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Physics

Physics

Location

  • Department of Physics
  • Ernest Rutherford Physics Building
  • 3600 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6485 (Graduate Information)
  • Fax: 514-398-8434
  • Email: graduate [dot] physics [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.physics.mcgill.ca

About Physics

The Department of Physics currently has a faculty of approximately 40 members, including several holders of Canada Research Chairs and many other prestigious named Chairs. Additionally, we host an impressive number of postdoctoral fellows and research associates and run one of the largest and most vibrant graduate programs in North America. The graduate student enrolment is currently approximately 150.

Faculty members in the Department of Physics are recognized internationally for their excellence. Our members have received national and international prizes and fellowships including Les Prix Du Quebec, Steacie Prize, Sloan Fellowships, NSERC, and many others. They are also in constant demand as reviewers and referees. Students who earn advanced degrees from the Department of Physics will not only get an excellent education, they will also receive valuable guidance and network contacts to help with subsequent career steps.

The Department offers full M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree programs in a wide range of disciplines, including:

  • astrophysics;
  • atmospheric physics;
  • bio-physics;
  • condensed-matter physics;
  • high-energy physics;
  • laser spectroscopy;
  • material physics;
  • non-linear dynamics;
  • nuclear physics;
  • statistical physics;
  • medical-radiation physics.

Although most of the teaching and research facilities are located in the Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, the Department has space and research facilities in the Wong Materials Science Centre, adjacent to the Rutherford Building on McGill's lower campus. Our groups also conduct research at laboratories around the world including Argonne, CERN, FermiLab, SLAC, and TRIUMF.

Departmental researchers enjoy technical support in the areas of engineering, electronics, and precision machining. The Department maintains an excellent conventional machine shop as well as the McGill Nanotools-Microfab facility. Most of the scientific computing is done with an extensive in-house network of powerful workstations and several Beowulf clusters.

Remote access to supercomputing sites in Canada and the United States is also possible including the McGill HPC super-computing facility which is a part of the nationwide network of High Performance Computing Installations in Quebec.

The Department of Physics currently guarantees financial support of $22,500 per year for every graduate student. This minimum level of support can be supplemented by winning one of McGill's large number of in-house scholarships, worth up to $25,000 per year. For details, see www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/finance.html.

Graduate students in the Department of Physics come from many different countries and cultures from all over the world, providing a stimulating cosmopolitan atmosphere in the Department. This, coupled with the unique opportunities afforded by the city of Montreal, guarantees a quality of life that is second to none among Canadian universities. For graduate admission and application information, please visit www.physics.mcgill.ca/grads/application.html.

Fields of Research:

High-Energy Physics

Theoretical: The McGill high energy theorists have interests in a wide range of areas within quantum field theory, string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology. Research areas of the high-energy theory faculty include applications of quantum field theory techniques to relativistic heavy ion collisions, baryogenesis, superstring cosmology, theory of cosmological perturbations, black hole physics, supergravity, three dimensional gravity, and various topics related to the physics and mathematics of superstring theory. The high-energy theorists have close connections to the nuclear theory group, the astrophysics group, the high-energy experimentalists, and to members of the Mathematics Department.

Experimental: The experimental high-energy physics group is engaged in a number of experiments at the research frontiers of the field, both in subatomic physics and in high-energy astrophysics. These include:

  • Electron-positron collisions: a group works on the BaBar experiment at SLAC and the Belle-2 experiment at the KEK laboratory in Japan, with specific interest in CKM matrix elements and physics beyond the Standard Model through studies of rare decays, and on R&D for a future International Linear Collider, with interest in calorimeter development.
  • Hadron-hadron collisions: A group is involved in major contributions to the energy frontier at CERN's LHC, with work on the High Level Trigger for the ATLAS experiment. Work also focuses on searches for new physics phenomena, precision physics of known Standard Model processes, development of the ATLAS experiment's trigger system, and direct contribution to the upgrade of the ATLAS detector.
  • High-energy particle astrophysics: ground-based gamma-ray astronomy using the VERITAS telescope array and development of the next-generation detector.
  • Underground physics: A group carries out experimental R&D with the aim of measuring, for the first time, the neutrinoless double-beta decay process with the EXO experiment.

Students at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels are offered a strong program of research in a challenging and rapidly advancing field. Short term master's projects are based mainly on instrumentation or data analysis conducted on campus, while Ph.D. research may involve an extended stay at one of the world's major research laboratories.

Nuclear Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs include transport equations for heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy; nuclear equation of state from heavy ion collisions; fragmentation at intermediate energy; electromagnetic probes in relativistic heavy ion collisions; effective Lagrangians for hadronic systems at finite temperature; and Quark-Gluon Plasma, QCD.

Experimental: Current research programs in experimental nuclear physics at McGill are focused on two main axes:

  • The study of heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies to determine the properties of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. This program is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Large Hadron Collider facility at CERN.
  • The study of ground state properties of unstable nuclei using laser spectroscopy techniques and ion traps. This work is being carried out using the Canadian Penning trap facility at the Argonne National Laboratory, at the accelerator ISOLDE (CERN), and the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

Furthermore, the Nuclear Physics Group has an active in-house research program that applies the ion trap and laser techniques to the detection of trace quantities of material and contaminants, and to ion spectroscopy.

Condensed Matter Physics

Theoretical: Current research programs involve the nonequilibrium, ab-initio modelling of molecular and nanoelectronic systems and devices; the study of quantum effects in interacting mesoscopic electron systems; nonequilibrium phenomena in extended systems; and applications of statistical mechanics to problems in biophysics.

Experimental: Current research programs involve:

  • the study of the time evolution of non-equilibrium systems via x-ray diffraction;
  • fundamental quantum properties of strongly correlated systems at temperatures very near absolute zero;
  • macromolecular interactions in living cells using single-photon and two-photon imaging;
  • molecular electronics and nanoelectronic systems by scanning probe microscopy;
  • dynamics and mechanical properties of soft matter systems and spatial organization and dynamics in living cells;
  • mechanical behaviour of very small systems by high-resolution force microscopy;
  • electronic properties that emerge at the limits of miniaturization and quantum computing;
  • nuclear methods to study interactions in magnetic materials that lead to exotic magnetic ordering behaviour. This includes studies of novel materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, unconventional superconductors, quantum dots, heterostructures, amorphous systems, and spin glasses.

Astrophysics

Research in the astrophysics group covers a wide range of topics including cosmology, galaxy formation, high-energy astrophysics, and extrasolar planets. This involves observations at all wavelengths, from gamma rays and X-rays to sub-mm, infrared and radio, using international observatories in space and on the ground. Experimental groups at McGill are involved in development and operation of ground-based high-energy gamma-ray observatories, and cosmic microwave background experiments. Theoretical work includes studies of how astrophysics and observational cosmology can experimentally determine the most important properties of dark matter and dark energy, studies of the diverse physics of neutron stars, and extrasolar planet formation.

Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics

This group studies nonlinear dynamical processes in the atmosphere and other geophysical systems, especially those associated with turbulent, chaotic, and extremely variable behaviour. Emphasis is placed on multifractal analysis and modelling as well as the development of new theories and techniques covering wide ranges of scale in time and space. Data from a variety of in situ and remotely sensed sources are used. This includes satellite data of the Earth's atmosphere and surface as well as high-quality precipitation data from the McGill Radar Weather Observatory.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Physics (Thesis) (45 credits)

McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Physics

McGill graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry as well as in government. Our former students teach in colleges and universities world-wide and others have research positions in governmental and industrial laboratories. Still others work in the financial sector or as entrepreneurs making good use of the analytic and quantitative problem-solving skills acquired during their education as physicists. Consult the Department for more information about this program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Physics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc.

The normal requirement is a B.Sc. in Physics or equivalent, with high standing.

Ph.D.

The normal requirement is an M.Sc. in Physics or equivalent. On the recommendation of the Departmental Graduate Committee, fast-tracking from the M.Sc. program into the Ph.D. program may be granted after one year, if:

  • the student has fulfilled the M.Sc. coursework requirements, or;
  • the Committee determines that the student qualifies based on the student's academic record.

All students who transfer to the Ph.D. program are required to fulfil Ph.D. coursework requirements in addition to the courses taken as an M.Sc. candidate.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance will be offered to students in the form of a bursary, and teaching and research assistantships. For new students, financial support will be offered at the time of acceptance. Forms are given and filled out on registration day.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Physics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Nursing

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Nursing

Location

  • Ingram School of Nursing
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada

About Nursing

The Ingram School of Nursing is a professional School within the Faculty of Medicine that has been educating nurses since 1920. On September 10, 2012 the School was formally renamed the Ingram School of Nursing in recognition of Richard and Satoko Ingram and their exceptional support for Nursing at McGill. The School is internationally recognized for its distinctive vision, leadership in nursing, and the quality of its programs. McGill nursing graduates have earned a reputation as outstanding clinicians, educators, researchers, and leaders in the discipline.

Over the years, the faculty of the School at McGill has worked to formulate a philosophy about the responsibilities and practice of nursing. This philosophy, known as the McGill Model of Nursing, directs the curricula at the School and emphasizes health, the family, learning and development, collaboration with clients, and working with the resources of individuals, families, and communities. Its intent is to actively promote health and well-being in people of all ages and across all situations. The McGill Model of Nursing is also central to the McGill University Health Centre's (MUHC) Department of Nursing.

At the graduate level, the Ingram School of Nursing offers tailored programs in advanced nursing practice that prepare our students to be leaders in their field. The learning experience at the School is geared to foster individual judgment, creativity, and initiative. Led by nationally recognized researchers, students will participate in cutting-edge programs of research related to nursing practice, education, and administration. McGill's Ingram School of Nursing is for you if you want to contribute to the knowledge base of advanced nursing practice and want to be involved actively in changing how healthcare is delivered locally, nationally, and internationally.

The School is located in Wilson Hall, which houses classrooms, faculty offices, and lounges. A recently renovated Nursing Learning Laboratory, located at University Hall Residence, has seven clinical beds, an ICU bed, two examination tables, and AV capacity for distance education. Students registered in the School also take courses in other faculties within the University. Selected experience in nursing is provided in the McGill University Health Centre, other McGill-affiliated hospitals, and in a wide variety of health agencies in Montreal.

For information on undergraduate programs, please consult the Ingram School of Nursing's Undergraduate section.

M.Sc.A. Program and Concentrations

The Master's (Applied) in Nursing is offered in a number of formal concentrations, which are listed in the table below.

Graduate Certificates and Diplomas

Nurse applicants with a Master's degree in Nursing and with the required clinical experience are prepared for nurse practitioner roles through our Certificate and/or Diploma programs. These programs offer students the necessary biomedical skills and knowledge in either Neonatology or Primary Care to prepare them for the last step to their career, which is the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec) nurse practitioner licensing exam.

Doctoral Program

The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare nurses to contribute to the development of knowledge in the discipline through research and academia. Faculty members are active researchers in many areas, including telehealth, pediatric ethics, family health, psychosocial oncology, palliative care, pain, and chronic illness.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Clinical Nurse Specialist (48 credits)

This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students for full-time (two-year program of study) or part-time studies (three to five years of study). The core content of the CNS concentration prepares students for advanced practice nursing roles in diverse settings and with diverse populations. Content is organized based on the McGill Model of Nursing and focuses on such areas as family intervention, collaborative practice, and working with family strengths and resources. Through clinical courses, students engage in advanced clinical assessments and interventions, and develop greater capacities to reflect purposefully and in-depth on their nursing practice. Research methods, systematic study of clinically-based nursing problems, and dissemination of knowledge relevant to clinical practice are all developed within this program of study.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Direct Entry Nursing (54 credits)

The Direct Entry Nursing concentration remains the only one of its kind in Canada. This three-year program is tailored to the university graduate with a general Arts or Science degree and no previous preparation in nursing. Candidates complete entry-to-practice preparation in nursing while also completing graduate level studies. Upon completion of the M.Sc.A. Year 2, graduates are eligible to write the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec) licensing exam. This program is accredited by the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN).

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Global Health Clinical Nurse Specialist (50 credits)

This Global Health Clinical Nurse Specialist concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students who wish to include global health content throughout their program of study. It sets out to prepare students for the challenges of working with diverse populations in limited-resource environments with a philosophy stressing the importance of understanding the inherent power dynamics, equity issues, and ethical dilemmas that arise through this work. Students spend one semester in their final year taking clinical- and project-based courses in a global health placement setting.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Global Health Direct Entry (57 credits)

The Global Health Direct Entry concentration is thus labelled for bachelor-prepared non-nurse students who wish to include global health content throughout their program of study. It sets out to prepare students for the challenges of working with diverse populations in limited-resource environments, based on the belief that we have much to learn from one another. Students spend one semester taking clinical- and project-based courses in their final year in a global health placement site. This concentration is managed by the Global Health Committee of the Ingram School of Nursing.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Neonatology Nurse Practitioner (45 credits)

This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. It prepares students for the multifaceted role of nurse practitioner in intermediate, acute, and critical care in neonatology. The nurse practitioner will acquire the necessary knowledge and understanding required to practice in a collaborative way in providing services designed to deal with the healthcare needs and problems of neonates and their families in a variety of settings. Students who successfully complete this program are eligible to apply to the Graduate Diploma, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner program, which is the last step before the relevant licensing exam of the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec).

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Nursing Education (49 credits)

This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. It was developed to expose graduate-level nurses to instructional and learning theory, to better equip them to lead the movement towards more innovative and effective pedagogical approaches in training nurses working in healthcare establishments or nursing students in academic settings.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Nursing Services Administration (49 credits)

This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. Students in this concentration develop their capacity to assess the factors that affect and determine the nursing workforce. This will enable them to make strategic and effective decisions, and influence policy with regard to the planning and management of the nursing workforce.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Nursing (Non-Thesis) — Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (45 credits)

This concentration is open to bachelor-prepared nurse students. It was developed to train graduate-level nurses to take on this advanced practice role. Primary Care Nurse Practitioners assume responsibility for tasks related to physical assessment, diagnosis, and treatment within legally sanctioned, pre-determined conditions that have traditionally been exclusive to medical practice. This concentration focuses on a wide range of acute and chronic health concerns across the life span. Students who successfully complete this program are eligible to apply to the Graduate Diploma, Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program, which is the last step before the relevant licensing exam of the OIIQ (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec).

Graduate Certificate; Theory in Neonatology (15 credits)

This graduate certificate prepares students with completed graduate studies, comparable to McGill's Master of Science (Applied) Nursing program, and experience in neonatology to continue their studies in the Graduate Diploma in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. The program of study focuses on the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences in the context of the nurse practitioner role. The Graduate Certificate Theory in Neonatology and the Graduate Diploma in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner cannot be taken concurrently.

Graduate Certificate; Theory in Primary Care (15 credits)

This graduate certificate prepares students with completed graduate studies, comparable to the McGill Master of Science (Applied) Nursing program, and experience in primary care to continue their studies in the Graduate Diploma Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. The program of study focuses on the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences in the context of the nurse practitioner role. The Graduate Certificate Theory in Primary Care and the Graduate Diploma in Primary Care Nurse Practitioner cannot be taken concurrently.

Graduate Diploma in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (30 credits)

This diploma is the final step in the student's preparation to assume the new role as nurse practitioner. Students with completed graduate studies in the discipline and experience in neonatology now combine the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences to the application of this knowledge in context. Upon successful completion of the diploma program, candidates are eligible to write the nurse practitioner licensing exam.

Graduate Diploma in Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (30 credits)

This diploma is the final step in the student's preparation to assume the new role as nurse practitioner. Students with completed graduate studies in the discipline and experience in primary care now combine the acquisition of advanced-level knowledge from the biomedical sciences to the application of this knowledge in context. Upon successful completion of the diploma program, candidates are eligible to write the nurse practitioner licensing exam.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Nursing

The Ingram School of Nursing of McGill University and the Faculté des sciences infirmières of the Université de Montréal offer a joint doctorate program leading to a Ph.D. in Nursing. This program is offered in English at McGill. The program is designed to train nurse scientists who will make a contribution to the advancement of knowledge in the discipline of nursing and assume a leadership role both in the profession and in the health care system.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Nursing — Psychosocial Oncology

A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSOO) is offered in collaboration with the Departments of Oncology and Psychology and the Schools of Nursing and Social Work. This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Nursing Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Proficiency in English

The language of instruction at McGill University is English. Students must write term papers, examinations, and theses in English or in French. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), require documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office.

  • TOEFL: a minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based test (iBT; 600 on the paper-based test (PBT)) with each component score no less than 20
  • IELTS: a minimum overall score of 7.5

An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if TOEFL or IELTS test results are not available.

For more information about the Language Policy at McGill University, please refer to Language Policy in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies University Regulations and Resources.

GRE (Graduate Record Examination) general test results may be required in individual circumstances.

Students who have not completed their studies in North America may be asked to arrange for an interview as part of the application process.

Master's, Graduate Certificate, and Graduate Diploma Programs

Nurse applicants to the master’s program may complete their studies on a part-time basis (with the exception of those in Nurse Practitioner areas of study, where only the first year may be taken part-time), i.e., minimum of 3 credits per term to a maximum of five years. Applicants to the Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas should consult with their adviser concerning course load.

All nurse applicants are expected to hold current registration in the province or country from which they come. Nurses who are not licensed in Quebec must be registered (immatriculé(e)) with the Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec upon the start of their graduate studies. Nurse applicants to the Nurse Practitioner areas of study must hold current and full licensure with the OIIQ.

International nurse applicants are required to have had experience as nurses in their country of origin and in North America.

B.A./B.Sc. Applicants to the Master's Program (Direct Entry – DE)

Applicants holding a general B.A. or B.Sc., including a number of prerequisite courses, may be admitted to a Qualifying year. A minimum CGPA (cumulative grade point average) of 3.0 (3.2 is strongly preferred) on a scale of 4.0 is required in order to be considered for entry. Upon successful completion of the Qualifying year, candidates apply to the master’s program.

Direct-Entry applicants must complete their Qualifying year and the master’s program of study on a full-time basis, i.e., a total of three years. The School considers admissions to this program for the Fall term only.

Note: For further information about the required courses in the Qualifying year of the Direct-Entry program, please see the Nursing website.

Nurse Applicants (Nurse Bachelor's Entry – NBE) to the Master's Program

Applicants for the master's degree must have completed a bachelor's degree in nursing with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0. This preparation must be comparable to that offered in the bachelor's in nursing programs at McGill, which is a minimum of 66 university credits including 12 credits in the biological sciences. Applicants must also have completed an Introductory Statistics course (3 credits) prior to entry. Prospective applicants whose undergraduate degree differs from the McGill degree are encouraged to contact the Ingram School of Nursing to have the eligibility of their degree assessed. Experience in nursing is strongly recommended.

Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas in Nurse Practitioner

Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a master’s degree in nursing comparable to McGill (the bachelor program must have a minimum of 66 credits including 12 credits in the biological sciences) with a minimum CGPA of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale required. Prior to entry, applicants are required to have a minimum of two years of experience in Canada in the specialty area over the previous five years.

Students in the Nurse Practitioner program are required to hold a “carte de stage” allowing them to participate in the required clinical practicum at the end of the second year of the program. The “carte de stage” is granted by the Quebec Order of Nurses (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec – OIIQ) to Nurse Practitioner candidates that are licensed in Quebec.

International students must therefore obtain current and full licensure from the OIIQ before submitting their application to the Neonatology or Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program. Please note that in order to obtain a nursing licence in Quebec, one must be proficient in the French language. For more information regarding the OIIQ licensure eligibility criteria, please contact the OIIQ at 514-935-2505.

The Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program delivers some courses in French, making proficiency in French a requirement for this program as well.

Ph.D. Program

Applicants admitted to the doctoral program through McGill University must have completed master’s-level studies with either their undergraduate or graduate degree in nursing comparable to McGill. Applicants must have a CGPA of 3.3 on a scale of 4.0 or a B+ standing. Highly qualified nurse bachelor's entry students enrolled in the M.Sc.(A.) in the nursing program may be accepted into the Ph.D. program provided they meet its standards.

The School considers admissions to the doctoral program for the Fall term only. The nursing courses in the doctoral program are offered every two years and incoming students may begin with Schedule A or Schedule B (see Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Nursing for details) depending upon their admission year.

Registration and Regulations

Official registration through Minerva must be completed by August 14. Students registering late for reasons unrelated to the admission procedure are subject to the late payment fee.

Orientation for new students will be held in class during the first week of lectures. Students should contact their academic adviser for approval of complementary courses before the add/drop deadline.

Returning students are responsible for ensuring that registration is completed according to the University timetable deadlines.

Course Requirements

Students are provided with the course objectives, requirements, and methods of evaluation at the beginning of each course. Students will not be permitted to write an examination in any course unless they have fulfilled the requirements, including attendance.

OIIQ Registration or Proof of Licensure

Please visit www.mcgill.ca/nursing/students/clinical for further details.

Vaccination/Immunization and Mask-Fitting Requirements

New students must refer to Ingram School of Nursing > Undergraduate > Health Sciences: General Information > Student Services and Regulations > Vaccination/Immunization Requirements for Health Sciences Programs. A copy of the immunization form outlining requirements can be found at www.mcgill.ca/studenthealth/immunize/forms. Annual flu vaccination is strongly recommended to all health science students. Entry into the McGill University Teaching Hospital Network is dependent on having met the immunization requirements. All students must have immunizations completed (or in process for Hepatitis B) and mask fitting done by the start of clinical placement in September.

CPR and First Aid Requirements

Valid First Aid and CPR Certification Health Care Provider (HCP) and Automated External Defibrillation (AED) is required no later than September 15 for all graduate nursing students except for those in the Ph.D. program. Students are responsible for maintaining this certification up-to-date throughout their program of study.

Achievement Builders – Student Services

Any student who is experiencing difficulty in meeting course requirements must take advantage of the Achievement Builders program offered through Student Services. Information is available at www.mcgill.ca/firstyear/studentlife/workshops1. Further information on services available to students is at University Regulations and Resources > Graduate > Student Services and Information > Student Services – Downtown Campus.

Regulations Concerning Clinical Placement Courses

  • Students must be registered with the OIIQ before they can have access to clinical placements. Students who have not completed the registration procedure cannot commence clinical studies.
  • Students must have met the vaccination/immunization requirements prior to commencing clinical studies in September.
  • Students are required to purchase equipment such as a stethoscope and physical-assessment equipment. Information is provided at registration or within specific courses.
  • Students are expected to demonstrate professional behaviour at all times. The Code of Ethics for Nurses and the McGill University Code of Student Conduct (as outlined in the Handbook on Student Rights and Responsibilities) provide guidelines. Professional behaviour is expected in relation to classmates, teachers, patients, and the institutions within which studies take place.
  • In any formal documentation, students must identify themselves as a McGill Nursing Student with the respective year of study noted.
  • Name badges must be worn at all times in clinical studies. These are ordered in the Fall semester of the first year of studies and the cost is charged directly to the student's fee account. Name badges are ordered through the Ingram School of Nursing and students will be required to purchase two sets of name badges in early Fall prior to starting clinical placement. Students must comply with the uniform policy during clinical placements.
  • Students must have a photo I.D. taken at the MUHC for their clinical placements there.
  • Attendance in clinical courses is mandatory and absences must be discussed with the instructor. Students with repeat absences may be asked to defer clinical studies if progress in the clinical course is compromised.
  • Students whose performance in clinical studies does not meet the course objectives will be informed in writing and a learning plan will be developed. Students whose performance is below expectations or who are unsafe in clinical studies may be required to withdraw from the course at any time.
  • Students whose academic performance is below expectation or considered to be incompetent or unsafe in clinical studies can be required to withdraw from the course at any time—in such cases the student will receive a grade of WF or F.
  • While an effort is made to place students within reasonable travelling distance for clinical studies, each student must budget a sum of money to travel to and from a patient home and clinical institutions.
  • Clinical courses that are offered during the Summer session may require that students study during the day or evening.
  • Clinical agencies may require students entering their facility to undergo a Criminal Reference Check prior to being granted permission to enter their facility.

Requirements for Licensure

Following completion of a first-level program in nursing, graduates must obtain licensure from the professional organization in the province or state in which they complete their studies. Visit www.mcgill.ca/nursing/students/graduation for further information.

Application Procedures

McGill's online application for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

For information on the application process as well as the supporting documents required in addition to the uApply online application, please visit the Nursing website, then search for your program of study.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Students who have not completed their studies in North America may be asked to arrange for an interview as part of the application process.
  • GRE (Graduate Record Examination) general test results may be required in individual circumstances.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Ingram School of Nursing and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Term of Entry Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Feb. 1 Jan. 1 Feb. 1 (Canadian)/Jan. 1 (International)
Winter:
  • M.Sc.A. Nurse Bachelor Entry, part-time studies in all concentrations (except Global Health and Nurse Practitioner) must contact the Graduate Admissions Coordinator prior to applying
  • Graduate Certificate; Theory in Neonatology
  • Graduate Certificate; Theory in Nurse Practitioner Primary Care
  • Graduate Diploma; Neonatology Nurse Practitioner
Sept. 30 N/A Sept. 30
Summer:
  • Graduate Diploma; Nurse Practitioner Primary Care
Dec. 15 N/A N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Location

  • Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics
  • McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
  • 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler, Room 1325
  • Montreal QC H3G 1Y6
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3623
  • Fax: 514-398-2045
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] pharmacology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/pharma

About Pharmacology and Therapeutics

The Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics offers training leading to M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degrees.

The Department also offers the Chemical Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Option, together with the Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry. Students interested in training in this option must first be accepted for graduate studies by one of the participating departments. Information on this option can be found at www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/graduate-studies-2/chemicalbiology.

Pharmacology is a multidisciplinary science that deals with all aspects of drugs and their interactions with living organisms. Thus, pharmacologists study the physical and chemical properties of drugs, their biochemical and physiological effects, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and therapeutic and other uses. The Department offers broad exposure and training in both basic and clinical research in a range of areas of specialty, including:

  • neuropharmacology;
  • reproductive pharmacology;
  • endocrine pharmacology;
  • receptor pharmacology;
  • cardiovascular pharmacology;
  • cancer;
  • developmental pharmacology;
  • autonomic pharmacology;
  • clinical pharmacology;
  • biochemical pharmacology;
  • molecular biology;
  • toxicology.

The present 52 full and affiliate members of the Department have research laboratories located in the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building and in a variety of hospitals, institutes, and industry including the Douglas Hospital Research Centre, Allan Memorial Institute, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal General Hospital, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal Heart Institute, Lady Davis Research Institute, Pfizer Canada, and Merck Frosst Canada Inc. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.) The participation of researchers from both industry and government ensures the relevance of the Department's applications-oriented training programs.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pharmacology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The objective of the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degree training programs is to provide in-depth independent research experience in a specific area of pharmacology. The program leading to a master’s degree is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire knowledge in pharmacology, to conduct a research project, to analyze data, and to write a thesis. Students will also receive essential training in research professionalism and scientific communication.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pharmacology (Thesis) — Chemical Biology (47 credits)

The Chemical Biology Thematic Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics that span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes that unite the research being performed in this group is trying to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer, and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pharmacology

The objective of the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degree training programs is to provide in-depth independent research experience in a specific area of pharmacology. The program leading to a doctoral degree is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire knowledge in pharmacology, to conduct an original research project, to analyze data, and to write a thesis. Students will also receive essential training in research professionalism and scientific communication.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pharmacology — Chemical Biology

The Chemical Biology Thematic Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics that span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes which unite the research being performed in this group is the attempt to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Pharmacology and Therapeutics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates are required to hold a B.Sc. degree in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study; those with the M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees are also eligible to apply. A background in the health sciences is recommended, but programs in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physical sciences may be acceptable.

Admission is based on a student's academic record, letters of assessment, and, whenever possible, interviews with staff members. Students are required to take the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test (GRE) and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the equivalent, except as follows: in accordance with McGill policy, only those whose mother tongue is English, who graduated from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), or who completed an undergraduate or graduate degree at a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction are exempt from providing proof of competency in English.

Inquiries relating to all aspects of graduate study should be directed to the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, as early as possible in each academic year.

Admissions Requirements – Chemical Biology Option

As for the regular graduate programs of the participating departments, acceptance into the Chemical Biology option consists of two steps:

  1. Preliminary approval by the Department's Graduate Committee based on the student's transcript, references, and other documents submitted with the application. The criteria for assessment at this level are the same as those for the regular graduate programs of the participating departments.
  2. Acceptance by an individual research director. For students wishing to participate in the Chemical Biology option, the director must propose a research project for the student that provides training in the methods and philosophy of chemical biology. Project proposals are assessed by the Chemical Biology Program Committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • GRE – required for degrees from outside North America
  • Acceptance by a Chemical Biology research director (Chemical Biology option only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Please refer to our website for complete deadlines.

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Mechanical Engineering

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

 

Mechanical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Macdonald Engineering Building
  • 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Room MD-270
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C3
  • Canada
  • Telephone (Admissions & Scholarships): 514-398-8869
  • Telephone (All other inquiries): 514-398-6281
  • Fax: 514-398-7365
  • Email (Admissions & Scholarships): grad [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Email (All other inquiries): gradcoordinator [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad

About Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are traditionally concerned with the conception, design, implementation, and operation of mechanical systems. Common fields of work include aerospace, energy, manufacturing, machinery, and transportation. Due to the broad nature of the discipline, there is usually a high demand for mechanical engineers with advanced training.

The Department includes more than 30 faculty members and 200 graduate students, and is housed primarily within the recently renovated Macdonald Engineering building. The Department contains state-of-the-art experimental facilities (including a major wind tunnel facility) and has extensive computational facilities. Professors within the Department collaborate widely with professors in other units, often through research centres including the Centre for Intelligent Machines (CIM); the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM); and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (MNI). The research interests within the Department are very broad and fall largely within the following five areas:

  • aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering
  • mechanics of materials and structures
  • dynamics and control
  • design and manufacturing
  • bioengineering

Within these areas, specific topics of research are given in the following:

Aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering

Experimental fluid mechanics and aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and aeroacoustics; theoretical fluid mechanics; turbulence; mixing in turbulent flows; fluid flow control; fluid-structure interactions; computational fluid dynamics, multidisciplinary optimization, and computer flow visualization; heat transfer; combustion, shock wave physics, energetic materials, high-speed reacting flows, hypersonic propulsion, and alternative fuels.

Mechanics of materials and structures

Composite materials: structural design, analysis, manufacturing, and processing; micro/nano mechanics; MEMS/NEMS; adaptronic structures; thermomechanics, wave propagation, and computational mechanics.

Dynamics and control

Multibody systems, legged and wheeled vehicles, compliant mechanisms, and kinematic geometry; tethered systems, lighter-than-air craft, and underwater vehicles; spacecraft dynamics and space robotics; modelling and simulation; fluid-structure interactions, nonlinear and chaotic dynamics; dynamics of bladed assemblies.

Design and manufacturing

Design theory and methodology, design optimization; biomimetics; machine tools and systems, manufacturing processes, and management and control; micro/nano machining; wear and comminution processes.

Bioengineering

Biomechanics, biomaterials, blood and respiratory flows, mechanics of soft tissues, cardiovascular devices, image processing for medical diagnostics, voice production.

Programs Offered

The Department offers programs of study leading to the M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Both M.Eng. (Thesis) and M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) programs are offered.

There are several options for completing master’s degrees that do not involve the completion of a thesis. The M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program has more extensive course requirements and will appeal to students who desire to gain both a broad understanding of subjects within Mechanical Engineering as well as in-depth information in a specific area. Two other non-thesis master’s degree options are described below.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Eng. (Thesis) program requires the completion of 16 credits of technical complementary courses, a seminar course, and a thesis. The thesis involves advanced research supervised by one or more professors who are internationally known in their field. This program prepares students for either an industrial research career or further academic research at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (46 credits)

For students who would like to concentrate on computational work for their research, the M.Eng. (Thesis) – Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) option is available. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. In this program, students choose their complementary courses from within a list of scientific computing courses and courses that involve applications and specialized methods.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

Students in this program must complete four required courses in addition to 16 credits of complementary courses and a seminar course. They also complete a project that is less involved than a thesis and may involve a limited research project, or a technical or design study. Graduates of this program are well-prepared for carrying out research and development in industry and may also proceed to further research at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Aerospace Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Eng. Aerospace degree is offered to students who wish to specialize in the general area of aerospace engineering. This degree is given in conjunction with Concordia University, École Polytechnique, Université Laval, Université de Sherbrooke, and École de Technologie Supérieure. Students registered at McGill are required to take two courses from two other institutions.

The aerospace industry is strongly established in Quebec. Representatives of the aerospace industry therefore requested that measures be taken to provide for qualified scientists in aerospace. Five universities offering courses in engineering came together to offer a master’s degree program in the field of aeronautics and space technology. This program is offered to students who wish to specialize in these disciplines. The industry’s participation is a special feature of this program. The universities and the participating industries, with the cooperation of the Centre of Aerospace Manpower Activities in Quebec (CAMAQ), have formed a Coordinating Committee, CIMGAS, to arrange for industrial internships and case study courses for the students and to implement specific program developments to meet the needs of the industry.

The M.Eng. (Aerospace) program requires a minimum of 45 credits, including an “Industrial Stage” (i.e., engineering work in an aerospace industry) of four months. Enrolment is limited to the number of industrial stages available, so admission to the program is typically quite competitive. While intended to be a full-time program, the M.Eng. Aerospace program may be completed on a part-time basis over a maximum of five years. By the time of completion of the program, graduates are extremely well-prepared to enter into a career in the aerospace industry.

Depending on their background, students would specialize in one of the four areas:

  1. Aeronautics and Space Engineering
  2. Avionics and Control
  3. Aerospace Materials and Structures
  4. Virtual Environment
Master of Management (M.M.); Manufacturing Management (Non-Thesis) (56 credits)

This program is currently not offered

The Master in Manufacturing Management (M.M.M.) program attracts business professionals from around the world who wish to pursue a career in the effective management of global operations and supply chain. It is a professionally-oriented graduate program offered jointly through the Faculties of Engineering and Management, aimed at those candidates with engineering or science backgrounds.

In just eleven months of academic studies, M.M.M. students sharpen their expertise in supply chain and operations through an intensive program that includes:

  • A challenging curriculum
  • Extensive industrial interaction
  • Innovative research projects

Additionally, students are exposed to the latest trends and developments in management and participate in professional development seminars to leverage their communication and leadership skills. After less than one year of studies, participants complete a paid work term at an industrial location. This is a unique opportunity to work on a real-world project with an M.M.M. partner company in North America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)

Please consult the Department for more information on this program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mechanical Engineering

In the Ph.D. program, students are required to demonstrate a significant new contribution to their field of research, as documented in an externally reviewed thesis. The research is carried out under the supervision of professors who are leaders in their field. Since research in Mechanical Engineering is often interdisciplinary in nature, it is common for Ph.D. students to have a co-supervisor in addition to their principle supervisor. Graduates from this program typically proceed to careers in research in either industrial or academic environments.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Mechanical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The general rules of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies apply. Candidates who come from other institutions are expected to have an academic background equivalent to the undergraduate curriculum in mechanical engineering at McGill or to make up any deficiencies in a Qualifying year.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering. Applicants who hold an undergraduate degree in a non-Engineering discipline—typically the Physical Sciences—may apply for the M.Sc. (Thesis) program, which is governed by the same regulations as the M.Eng. (Thesis) program.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Mechanical Engineering.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Aerospace) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program must have successfully completed a master's degree program (or equivalent) in Engineering or the Physical Sciences. In exceptional circumstances, students with outstanding performance at the bachelor's level may be offered direct entry into the Ph.D. program (Ph.D. 1).

In the case of all programs, applicants must have successfully completed their prior degree(s) with a minimum CGPA equivalent to 3.3 on a scale of 4.0. Satisfaction of these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit official results of either a TOEFL or an IELTS test. The minimum score required is 92 for the Internet-based TOEFL test, with each component score not less than 20 (or 580 on the paper-based test, with a minimum of 4.0 on the “Test of Written English”); or a minimum overall band of 7.0 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please consult www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad for further details on required application documents.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • two official Referee Reports
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Curriculum Vitae – please include a list of publications, if relevant
  • proof of French proficiency (for Aerospace program only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Oct. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).