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Earth and Planetary Sciences

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Earth and Planetary Sciences

Location

  • Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • Frank Dawson Adams Building
  • 3450 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6767
  • Fax: 514-398-4680
  • Email: grad [dot] eps [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/eps

About Earth and Planetary Sciences

The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences offers both M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs. Graduate programs are based on research, although some courses are required to build the backgrounds of students. Research in the Department is wide-ranging: it includes studies of the geochemistry of the mantle; the nature of processes concentrating metals in hydrothermal mineral deposits; experimental studies of the controls of viscosity in magmas and the mechanisms of volcanic eruption; the fixation of mercury in marine sediments; the nature of changes in atmospheric chemistry in the early and late Precambrian; mechanisms of faulting; the evolution of topography during orogenesis; wetland hydrogeology; and planetary-scale ocean biogeochemistry and its relationship to global warming. There is a very substantial interdisciplinary basis to much of the research.

Facilities in the Department include low-temperature and pressure to high-temperature and pressure experimental laboratories, a stable-isotope mass spectrometer, laser-ablation ICP-MS, and electron microprobe, as well as atomic absorption spectrometers. Our students also make substantial use of other facilities at McGill and at nearby Université du Québec à Montréal.

Financial assistance is available in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and scholarships.

Areas of Research:

Aquatic Geochemistry

Application of chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, and surface chemistry to the characterization of mineral-solution interactions in aquatic environments; carbonate geochemistry; early diagenesis of marine and coastal sediments; trace metal and environmental geochemistry in freshwater and marine systems.

Biomineralization

Investigation of process occurring at the interface between inorganic and organic phases leading to the nucleation and growth of crystals in both natural and synthetic systems; pathogenic mineralization and calcification in mammalian cells and tissues; investigating biomarkers as signatures of ancient biological activity in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials.

Economic Geology

Studies of the genesis of hydrothermal mineral deposits through a combination of field-based, experimental, and theoretical methods. Research focuses on the understanding of physico-chemical controls of mineralization, through geological mapping of deposits, experimental studies of metal solubility and speciation in hydrothermal systems, simulations of hydrothermal alteration, and theoretical studies designed to estimate conditions of alteration and ore formation. Trace-element chemistry of minerals as quantitative probes of the compositions of ore-forming fluids.

Hydrogeology

Studies of pore-water flow in northern peatlands; heat transport; heat as a tracer of natural systems; groundwater modelling; coupled numerical models of pore water flow and heat transport with freeze/thaw processes; and the impact of melting tropical glaciers on water resources.

Igneous Petrology

Experimental studies of the structure, thermodynamics, and transport properties (diffusion and viscosity) of silicate melts and applications to igneous petrogenesis. The nature of the Earth's upper mantle and the processes within it which give rise to basaltic volcanism on both the Earth and the other terrestrial planets. Applications of laser ablation ICPMS; Petrology, geochemistry, and tectonics of the Appalachian lithosphere.

Mineralogy

Chemistry and crystallography of carbonate minerals. Experimental investigations of the effect of environmental factors (e.g., solution composition and temperature) on the morphology and composition of calcite.

Oceanic Biogeochemistry

Links between the marine ecosystem and climate through observations of the modern ocean, simulations of ocean biogeochemistry with computer models, and sedimentary records of past climate change.

Seismology

Subduction earthquake nucleation and rupture propagation processes. Physical mechanism of aseismic deformation transients, deep non-volcanic tremors, dynamic and static stress triggering of low-frequency earthquakes and transients. Pore-fluid pressure coupling with frictional strength and slip.

Tectonics

The interactions of climate and tectonics, especially in regard to the formation and degradation of orogens. Archean orogenic processes. Fluid flow in faults, granular flow in faults, and catastrophic structural/geochemical events in faults.

Isotopic Geochemistry and Sedimentary Geology

Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and isotope geochemistry as guides to reconstructing ancient environments. Reconstruction of paleoenvironmental change during the Neoproterozoic to early Phanerozoic. Relationships between tectonics (i.e., supercontinental break-up and assembly), seawater chemistry and ocean redox, severe climatic fluctuations (including snowball Earth), and the origin and diversification of animals. Recovery of the geochemical memory of large-scale Earth system processes (e.g., microbial control of the global S cycle; anthropogenic manipulation of atmospheric OH abundances). Investigations of microbial biogeochemistry under an anoxic Archean atmosphere, to constrain mass fluxes in the Phanerozoic geologic sulfur cycle, and to track processes that control the pollution-cleansing oxidants (OH, O3) in the modern atmosphere.

Volcanology

Petrology and geochemistry of intermediate and felsic magmas. Understanding physical processes and forecasting eruptions at active subduction-zone volcanoes. Geochemistry of volcanic gases, their use for eruption prediction, and their impact on the atmosphere.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) (45 credits)
The nature of graduate research in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is highly variable. As a result, students may enter the graduate program with backgrounds in earth sciences, chemistry, or physics, depending on their research interests and the supervisor with whom they wish to work. Students pursuing an M.Sc. are required to take four courses, but their major project is an M.Sc. thesis that typically results in a journal publication. Research for the thesis typically begins in the first year of residence and is completed, together with the written results, in the second year of residence. Students graduating from the program typically proceed to a Ph.D. or work in the mineral exploration or petroleum industries. Excellent students admitted into the M.Sc. program can be “fast-tracked” from the M.Sc. into the Ph.D. program at the end of the first year if suitable progress has been demonstrated. Such students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits of coursework and a comprehensive oral examination in the Ph.D. 2 year.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students that have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Earth and Planetary Sciences
The nature of graduate research in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is highly variable. As a result, students may enter the graduate program with backgrounds in earth sciences, chemistry, or physics, depending on their research interests and the supervisor with whom they wish to work. Ph.D. students typically enter with an M.Sc., in which case they are required by our regulations to take only two courses, although a supervisor may require more, depending on the suitability of the student’s background. Aside from courses, the first year is occupied by early work on the thesis project that constitutes the bulk of the Ph.D., with preparation for an oral examination on their research proposal at the end of the first year. Conduct of the research, and preparation of the results, for thesis and publication, typically takes three additional years. Students entering the Ph.D. program without an M.Sc. are required to take a full year of courses before embarking on the processes described above. Students graduating from our Ph.D. program pursue careers in universities and government-funded research institutes, and in the mineral-exploration and petroleum industries.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Earth and Planetary Sciences — Environment
The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students that have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the McGill School of Environment (MSE), in partnership with participating academic units.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Earth and Planetary Sciences Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants should have an academic background equivalent to that of a McGill graduate in the Honours or Majors program in geology, geophysics, chemistry, or physics (minimum CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0). The Admissions Committee may modify the requirements in keeping with the field of graduate study proposed. In some cases, a Qualifying year may be required.

Application Procedures

Applicants who want to be considered for entrance awards, or who require financial assistance, should apply before the application deadlines. There are no special forms required to apply for financial aid from the Department, as all applicants will be considered for the awards for which they are eligible.

Students should first contact potential supervisors within the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (www.mcgill.ca/eps/people/faculty) and assess their interest in accepting new students before starting the formal application procedure. General inquiries concerning the Department should be addressed to Graduate Admissions, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at grad [dot] eps [at] mcgill [dot] ca. Candidates should indicate their field(s) of interest when making formal application for admission.

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: Feb. 1 Fall: Feb. 1
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

 

Chemistry

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Chemistry

Location

  • Department of Chemistry
  • Otto Maass Chemistry Building
  • 801 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6999
  • Fax: 514-398-3797
  • Email: graduate [dot] chemistry [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.chemistry.mcgill.ca

About Chemistry

Research in Chemistry

Members of the Department are organized into various research themes. Some of the current research interests are listed below, and are presented in much more detail on the Departmental website at www.chemistry.mcgill.ca.

Analytical/Environmental

The Analytical/Environmental Thematic Research Group at McGill is involved in a wide range of exciting fundamental and applied research with focus on: state-of-the-art instrumental development in spectroscopy; imaging; chemometric and analytical bio-spectroscopy; artificial intelligence; ultra trace sampling; state-of-the-art atmospheric kinetics and photochemistry; thermochemical, box, and cloud modelling; as well as the development and application of state-of-the-art numerical models of the chemistry of the regional and global atmosphere. Our collective research has direct implications in fields such as materials, environmental, and biomedical chemistry.

Chemical Biology

The Chemical Biology Thematic Research Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics, which span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single-molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes that unite the research being performed in this group is the attempt to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Chemical Physics

The research interests of the members of the Chemical Physics Thematic Research Group are diverse, with groups focusing on high-end laser and NMR spectroscopies, kinetics and modelling of atmospheric chemical reactions, experimental and theoretical biophysical chemistry, polymers at interfaces, and statistical and quantum mechanics. In the field of biophysical chemistry, single molecule spectroscopy is being used to probe enzyme function as well as DNA recombination and repair. Our recent advances in image correlation spectroscopic techniques now allow researchers to precisely follow the macromolecular dynamics in living cells. In a similar vein, breakthrough ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments have opened the window to real-time observation of the making and breaking of chemical bonds. State-of-the-art multi-pulse femtosecond spectroscopy experiments are being applied to interesting and technologically important new materials such as photonic crystals and quantum dot superlattices. A molecular-level picture of polymer dynamics and structure at surfaces and interfaces is being developed through theoretical modelling, high-field solids NMR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and other surface characterization methods. In the area of atmospheric chemistry, the chemical transformation of the atmosphere is being modelled both experimentally and theoretically to understand how these processes are currently affecting and driving climate change. Finally, we have basic theory projects relating to the experimental work just described, as well as in transport and structure in complex colloidal or zeolite systems, protein dynamics, and fundamental issues in quantum and statistical mechanics.

Materials Chemistry

The chemistry of materials is a rapidly evolving domain of research. Materials chemistry seeks to understand how composition, reactivity, and structure are related to function from a molecular perspective. The functionality of materials is expressed in a variety of areas including photonics, micro- and nano-electronics, biosystems, nanotechnology, drug delivery, catalysis, polymer science, molecular biology, and chemical and biological sensing. Activities of the Materials Chemistry Thematic Research Group are often broadly interdisciplinary. University-wide synergies among members of this group have led to the creation of the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM) and the McGill Nanotools Facility. The latter comprises state-of-the-art micro/nanofabrication, atomic manipulation and high-performance computing facilities. MIAM and members of the Chemistry Department have established research that links the Centre for Self Assembled Chemical Structures, the Centre for Biosensors and Biorecognition, the Centre for the Physics of Materials, and the Centre for Bone and Periodontal Research. Synthetic approaches to new materials include research in dendrimers, polynucleic acid architectures, polymers that conduct electrons or light and biopolymers. Polymer and colloid science figure prominently as does research and applications of the chemistry and physical properties of nanostructures. There is significant activity in understanding directed molecular assembly at interfaces and in the application of sophisticated spectroscopic tools to explore them.

Synthesis/Catalysis

The Synthesis/Catalysis Research Activity Group is a collective to develop the state-of-art catalysts, synthetic methodologies, reaction mechanisms, and synthetic routes for organic chemicals, natural products, and materials. The following are the major research activities at McGill: (1) Development of novel catalysts and catalytic reactions for highly efficient organic synthesis; Green Chemistry. This includes the study and discovery of novel transition-metal catalysts, biological catalysts, nano- and dendrimer-based catalysts for synthetic purposes; new chemical reactivity such as C-H activation, asymmetric catalysis and theory, multi-component reactions and combinatorial chemistry; innovative chemistry in alternative solvents such as water, sub-critical water, ionic liquids, and liquid CO2; photocatalytic reactions, reaction mechanisms, and physical organic chemistry; and computational chemistry. (2) Synthesis of biological compounds, organic materials, and natural products. Focus areas are total synthesis of natural products, synthesis of DNA and RNA analogues; synthesis of antiviral and anticancer nucleoside analogues, synthesis of amino acid and peptides; synthesis and study of carbohydrate derivatives; design, synthesis, and study of speciality organic chemical and materials.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Chemistry (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please consult the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Chemistry (Thesis) — Chemical Biology (45 credits)
This program is currently not offered.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Chemistry
Please consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Chemistry — Chemical Biology
This program is currently not offered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Chemistry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The minimum academic standard for admission to research thesis degree programs is a minimum standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Applicants from other institutions should have an academic background equivalent to that of a McGill graduate in the Chemistry Honours/Major programs. If possible, candidates should specify the field of research in which they are interested.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees

Graduate students devote 12 hours per week (contact hours, plus grading of reports, etc.) during the academic session to their teaching duties. Financial assistance during the remainder of the year is provided from research funds. Scholarship holders, such as NSERC or awards of similar value, receive a tuition fee waiver.

Additional Requirements

  • GRE – may be required for international degrees

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Chemistry Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: June 1
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Oct. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.

All inquiries concerning graduate work in the Department should be addressed to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Law

Law

Location

  • Faculty of Law
  • Graduate Programs in Law
  • New Chancellor Day Hall
  • 3644 Peel Street, Room 406
  • Montreal QC H3A 1W9
  • Canada

Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) – Angela Campbell

About Law

Graduate students in Law at McGill have one thing in common: a sharp curiosity to explore ideas and projects in an environment that is uniquely comparative and pluralist.

The extensive and impressive history of graduate teaching and supervision at McGill, combined with the innovations in legal pedagogy for which the Faculty of Law is celebrated, create an unrivaled quality and experience for graduate students. Grounded in Montreal, a city that embodies a lively mix of languages, cultures, and communities, the Faculty of Law invites students pursuing their D.C.L. and LL.M. degrees to discover and write within a community of legal scholars that is internationally renowned and engaging.

McGill Law is a meeting place for the major languages of North America, for the world’s legal traditions, and for students who wish to participate in the graduate life of a truly outstanding, prestigious, and intellectually vibrant Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law offers a range of programs at the graduate level. These include the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), as well as graduate certificates.

Students may choose to pursue either the LL.M. or the D.C.L. in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL), or the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL). Graduate certificates may only be completed within either the IASL or the ICL.

The Faculty of Law promotes study and research in private, commercial, international, and public law, as well as legal theory, from the perspectives of diverse legal traditions. In collaboration with the McGill School of Environment, the Faculty offers an LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis option in Environment. The Faculty also offers two other options within the LL.M. degree, a cross-disciplinary European Studies Option (ESO; availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year) in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts, and a specialization in Bioethics. The D.C.L. degree always involves a substantial thesis.

The Institute of Air and Space Law operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute offers a curriculum exploring legal issues that arise from international civil aviation and new technologies in space. It provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal processes regulating worldwide aerospace activities. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law.

The Institute of Comparative Law operates within the Faculty of Law as a centre of comparative legal studies. It accommodates national, international, and transnational studies and encourages openness to diverse legal cultures in teaching and research. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law.

Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degrees

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education primarily through research, as the program concentrates on the production of a 30,000-word thesis, as well as some graduate-level coursework.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Bioethics (45 credits)
The master’s specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes both the conceptual and practical aspects of Bioethics. Students apply through either the Faculty of Law, Medicine, Religious Studies, or the Department of Philosophy. Students entering pursuing an LL.M., Bioethics, are bound by the requirements of the Faculty of Law’s LL.M. program. This program is offered in the thesis option only.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of the Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis), providing students with an appreciation for the role of science, politics, and ethics in informed decision-making in the environment sector.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); European Studies (46 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within the existing LL.M. Thesis program. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood.
Note: Availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education largely through graduate-level coursework. The program requires two terms of coursework as well as a 15,000-word research project.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis) providing students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environment sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.

Institute of Air and Space Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to focus on original scholarly research and writing under the supervision of a law professor. This program involves 20 credits in coursework and 25 research credits (a thesis of 100–150 pages). The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent analysis, writing skills, and organization.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to gain a wide exposure to a range of taught courses within, and related to, the domain of Air and Space Law. The Non-Thesis option requires a substantial Supervised Research Project (18 credits), with the remaining 27 credits earned in courses.

Institute of Comparative Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their master’s thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their individual master’s supervised research project (for LL.M. Master’s Non-Thesis students). Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) Degrees

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.)
The Doctor of Civil Law program is centred around the doctoral thesis, which develops a substantive and original contribution to legal research and knowledge under the supervision of a faculty member. Many doctoral candidates intend on pursuing an academic career, and develop their approach to pedagogy, research, and writing while at McGill.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Air and Space Law
The Doctor of Civil Law in the Institute of Air and Space Law is a research degree ideal for scholars intent on deepening and broadening their critical understanding of the law, as well as their original engagement with it. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination to be done at the end of the first year, or during the second year of the D.C.L. program. The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidenced in concept and execution the original work of the candidate.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Comparative Law
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes doctoral students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their doctoral thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Graduate Certificates in Law

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a coursework program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis. This certificate is particularly appropriate for jurists and other professionals who wish to pursue graduate-level legal studies in aviation, air and space law, government regulations, conventions, and treaties dealing with these areas.
Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) to candidates who do not wish to undertake the master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Law Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law reviews applications and makes recommendations regarding admission. Final admission decisions are determined by admissions policies set by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

For information and application forms, please visit the Faculty website www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions or contact the Graduate Programs Office in Law, McGill University, at the Departmental address, or via email at grad [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca or telephone at 514-398-6635.

Note that applicants must submit their application through uApply. Any questions regarding the status of an application must be sent via the uApply communication tool.

Language Requirement

Graduate-level courses are generally offered in English, and English-language abilities must be demonstrated for admission. In order to understand all course material, the ability to speak and read French is an asset. At McGill's Faculty of Law, all students may choose to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or French. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian or American (English or French) institution, must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, Cambridge English Language Assessment, or EDEXCEL offices. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. For an application to be considered, a TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, Cambridge English Language Assessment, or EDEXCEL test result, McGill Certificate of Proficiency in English or McGill Certificate of Proficiency – English for Professional Communication must be submitted.

One of the following language requirements must be met: 100 on the TOEFL (iBT) with each component score no less than 25, 600 on the TOEFL (PBT), a band score of 7.0 or greater on the IELTS, a grade of 85 or higher on the MELAB, a grade of “A” (Excellent) on the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CAE), a grade of “B” (Good) or higher on the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CPE), an overall grade of at least “Distinction” on the EDEXCEL (Level 4) or an overall grade of at least “Merit” on the EDEXCEL (Level 5).

For information about the TOEFL, including the registration process, visit www.ets.org/toefl. For information about the IELTS, visit www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and it takes approximately 40 days to communicate the results. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institutions to McGill University. McGill’s institutional code is 0935; this code must be provided to the testing agencies when requesting a test report form. For further information on English proficiency tests, visit www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions/requirements.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the D.C.L. program occurs only when all four of the following conditions are met:
  1. The candidate holds a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.).
  2. The candidate holds a master's degree (or equivalent) in Law with thesis from McGill University or another university. (Review of the master’s thesis is normally part of the admission decision–making process. In exceptional cases, a candidate with a non-thesis master's degree with an outstanding academic record may be admitted to the D.C.L. program.)
  3. The candidate maintained, for each of the above degrees, a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 (or equivalent) or higher. (Note that this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire dossier, including the applicant's reference letters and the quality of the research proposal.)
  4. The Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of the candidate's previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a D.C.L. program.

Admission to the doctoral program is always dependent on the availability of a suitable supervisor.

LL.M. Degrees

Candidates for admission to the master's programs must hold a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.), with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 our of 4.0 (or equivalent). Note that this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire dossier, including the applicant's reference letters and the quality of the research proposal.

LL.M. Interdisciplinary Options

  1. Environment Option: This option is available to students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis program at the Faculty of Law. For further information, see this eCalendar under McGill School of Environment > Graduate > Academic Programs > Environment or visit www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.
  2. European Studies Option: This option is available to students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis program at the Faculty of Law. Note the availability of this option is subject to relevant courses offered in a given year.

LL.M. Specialization in Bioethics

Requirements for admission to the master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information, see this eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioethics or visit www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the graduate certificate programs are essentially the same as for the master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience. For further information, visit www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions/requirements. Graduate certificate programs are available in the following two fields:

  1. Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law
  2. Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law
Note: ALL international students must obtain permission to study from the governments of Quebec and Canada. Immigration Quebec issues the Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada issues federal Study Permits. You may also wish to contact International Student Services at www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents for assistance.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by the Faculty of Law:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Faculty of Law and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The application deadline to all graduate law programs (LL.M., D.C.L., graduate certificates) is December 15. The Faculty of Law will not consider applications received on or after December 16.

The Faculty of Law offers Fall term admission only; the Faculty will not consider applications for Winter or Summer entry. Applications submitted for the Winter and Summer terms will be cancelled WITHOUT reimbursement of the application fee.

Note: The application fee remains non-refundable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

 

Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location

  • Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics
  • Macdonald Engineering Building, Room 492
  • 817 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C3
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6858
  • Fax: 514-398-7361
  • Email: gradinfo [dot] civil [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/civil

About Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Advanced courses of instruction and laboratory facilities are available for Engineering graduate students who wish to proceed to the degrees of M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D.

Graduate studies and research are at present being conducted in the fields of structures and structural mechanics; infrastructure rehabilitation; risk engineering; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; materials engineering; soil behaviour; soil mechanics and foundations; water resources engineering; environmental engineering; and transportation engineering.

M.Eng. in Civil Engineering

The master's degree can be pursued as a research degree (thesis) or as a coursework-based degree (project). The thesis degree is for those who wish to undertake research while the project degree is for those who wish to have a broader and more specialized training in civil engineering.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Civil Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students obtain a deeper understanding of their area of specialty through courses selected with their supervisor. A two- to three-semester independent research project is undertaken in the field of structures and structural materials; infrastructure rehabilitation; risk engineering; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; materials engineering; soil behaviour; soil mechanics and foundations; water resources engineering; environmental engineering; and transportation engineering.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Civil Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
Candidates with a bachelor's degree in a discipline other than Engineering, such as Science or Arts, may be accepted into an M.Sc. program in the Department. Such students would typically study in the fluid mechanics, water resources, environmental engineering, or transportation engineering areas, and would follow the thesis option program.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Civil Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This is primarily a coursework degree with a small independent project.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Civil Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
This program is offered to students with a university undergraduate degree in engineering who desire graduate education in the environmental engineering field. This non-thesis option is within the context of the existing M.Eng. (project option) programs currently offered in the Departments of Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences); Chemical Engineering; Civil Engineering; and Mining, Metals, and Materials Engineering. This program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge courses, practical applications in diverse environmental contexts, and functional skills needed for solving environmental problems through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University. Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree in engineering. The Environmental Engineering option is administered by the Faculty of Engineering. Further information may be obtained from the Program Coordinator, Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Civil Engineering
Research can be conducted in the fields of structures and structural mechanics; infrastructure rehabilitation; risk engineering; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; materials engineering; soil behaviour; soil mechanics and foundations; water resources engineering; environmental engineering; and transportation engineering.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The general rules of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies apply and are detailed in Graduate Admissions and Application Procedures. The minimum academic standard for admission is a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 in a recognized program. Alternatively, an equivalent grade point average of no less than 3.2/4.0 over the last two years of the program will be accepted.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must write the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language; preferably the Internet-based test) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). Ph.D. applicants must achieve a minimum overall score of 92 (or minimum 580 on the paper-based test), with a minimum score of 20 for each component (i.e., Writing, Reading, Speaking, Listening); or, achieve a minimum band score of 7 for the IELTS in order to apply. Master's applicants must achieve an overall minimum TOEFL score of 86 (or minimum 567 on the paper-based test), with a minimum score of 20 for each component; or, achieve a minimum band score of 6.5 for the IELTS in order to apply. Test results reach McGill approximately eight weeks after the test is taken; please note that it is the student's responsibility to make the necessary arrangements with the examining board to write the test in his/her country of residence. Full information about the test, and a registration form, may be obtained by consulting the TOEFL or the IELTS websites.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Sociology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Sociology

Location

  • Department of Sociology
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 713
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada
  • Graduate Program and Admission Information:
  • Telephone: 514-398-6847
  • Fax: 514-398-3403
  • Email: graduate [dot] sociology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/sociology

About Sociology

The Department offers training leading to the following degrees:

  • Master of Arts in Sociology (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Development Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Gender and Women’s Studies Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Medical Sociology Option (Thesis and Non-Thesis) with the Social Studies of Medicine Department
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Master of Arts in Sociology – Social Statistics Option (Non-Thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Gender and Women's Studies Option
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology – Population Dynamics Option

We have particular strength in the following fields: states, nationalism, and development; economy and society; social inequality (class, ethnicity, and gender); deviance and social control; and health and society. The Department of Sociology has very high standards and an excellent record of placing students in both academic and non-academic careers in institutions ranging from the University of Chicago and Berkeley to StatsCan and CEGEPs. The Department has a stellar record of research publications and a lively graduate program, and we benefit from many new faculty appointments allowing us to be at the forefront of current issues. A large number of M.A. programs are offered. Fewer are offered at the Ph.D. level (see below). The Department houses the Social Statistics Unit. This has full access to the resources of StatsCan, with additional training for students.

Availability of Funding

The Department offers a limited number of teaching assistantships. A full teaching assistantship consists of a maximum of 180 hours of work per term. Appointments for a full teaching assistantship span 15 weeks and involve an average of 12 hours per week.

M.A. Program Options

Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program provides excellent methodological training, but is principally designed for students who wish to gain a first experience doing original research. Some students have stopped at this stage; more have gone on to higher degree work. Researching and writing a thesis requires considerable effort, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s thesis must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. Researching and writing a thesis takes considerable time, and this program typically takes two years to complete.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is both for students who wish to continue from an undergraduate degree in sociology, and those who wish to enter sociology for the first time. McGill is an excellent venue because the program involves rigorous training in methodology. Academically inclined students have gone on to higher degrees, some at McGill and others at other universities; the training offered has allowed others to go to varied careers, not least as teachers in CEGEPs. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
This program is for students with a particular interest in development—an area in which McGill is very strong. Many students from this program have gone on to further research, but several have entered the world of non-governmental organizations—with some going on to work for the U.N. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary seminar and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The research paper must be on a topic related to development studies, approved by the Development Studies Option Coordinating Committee. This program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the degree requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and in issues in feminist research and methods. The student’s research paper must be on a topic centrally relating to issues of gender and/or women’s studies. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Medical Sociology (45 credits)
The Department contributes to knowledge at the forefront of current issues—in particular, those dealing with health systems and with policies concerning HIV/AIDS. This program is a cooperative effort of the Department of Sociology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine. Many students who have chosen this option have gone on to do further research and others to personnel work in the health services. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (45 credits)
The purpose of the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is to provide graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Research Projects must be on a topic relating to population dynamics, approved by the PDO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Sociology (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
This program complements the basic research training with the application of statistical methods to Statistics Canada data (or equivalent). It requires a statistics-based research paper that will normally flow out of a paper written for one of the graduate seminars. Comparable to an article in a professional journal, the paper ought to focus on a clearly defined research problem, demonstrating familiarity with the most important relevant scholarly work and the ability to carry out and organize the results of the research. The program is designed to be completed within twelve months.

Ph.D. Program Options

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology
There are two ways to enter the Ph.D. program. Some students are fast-tracked (i.e., from a B.A. degree without having to complete an M.A. in Sociology), as Ph.D. 1 students; they take twelve substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements, and are trained in qualitative and quantitative research methods and in research design. Other students, typically those with an M.A. in Sociology, are considered as Ph.D. 2 students; they typically take six substantive courses, in addition to various thesis requirements—although further courses may be required if their methodological skills do not meet the standards required by the Department. Our Social Statistics Laboratory allows students to make systematic use of quantitative data sources. All students must pass two area exams and present a thesis proposal before turning to the thesis itself, which may take the form of a single piece of research, or a set of articles on a particular theme.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Gender and Women's Studies
This interdisciplinary program is for students who meet the Ph.D. requirements in Sociology and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and on issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis or set of articles must relate to issues of gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Sociology — Population Dynamics
This program aims to provide advanced graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. As such, students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course in Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Dissertation topics must be related to population dynamics and approved by the Population Dynamics Option (PDO) coordinating committee.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Sociology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree with a standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.3 or better out of a possible 4.0. The degree may be either in Sociology or in another relevant social science. In the latter case, applicants may be required to take some additional sociology courses to fill gaps in their background.

The strength of an applicant's academic record is of primary importance in consideration of an applicant's dossier. For a detailed description of courses open to graduates and undergraduates, and of preparation required of McGill University honours students, candidates should consult the Undergraduate eCalendar.

All applicants are asked to submit a writing sample. Applicants must submit with their applications the results of the Verbal, Analytical, and Quantitative aptitude tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Arrangements to take the GRE should be made directly with the Educational Testing Service by visiting their website at www.ets.org/gre. Certain students must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. The minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL exam is 567 on the paper-based test and 86 overall on the Internet-based test (no less than 20 in each of the four component scores). For more information on whether the TOEFL is required please visit www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency. International students can also contact International Student Services at 514-398-4349 for more information, or visit their website, www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents.

Candidates who lack sufficient preparation in the social sciences, but whose academic record justifies consideration for eventual admission to the master's graduate program, must register for a qualifying year during which they are required to take courses to broaden their knowledge of sociology. Candidates must achieve a final grade of at least a B in these courses and an average in all courses of at least B+; in general, they must, in the opinion of the Department, have achieved sufficient preparation in the subject matter of sociology before they will be allowed to proceed with graduate work. All candidates are expected to have taken courses in statistics, research methods, and sociological theory at the undergraduate level.

Any prospective students are encouraged to contact faculty members that they may wish to work with to ascertain that they will be available and not on leave during the time at which they wish to study. If need be, they may feel free to contact the Graduate Program Director to guide them.

The program of study is designed to give students an advanced understanding of a major field in sociology, of current methods of sociological research, and of some principal theoretic issues in the discipline. Three terms of residence study is the minimum requirement for a master's degree. For the doctoral program, three years is the minimum residency requirement for students entering at the Ph.D. 1 level (those students without an M.A.) and two years for students entering at the Ph.D. 2 level (those with an M.A.).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please note that the dossier must be complete before the applicant will be considered for entrance to the graduate program.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GRE
  • Personal Statement
  • Writing Sample – can be in the form of a graded paper or a chapter from a thesis and must be at least 15 typewritten pages in length translated into English or French

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Sociology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Plant Science

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Please note that Summer admission is no longer an option for the Plant Science programs. Please choose either Fall or Winter admission.

Plant Science

Location

  • Department of Plant Science
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/plant

About Plant Science

The Department offers an M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Plant Science with options in Bioinformatics, Environment, or Neotropical Environment, and provides for study in all fields of plant science. Research facilities—both field and laboratory—are available for investigations in plant breeding, crop physiology, crop management, crop quality, plant ecology, the epidemiology and biology of plant diseases, epigenetics, biosystematics, recombinant DNA technology, mycology, weed biology, tissue culture, plant biochemistry, and bioinformatics. Facilities include: the Horticultural Research Centre, the Emile A. Lods Agronomy Research Centre, greenhouses, growth cabinets, the McGill University Herbarium, the Applied Biotechnology laboratory, the CT Scanning laboratory, and a Level 2 Quarantine Facility.

An advisory committee is named for each student and has the responsibility of developing the program of study appropriate to the student's background and area of specialization.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. The goal of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This option has an added emphasis on bioinformatics, including additional seminars. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field. This option has an added emphasis on environmental sciences, including additional courses and seminars. The Environment graduate option is aimed at students who wish to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions with students from a wide range of disciplines.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field. This option has an added emphasis on neotropical environments, including additional courses and seminars. Part of the program takes place in Panama.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Plant Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires about 18 months or four to five terms for completion. Overall, the program consists of graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Bioinformatics
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector. This option has an added emphasis on bioinformatics, including additional courses and seminars. The goal of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Environment
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector. This option has an added emphasis on environmental sciences, including additional courses and seminars. The Environment graduate option is aimed at students who wish to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions with students from a wide range of disciplines.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Neotropical Environment
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector. This option has an added emphasis on neotropical environments, including additional courses and seminars. Part of the program takes place in Panama.
Graduate Certificate in Bioinformatics (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Bioinformatics is a new cross-disciplinary program that teaches students the foundations of bioinformatics thinking, methodology, and applications through hands-on experience with computers and bioinformatics tools. The program introduces students to many areas of application such as medicine, agriculture, and chemistry. Required courses include basic UNIX skills, genomics data, common bioinformatics software, relational databases, and web resources. The Certificate is completed in one term (Winter) after which graduates may go on to pursue successful careers in the biomedical, biotechnology, and biosciences fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Plant Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General

The minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or a GPA of 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

Ph.D.

Ph.D. candidates are required to have an M.Sc. degree in an area related to the chosen field of specialization for the Ph.D. program. Outstanding M.Sc. students may be permitted to transfer to the second year of the Ph.D. program following one year of study.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Plant Science and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Natural Resource Sciences

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Natural Resource Sciences

Location

  • Department of Natural Resource Sciences
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/nrs

About Natural Resource Sciences

The Department of Natural Resource Sciences offers programs leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Entomology (includes Environment and Neotropical Environment options), Microbiology (includes Bioinformatics and Environment options), Renewable Resources (includes Forest Science, Micrometeorology, Soil Science, and Wildlife Biology with Environment and Neotropical Environment options available) and an M.Sc. degree in Agricultural Economics. It is also possible for students to pursue doctoral studies in Agricultural/Environmental Economics or with a Ph.D. in Renewable Resources. An interdisciplinary option in Bioinformatics for doctoral students is also available.

The Department possesses, or has access to, excellent facilities for laboratory and field research. Affiliated with the Department are the Lyman Entomological Museum and Research Laboratory, the Molson Nature Reserve, the Morgan Arboretum, and the Ecomuseum of the St. Lawrence Valley Natural History Society.

Master of Science Degrees

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Agricultural Economics (Thesis) (46 credits)

This program provides students with applied economic concepts and tools to identify, define, and analyze economic problems affecting the performance of the agri-food sector and the environment. The ideal prior preparation is an undergraduate degree in Agricultural Economics or Economics, including undergraduate courses in intermediate economic theory (micro and macro), calculus, algebra, statistics, and econometrics.

Attention is given to the development of analytical skills in the broad areas of agricultural, environmental, and ecological economics. Students may specialize, by way of their research program, in agribusiness, development, finance, marketing and trade, policy, and resource economics. The program prepares graduates for rewarding careers in research, analysis, and decision-making in academia, private and NGO sectors, and government.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) (45 credits)
(Including Micrometeorology, Forest Science, Soil Science, and Wildlife Biology as areas of research)
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Assessment (45 credits)
This program is currently not offered.

Ph.D. Degrees in Entomology, Microbiology, or Renewable Resources (Includes Micrometeorology, Forest Science, Soil Science, and Wildlife Biology)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Neotropical Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Bioinformatics
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Neotropical Environment
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Natural Resource Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis (Agricultural Economics)

Direct admission to the M.Sc. requires the completion of a B.Sc. in Agricultural Economics or a closely related area, with the equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

The ideal preparation includes courses in agricultural economics, economic theory (intermediate micro and macro), calculus, linear algebra, and statistics. Students with deficiencies in these areas will be required to take additional courses as part of their degree program.

M.Sc. Thesis (Entomology, Microbiology, Renewable Resources)

Candidates are required to have a bachelor's degree with an equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

M.Sc. in Renewable Resources (Non-Thesis) – Environmental Assessment Option

Applications are not being accepted for the 2014-2015 academic year; the program is currently under review.

Ph.D. Thesis (Entomology, Microbiology, Renewable Resources)

Candidates, normally, are required to hold an M.Sc. degree and will be judged primarily on their ability to conduct an original and independent research study.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Support – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs normally depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Natural Resource Sciences and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

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