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Physics

Physics

Location

  • Department of Physics
  • Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • 3600 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6485 (Graduate Information)
  • Fax: 514-398-8434
  • Email: graduate [dot] physics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.physics.mcgill.ca

About Physics

The Department of Physics currently has a faculty of approximately 40 members, including several holders of Canada Research Chairs and many other prestigious named Chairs. Additionally, we host an impressive number of postdoctoral fellows and research associates and run one of the largest and most vibrant graduate programs in North America. The graduate student enrolment is currently approximately 150.

Faculty members in the Department of Physics are recognized internationally for their excellence. Our members have received national and international prizes and fellowships including Les Prix Du Quebec, Steacie Prize, Sloan Fellowships, NSERC, and others too many to list here. They are also in constant demand as reviewers and referees. Students who earn advanced degrees from the Department of Physics will not only get an excellent education, they will also receive valuable guidance and network contacts to help with subsequent career steps.

The Department offers full M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs in a wide range of disciplines including astrophysics, atmospheric physics, bio-physics, condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, laser spectroscopy, material physics, non-linear dynamics, nuclear physics, statistical physics, and medical-radiation physics.

Although most of the teaching and research facilities are located in the Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, the Department has space and research facilities in the Wong Materials Science Centre, adjacent to the Rutherford Building on McGill's lower campus. Our groups also conduct research at laboratories around the world including Argonne, CERN, FermiLab, SLAC, and TRIUMF.

Departmental researchers enjoy technical support in the areas of engineering, electronics, and precision machining. The Department maintains an excellent conventional machine shop as well as the McGill Nanotools-Microfab facility. Most of the scientific computing is done with an extensive in-house network of powerful workstations and several Beowulf clusters.

Remote access to supercomputing sites in Canada and the United States is also possible including the McGill HPC super-computing facility which is a part of the nationwide network of High Performance Computing Installations in Quebec.

The Department of Physics currently guarantees financial support of $22,000 per year for every graduate student. This minimum level of support can be supplemented by winning one of McGill's large number of in-house scholarships, worth up to $25,000 per year. For details, see www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/finance.html.

Graduate students in the Department of Physics come from many different countries and cultures from all over the world, providing a stimulating cosmopolitan atmosphere in the Department. This, coupled with the unique opportunities afforded by the city of Montreal, guarantees a quality of life that is second to none among Canadian universities. For graduate admission and application information, please visit www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/application.html.

Fields of Research:

High-Energy Physics

Theoretical: The McGill high energy theorists have interests in a wide range of areas within quantum field theory, string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology. Research areas of the high-energy theory faculty include applications of quantum field theory techniques to relativistic heavy ion collisions, baryogenesis, superstring cosmology, theory of cosmological perturbations, black hole physics, supergravity, three dimensional gravity, and various topics related to the physics and mathematics of superstring theory. The high-energy theorists have close connections to the nuclear theory group, the astrophysics group, the high-energy experimentalists, and to members of the Mathematics Department.

Experimental: The experimental high-energy physics group is engaged in a number of experiments at the research frontiers of the field, both in subatomic physics and in high-energy astrophysics. These include:

  • Electron-positron collisions: a group works on the BaBar experiment at SLAC and R&D for the proposed SuperB experiment at LNF in Italy, with specific interest in CKM matrix elements and physics beyond the Standard Model through studies of rare decays, and on R&D for a future International Linear Collider, with interest in calorimeter development.
  • Electron-proton collisions: a group is studying high-energy lepton-quark interactions using data from the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, with interest in deep inelastic scattering and flavour production.
  • Hadron-hadron collisions: CDF and Dzero groups employ Fermilab's energy frontier Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator to study top and bottom quarks and search for the Higgs boson. A group is also involved in major contributions to the next energy frontier at CERN's LHC, with work on the High Level Trigger for the ATLAS experiment.
  • High-energy particle astrophysics: ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using the newly commissioned VERITAS telescope array and development of the next-generation detector.

Students at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels are offered a strong program of research in a challenging and rapidly advancing field. Short term master's projects are based mainly on instrumentation or data analysis conducted on campus, while Ph.D. research may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Nuclear Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs include transport equations for heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy; nuclear equation of state from heavy ion collisions; fragmentation at intermediate energy; electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy ion collisions; effective Lagrangians for hadronic systems at finite temperature; and Quark-Gluon Plasma, QCD.

Experimental: Current research programs in experimental nuclear physics at McGill are focused on two main axes:

  • The study of heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies to determine the properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. This program is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN.
  • The study of ground state properties of unstable nuclei using laser spectroscopy techniques and ion traps. This work is being carried out using the Canadian Penning trap facility at the Argonne National Laboratory and at the accelerator ISOLDE (CERN), and the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

Furthermore, the Nuclear Physics Group has an active in-house research program that applies the ion trap and laser techniques to the detection of trace quantities of material and contaminants, and to ion spectroscopy.

Condensed Matter Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs involve the nonequilibrium, ab-initio modelling of molecular and nanoelectronic systems and devices; the study of quantum effects in interacting mesoscopic electron systems; nonequilibrium phenomena in extended systems; and applications of statistical mechanics to problems in biophysics.

Experimental: Current research programs involve the study of the time evolution of non-equilibrium systems via x-ray diffraction, fundamental quantum properties of strongly correlated systems at temperatures very near absolute zero, macromolecular interactions in living cells using single-photon and two-photon imaging, molecular electronics and nanoelectronic systems by scanning probe microscopy, dynamics and mechanical properties of soft matter systems and spatial organization and dynamics in living cells, mechanical behaviour of very small systems by high-resolution force microscopy, electronic properties that emerge at the limits of miniaturization and quantum computing, and nuclear methods to study interactions in magnetic materials that lead to exotic magnetic ordering behaviour. This includes studies of novel materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, unconventional superconductors, guantum dots, heterostructures, amorphous systems, and spin glasses.

Astrophysics

Research in the astrophysics group covers a wide range of topics including cosmology, galaxy formation, high-energy astrophysics, and extrasolar planets. This involves observations at all wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays to sub-mm, infrared and radio, using international observatories in space and on the ground. Experimental groups at McGill are involved in development and operation of ground-based high-energy gamma-ray observatories, and cosmic microwave background experiments. Theoretical work includes studies of how astrophysics and observational cosmology can experimentally determine the most important properties of dark matter and dark energy, studies of the diverse physics of neutron stars, and extrasolar planet formation.

Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics

This group studies nonlinear dynamical processes in the atmosphere and other geophysical systems, especially those associated with turbulent, chaotic, and extremely variable behaviour. Emphasis is placed on multifractal analysis and modelling as well as the development of new theories and techniques covering wide ranges of scale in time and space. Data from a variety of in situ and remotely sensed sources are used. This includes satellite data of the Earth's atmosphere and surface as well as high-quality precipitation data from the McGill Radar Weather Observatory.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physics (Thesis) (45 credits)
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physics
McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Physics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc.

The normal requirement is a B.Sc. in Physics or equivalent, with high standing.

Ph.D.

The normal requirement is an M.Sc. in Physics or equivalent. On the recommendation of the Departmental Graduate Committee, fast-tracking from the M.Sc. program into the Ph.D. program may be granted after one year, if:

  • the student has fulfilled the M.Sc. coursework requirements, or;
  • the Committee determines that the student qualifies based on the student's academic record.

All students who transfer to the Ph.D. program are required to fulfil Ph.D. coursework requirements in addition to the courses taken as an M.Sc. candidate.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance will be offered to students in the form of a bursary, and teaching and research assistantships. For new students, financial support will be offered at the time of acceptance. Forms are given and filled out on registration day.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Physics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Computer Science

Computer Science

Location

  • School of Computer Science
  • McConnell Engineering, Room 318
  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7071, ext. 00074
  • Fax: 514-398-3883
  • Email: grad [dot] cs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.cs.mcgill.ca

About Computer Science

The School of Computer Science is one of the leading teaching and research centres for computer science in Canada. We offer a Ph.D. program and several M.Sc. programs. All include coursework and research. In the basic M.Sc. programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option, which requires a project. The Ph.D. program includes an option in bioinformatics, and the thesis M.Sc. program includes options in bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering. Students are normally funded by their adviser's research grants; in the case of scholarship students, this typically takes the form of a 'top-up' to the scholarship. Research in the School covers a broad range of areas, including:

  • Theory: algorithms, combinatorial optimization, computational geometry, cryptography, graph theory, logic and computation, programming languages, quantum computing, theory of computation, and scientific computing;
  • Systems: compilers, computer games, distributed systems, embedded and real-time systems, modelling and simulations, networks, software engineering;
  • Applications: bioinformatics, machine learning, robotics, computer animation, graphics, and vision.

All students must consult the graduate program website www.cs.mcgill.ca, where up-to-date information about the graduate programs is posted. Any questions concerning programs should be addressed to the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students with a strong interest in research in computer science who hold at least the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in CS. This program combines a strong course component with a research thesis. It is the usual (but not mandatory) entry point for students who wish to do a Ph.D., but is also the program of choice for students who want to find challenging and exciting jobs after their master's.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (45 credits)
This program option is to train graduates in state-of-the-art applications of numerical and modelling methods and computer technology to scientific and engineering problems. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students who want to obtain broad knowledge of advanced topics in computer science but without the requirement of a thesis. It offers an excellent preparation for the job market, but is not recommended for students interested in eventually pursuing a Ph.D.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science
The Ph.D. program trains students to become strong, independent researchers in the field of their choice. Our graduates take challenging positions in industry or take academic positions at universities and research labs. In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, applicants should normally hold a master's degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university, but exceptional students can be admitted to the Ph.D. program directly without a master's degree.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Computer Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s (M.Sc.)

The minimum requirement for admission is a bachelor's degree (cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 or better, or equivalent) with the coursework in Computer Science as listed on our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/msc_applicants.

The website supplements the information in this publication, and should be consulted by all graduate students.

Ph.D.

In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, normally applicants should hold an M.Sc. degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university. Students who hold a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science but have an exceptionally strong academic record may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program, but they must initially apply to the M.Sc. program. Students who are in the M.Sc. program have the option to be fast-tracked into the Ph.D. program at the end of their first academic year, contingent on excellent performance as judged by the Ph.D. committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae – required for Ph.D. program
  • Statement of Purpose – required for Ph.D. program
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE General Test) – required for degrees from outside Canada. Recommended for Ph.D. program.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Computer Science and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1
Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only)
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

For further details on our admission requirements, please visit our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/applying.

Scholarship Deadlines: January 1 for applicants who wish to be considered for scholarship awards; otherwise, March 1 for admission to the Fall term.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Biology

Biology

Location

  • Department of Biology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W4/8
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-5478
  • Fax: 514-398-5069
  • Email: graduate-admissions [dot] biology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: http://biology.mcgill.ca

About Biology

The Department offers graduate training in many areas of biology with particular strengths in the following areas: Molecular Biology and Genetics; Cell and Developmental Biology; Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation; Evolution; Neurobiology; Bioinformatics; and Plant Biology. In addition to the regular M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs, the Biology Department offers specialized programs, known as “concentrations” in certain specific areas: Neotropical Environment (NEO), Bioinformatics, and Environment.

Graduate programs leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees are offered. Both are research-intensive degrees, and the emphasis in both programs is on development of the intellectual and technical skills necessary for independent research. The main component of both degrees is a thesis presenting results of this work and the student’s original contribution to scientific knowledge. Formal coursework, usually in the form of literature-based seminar courses, is minimal and typically completed within the first year. To complement their classroom and laboratory training, students regularly attend other seminar series and journal clubs and present their own work annually in a formal seminar.

In addition to working with world-class researchers, graduate students in Biology have access to top-notch research infrastructure. The recently renovated Stewart Biology Building and the newly constructed Bellini Life Sciences Complex are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for sophisticated imaging, robotic, and genetic techniques, to name a few. These in-house capabilities are complemented by a wide range of field research facilities, which include the Gault Nature Reserve at Mont St. Hilaire (Quebec), the Morgan Arboretum (Quebec), the Huntsman Marine Science Centre (New Brunswick), the Subarctic Research Laboratory (Quebec), the Bellairs Research Institute (Barbados), the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (Panama), and the limnology research station at the Wilder and Helen Penfield Nature Reserve on Lake Memphremagog (Quebec). These resources are also extended by affiliation with other organizations such as the Redpath Museum, the Biotechnology Research Institute of the National Research Council of Canada, the Groupe Interuniversitaire de Recherches Océanographiques du Québec (GIROQ), the McGill Macdonald campus, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the Jewish General Hospital, the Montreal General Hospital, the Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Royal Victoria Hospital. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.)

The Department specifies a minimum level of support for all graduate students. This amount is $15,500 per annum plus tuition fees. The required minimum duration of support is two years for the M.Sc. program, five years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 1 (directly from a bachelor's degree), and four years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 2 (after having completed a master's degree).

The graduate program of each student is established and regularly evaluated by a three-member supervisory committee appointed by the Graduate Training Committee and chaired by the student’s thesis supervisor.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.). Admission is based on an evaluation by the applicant’s potential supervisor, who is the faculty member who will provide supervision and financial support for the student’s research, and by the Biology Graduate Training Committee. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of disciplines.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the M.Sc. level, students successfully completing the Bioinformatics concentration will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.). Admission is based on an evaluation by the applicant’s potential supervisor, who is the faculty member who will provide supervision and financial support for the student’s research, and by the Biology Graduate Training Committee. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of different disciplines. This concentration is available in: Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (Bioresource Engineering, Entomology, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Renewable Resources), Arts (Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Sociology), Law, Medicine (Epidemiology and Experimental Medicine), and Science (Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Geography).

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Neotropical Environment

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program.

NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Bioinformatics

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the Ph.D. level students will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will also have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 27, 2014).

Biology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study with an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). A score of 550 on the paper-based TOEFL or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20 or 6.5 on IELTS is the minimum standard for admission. Specific programs may have additional requirements.

Admission is based on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee and on acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact staff members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply. All applicants should read the academic faculty and admission procedure sections on the Biology Department website before completing the application form. These guidelines contain specific information on the application process, summaries of the research areas of staff, and contact information.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Biology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit. All inquiries pertaining to admission procedures should be directed to the Graduate Admissions Secretary.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Surgery, Experimental

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Surgery, Experimental

Location

  • Surgery, Experimental
  • Montreal General Hospital, Room C9-169
  • 1650 Cedar Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3G 1A4
  • Canada
  • Graduate Program Coordinator: Sharon Turner
  • Telephone: 514-934-1934, ext. 42837
  • Fax: 514-934-8289
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] surgery [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/experimentalsurgery

About Experimental Surgery

Experimental Surgery offers graduate programs leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. The Experimental Surgery department is responsible for the administration of the graduate programs and allows excellent opportunities for training under the supervision of professors located in the research institutes of the different McGill teaching hospitals. The scope of the research and close connections with other centres and departments of McGill provide ample opportunities for collaboration. The research in the Department covers a broad range of topics from tissue repair and regeneration to cancer cell biology, sexual dysfunction, and surgical health outcomes.

A list of research directors and a description of their research topics, as well as application forms may be obtained from our website (www.mcgill.ca/experimentalsurgery).

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Surgery (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Sc. program is intended for students wishing to pursue careers in academia, the medical field, or industry. Thesis projects available in the various laboratories of the Department are multidisciplinary and ensure that students are exposed to a broad spectrum of research projects and experimental approaches. Students who have achieved superior progress in their research have the option to transfer to the Ph.D. program, waiving the M.Sc. thesis submission.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Surgery (Thesis) — Surgical Education (45 credits)
This concentration's focus is on surgical education, and it is intended for students wishing to pursue careers in academia, the medical field, or industry. Thesis projects available in the various laboratories of the Department are multidisciplinary and ensure that students are exposed to a broad spectrum of research projects and experimental approaches. Students who have achieved superior progress in their research have the option to transfer to the Ph.D. program, waiving the M.Sc. thesis submission.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Surgery (Thesis) — Surgical Innovation (45 credits)
This concentration's focus is on surgical innovation, and it is intended for students wishing to pursue careers in academia, the medical field, or industry. Thesis projects available in the various laboratories of the Department are multidisciplinary and ensure that students are exposed to a broad spectrum of research projects and experimental approaches. Students who have achieved superior progress in their research have the option to transfer to the Ph.D. program, waiving the M.Sc. thesis submission.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Experimental Surgery
The doctoral program is intended for students with excellent academic standing who wish to pursue research-focused careers in academia, the medical field, or industry. Thesis projects, available in the various laboratories of the Department, ensure that students receive in-depth training and exposure to varied conceptual frameworks and a wide array of experimental strategies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Experimental Surgery Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Programs

Usually a B.Sc., M.D., or D.V.M. degree is required, with a minimum CGPA of 3.2/4.0. Applications will be accepted from candidates sponsored by a research supervisor willing to provide laboratory space, funding, and direction for their research work.

Ph.D. Program

Admission is usually from one of the M.Sc. programs either upon completion of the M.Sc. degree, or by transfer from the first year of M.Sc. to the second year of Ph.D. studies. Request for such transfer is to be made in writing by the thesis supervisor during the candidate's first year of M.Sc. studies, not later than March 30 for students enrolled in September, or October 15 for those registered in January. The student must then apply for admission to the Ph.D. program in order to effect the transfer. Transfer is granted on the basis of an examination administered by the student's Research Advisory Committee. Exceptional students with a minimum 3.5/4.0 CGPA may apply directly to the Ph.D. program.

Students with an M.Sc. degree from other departments or from other recognized universities whose M.Sc. topic is closely related to the subject of their Ph.D. research may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program, at the level of Ph.D. 2, at the discretion of the Department. Exceptional students with a master's degree unrelated to their proposed research may be admitted to Ph.D. 1.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor
  • Memorandum of Agreement

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by Experimental Surgery and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at: www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: April 14 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 5 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Occupational Health

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Occupational Health

Location

  • Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health
  • Purvis Hall
  • 1020 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1A2
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6258
  • Email: graduate [dot] eboh [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/occh

About Occupational Health

The Department of Occupational Health offers two graduate degree programs: a doctorate (Ph.D.) and master (M.Sc.(A.)) in occupational health sciences. The master's program is available on campus or in distance education format. Special Student status may be granted to students who wish to take only specific courses from our M.Sc. program. There is a maximum of 12 credits overall, with a maximum of 6 credits per semester.

Students are required to have access to a computer and the Internet as some of the course material is most readily available by accessing the web.

Note: We are not accepting applications for the Occupational Health Ph.D. or the M.Sc.A. (Distance) programs until further notice.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Occupational Health (Resident) (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
A one-year program in health and hygiene appropriate for physicians, nurses, and graduates from engineering and basic sciences. Occupational health training allows candidates to evaluate work environments and attenuate work hazards using prevention and control.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Occupational Health (Distance) (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is not accepting applicants for 2014–2015.

A three-and-a-half-year program completed mostly over the Internet.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Occupational Health

This program is not accepting applicants for 2014–2015.

The objective of this program is to train independent researchers in the field of work environment and health.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Occupational Health Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum score of 550, or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20.

M.Sc. Applied Program (Resident) (on campus)

Candidates should have completed, with a standing equivalent to a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, one of the requisites below:

  • a Bachelor of Science degree or its equivalent, in a discipline relevant to occupational health or hygiene such as: chemistry, engineering, environmental sciences, physics
  • an M.D. (medicine)
  • a B.Sc. in health sciences or nursing

Distance Education

Note: We are not accepting applications for the Occupational Health Distance program until further notice.

Candidates should have completed, with a standing equivalent to a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, one of the requisites below:

  • a Bachelor of Science degree, or its equivalent, in a discipline relevant to occupational health or hygiene such as: chemistry, engineering, environmental sciences, physics
  • an M.D. (medicine)
  • a B.Sc. in health sciences or nursing

Candidates should have at least three years of experience in industrial hygiene and/or in safety.

For medical doctors and nurses, priority will be given to candidates with at least three years of experience in occupational health.

Ph.D. Program

Note: We are not accepting applications for the Occupational Health Ph.D. program until further notice.

Candidates must hold an M.Sc. degree or its equivalent in occupational health sciences, or in a relevant discipline, such as: community health, environmental health, epidemiology, chemistry, engineering, physics, or health sciences (medicine, nursing, etc.).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Resident (on campus)

Eligible candidates may be invited for an interview with members of the Admissions Committee of the Department.

Applications are considered for Fall term only. Applications for Winter/Summer term admission will not be considered, with the exception of admission as Special Students in the Winter term.

Distance Education

Students are required to have access to a computer and the Internet as the course material is available through the web.

Ph.D. Program

Each student will be assigned to one academic staff member of the Department, who will act as his/her supervisor, and who will guide him/her in the preparation of a definite research protocol.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

M.Sc. Applied (Resident)

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement

M.Sc. Applied (Distance Education)

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement

Ph.D. Program

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Research Proposal

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Apr. 30
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter/Summer term admission will not be considered, with the exception of admission as Special Students in the Winter term.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

 

Human Genetics

Human Genetics

Location

  • Department of Human Genetics
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, N5/13
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
Administration
Kandace Springer – Administrative Assistant
  • Email: kandace [dot] springer [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Ross Mackay – Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: ross [dot] mackay [at] mcgill [dot] ca
Laura Benner (On Leave) – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
Kailee Bialaszewski (Acting) – Assistant Graduate Program Coordinator
  • Email: dept [dot] humangenetics [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Human Genetics

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees in Human Genetics

The Department of Human Genetics offers a clinical master’s program in Genetic Counselling, as well as research training at both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels. Both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs require the completion of a thesis, which is the major focus of the student's effort. A minimal amount of coursework is required, but specific course choices are flexible and vary according to the student's previous training and current research interest. The Department also offers a Bioinformatics option. Information on the Bioinformatics option can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/mcb/academic/graduate.

Most of the faculty of the Human Genetics Department are located in McGill teaching hospitals, reflecting the medically learned knowledge at the core of human genetic studies.

Faculty have a wide variety of research interests, which embrace: cancer genetics, cytogenetics, reproductive biology, neurogenetics, and genomic and genetic basis of human diseases. Detailed information regarding faculty research interest can be found on the Department web page at www.mcgill.ca/humangenetics/prospective-students/supervision.

Students accepted into the Human Genetics research graduate program will receive a minimum stipend of $15,000, plus tuition and fees.

Tuition Differential Fee Waivers

A certain number of tuition differential fee waivers will be offered to incoming out-of-province/international students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. Students who have a CGPA of 3.5 out of 4.0 or above (as converted by McGill GPS guidelines) and who submit online application and documents by March 31 (Fall), Sept. 30 (Winter) will automatically be considered for a tuition waiver.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Genetics (Thesis) — Bioethics (45 credits)
McGill University offers specialized education in bioethics to graduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Religious Studies, and Law, and the Department of Philosophy. The Master's degree Specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary academic program that emphasizes both the conceptual and the practical aspects of bioethics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Genetic Counselling (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program provides the academic foundation and clinical training required for the contemporary practice of genetic counselling. Genetic counsellors are health professionals who provide information and support to families who have members with birth defects or genetic disorders and to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited conditions. Genetic counsellors investigate the problem present in the family, analyze inheritance patterns and risks of recurrence, and review available options with the family. Some counsellors also work in administrative and academic capacities, and many engage in research activities. The curriculum includes a variety of required courses in human genetics and other departments, and 40 weeks of supervised clinical training spread over four semesters. Graduates will be eligible to sit for both the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors and the American Board of Genetic Counselling certification examinations. Upon completion of the M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling program, students will demonstrate competence in, or satisfactory knowledge of: principles of human genetics, including cytogenetics, biochemical, molecular, and population genetics; methods of interviewing and counselling, and the dynamics of human behaviour in relation to genetic disease; and social, legal, and ethical issues in genetics. Enrolment will be limited to four students.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics
The Department of Human Genetics provides a unified curriculum of study in genetics. Areas of specialization include: biochemical genetics, genetics of development, animal models of human diseases, cancer genetics, molecular pathology, gene therapy, genetic dissection of complex traits, genetics of infectious and inflammatory diseases, non-mendelian genetics, bioinformatics, behavioural genetics, neurogenetics, bioethics, and genomics. Many of our faculty hold cross-appointments in various departments (including: biochemistry, biology, cardiology, medicine, microbiology, immunology, neurology, pathology, paediatrics, pharmacology, psychiatry) within the Faculties of Science and Medicine. This enables numerous opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The Department conducts research on all sites of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the McGill Life Sciences Complex, the McGill University-Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, the Biomedical Ethics Unit, and the Centre for Genomics and Policy.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Genetics — Bioinformatics

Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and have the capability of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.

Enrolment in the Bioinformatics option can only be approved after a student has been admitted into the Department. There is an agreement for the option that must be signed by the student, supervisor, and Department, and enrolment in the option is subject to space availability and other constraints that the Department cannot assess at the time of admission. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Human Genetics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. in Genetic Counselling

Prerequisites: Bachelor's or medical degree – minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0, or 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Recent (five years or less) university-level courses in basic sciences (molecular/cell biology, biochemistry, advanced genetics (preferably human), and statistics) and a minimum of two in psychology.

Applicants must have obtained some experience (either paid or volunteer) working with adults in a counselling or advisory capacity, ideally in a crisis setting.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Human Genetics

Prerequisites: B.Sc. – minimum CGPA 3.0 out of 4.0, or 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two full-time academic years. Applicants must have a minimum of 6 credits in cellular and molecular biology or biochemistry, 3 credits in mathematics or statistics, and 3 credits in genetics. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit a TOEFL score of 600 on the TOEFL paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test), with each component score no less than 20, as the minimum standard for admission.

Admission is based on acceptance by a research director who has agreed to provide adequate funding for the duration of the academic program and on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee.

Prospective graduate students should complete the online application form and indicate at least three faculty members they are interested in working with.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Human Genetics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program* (Non-Thesis) M.Sc. (Thesis) programs Ph.D. programs  
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: March 31 Fall: March 31 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Applications for thesis programs submitted after these deadlines may be considered, if a suitable supervisor can be secured. However, these applications will not be considered for departmental funding or entrance awards.

* The M.Sc. Genetic Counselling program accepts applications for the Fall term only. No late applications or applications for Summer or Winter terms for the Genetic Counselling program will be considered under any circumstances.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Biomedical Engineering
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street, Room 316
  • Montreal QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada

About Biomedical Engineering

The Department offers graduate training programs leading to master's (M.Eng.) and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Engineering.

We provide instruction and opportunities for interdisciplinary research in the application of engineering, mathematics, and the physical sciences to problems in medicine and the life sciences. Courses are offered for graduate students in the life sciences, engineering, and the physical sciences.

Excellent laboratory facilities for basic and applied research are available in the Department and in the laboratories of associated staff located elsewhere on campus. The Department operates a network of high-performance workstations and well-equipped mechanical and electronics workshops.

Basic research in the Department concentrates on the application of quantitative engineering analysis methods to basic biomedical research problems. Currently active areas of research include: neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. Staff members are also active in more applied research related to the development of quantitative analysis tools and instruments for biomedical research. Areas of activity here include: signal analysis, system identification, modelling, simulation and parameter estimation, image processing, pattern recognition, ultrasound, and biorobotics. A new option in bioinformatics is offered jointly with other University departments.

Graduate students may also be registered through the departments of Medicine, Science, and Engineering, and must then fulfil the requirements for advanced degrees imposed by their respective departments.

In addition, all students are required, through coursework and independent study, to achieve a degree of interdisciplinary competence appropriate to their area of specialization.

M.Eng. Meetings: 1) Initial; 2) Progress; and Fast-Track transfer to the Ph.D. program. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Ph.D. Meetings: 1) Preliminary; 2) Comprehensive Exam Preparation; 3) Thesis Proposal and Comprehensive Exam; 4) Thesis Progress; and 5) Thesis Pre-submission. Details of each meeting can be found at: www.mcgill.ca/bme/students/policies-forms.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME's internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields, and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (M.Eng.) spanning broad themes in neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine with a strong emphasis on mathematics, physics, chemistry, and basic physiology, or cell biology. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Biomedical Engineering (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train M.Eng. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering
As the first Biomedical Engineering (BME) department in Canada, BME internationally renowned staff provide frequent and stimulating interactions with physicians, scientists in many fields and with the biomedical industry. McGill BME provides opportunities to receive training in a unique multidisciplinary environment, taking advantage of research collaborations between staff in the Faculties of Medicine, Science, and Engineering. BME offers only thesis-based graduate degrees (Ph.D.) spanning broad themes in neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, cell and tissue engineering, drug delivery, microencapsulation, microbiome and probiotics, functional food and neutraceuticals, medical imaging, microfluidics, nanomedicine and nanotechnology, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. For details, please refer to the BME website: www.mcgill.ca/bme. The best preparation is with a bachelor's degree in engineering, science, or medicine and a master's degree in biomedical engineering, bioengineering, biotechnology, electrical engineering, physiology, chemical engineering, biomaterial, system engineering, imaging, or other related areas. Our BME graduates have secured positions in academia, biomedical and other industries, and government or regulatory sectors, either before or within a few months of graduation.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biomedical Engineering — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics Option is to train Ph.D. students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics Option will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field, and will be capable of developing an independent Bioinformatics research program. The option consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses and a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

Biomedical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please address enquiries directly to the Department.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by Biomedical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: April 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 21, 2014).

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