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Management (doctoral programs)

Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the Joint Ph.D. in Management

  • Ph.D. Program Office
  • Desautels Faculty of Management
  • McGill University
  • 1001 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1G5
  • Canada
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management
The Ph.D. program in Management is offered jointly by the four Montreal universities: Concordia University, École des Hautes Études Commerciales (affiliated with the Université de Montréal), McGill University, and Université du Québec à Montréal. The program is intended to educate competent researchers and to stimulate research on management issues.

The addresses of the three other institutions are:

  • Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Département des Sciences Administratives
  • 315 Ste-Catherine Est
  • Montreal, QC H2X 3X2
  • Canada
  • Website: www.phdadm.esg.uqam.ca

The program represents a number of innovations in doctoral work in the field of administration. First, by cooperating, the four universities are able to make available to the program's students a diverse pool of approximately 250 professors qualified to direct doctoral-level study and research. Second, the program has been carefully developed to encourage independent, creative work on the part of its students, with close, personal contact with the professors. This program will appeal especially to the mature, experienced candidate with relatively well-defined interests. Across the four member universities, some courses are offered in English and some in French. (All papers may, however, be written in English or French.) This is viewed as a definite advantage of the program for those students who expect to work in Canada or francophone countries after graduation.

The program places considerable emphasis on the theoretical foundations of management and its underlying disciplines. Graduates of the program are expected to have: (1) some knowledge of all the main areas of management, (2) a thorough knowledge of one applied area of management, and one support discipline, (3) a complete command of the research methodologies used in management, and (4) some familiarity with modern theories and methods of the pedagogy of management.

The program consists of three phases: preparation, specialization, and dissertation.

Phase I – Preparation

Before entering the program, the student will have selected the area of specialization from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management
  • Organizational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Organization
  • NSERC CREATE*

* NSERC CREATE Ph.D. option in Healthcare Operations and Information Management – Offered jointly by six Canadian universities: McGill, British Columbia, Ottawa, Queen's, Toronto, and Montréal, this Ph.D. program brings together expertise on healthcare processes, operations research, information systems, and telecommunications engineering.

Some students—notably those with strong master's degrees in administration or related disciplines—have a minimum of work in Phase I; others require up to one academic year of work.

Phase II – Specialization

In Phase II, students probe deeply into their chosen area of specialization. With their Advisory Committee, students work out an individual program of study, which takes about 18 months. The phase focuses on a specialization area and a support field. The specialization area could be one of the basic ones listed in Phase I (for example, marketing or operations management), a sub-area within one of these (such as organizational development within organizational behaviour), or an interdisciplinary area that combines two or more of these (such as behaviour aspects of accounting or international marketing).

The support field is selected to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge in a fundamental discipline that underlies the theory in administration. For example, a student in marketing might select psychology, sociology, or statistics. One in management policy might select political science or general systems theory, or perhaps even philosophy. Other choices are possible.

Students officially enter Phase II of the program when their Advisory Committee has been established and, together with the student, formally agrees on a proposal for the work to be done in Phase II. Phase II must be approved by the McGill and the Joint Doctoral Committees. This includes the following:

  • Doctoral seminars in the specialization area; minimum four courses
  • Any other existing graduate-level courses in the specialization area and support field deemed appropriate by the Advisory Committee; minimum two courses in support field
  • Seminar on Research Methodology (MGMT 707, 3 credits) or equivalent approved graduate-level course
  • Seminar in Pedagogy (MGMT 706, 3 credits) or Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDPH 689, 3 credits)
  • Comprehensive Examination (MGMT 701, 0 credits)
  • A publishable research paper (MGMT 720, 3 credits)

The Advisory Committee will normally consist of at least three or four persons; a Chair and others decided upon jointly by the Chair and the student. One of these members will typically come from the support field. Every student's Advisory Committee must have representation from at least two universities in the joint program.

Phase III – Dissertation

The third phase of the program consists of the dissertation in the course of which the student probes deeply into a well-defined research topic. The topic is developed with the Thesis Committee (at least three members), which may be the same as the Phase II Advisory Committee or may be reconstituted, again with representation from at least one of the other participating universities. The topic is approved formally by the Thesis Committee and, once the research is completed and the dissertation written, the student publicly defends the completed thesis.

Admission Requirements

Candidates normally hold a master's-level degree, with a strong academic record from a recognized university. Individuals possessing a qualified undergraduate degree with a high GPA will also be considered, and will be required to take additional management graduate courses during their first year in the Ph.D. program.

GMAT (or GRE-General Test) results are required for applications to the doctoral program; this includes McGill master's students applying to the Ph.D. The minimum score required is 600. Tests must have been written within the past five years.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. A minimum score of 100 for the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, is required for admission. A minimum score of 7 for IELTS is required. Tests must have been written within the past two years.

Files will not be considered unless GMAT (or GRE-General Test) and TOEFL scores are received by the Application Deadlines.

Students may apply for admission to one or more of the participating universities. These applications will be processed by the individual university to which the applicant has applied and by the Joint Committee of the four schools. Students' preferences will prevail when more than one participating university is prepared to accept them. The Ph.D. degree will be granted by the university that admits the student. The program requires a minimum full-time residency of six terms.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GMAT (or GRE-General Test) written within the past 5 years
  • answers to Personal Background Information questions
  • one recent passport-size photo
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/desautels/programs/phd/admissions/deadline.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Location

  • Faculty of Religious Studies
  • William and Henry Birks Building
  • 3520 University Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada

About Religious Studies

The Faculty of Religious Studies offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts (M.A.) (Thesis and Non-Thesis), Master of Arts (M.A.) (Thesis) with specialization in Bioethics, Master of Arts (M.A.) (Thesis) with option in Gender and Women’s Studies, Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). An interdisciplinary option in Gender and Women's Studies is also available for doctoral students.

The areas of graduate specializations of our world-renowned Faculty are: Hebrew Bible and/or Old Testament Studies; Early Judaism; Greco-Roman Judaism; New Testament and Early Christianity; Church History; Christian Theology; Philosophy of Religion; Religious Ethics; Biomedical Ethics; Hinduism; and Buddhism. The many different areas of research interest among members of the Faculty frequently require the hiring of graduate students as research assistants, especially as the Faculty is so successful in gaining research grants. The Faculty also seeks to train young scholars in the art of lecturing/teaching; to this end it has created opportunities for Ph.D. students to teach courses in the summer and permits M.A. and Ph.D. students to work as teaching assistants. The individual programs are described below.

Adequate library facilities are available in the William and Henry Birks Building and elsewhere in the University for the courses listed, and for research.

Language Requirements

The Faculty of Religious Studies offers courses in primary text source languages, such as Biblical Hebrew, Aramaic, Biblical Greek, Sanskrit, Pali, Tamil, and classical literary Tibetan. The Faculty does not guarantee instruction in any languages other than those mentioned above. Therefore, if a student wishes to have a language such as French, German, or Japanese counted as a second language, instruction may have to be sought outside the Faculty. The successful completion of at least 12 credits at the post-secondary level in a language course, or successful completion of a language examination administered by the appropriate member of the Faculty, will constitute evidence of the student's having the required reading knowledge of the language in question.

  • M.A.
    Students are required to give their area committee evidence of reading knowledge of a scholarly language other than English. This language may be either a modern language in which there is a significant amount of scholarship relevant to the student's area of research, or a classical language relevant to the student's area of research. If a classical language is chosen, it must be in addition to any prerequisite language for the area in question.
    Note: The M.A. with specialization in Bioethics has no language requirement.
  • Ph.D.

    Students are required to give their area committee evidence of reading knowledge of two languages other than English. These languages must be chosen from modern languages in which there is a significant amount of scholarship relevant to the student's area of research or classical languages relevant to the student's area of research.

    Research in some disciplines, or on certain thesis topics, may require proficiency in more than two languages besides English. In that case, additional language requirements may be stipulated by the supervisor.

  • S.T.M.

    The S.T.M. program has no language requirement.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Religious Studies (Thesis) (48 credits)
The purpose of the M.A. (Thesis) degree is to encourage advanced study and research in one of the disciplines of Religious Studies for those who wish to become scholars or teachers, or will be engaged in some field of religious or public service. The M.A. (Thesis) program in Religious Studies offers a specialization in Bioethics and an option in Gender and Women's Studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Religious Studies (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The M.A. (Thesis) with specialization in Bioethics is offered in conjunction with the Bioethics Unit. Please contact the Religious Studies Department or Bioethics Unit for more information about this specialization. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, Bioethics courses (6 credit minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master’s degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required including the thesis.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Religious Studies (Thesis) — Gender and Women’s Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet degree requirements in Religious Studies (and other participating departments and faculties) and who wish to focus on gender-related issues and feminist research and methodologies. Research focus is on a topic relating to gender issues or women’s studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Religious Studies (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. without thesis is intended to ensure a student's well-rounded exposure to several religions and to several of the disciplinary approaches currently used in their academic study. Particular to this program is its ability to provide the student with the opportunity to develop three different research papers with reference to the student’s own interests in Religious Studies under the supervision of professors from various parts of the University.
Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.); Religious Studies (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The S.T.M. is meant for those who intend to enter the ministry of the Christian Church or another religious institution, or proceed to a teaching career or to some form of social work. This degree enables students to specialize in one area or discipline of theological study before or after the third year of the M.Div. and is unique in Canada. The S.T.M. program is fully accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the U.S. and Canada.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Religious Studies
The purpose of the Ph.D. program is to engage students in advanced academic studies normally in preparation for an academic career. The community of graduate scholars in this program is engaged in a broad spectrum of critical research involving any number of interdisciplinary approaches conducted on a number of different religious traditions. The Faculty members are committed to the training of teaching scholars, making the Faculty of Religious Studies one of few schools that prioritizes offering graduate students opportunities under faculty supervision to teach/lecture during their time in the program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Religious Studies — Gender and Women’s Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students meeting the degree requirements in Religious Studies who wish to focus on gender-related issues and feminist research and methodologies. Research focus is on a topic relating to gender issues or women’s studies. Please contact the Department for more information about this option.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Religious Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master of Arts (M.A.) Thesis

Applicants must possess a B.A. with a Major or Honours in Religious Studies or a Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.), or a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree, normally with a minimum CGPA of 3.3/4.0 (B+) from an accredited university or college. Applicants with fewer than 30 appropriate credits in Religious Studies or Theology are normally required to take a Qualifying Program before entering the M.A.

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Religious Studies (Thesis) – Gender and Women’s Studies Option/Concentration

The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet degree requirements in Religious Studies (and other participating departments and faculties) who wish to focus on gender-related issues and feminist research and methodologies. Research focus is on a topic relating to gender issues or women's studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.) (Thesis) in Religious Studies with specialization in Bioethics

For information contact the Chair, Master's Specialization in Bioethics, Biomedical Ethics Unit, 3690 Peel Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 1W9; telephone: 514-398-6980; fax: 514-398-8349; email: jennifer [dot] fishman [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

Master of Arts (M.A.) (Non-Thesis)

Applicants must possess a B.A. with a Major or Honours in Religious Studies or a Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.), or a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree, normally with a minimum CGPA of 3.3/4.0 (B+) from an accredited university or college. Applicants with fewer than 30 appropriate credits in Religious Studies or Theology are normally required to take a Qualifying Program before entering the M.A.

Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.)

Applicants must possess a B.A., normally with at least a good second-class standing (B+ or CGPA 3.3/4.0), in a major or honours program in religious studies or theology from an accredited university or college. Those who have a McGill B.Th. or an equivalent degree in addition to a B.A. degree with a second-class standing may be admitted to the second year of the S.T.M. program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Entry into the doctoral program is limited to applicants who have earned an academic master's degree in religious studies or theology in a recognized graduate program, or those who have finished the course requirements of such a program with a minimum CGPA of 3.5/4.0.

Advanced Standing (Ph.D. 2) may be granted if the completed master's-level work including a thesis is in the same area as that of the intended doctoral specialization and involved not less than six (6) courses (18 credits).

It is recommended that a foreign language related to the area of study be included in the bachelor's or master's work preceding doctoral study.

Applicants for doctoral programs are requested to submit a substantial sample of their scholarly writing (15–20 pages) with their application. The application should specify one of the specializations listed in About Religious Studies.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Religious Studies – Gender and Women’s Studies Option/Concentration

The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Religious Studies who wish to focus on gender-related issues and feminist research and methodologies. Research focus is on a topic relating to gender issues or women's studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – approximately 500 words
  • Written Work – recent academic writing

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15* Fall: March 15* Fall: March 15*
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

* For funding consideration, the application for September admission must be submitted by January 15.

Note: Applications for Winter term admission to the M.A. Bioethics option will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Physical and Occupational Therapy

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Please note that sections of this page are currently under review. For the most up to date information on professional maters programs, please refer to the following departmental webpages on physical therapy and occupational therapy.

Human Genetics

Human Genetics

Location

  • Department of Human Genetics
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, N5/13
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
Administration
Kandace Springer – Administrative Assistant
  • Email: kandace [dot] springer [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Ross Mackay – Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: ross [dot] mackay [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Laura Benner – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: laura [dot] benner [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Human Genetics

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees in Human Genetics

The Department of Human Genetics offers a clinical master’s program in Genetic Counselling, as well as research training at both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels. Both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs require the completion of a thesis, which is the major focus of the student's effort. A minimal amount of coursework is required, but specific course choices are flexible and vary according to the student's previous training and current research interest. The Department also offers a Bioinformatics option. Information on the Bioinformatics option can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/mcb/academic/graduate.

Most of the faculty of the Human Genetics Department are located in McGill teaching hospitals, reflecting the medically learned knowledge at the core of human genetic studies.

Faculty have a wide variety of research interests, which embrace: cancer genetics, cytogenetics, reproductive biology, neurogenetics, and genomic and genetic basis of human diseases. Detailed information regarding faculty research interest can be found on the Department web page at www.mcgill.ca/humangenetics/prospective-students/supervision.

Students accepted into the Human Genetics research graduate program will receive a minimum stipend of $15,000, plus tuition and fees.

Tuition Differential Fee Waivers

A certain number of tuition differential fee waivers will be offered to incoming out-of-province/international students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. Students who have a CGPA of 3.5/4.0 or above (as converted by McGill GPS guidelines) and who submit online application and documents by Jan. 31 (Summer), March 31 (Fall), Sept. 30 (Winter) will automatically be considered for a tuition waiver.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
McGill University offers specialized education in bioethics to graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Religious Studies, and Law, and the Department of Philosophy. The Master's degree Specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Genetic Counselling (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program provides the academic foundation and clinical training required for the contemporary practice of genetic counselling. Genetic counsellors are health professionals who provide information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorders and to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited conditions. Genetic counsellors investigate the problem present in the family, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence, and review available options with the family. Some counsellors also work in administrative and academic capacities, and many engage in research activities. The curriculum includes a variety of required courses in human genetics and other departments, and 40 weeks of supervised clinical training spread over four semesters. Graduates will be eligible to sit for both the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors and the American Board of Genetic Counselling certification examinations. Upon completion of the M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program, students will demonstrate competence in, or satisfactory knowledge of: principles of human genetics, including cytogenetics, biochemical, molecular, and population genetics; methods of interviewing and counselling, and the dynamics of human behaviour in relation to genetic disease; and social, legal, and ethical issues in genetics. Enrolment will be limited to four students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics — Bioinformatics

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and have the capability of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Human Genetics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling

Prerequisites: Bachelor's or medical degree – minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Recent (five years or less) university-level courses in basic sciences (molecular/cell biology, biochemistry, advanced genetics (preferably human), and statistics) and a minimum of two in psychology.

Applicants must have obtained some experience (either paid or volunteer) working with adults in a counselling or advisory capacity, ideally in a crisis setting.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Human Genetics

Prerequisites: B.Sc. – minimum CGPA 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Applicants must have a minimum of 6 credits in cellular and molecular biology or biochemistry, 3 credits in mathematics or statistics, and 3 credits in genetics. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

Admission is based on acceptance by a research director who has agreed to provide adequate funding for the duration of the academic program and on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee.

Prospective graduate students should complete the online application form and indicate at least three faculty members they are interested in working with.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs  
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A** Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: N/A Summer: N/A** Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: N/A

Applications for thesis programs submitted after these deadlines may be considered, if a suitable supervisor can be secured. However, these applications will not be considered for departmental funding or entrance awards.

* The M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program accepts applications for the Fall term only. No late applications or applications for Summer or Winter terms for the Genetic Counselling program will be considered under any circumstances.

** The Department of Human Genetics is not willing to consider any applications to the M.Sc. (Thesis) for the Summer term.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Bioethics

Bioethics

Location

  • Biomedical Ethics Unit
  • 3647 Peel Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1X1
  • Canada

For information, contact Jennifer Fishman, Graduate Program Director, at jennifer [dot] fishman [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Bioethics

The Biomedical Ethics Unit was established in 1996 with the aim of supporting scholarly research, clinical services, teaching, and public outreach. Members of the unit have backgrounds in anthropology, history, law, medicine, molecular genetics, philosophy, and sociology. We offer a master's degree specialization in biomedical ethics for selected master's students in the Division of Experimental Medicine, Human Genetics Department, Philosophy Department, Faculty of Religious Studies, and Faculty of Law.

Master's Specialization in Bioethics

The Master's Specialization in Bioethics is sponsored by the:

  • Faculty of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine; Department of Human Genetics;
  • Faculty of Law;
  • Faculty of Religious Studies; and
  • Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.

Students receive an M.A., LL.M., or M.Sc. degree in the discipline chosen with a specialization in Bioethics.

Some applicants are mid-career professionals currently working as physicians, nurses, social workers, other health care providers, or lawyers. Other applicants have recently completed their undergraduate degrees in philosophy, law, religious studies, or other disciplines and wish to pursue specialized master's level training in bioethics before enrolling in doctoral level studies or entering the workplace.

Students pursuing the master's degree specialization normally take two semesters of courses before beginning their master's thesis. Courses offered include Bioethics Theory, Public Health Ethics and Policy, Research Ethics, and a Practicum that includes placement in a clinical or research setting. Research and writing the thesis normally takes one year. Students must also comply with the course and thesis requirements of their home disciplines.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Bioethics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.D., bachelor's-level professional training in a health science, or bachelor's degree in law, philosophy, or religious studies. Other students may be considered on an individual basis.

Enrolment is limited to 12 students.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications for the Master’s Specialization in Bioethics are made initially through the Faculties of Law, Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Human Genetics), Religious Studies, and the Department of Philosophy.

Applicants must satisfy the admission criteria for their chosen discipline and those of the Bioethics Unit, which administers the program and teaches the core courses (see www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters/apply). Once you have completed your online application, send an email to heike [dot] faerber [at] mcgill [dot] ca at the Bioethics Unit stating your chosen base discipline.

Applicants must be accepted by the appropriate Faculty, the Bioethics Graduate Studies Advisory Committee, and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Law

Law

Location

  • Faculty of Law
  • Graduate Programs in Law
  • New Chancellor Day Hall
  • 3644 Peel Street, Room 406
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1W9
  • Canada

Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) – Angela Campbell

About Law

Graduate students in Law at McGill have one thing in common: a sharp curiosity to explore ideas and projects in an environment that is uniquely comparative and pluralist.

The extensive and impressive history of graduate teaching and supervision at McGill, combined with the innovations in legal pedagogy for which the Faculty of Law is celebrated, create an unrivaled quality and experience for graduate students. Grounded in Montreal, a city that embodies a lively mix of languages, cultures, and communities, the Faculty of Law invites students pursuing their D.C.L. and LL.M. degrees to discover and write within a community of legal scholars that is internationally renowned and engaging.

McGill Law is a meeting place for the major languages of North America, for the world’s legal traditions, and for students who wish to participate in the graduate life of a truly outstanding, prestigious, and intellectually vibrant Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law offers a range of programs at the graduate level. These include the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), as well as graduate certificates.

Students may choose to pursue either the LL.M. or the D.C.L. in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL), or the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL). Graduate certificates may only be completed within either the IASL or the ICL.

The Faculty of Law promotes study and research in private, commercial, international, and public law, as well as legal theory, from the perspectives of diverse legal traditions. In collaboration with the McGill School of Environment, the Faculty offers an LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis option in Environment. The Faculty also offers two other options within the LL.M. degree, a cross-disciplinary European Studies Option (ESO; availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year) in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts, and a specialization in Bioethics. The D.C.L. degree always involves a substantial thesis.

The Institute of Air and Space Law operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute offers a curriculum exploring legal issues that arise from international civil aviation and new technologies in space. It provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal processes regulating worldwide aerospace activities. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law.

The Institute of Comparative Law operates within the Faculty of Law as a centre of comparative legal studies. It accommodates national, international, and transnational studies and encourages openness to diverse legal cultures in teaching and research. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law.

Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degrees

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education primarily through research, as the program concentrates on the production of a 30,000-word thesis, as well as some graduate-level coursework.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Bioethics (45 credits)
The master’s specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes both the conceptual and practical aspects of Bioethics. Students apply through either the Faculty of Law, Medicine, Religious Studies, or the Department of Philosophy. Students entering pursuing an LL.M., Bioethics, are bound by the requirements of the Faculty of Law’s LL.M. program. This program is offered in the thesis option only.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of the Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis), providing students with an appreciation for the role of science, politics, and ethics in informed decision-making in the environment sector.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); European Studies (46 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within the existing LL.M. Thesis program. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood.
Note: Availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education largely through graduate-level coursework. The program requires two terms of coursework as well as a 15,000-word research project.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis) providing students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environment sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.

Institute of Air and Space Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to focus on original scholarly research and writing under the supervision of a law professor. This program involves 20 credits in coursework and 25 research credits (a thesis of 100–150 pages). The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent analysis, writing skills, and organization.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to gain a wide exposure to a range of taught courses within, and related to, the domain of Air and Space Law. The Non-Thesis option requires a substantial Supervised Research Project (18 credits), with the remaining 27 credits earned in courses.

Institute of Comparative Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their master’s thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their individual master’s supervised research project (for LL.M. Master’s Non-Thesis students). Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) Degrees

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.)
The Doctor of Civil Law program is centred around the doctoral thesis, which develops a substantive and original contribution to legal research and knowledge under the supervision of a faculty member. Many doctoral candidates intend on pursuing an academic career, and develop their approach to pedagogy, research, and writing while at McGill.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Air and Space Law
The Doctor of Civil Law in the Institute of Air and Space Law is a research degree ideal for scholars intent on deepening and broadening their critical understanding of the law, as well as their original engagement with it. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination to be done at the end of the first year, or during the second year of the D.C.L. program. The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidenced in concept and execution the original work of the candidate.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Comparative Law
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes doctoral students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their doctoral thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Graduate Certificates in Law

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a coursework program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis. This certificate is particularly appropriate for jurists and other professionals who wish to pursue graduate-level legal studies in aviation, air and space law, government regulations, conventions, and treaties dealing with these areas.
Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) to candidates who do not wish to undertake the master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Law Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law reviews applications and makes recommendations regarding admission. Final admission decisions are determined by admissions policies set by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

For information and application forms, please consult the Faculty website www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions or contact the Graduate Programs Office in Law, McGill University, at the Departmental address, or via email at grad [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca, and telephone 514-398-6635.

Language Requirement

Graduate-level courses are generally offered in English, and English-language abilities must be demonstrated for admission. In order to communicate fully with all law students at McGill, and to understand all course materials, the ability to speak and read French is an asset. At McGill's Faculty of Law, all students may choose to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or French.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian or American (English or French) institution, must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, ESOL, or EDEXCEL offices. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. For an application to be considered, a TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, ESOL, or EDEXCEL test result, McGill Certificate of Proficiency in English or McGill Certificate of Proficiency – English for Professional Communication must be available.

Generally, successful applicants to our LL.M. and D.C.L. programs typically report scores of at least 100 on the TOEFL (iBT), 600 on the TOEFL (PBT), a band score of 7.0 or greater on the IELTS, a grade of 85 or higher on the MELAB, a grade of “A” (Excellent) on the ESOL (CAE), a grade of “B” (Good) or higher on the ESOL (CPE), an overall grade of at least “Distinction” on the EDEXCEL (Level 4) or an overall grade of at least “Merit” on the EDEXCEL (Level 5).

In all programs, non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is French must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 567 (86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) or an IELTS score of 7.0 overall band. This is because McGill students can write essays, examinations and theses in French, even where the course is taught in English. Note that the majority of courses in Graduate Programs in Law are taught in English.

For information about the TOEFL, and to register to take the test, see www.ets.org/toefl. For information about the IELTS, see www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and it takes approximately 40 days to communicate the results. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institution to Graduate Programs in Law. For the TOEFL, McGill’s institutional code is 0935 and Law’s departmental code is 03. These codes must be provided to TOEFL when requesting a test report form. For the IELTS, applicants must ask for an official report to be sent to Graduate Programs in Law at the Graduate Programs’ departmental address. These tests must be taken sufficiently early for results to reach McGill no later than January 15 of the year of admission. Application files must be completed by that date to be considered.

French: The ability to speak or read French is an asset but not a necessity. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential. Applicants should indicate their knowledge of French on the admissions questionnaire; they will be notified if French is essential to the area of study.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the D.C.L. program occurs only when:
  1. the candidate has completed a graduate law degree with thesis at McGill or at another university, and
  2. the Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of his or her previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a doctoral program.

Review of the completed master’s thesis is normally part of the admission decision–making process. Exceptionally, a candidate with a non-thesis master's degree with an outstanding file may be admitted to the doctoral program.

Master’s Degrees

Candidates for admission to the LL.M. program must hold a Bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.), with at least Upper Second Class honours or the equivalent of 3.0/4.0 cumulative grade point average. However, this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire file, including the applicant's references and the quality of the research proposal.

Furthermore, in the case of thesis programs, the Committee must consider the availability of a supervisor. If a supervisor is not available in the applicant's preferred field of study, the applicant may be refused admission or else offered admission pending a change of field of study.

LL.M. Interdisciplinary Options in Environment and European Studies

Students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis program at the Faculty of Law may specify an interest in these options.

LL.M. Specialization in Bioethics

Requirements for admission to the Master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information, see the Bioethics section of this publication, or contact the Chair, Master’s Specialization in Bioethics, Biomedical Ethics Unit, 3647 Peel Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 1W9. Telephone: 514-398-6980; fax: 514-398-8349; email: kathleen [dot] glass [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the graduate certificate programs are essentially the same as for the master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience.

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law

Candidates desiring a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law who do not hold a law degree may be admitted if they have earned an undergraduate university degree in another discipline and possess sufficient professional experience to compensate for the lack of a law degree (as determined by the Graduate Admissions Committee).

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after one full-time term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 academic credits of law courses. Those credits must include the three Air and Space law courses obligatory for master's students (ASPL 633 Public International Air Law, ASPL 636 Private International Air Law, and ASPL 637 Space Law: General Principles), which are all offered in the Fall term. Students may take courses beyond the minimum of 15 credits, and these additional courses may be non-law courses.

Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after one full-time term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 course credits. In every case, the program is structured to meet individual needs and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies).

Note: ALL international students must obtain permission to study from the governments of Quebec and Canada. Immigration Quebec issues the Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada issues federal Study Permits. You may also wish to contact www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents for assistance.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The application deadline to all graduate law programs (LL.M., D.C.L., Graduate Certificates) is January 15. Although McGill continues to accept applications until June 30 (April 30 for international applicants) for the Fall term, the Faculty of Law will not consider applications received on or after January 16.

McGill Graduate Law offers Fall term admission only; the Faculty is not willing to consider applications for Winter and Summer. Applications submitted for the Winter and Summer terms will be cancelled by the Faculty of Law WITHOUT reimbursement of the application fee.

Note: The application fee remains non-refundable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 14, 2013).

Environment

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Environment

Location

  • McGill School of Environment
  • Downtown Campus
  • 3534 University Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-2827
  • Fax: 514-398-1643
  • McGill School of Environment
  • Macdonald Campus
  • Rowles House
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7559
  • Fax: 514-398-7846

About Environment

Resolving environmental issues requires a dialogue between pure and applied sciences, the social sciences, and humanities. The degradation of the biological and biophysical environment has roots in the structure of human societies while solutions to environmental problems have an impact on human livelihoods.

A number of academic departments and institutes at McGill promote graduate-level research and training on environmental topics and have faculty members whose main research interest falls in this domain. As such, environmental research is widespread throughout the McGill community. The Environment option provides a vehicle whereby discipline-based graduate programs can easily and effectively incorporate collaborations from at least one other discipline into their research.

Goals of the Option

  • To provide thesis or non-thesis students in existing graduate programs with an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment;
  • To develop an appreciation of the role of scientific, political, socioeconomic, and ethical judgments in influencing that process;
  • To provide a forum whereby graduate students in environment throughout the University bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

Students admitted into the Environment option will be supervised or co-supervised by an accredited McGill faculty member. Their Advisory Committee will include at least one individual from outside the home department. It is expected that the thesis, dissertation, or project, as well as the final seminar presentation, will contain an environmental component and will include a discussion of the applied implications of the research findings. Together with the courses common to the Environment option, specific course requirements for each program are given within the departmental listings cited below.

Program List

The Environment option is currently available with the following graduate programs:

Anthropology
M.A. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Anthropology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Biology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment
Bioresource Engineering
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
M.Sc. (Applied) – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment
Earth and Planetary Sciences
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Earth and Planetary Sciences — Environment
Entomology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Environment
Epidemiology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Epidemiology and Biostatics > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Environment (60 credits)
Geography
M.A. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Environment
Law
LL.M. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law > Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
LL.M. (Non-Thesis) – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law > Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
Medicine, Experimental
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Medicine (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Experimental Medicine — Environment
Microbiology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Environment
Parasitology
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology — Environment
Philosophy
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Philosophy > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
Plant Science
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Environment
Renewable Resources
M.Sc. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Environment
Sociology
M.A. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Sociology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
Ph.D. – see Programs, Courses and University Regulations > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Sociology > Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Environment
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 29, 2013).

Please note that the department of sociology will no longer be offering an option in Environment.

Environment Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates must apply separately to the McGill School of Environment (MSE) for the graduate Environment option. Their acceptability will be based on their academic experience and performance, and availability of a potential MSE-accredited supervisor or co-supervisor for their proposed research. For further information, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines to the graduate Environment option may vary depending on the department you are applying to. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Educational and Counselling Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Educational and Counselling Psychology

Location

  • Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology
  • Education Building, Room 614
  • 3700 McTavish Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1Y2
  • Canada
  • Telephone – Program Information: 514-398-4242
  • Fax: 514-398-6968
  • Email: ecpinfo [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp

About Educational and Counselling Psychology

The Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology (ECP) programs and research examine the interplay between complex human systems (cognitive, social, emotional, behavioural, and biological) to maximize: (a) learning, (b) wellness (mental and physical), and (c) human development in multiple settings and throughout the lifespan. More specifically, they examine issues pertaining to cognitive processes and developmental neuroscience, assessment and intervention, and the design and evaluation of learning environments and instructional practices, with both typical and atypical populations in mind. While ECP’s primary disciplinary bases are psychology and education, it contributes to and is enriched by extended interdisciplinary collaborations with, among others, medicine and other health professions, neurosciences, computer science, science, social work and policy, and law.

Students in our programs benefit from having access to the McGill Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/about/clinic) and the Departmental Assessment Materials Resource Centre (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/students/amrc). To develop their professional skills in assessment, therapy, and supervision, students are equipped with the latest standardized materials and a state-of-the-art venue within which to conduct psychological and cognitive assessments. Our professional programs also have established connections with world-class public and private organizations, which include health care facilities and school boards where students receive supervised training for internships and practica. Our faculty members are involved in intra- and interdisciplinary collaborative research locally, nationally, and internationally. These networks offer students valuable exposure to, and connection with, different research laboratories, research leaders, and professional organizations. Students benefit from international mobility programs and specialized training offered in specific locations. Working closely with faculty members in their research teams, our students enrolled in research-based M.A. and Ph.D. programs have proven very successful in obtaining major external fellowships from bodies such as SSHRC, FQRSC, FRSQ, and CIHR.

Our graduates secure careers in a varied and rewarding range of settings. These include, but are not limited to: academic and research settings, professional psychology (counselling and school psychology), specialized and innovative teaching, educational research, development and leadership at all levels (e.g., schools, colleges and universities, school boards, ministries of education), staff development, and education in the professions.

Detailed graduate degree descriptions are available in the following sections:

Master of Arts (M.A.) Degrees

Students can obtain an M.A. degree in:

  1. Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) with major concentrations in:
    • Professional/Internship (coursework and internship based)
    • Project (coursework and research based)
  2. Educational Psychology with a Major in:
    • School/Applied Child Psychology
  3. Educational Psychology with concentrations in:
    • Health Professions Education
    • Human Development
    • Learning Sciences

Master of Education (M.Ed.) Degrees

Students can obtain an M.Ed. degree in Educational Psychology. Please note these are all non-thesis options. The M.Ed. program in Educational Psychology offers concentrations in:

  • Family Life Education (admissions to this concentration are currently suspended)
  • General Educational Psychology
  • General Educational Psychology (Project)
  • Inclusive Education
  • Inclusive Education (Project)
  • Learning Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Degrees

Students can obtain a Ph.D. degree in:

  1. Counselling Psychology
  2. Educational Psychology with concentrations in:
    • Human Development
    • Learning Sciences
  3. School/Applied Child Psychology

Postdoctoral Degrees

The Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology offers one postdoctoral diploma:

  • Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

For information about these graduate programs please view our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/prospective or contact the appropriate Program Coordinator/Adviser:

For Educational Psychology programs (excluding School/Applied Child Psychology) contact:

  • Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Mrs. Geri Norton
  • Telephone: 514-398-4244
  • Email: edpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca

For Counselling Psychology and School/Applied Child Psychology contact:

  • Graduate Program Adviser
  • Mr. Alexander Nowak
  • Telephone: 514-398-4245
  • Email: counsellingpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca or schoolpsych [dot] education [at] mcgill [dot] ca

Professional Accreditation

The Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and is currently under review for accreditation by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA). The Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology is jointly accredited by the CPA and the APA. The Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ) accredits both the Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology and the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology.
Note: The APA will no longer accredit programs outside of the United States of America effective September 1, 2015. The implication of this decision for students is that those who graduate from our programs after this date cannot attest to having graduated from an APA-accredited program. For further information regarding APA accreditation, see: www.apa.org/support/education/accreditation/international.aspx#answer.

Important addresses:

APA – Committee on Accreditation, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC, 20002-4242, U.S.A.; Telephone: 1-800-374-2721

CPA – 151 Slater Street, Suite 205, Ottawa, ON, K1P 5H3, Canada; Telephone: 1-888-472-0657

OCCOQ – 1600 Henri Bourassa Blvd. West, Suite 520, Montreal, QC, H3M 3E2, Canada; Telephone: 514-737-6431

OPQ – 1100 Beaumont, Suite 510, Mount-Royal, QC, H3P 3H5, Canada; Telephone: 514-738-1881

Graduate degrees in Counselling Psychology or School/Applied Child Psychology, and elsewhere in Educational Psychology, do not lead to teaching certification—see the Undergraduate eCalendar for B.Ed. programs (www.mcgill.ca/study). Holders of other undergraduate degrees may apply to enter the B.Ed. with Advanced Standing.

Research/Training Facilities

The Department houses a number of training and research units and maintains working relationships with specialized centres and research groups that offer opportunities for training and research to selected students. For a comprehensive list of such groups, consult our website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/research.

Graduate Degrees in Counselling Psychology

Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Professional/Internship (60 credits)

The aim of the M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Counselling Psychology (Professional/Internship) is to produce graduates who:

  1. are trained in the major applied areas of counselling;
  2. will be qualified to work in a variety of settings where educational, vocational, personal, and developmental counselling is offered; and
  3. have had an extensive supervised internship in either a clinical or educational setting.

To do so, the training program emphasizes career and vocational theory and development, individual and group counselling skills, the integration of multicultural, gender, and other diversity theories into practice, and diagnosis and assessment procedures.

Students take a combination of theoretical and practical courses throughout the completion of their degree. Most coursework is taken during their first year (including the Summer term) while also completing a practicum in the Department’s Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic. In their second year, students are on-site at internship placements for three full days per week while attending classes on their remaining two days.

Accredited upon graduation by the Ordre des conseillers et conseillères d’orientation du Québec (OCCOQ), this program prepares students to work in the field as Counsellors in settings such as CLSCs, schools, community, rehabilitation, and vocational guidance centres, governmental, non-governmental, or private settings. All students must also attend weekly case conferences.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Project (60 credits)

The M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Counselling Psychology (Project) is designed to produce graduates with introductory academic preparation for research or clinical careers in counselling psychology. Training is provided in the research domain through coursework in data analysis and a research project. Clinical preparation is initiated in the program through coursework in ethics, intervention, assessment, psychological testing, and multicultural issues and through a practicum. Most coursework is taken during the student's first year of studies while beginning work on their research projects. In their second year, students gain practical experience via a practicum in the Department’s Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic while also completing the majority of their work on the research project. The degree alone does not fulfil the requirements for membership in the orders that certify either guidance counsellors (OCCOQ) or psychologists (OPQ) in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Counselling Psychology

Student pursuing a Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the duration of their degree. It draws upon a number of different sciences (including developmental, social, career and neuropsychology and personality theory) to develop critically astute researchers and exceptionally skilled clinicians. Building on the M.A. in Counselling Psychology (Project concentration), or equivalent, the program offers opportunities in Practicum, Supervision, and full-year Internships to develop clinical skills while also working toward the completion of a doctoral dissertation (thesis). The Ph.D. program, has the following aims:

  1. To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the field of counselling psychology.
  2. To practise from a strong evidence base.
  3. To take a leadership role in community, professional, and university organizations in counselling psychology.

Graduates of the program will be prepared to assume careers in education and community settings, including faculty positions, counselling and psychological positions on the staff of university and college mental health centres, and professional positions in psychological agencies offering preventative mental health services. The program is currently accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ), and American Psychological Association (APA). (Please note that APA accreditation will cease for all Canadian institutions in 2015.) Graduates are eligible for licensure in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych.

Graduate Degrees in School/Applied Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); School/Applied Child Psychology

The Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology is the second degree in a combined M.A. and Ph.D. program with the M.A. (Thesis) in Educational Psychology's School/Applied Child Psychology concentration. Most students in the doctoral program completed their M.A. in the Educational Psychology program although students can apply for direct entry into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree obtained at another institution. At both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels, students take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the course of their degree. Students will produce a thesis at both levels of study.

Extending upon the M.A. degree, the program's focus remains on the improvement of the educational and psychological well-being of children and to educate school psychologists in a manner consistent with the highest international standards in the field. Students explore a variety of topics including mental health, child development, school organization, learning processes, behaviour, motivation, and effective teaching. They are prepared to become inquiring professionals committed to the development of children and youth and receive intensive training of clinical practice with children and families, as well as basic and applied research.

The program develops clinical skills through intensive assessment courses, a Clinic Practicum, Field Placement, and a full-year Internship. Typically, our graduates go on to practise school psychology across a range of environments including private practice, academia, hospitals, and school boards. The Ph.D. program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ). (Please note that APA accreditation will cease for all Canadian institutions in 2015.) Graduates are eligible for licensure in Quebec.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych.

Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

This post-Ph.D. graduate diploma enables holders of a doctorate in Psychology to pursue further studies in School/Applied Child Psychology. The course of study is adapted to the background of each student. The program includes exceptionally one, or typically two, years of courses and practica, plus a year of Internship. Students register on a per-credit basis (including Internship).

Students are not required to demonstrate knowledge of a second language within this program; however, any student wishing to be licensed as a professional psychologist in Quebec must have a working knowledge of French. Accreditation status may be confirmed by contacting the accrediting bodies.

Professional Accreditation

All elements of this postdoctoral graduate diploma are selected from the professional components of the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology, which is accredited in the School Psychology category by the American Psychological Association (APA). Graduates of a re-specialization program are normally accorded the same recognition as graduates of the accredited program.

The Ph.D. is approved by the Ordre des psychologues du Québec (OPQ), which has recommended the final stage of professional recognition to the Office des professions of the Government of Quebec. Once this accreditation is confirmed, however, graduates of the postdoctoral graduate diploma will not be automatically eligible for membership in the OPQ and the right to practise professional psychology in Quebec. Candidates wishing to practise in Quebec will be required to apply to the OPQ for the recognition of equivalent qualifications.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych.

Graduate Degrees in Educational Psychology

Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree offers educators and practising professionals advanced professional training in areas where educational psychology can make a practical contribution to the design, delivery, and assessment of educational programs and the impact of these programs on student learning. Courses aim to promote:

  1. a greater understanding of human development, individual differences, and the learning process;
  2. a greater understanding on classroom processes and strategies for teaching diverse learners in a variety of contexts;
  3. the evaluation of student learning, teaching, programs, and educational experimentation and innovation; and
  4. the application of results of educational research.

The program offers the following concentrations of study:

  1. Family Life Education: Admission to this concentration is currently suspended.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Family Life Education (48 credits).

  2. General Educational Psychology: Permits students with very specific experiences and career paths to tailor the program to their particular situations. Students may draw courses from other concentrations within the M.Ed. programs including Inclusive Education, Learning Sciences, or any other general Departmental courses. This program suits students with very unique program needs in Educational Psychology.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — General Educational Psychology (48 credits).

  3. General Educational Psychology (Project) Provides students with an interest in the General Educational Psychology concentration the opportunity to focus on an issue in the field and complete a research project in place of course work (12 credits worth).

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — General Educational Psychology: Project (48 credits).

  4. Inclusive Education: Prepares students to work with diverse individuals in a variety of settings that emphasize inclusive practice. As most professional and educational contexts are becoming more diverse, this program has wide appeal and is relevant to current teachers, consultants, other professionals working in the education system, and to those wishing to understand human development and potential in all inclusive contexts.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Inclusive Education (48 credits).

  5. Inclusive Education (Project): Provides students with an interest in the Inclusive Education concentration the opportunity to focus on an issue in the field and complete a research project in place of course work (12 credits worth).

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Inclusive Education: Project (48 credits).

  6. Learning Sciences: Focuses on the study of learning as it occurs in real-world situations and ways in which learning may be facilitated in designed environments.

    See Master of Education (M.Ed.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Learning Sciences (48 credits).

The M.Ed. program has been developed for students who have a background in education (B.Ed.), psychology, or another related degree. Students have the option of conducting academic or applied research (via a 12-credit Research Project or Special Activity) to enhance the applied experience of learning. The academic staff who teach and supervise within the program understand both research and applied contexts such as the school system. Courses are offered in the evening to accommodate full-time professionals and can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Many of our graduates work in the school system as resource teachers, special education, or educational consultants. Others work in or create special tutorial programs or family/child programs for students with difficulties, or in specialized settings (e.g., hospital programs), and others have moved on into our doctoral program in Human Development.

For further information, consult the website at www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/mededpsych.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) (48 credits) (Note that the School/Applied Child Psychology Major is 78 credits.)

The aim of the M.A. (Thesis) in Educational Psychology is to produce graduates who:

  1. are broadly trained in educational psychology;
  2. have sufficient research competence to critically evaluate research in educational psychology, and to design, conduct, and report empirical research; and
  3. have experience in applying research methods and findings to the solution of practical problems in varied educational settings.

Candidates are required to select and follow the set of courses in one of three concentrations of study or the Major in School/Applied Child Psychology, select a topic for research, and present the results of such research in a thesis.

The program offers three concentrations and one major:

  1. The Health Professions Education concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions) is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning as they happen in the health professions and throughout the lifespan. The program is for health professionals who are interested in conducting educational research and working on development projects (e.g., program, curriculum, faculty) as well as for educational psychology graduate students who are interested in issues related to medical education and education in other health professions.

    The program will produce a graduate who can recognize the role of education in a health professions context, who has sufficient research competence to conduct empirical research in health education settings, and who can apply research results to solve practical problems in this field. Student admission and supervision is done jointly with the Centre for Medical Education; see website: www.mcgill.ca/centreformeded.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Health Professions Education (48 credits).

  2. The Human Development concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev) is intended to prepare students from education and psychology backgrounds to work in school, institutional, and university settings. The degree prepares candidates to support the educational and psychological well-being of individuals, to use research to critically inform practice, and to be able to conceptualize and conduct applied and theoretical research related to different trajectories of human development and varied educational settings. The program follows a mentorship model that encourages students’ active participation in research and prepares them for academia and leadership roles in the field.

    The program is unique in exploring development including cognitive, language, social, personality, and gender development issues in children and adolescents from the diverse perspectives of our multidisciplinary faculty. For example, students are exposed to clinical and non-clinical perspectives on developmental issues; these perspectives are then employed to better understand issues related to disabilities and individuals’ diverse needs in educational and community settings. Most students in this program go on to pursue studies at the Ph.D. level.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Human Development (45 credits).

  3. The Learning Sciences concentration (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci) aims to develop competent and inquiring professionals who have the skills to understand and improve learning and teaching by way of conceptualizing and conducting applied and theoretical research in different formal and informal educational settings. It is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning in schools, colleges and universities, the workplace and professional practice, as well as virtual learning communities. Students acquire theoretical and practical knowledge through coursework, team-based research assistantships, and apprenticeships where appropriate.

    The profiles of our graduates speak to the flexibility and application of acquired skills and competencies in a range of professions. These include academic positions around the world, positions in school boards and hospital education programs, researchers involved in educational and institutional research and policy development, training and education specialists in business and industry, medical education researchers, and faculty developers.

    See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — Learning Sciences (48 credits).

The School/Applied Child Psychology Major (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych) is a combined M.A. and Ph.D. program with the doctoral degree in School/Applied Child Psychology. Most students who enrol in the master’s program continue to pursue studies at the doctoral level, although students can apply for direct entry into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree obtained at another institution.

The program's focus is on the improvement of the educational and psychological well-being of children and educates school psychologists in a manner consistent with the highest international standards in the field. Students explore a variety of topics including mental health, child development, school organization, learning processes, behaviour, motivation, and effective teaching, and are prepared to become inquiring professionals committed to the development of children and youth. Therefore, students receive intensive training of clinical practice with children and families, as well as basic and applied research.

To do so at both the M.A. and Ph.D. level, students take a combination of theoretical, practical, and research-based courses throughout the course of their degree. Students will produce a thesis at both levels of study. Our students go on to practise school psychology across a range of environments including private practice, academia, hospitals, and school boards.

See Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — School/Applied Child Psychology (78 credits).

Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The M.A. (Non-Thesis) in Educational Psychology is available only to M.A. students admitted to the study sequence leading to the Ph.D. School/Applied Child Psychology, and who wish to transfer after the first semester.

Please note that this program will not be offered in 2013–2014.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology
The aim of the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology emphasizes the development of research skills and supports both basic and applied research pertaining to all domains of educational psychology. It aims to develop graduates who can demonstrate:
  1. broad scholarship in planning and implementing basic and applied research on problems of cognition, teaching, learning, and human development;
  2. mastery of current theoretical issues in educational psychology and their historical development; and
  3. a detailed knowledge of their selected concentration.
The program offers two concentrations:
  1. Human Development concentration: (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev) The Human Development concentration builds upon the M.A. program and is intended to prepare students to work in school, institutional, and university settings. The degree prepares candidates to support the educational and psychological well-being of individuals, to use research to critically inform practice, and to be able to conceptualize and conduct applied and theoretical research related to different trajectories of human development and varied educational settings. The program follows a mentorship model that encourages students’ active participation in research and prepares them for academia and leadership roles in the field.

    The Human Development program is unique in exploring development including cognitive, language, social, personality, and gender development issues in children and adolescents from the diverse perspectives of our multidisciplinary faculty. These perspectives are then employed to better understand issues related to disabilities and individuals’ diverse needs in educational and community settings.

    See Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology — Human Development.

  2. Learning Sciences concentration: (www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci) The Learning Sciences concentration builds upon the M.A. program and continues its aim of developing competent and inquiring professionals who have the skills to understand and improve learning and teaching by way of conceptualizing and conducting applied and theoretical research in different formal and informal educational settings. It is dedicated to the preparation of qualified researchers, developers, and practitioners who can advance the scientific understanding and practice of teaching and learning. The settings could be schools, colleges and universities, the workplace and professional practice, as well as virtual learning communities. Students acquire theoretical and practical knowledge through coursework, team-based research assistantships, and apprenticeships where appropriate.

    See Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Educational Psychology — Learning Sciences.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 18, 2013).

Educational and Counselling Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

M.A. in Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis)

The M.A. in Counselling Psychology program offers the following two concentrations:

  1. Professional/Internship (coursework and internship based)
  2. Project (research based)

Admission Requirements

Concentration: Professional/Internship

To be eligible, applicants must hold either:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in psychology, including statistics, theories of personality, history and systems of psychology, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, and social psychology (18-credit core), with a minimum GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the final two years of full-time study (minimum 48 credits).

    OR

  2. A baccalaureate degree in a field other than psychology, with a minimum GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the final two years of full-time study (minimum 48 credits), and sufficient academic preparation to meet the following requirements:
    • 18 credits in psychology (consisting of core courses as listed above) and up to 24 credits in related disciplines in the social sciences.

Concentration: Project

To be eligible, applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree in psychology consisting of 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist in our application e-package), with a minimum GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in their final two years of full-time study (minimum 48 credits).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Interview – for applicants to the Professional/Internship concentration
  • M.A. in Counselling Psychology Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Counselling Psychology: Project and Professional/Internship concentrations, can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/ma.

Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology

Admission Requirements

To be eligible applicants must hold:

A master's degree equivalent to the Master of Arts (M.A.); Counselling Psychology (Non-Thesis) — Project (60 credits) along with 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist in our application e-package).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Written Work
  • Ph.D. Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Counselling Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/counsellingpsych/phd

Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

To be eligible applicants must hold:

A master's degree equivalent to the Master of Arts (M.A.); Educational Psychology (Thesis) — School/Applied Child Psychology (78 credits) along with 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist in our application e-package), with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0.

All doctoral students must have a research supervisor upon entry to the program. Interested candidates should consult the Departmental website for a list of faculty members and their research interests. A supervisor must be selected from among professors in the School/Applied Child Psychology program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements
The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Written Work
  • Ph.D. Pre-Admission Academic Checklist
  • GRE – General and Psychology subject tests
  • Program Application Form
  • A letter from the applicant's prospective supervisor agreeing to act as their Ph.D. supervisor

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in School/Applied Child Psychology, can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/phd.

Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

An earned doctorate in Educational Psychology, another area of Psychology, or a closely related discipline (to be recognized by the Program Committee).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Post-Ph.D. Graduate Diploma in School/Applied Child Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/phd.

M.Ed. in Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis)

This program offers six concentrations:

  1. Learning Sciences
  2. General Educational Psychology
  3. General Educational Psychology (Project)
  4. Inclusive Education
  5. Inclusive Education (Project)
  6. Family Life Education (admission to the Family Life Concentration is currently suspended)

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.Ed. concentrations in Educational Psychology can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/mededpsych/med.

M.A. in Educational Psychology (Thesis)

This program offers three concentrations:

  1. Learning Sciences
  2. Health Professions Education
  3. Human Development

and one Major:

  1. School/Applied Child Psychology

Admission Requirements

Learning Sciences Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies.

Health Professions Education Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology. It is recommended that some prior study of a relevant branch of psychology form part of the undergraduate training.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies.

The Health Professions Education program has been conceived and is offered in collaboration with the McGill Centre for Medical Education and affiliated faculty. Student selection is done jointly as is graduate supervision.

Human Development Concentration

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology.
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies.

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

  1. An undergraduate degree in education, psychology, or another field relevant to the proposed studies in Educational Psychology, consisting of 42 credits of core courses in specific domains (see list in the Pre-Admission Academic Checklist in our application e-package).
  2. Minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher in undergraduate studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Learning Sciences Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Learning Sciences concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci/ma.

Health Professions Education Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Health Professions concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/healthprofessions/ma.

Human Development Concentration

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: Human Development concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev/ma.

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the M.A. in Educational Psychology: School/Applied Child Psychology Major can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/ma.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Learning Sciences Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement

Health Professions Education Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement

Human Development Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement, including the names of two potential thesis supervisors
  • Program Application Form

School/Applied Child Psychology Major

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Program Application Form
  • GRE – General and Psychology subject scores
  • Pre-Admission Academic Checklist

M.A. in Educational Psychology (Non-Thesis)

Note: Admission to this program is currently suspended.

Admission Requirements

Same as M.A. (Thesis) Educational Psychology Major in School/Applied Child Psychology.

For application information please refer to instructions listed under M.A. (Thesis) Educational Psychology Major in School/Applied Child Psychology.

For further information about the application process, please consult our Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/schoolpsych/ma.

Ph.D. in Educational Psychology

Admission Requirements

All doctoral students must have a research supervisor upon entry to the program. Interested candidates should consult the Departmental website for a faculty list: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp. All applicants must have a minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or higher. Please note: it is essential to clearly identify your desired concentration of study on your application. The two concentrations offered are:

  1. Human Development
  2. Learning Sciences

The specific requirements to be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level are as follows:

Applicants should hold an M.A. in Educational Psychology from McGill or a recognized equivalent degree from a program which requires a thesis, reflecting high overall standing, study within the area of proposed doctoral specialization, and evidence of research competence.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Human Development concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/humandev/phd.

Information on application procedures, deadlines, supporting documents, and contact information for the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Learning Sciences concentration can be found online in the following section of the Departmental website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-ecp/programs/learningsci/phd.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Human Development Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Letter from proposed supervisor indicating their agreement to act as the Thesis Supervisor
  • Program Application Form

Learning Sciences Concentration

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three reference letters
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal
  • Letter from proposed supervisor indicating their agreement to act as the Thesis Supervisor

Application Deadlines

Counselling Psychology (M.A. or Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Educational Psychology and School/Applied Child Psychology programs (M.A., M.Ed., or Ph.D.)
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 18, 2013).

Philosophy

Philosophy

Location

  • Department of Philosophy
  • Leacock Building, Room 908
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6060
  • Fax: 514-398-7148
  • Email: info [dot] philosophy [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/philosophy

About Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy has particular strength in the following areas: Ancient Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Kant and post-Kantian German Philosophy; Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Mind; Aesthetics; Moral and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics; Contemporary European Philosophy.

The Department offers assistance to students in every aspect of placement. Our Placement Officer counsels students about coursework and areas of competence, helps to establish evidence of teaching ability, administers the dossier for job applications, and provides advice and follow-up in the interview process. Many of our graduates have gone on to do postdoctoral research and over 80% are now in tenure track or sessional appointments.

The Department offers courses of study leading to the Ph.D. in Philosophy. It also offers, in conjunction with the Biomedical Ethics Unit, a course of study leading to the M.A. degree in Bioethics.

Students with an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 1 level. Students who hold an M.A. degree in Philosophy, or equivalent, from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. program at the Ph.D. 2 level. Students entering the Ph.D. program (at Ph.D. 1 or Ph.D. 2) will be required to complete two years of coursework. (N.B. At present, we do not normally consider applicants for an M.A. in Philosophy, with the exception of the specialty M.A. in Biomedical Ethics.) The Department considers an adequate undergraduate training in philosophy to be one that furnishes a student with:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western Philosophy: Greek, Medieval, and Modern.
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics.
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in 1 and 2.

Ph.D. Program

By December 15 of their third year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 1 and August 15 in their second year in the program (Ph.D. 3) for students admitted at Ph.D. 2, students must submit a research paper (the “candidacy paper” [3 credits]), which may be worked up from a paper written to fulfil the requirements of a graduate course, to a Thesis Advancement Committee consisting of a least two members of the staff of the Department. The membership of this committee will be determined by the Graduate Director in consultation with the student; it is anticipated that members of this committee would, in principle, direct the student's thesis. This committee assigns a grade to the student's paper and reviews her or his graduate performance; on the basis of its assessment and review, it recommends to the Department as a whole either to permit the student to continue with the Ph.D. program and undertake a thesis or to decline to permit the student to continue. Two necessary conditions for a positive recommendation are that the student (a) receive a grade of at least B+ on the candidacy paper, and (b) have at least a 3.5 GPA (on the undergraduate Grade Point scale) in the coursework required for the program. The Department as a whole, taking into account the Thesis Advancement Committee's recommendation and the student's overall academic record in the program, decides whether to permit the student to continue. Students who do not receive a positive recommendation but who satisfy Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements (no courses below a B- and completion of 45 credits) will be recommended to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by the Department to transfer from the Ph.D. program to the M.A. program.

Graduate students are expected to continue to contribute to the intellectual life of the Department after being promoted to candidacy. They can do so by participating in reading and discussion groups and, most of all, by auditing seminars both within and outside their areas of specialty.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Philosophy (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
The Master's in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics. Ordinarily, it takes at least two years to complete, although some students have completed it in 18 months. The first year is devoted to coursework (including a clinical practicum), and the second year is devoted to a master's thesis on a topic in bioethics that also satisfies the requirements of the base discipline. The curriculum is composed of required courses (6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (6 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department, and any graduate course required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required, including the thesis. Students graduate with a master's degree from the faculty of their base discipline (M.A., M.Sc., or LL.M.) with a specialization in bioethics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy
The program is intended for students with a B.A. or M.A. in Philosophy, though some exceptions may be possible. It is a pluralist Department with an excellent professor-to-student ratio, strong preparation for dissertation work, and guaranteed full funding for four years for all admitted Ph.D. students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Philosophy who wish to earn 9 additional credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women's studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

Philosophy Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Ph.D.

Students with an Honours B.A. degree in Philosophy, or the equivalent, are normally admitted to the Ph.D. program directly at the Ph.D. 1 level. The Department considers an Honours B.A. degree to include:

  1. A general knowledge of the history of Western philosophy: Greek, Medieval, Modern
  2. A systematic knowledge of the main philosophical disciplines in their contemporary as well as historical contexts: logic, ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics
  3. An ability to present, in written form, clear and substantial reconstructions and analyses of the materials normally studied in the areas mentioned in (1) and (2)

To demonstrate their competence in these areas, applicants must submit transcripts of academic work, three letters of recommendation from persons with whom they have studied, and at least one substantial example (approximately 15–20 typewritten pages) of their written philosophical work.

In addition, applicants from North America whose first language is English are strongly encouraged to submit scores of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English (TOEFL score).

Students who hold an M.A. degree from another institution should apply for admission to the Ph.D. 2 level.

M.A. (Bioethics)

Students applying to the Bioethics Specialty program must write an M.A. thesis proposal. All applications to this program must also receive the approval of the Director of the Specialty program. Students who apply for this program should note that they must participate in a practicum, which continues beyond the end of their second term of classes.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Letters of Reference – three (3) original letters of reference
  • Writing Sample (15–20 pages)
  • Personal Statement (2–3 pages)

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Contact the Department
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Note: The Department considers admissions for the Fall term only. Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 19, 2013).

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