approved by the PDO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
This program complements the basic research training with the application of statistical methods to Statistics Canada data (or equivalent). It requires a statistics-based research paper that will normally flow out of a paper written for one of the graduate seminars. Comparable to an article in a professional journal, the paper ought to focus on a clearly defined research problem, demonstrating familiarity with the most important relevant scholarly work and the ability to carry out and organize the results of the research. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.

Ph.D. Program Options

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology
There are two ways to enter the Ph.D. program. Some students are fast-tracked (i.e., from a B.A. degree without having to complete an M.A. in Sociology), as Ph.D. 1 students; they take twelve substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements, and are trained in qualitative and quantitative research methods and in research design. Other students, typically those with an M.A. in Sociology, are considered as Ph.D. 2 students; they typically take six substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements—although further courses may be required if their methodological skills do not meet the standards required by the Department. Our Social Statistics Laboratory allows students to make systematic use of quantitative data sources. All students must pass two area exams and present a thesis proposal before turning to the thesis itself, which may take the form of a single piece of research, or a set of articles on a particular theme.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Gender and Women's Studies
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the Ph.D. requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and on issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis or set of articles must relate to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Population Dynamics
This program aims to provide advanced graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Dissertation topics must be related to population dynamics and approved by the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) coordinating committee.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Sociology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree with a standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.3 or better out of a possible 4.0. The degree may be either in Sociology or in another relevant social science. In the latter case, applicants may be required to take some additional sociology courses to fill gaps in their background.

The strength of an applicant's academic record is of primary importance in consideration of an applicant's dossier. For a detailed description of courses open to graduates and undergraduates, and of preparation required of McGill University honours students, candidates should consult the Undergraduate eCalendar.

All applicants are asked to submit a writing sample. Applicants must submit with their applications the results of the Verbal, Analytical, and Quantitative aptitude tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Arrangements to take the GRE should be made directly with the Educational Testing Service by visiting their website at www.ets.org/gre. Certain students must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL exam is 567 on the paper-based test and 86 overall on the Internet-based test (no less than 20 in each of the four component scores). For more information on whether the TOEFL is required please visit www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency. International students can also contact International Student Services at 514-398-4349 for more information, or visit their website, www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents.

Candidates who lack sufficient preparation in the social sciences, but whose academic record justifies consideration for eventual admission to the master's graduate program, must register for a qualifying year during which they are required to take courses to broaden their knowledge of sociology. Candidates must achieve a final grade of at least a B in these courses and an average in all courses of at least B+; in general, they must, in the opinion of the Department, have achieved sufficient preparation in the subject matter of sociology before they will be allowed to proceed with graduate work. All candidates are expected to have taken courses in statistics, research methods, and sociological theory at the undergraduate level.

Any prospective students are encouraged to contact faculty members that they may wish to work with to ascertain that they will be available and not on leave during the time at which they wish to study. If need be, they may feel free to contact the Graduate Program Director to guide them.

The program of study is designed to give students an advanced understanding of a major field in sociology, of current methods of sociological research, and of some principal theoretic issues in the discipline. Three terms of residence study is the minimum requirement for a master's degree. For the doctoral program, three years is the minimum residency requirement for students entering at the Ph.D. 1 level (those students without an M.A.) and two years for students entering at the Ph.D. 2 level (those with an M.A.).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please note that the dossier must be complete before the applicant will be considered for entrance to the graduate program.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE
  • Personal Statement
  • Writing Sample – can be in the form of a graded paper or a chapter from a thesis and must be at least 15 typewritten pages in length translated into English or French

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Sociology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Social Work

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Social Work

Location

  • School of Social Work
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street, Suite 300
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7070
  • Fax: 514-398-4760
  • Email: graduate [dot] socialwork [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/socialwork

About Social Work

The School of Social Work offers dynamic M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, designed to explore cutting-edge knowledge on social work theory, practice, policy, and research. We have an exciting and growing faculty with a variety of research and practice expertise in the fields of: child welfare; health, mental health, and disability; poverty; aging; First Peoples; marginalized groups (e.g., immigrants and refugees, war affected populations, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people); loss and bereavement; domestic violence; and international social work. Our approaches to practice and research cover all levels of intervention from individuals, families, groups, and communities. Located within the School of Social Work are specialized centres devoted to research and training in the areas of domestic violence; children and families; and international human rights. Graduate students also have access to workstations equipped with computers, and many professional development workshops and seminars. Several research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available each year.

The McGill School of Social Work is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW), the Canadian Association for Social Work Education – l'Association Canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE-ACFTS), and of the Regroupement des unités de formation universitaire en travail social du Québec (RUFUTS).

The School of Social Work is a professional school with the primary objective of preparing students for careers and for leadership in the fields of social work and social welfare.

Qualifying Year Entry into the M.S.W. Program

Applicants demonstrating academic excellence and a minimum of one year of social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional) are considered for admission to the one-year, full-time (only) Qualifying year of study in preparation for entry to the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program. The objective of this preparatory year is to provide students with essential foundation social work knowledge that will provide a basis upon which to embark on graduate-level studies in social work.

M.S.W. Program

The overarching objective of the master's program is the provision of advanced professional training by means of integrated learning experiences. Specifically, the educational goals are to:

  1. develop a deepened and advanced competence in practice and research;
  2. embrace a capacity for critical understanding of social theories, social problems, and emergent issues; and
  3. understand population groups in need, institutional structures, and policy initiatives and processes.

The M.S.W. degree can be pursued via two options: thesis and non-thesis. Both options carry a weight of 45 credits, and, taken on a full-time basis, both options involve three terms of study. In both options, part-time study can be arranged.

There are two points of entry into the M.S.W.: one for those who hold a B.S.W. degree; and one for those who have completed the one-year Qualifying year of study offered by the School of Social Work.

Ph.D. Program in Social Work

The School of Social Work offers a dynamic Ph.D. program in social work/social policy in order to promote the development of scholarship on social issues within Canada and Quebec. Courses are offered in English at McGill. Parallel streams are offered in French at Université de Montréal and Université du Québec à Montréal. Students have the opportunity of taking courses at all three universities.

The program aims to:

  1. prepare graduates for careers in university teaching and research, policy development, implementation and evaluation, practice and program evaluation, leadership and management of human services;
  2. offer students the opportunity to acquire research methodology skills and to apply these to a range of areas relevant to social work; and
  3. stimulate original research on important social problems and issues.
Note: With respect to M.S.W. and Q.Y. programs, while not a prerequisite for admission, possession of a working knowledge of the French language is important not only to candidates who intend to seek admission to the Quebec professional Ordre after graduation but also to those who wish to maximize their field placement opportunities during their program. In consultation with the Field Education Coordinator, students may have the option of completing their field requirements at an approved social service agency outside of Quebec.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Couple and Family Therapy (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
The Master's program in Couple and Family Therapy is a full-time professional Master's program of 60 credits taken over five terms. Graduates of this program will qualify for two professional permits: the Couple and Family Therapist permit (Ordre des travailleurs sociaux et des thérapeutes conjugaux et familiaux du Québec (OTSTCFQ)); and the Psychotherapist permit (Ordre des Psychologues du Québec (OPQ)). The high standards for admission, course requirements, and clinical supervision will produce highly trained graduates who will be desirable future employees with enhanced career and employment opportunities. Graduating from McGill University's Master of Science, Applied in Couple and Family Therapy will be an esteemed professional credential.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of research skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. Program requirements consist of a thesis and six courses (two of which are required), taken over an extended period of three to four terms of full-time study. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional). Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Non-Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of practice skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. This program entails three semesters of full-time study that consist of coursework, professional education in a supervised field placement, and an independent study project. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional), or will have successfully completed the Qualifying year entry into the M.S.W. Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) — International Partner Program (45 credits)
This program is offered intermittently, based on funding, to a specific cohort of students by invitation only.
Joint Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with Integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) (132 credits)
The School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law offer a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law/Bachelor of Laws (B.C.L./LL.B.) designed to transcend academic boundaries in social justice issues. Lawyers and social workers often operate in the same fields, whether in public policy, child protection, family law, poverty law, or domestic violence situations, yet each profession has been constrained by internal limitations. The joint M.S.W. (non-thesis option)/Law program requires students to complete 132 credits (45 credits in M.S.W., 87 credits in Law). Students should take three and a half to four years to complete the M.S.W./B.C.L./LL.B. program. It is possible, however, to complete the program in three years, by doing work for credit over the summer and by carrying heavier course loads throughout the program. The joint program leads to conferral of the B.C.L./LL.B. law degrees and the master’s degree in social work. Prospective students possess a B.S.W. degree with prior practice experience.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Social Work (offered jointly by McGill and Université de Montréal)
As one of the top Ph.D. programs in Canada, the School of Social Work promotes leading scholarship on social policy and practice. Over the course of three to four years, working closely with their supervisor, students pursue individualized programs of study, which include coursework, research, and professional development. Faculty have expertise in a variety of areas such as aging; social exclusion; child welfare; international social welfare; Aboriginal people and communities; violence against women and children; health and disability; poverty and social development; migration and community organizing. Students normally take two semesters of coursework after which they complete a comprehensive exam. In the second year of the program students begin their thesis work and take a course designed to facilitate the research process. Research and writing usually takes between one and two years to complete. McGill offers entrance fellowships, access to computers and library resources, and active student networks. There are many opportunities to be involved in faculty research projects and sessional teaching. Students go on to careers in teaching, organizational leadership, and social policy analysis.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

M.Sc.(A) in Couple and Family Therapy  (60 credits)

Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Psychology

Location

  • Department of Psychology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W8/33A
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6124/514-398-6100
  • Fax: 514-398-4896
  • Email: gradsec [at] ego [dot] psych [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.psych.mcgill.ca

About Psychology

The aim of the Experimental program is to provide students with an environment in which they are free to develop skills and expertise that will serve during a professional career of teaching and research as a psychologist. Coursework and other requirements are at a minimum. Success in the program depends on the student's ability to organize unscheduled time for self education. Continuous involvement in research planning and execution is considered a very important component of the student's activities. Students are normally expected to do both master’s and doctoral study.

M.A. and M.Sc. degrees may be awarded in Experimental Psychology, but only as a step to the Ph.D.—students undergo formal evaluation beginning with the submission of their master's requirements (thesis or fast-track paper) to enter Ph.D. 2.

The Clinical program adheres to the scientist practitioner model and as such is designed to train students for careers in university teaching or clinical research, and for service careers (working with children or adults in hospital, clinical, or educational settings). Most of our clinical graduates combine service and research roles. While there are necessarily many more course requirements than in the Experimental program, the emphasis is again on research training. There is no master’s program in Clinical Psychology; students are expected to complete the full program leading to a doctoral degree.

Research interests of members of the Psychology Department include animal learning, behavioural neuroscience, clinical, child development, cognitive science, health psychology, psychology of language, perception, quantitative psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology.

Facilities for advanced research in a variety of fields are available within the Department itself. In addition, arrangements exist with the Departments of Psychology at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Allan Memorial Institute, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Montreal General Hospital, to permit graduate students to undertake research in a hospital setting. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.)

Students interested in neuroscience may apply to graduate programs in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience (IPN) department and work with an IPN supervisor from the Department of Psychology. For information about programs offered by the IPN department, see the eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Neuroscience (Integrated Program in) and www.mcgill.ca/ipn.

For full information about all programs and financial aid, and for application forms, contact the Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Psychology.

Ph.D. Option in Language Acquisition (LAP)

Information about this option is available from the Department and at: www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html.

Ph.D. Option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSO)

A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology is offered within the existing Ph.D. program in Psychology. Information about this option is available from the Department and at: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/oncology/programs/programs_psychosocialoncology.asp.

Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.
Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Language Acquisition
This unique interdisciplinary program focuses on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition Program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Psychosocial Oncology
The Department of Oncology, in conjunction with the Ingram School of Nursing, the Department of Psychology and the School of Social Work, has developed the cross-disciplinary Psychosocial Oncology Option (PSOO). This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Please note: there have been changes in the required documents for the admission and application procedures. Please consult the link http://www.psych.mcgill.ca/grad/program/application_admission.htm for additional requirements.

Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program depends on an evaluation of students' research interests and their aptitude for original contributions to knowledge and, if applicable, for professional contributions in the applied field.

The usual requirement for admission is an Honours or majors degree (B.A. or B.Sc.) in Psychology. This usually includes an introductory course plus twelve courses in psychology (each equivalent to three term hours). Courses in experimental psychology, the theoretical development of modern ideas in psychology, and statistical methods as applied to psychological problems (equivalent to an introductory course) are essential. Applicants' knowledge of relevant biological, physical, and social sciences is considered. Students applying to the clinical program are advised to complete 42 specific undergraduate credits in psychology as specified by the Order of Psychologists of Quebec.

Applicants who hold a bachelor's degree but who have not met these usual requirements should consult the Graduate Program Director to determine which (if any) courses must be completed before an application can be considered. Students with insufficient preparation for graduate work may register as Special Students (undergraduate level) in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science, and follow an appropriate course of study. Such registration requires the permission of the Department but carries no advantage with respect to a student's eventual admission to graduate studies.

Applicants should note that the deadline for many scholarships and fellowships is about four months earlier than the application deadlines and that applications for scholarships and fellowships should be submitted through their home university.

Applicants with little or no background in psychology are not required to submit scores on the subject component of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). We highly recommend to all other students to submit scores on the subject component of the GRE. If you did not take the GRE subject test and are accepted into the program, you may be asked to take it in April. All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Three letters of reference
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – All applicants must take the GRE if they have studied in an English-speaking university. Canadians who have not studied in an English institution are not required to submit the GRE.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Political Science

Political Science

Location

  • Department of Political Science
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 414
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Political Science

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. (with or without thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. These programs combine depth of specialization in a particular field with breadth of knowledge in related fields. The staff offers courses and supervises research on most of the important areas of political science. Students may specialize in any of the following: Canadian Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, or International Relations.

M.A. graduates gain the scholarly preparation required to proceed to the Ph.D. program at McGill or elsewhere. Alternatively, the M.A. degree prepares graduates for teaching at the college level, for advanced study in other disciplines, or for rewarding jobs in government and in the private sector. Students in the M.A. program may choose either the Research Essay option or the Thesis option. Both options are generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada.

Besides its traditional M.A. program, the Department also offers M.A. options in Social Statistics, Development Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and European Studies. Interested students must apply and be accepted to both the political science M.A. program and to the option program.

Graduate students can benefit from expertise and advanced scholarship in such diverse research areas as Electoral Studies, Comparative Federalism, Constitutional Theory and Practice, International Peace and Security Studies, International Development, Nations and Nationalism, Health and Social Policy, and Identity Politics. For a full list of our affiliated research centres and institutes, please consult our website: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/centres.

Changes may take place after this content is published. Students are advised to contact the Department Office for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.

Master's Programs

Students may select a program with the Thesis or the Non-Thesis (Research Project) option in completing M.A. degree requirements. They may switch from one option to the other while completing their coursework.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. A main purpose of the M.A. degree is to demonstrate an ability to design and execute with competence a major piece of research, comparable to a full‐length article in a scholarly journal. The length will vary with the nature of the topic. A thesis that contains considerable data analysis might be well developed in 50 pages, while an institutional or historical study would generally be longer.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European Studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. Students in the non-thesis program will submit a research essay. The research essay will normally be based on a paper written for a graduate seminar or an independent reading course. The research essay requirement also applies to each of the non-thesis options listed below.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The Gender and Women’s Studies Option offers McGill graduate students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework, a cross‐disciplinary specialization in feminist, and gender and/or women’s studies, deploying a wide array of disciplinary methodologies and modes of inquiry. The student's research paper must be on a topic centrally focused on gender and/or women's studies. See www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
The Social Statistics Option complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data or equivalent. Students complete course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, as advised by the Option Adviser, and subject to approval by the Department, and a statistics‐based M.A. research paper in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. See www.mcgill.ca/socialstatistics. Entrance to this option is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee subsequent to acceptance into the Departmental program. A research paper is required to demonstrate proficiency in research. It is normally about 50 pages in length and involves revision of a paper written for one of the graduate courses completed in the program. The research paper is evaluated by two faculty members in the Department.

Ph.D. Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science
The doctoral program is designed to give students the necessary foundation for making original contributions to knowledge. Graduate courses provide students with analytical and theoretical tools used in particular subfields. This general training includes specialized training in research methods. Recent graduates of our doctoral program are pursuing diverse employment opportunities. See: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/recentplacements.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Political Science and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. This option is a cross-disciplinary specialization run by the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies (see www.mcgill.ca/igsf). The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies. For more information on the option, see: www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 29, 2014).

Political Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The graduate Admissions Committee only considers applications from those who already have an undergraduate academic degree in political science or a closely related field (e.g., international studies, sociology, philosophy for prospective political theorists, etc.). Those without this required background occasionally enrol as Special Students in the undergraduate program and take upper-level undergraduate courses in order to build the academic record necessary to apply to the graduate program.

Master's

Students holding a B.A. degree may be eligible for admission to the M.A. program. Preparation equivalent to a McGill Honours program in Political Science is desirable.

Ph.D.

Students holding a master’s degree in political science may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program. In some instances, outstanding students with a B.A. in Political Science may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program without having completed an M.A. degree. They will be considered Ph.D. 1 and some previous political science coursework could be applied to the requirements of the program, provided that it did not count toward any other degree.

Reference Letters

All applicants, including those who have done their undergraduate work at McGill, must submit two letters of reference. It is recommended that you contact your referees at least a month in advance of the deadline. Applications that do not have references by January 15 will not be considered.

GRE and TOEFL Exams

GRE results are required for applications to the doctoral program. Use codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 1999. The test should be written well in advance of the application deadline. See www.ets.org/gre for more information on registering for the test. GRE results are not required for students applying to the master's program.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian/American institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) is required for admission. Please use the codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 89 when writing the TOEFL exam. See www.ets.org/toefl for more information on registering for the test. The IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) with a minimum overall band of 6.5 is also acceptable. Files will not be considered unless TOEFL/IELTS scores are received before the application deadline (January 15 for admission in the Fall).

For more information, consult the following websites: www.ets.org/gre and www.ets.org/toefl.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Writing Sample – Ph.D. only
  • GRE – required for applications to the Ph.D.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Political Science Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Completed applications (including all supporting documentation listed above) for all graduate programs in Political Science must be received by January 15. For detailed information, please see the Graduate Applicant Checklist at: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/gradformsdocs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

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