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Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Location

  • Department of Psychiatry
  • 1033 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal, QC H3A 1A1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4176
  • Fax: 514-398-4370
  • Email: graduate [dot] psychiatry [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/psychiatry

About Psychiatry

McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry is one the most prestigious in the world. In the 1950s and 60s, Heinz Lehmann conducted the first North American clinical trials for antipsychotic and antidepressant medications. Theodore Sourkes identified the core neurobiological features of Parkinson’s disease, and Eric Wittkower and Jack Fried brought together scholars from Anthropology and Psychiatry to create Transcultural Psychiatric Studies. Since then, faculty members and graduate students continue outstanding research in addictions; Alzheimer’s and childhood disorders; eating, personality, and mood disorders; stress; trauma; and psychosis. The work is conducted in people and animal models, and also benefits from expertise ranging from neuroimaging and epigenetics to mental health services and public policy. Our work remains at the cutting edge of research on health, disease, and recovery.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Psychiatry also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program on an ad hoc basis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychiatry (Thesis) (45 credits)
The graduate program in Psychiatry is designed to provide advanced research training in the basic, applied, and social sciences relevant to issues in psychiatry. Applicants are admitted from a wide range of backgrounds, including undergraduate degrees in relevant areas (e.g., psychology, neuroscience, sociology, medical anthropology, nursing, and medicine), and those who are pursuing their psychiatry residency at McGill. Most, though not all students, continue to a Ph.D. program. The graduate program does not provide clinical training.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Psychiatry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

  • A B.Sc., B.A., B.N., or M.D. degree.
  • A strong background in science and/or social science, as demonstrated by academic achievement equivalent to a GPA of 3.3 (on a 4-point scale) or 3.5 in the last two years.
  • A written agreement from the proposed research supervisor, and student's statement of purpose for seeking an M.Sc.
  • An outline of the proposed thesis research, to be written by the prospective student in collaboration with an appropriate research supervisor.
  • Two letters of reference.
  • TOEFL or IELTS certificate of proficiency in English for non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue and language of education is not English, with a minimum score of 550 on the written TOEFL test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, or 6.5 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – describing the specific reasons for seeking a Master of Science degree in Psychiatry
  • Letters of Reference – with Applicant Evaluation checklist forms (see Department website)
  • Written Confirmation of Supervision form (see Department website) from the proposed research supervisor

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Pathology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Pathology

Location

  • Department of Pathology
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street
  • Montreal, QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7192, ext. 00481 or 00494
  • Fax: 514-398-7446
  • Email: pathologyteaching [dot] med [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/pathology

About Pathology

Pathology is the science of disease, and research in pathology is focused on understanding the cellular and molecular changes that cause disease, generating knowledge that is essential in the development of new methods for prevention and treatment. Pathology is a multidisciplinary science, and laboratory techniques overlap those used in all current fields of biomedical investigation. We offer unique opportunities for graduate students to conduct fundamental biomedical research that is directly linked to patient care, working with teams of highly experienced investigators and clinicians. Our laboratories are located on the main campus and throughout the McGill network of hospitals and research institutes. Our investigators collaborate with basic scientists from a variety of other departments, and undertake collaborative studies with colleagues in academic institutions around the world. Graduate students take part in joint clinical-experimental presentations involving our 48 faculty members, gaining broad exposure to current issues in diagnosis and treatment of disease. This opportunity to combine basic research and potential applications offers very exciting possibilities for a highly rewarding career.

The Pathology Department offers research training in a wide variety of areas such as immunology and transplantation, neoplasia, ophthalmic pathology, cell biology, pulmonary vascular and airways disease, pulmonary edema, neurodegenerative disorders, and smooth muscle pathophysiology.

Modern techniques and equipment include light, fluorescence and electron microscopy (both transmission and scanning), laser capture, DNA analysis, cell culture, advanced immunological, pharmacological, biochemical, and physiological techniques, as well as morphometry and computer-aided analysis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pathology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Graduates can directly enter rewarding careers in research, or opt to continue with their studies and obtain a Ph.D. Some combine their research training with subsequent training in medicine, law, or business administration.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pathology
Our graduates enter successful careers in industry, academia, government/international agencies, or clinical medicine, sometimes combining two of these options. They leave McGill with experience in leadership and communication skills in addition to being highly trained in biomedical research, and their career choices include a wide range of administrative and research positions around the world.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Pathology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. or an equivalent degree with an extensive background in the physical and biological sciences. An academic record equivalent to or better than a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 out of 4.0 at McGill is required for at least the two final full-time years of undergraduate training, with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 overall.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit the GRE and TOEFL examinations in order to be properly evaluated as to their suitability.

Students are normally accepted into the M.Sc. program, and those candidates showing exceptional ability may be permitted to transfer into the Ph.D. program after one year of training.

Applicants who already possess an additional degree (M.Sc., M.D.) and have some research experience may be allowed to register in the Ph.D. program directly.

For further information, applicants may contact the Teaching Office, Department of Pathology.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

All applications will be evaluated by the Graduate Students Committee. Candidates found suitable must then be accepted by a research director, and adequate funding must be obtained for both personal support and research expenses.

Additional Requirements

  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • GRE may be required for non-Canadian applicants

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 30 Fall: June 30 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Nov. 15 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: March 15 Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Same as Canadian/International
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

Location

  • Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
  • Jewish General Hospital
  • 3755 Chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Suite E-903
  • Montreal, QC H3T 1E2
  • Canada

About Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

The Master of Science degree in Otolaryngology trains otolaryngologists and physicians for clinical or basic science research in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. Master's programs can include research on normal function and disease of head and neck structures: otology, neuro-otology, laryngology, rhinology, oncology, surgery, auditory-vestibular sciences, middle-ear modelling, oto-toxicity, genomics, infection, thyroid disease, or genetics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Otolaryngology (Thesis) (45 credits)
The master's program is intended for otolaryngologists or for physicians with a strong interest in otolaryngology research. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) may be considered. The program addresses research questions using an interdisciplinary approach, combining methodologies of both the clinical sciences and the basic sciences. The master's program is unique in Canada and rare elsewhere. Medical professionals graduating from the program can better treat ear-nose-throat diseases; they are better positioned to do, and to evaluate, research in Otolaryngology. They typically obtain the most highly sought positions in their fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Otolaryngology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the M.Sc. program requires acceptance by a research supervisor, and the proposed program must be approved by the Department.

Applicants should be otolaryngologists, or they should be currently enrolled in a residency program leading to certification in Otolaryngology, or they should be physicians. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) with a strong interest in Otolaryngology Research will be considered.

The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (minimum of 550 on the paper-based test or 86 on the Internet-based test with each component score not less than 20) is required for applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Prospective students should contact research supervisors individually.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Epidemiology

Epidemiology

The Department offers master's and doctoral programs in both Epidemiology and Biostatistics, as well as a Master's of Science in Public Health. The methods learned in these fields are used not only in the study of diseases, but also in health services research, program planning and evaluation, and policy development. Our faculty members are at the forefront of their research domains and include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, clinician scientists, medical informatics specialists, health economists, medical sociologists, and health geographers. Research in the Department spans all clinical specialties, pharmaco-epidemiology, social epidemiology, infectious diseases, population and public health, environmental and occupational health, clinical and public health informatics, biostatistics, health care delivery and organization, and many cross-disciplinary activities. Faculty members may have funding available for students through their research grants. We provide rich research environments at five university-affiliated hospitals, public health agencies, and university research centres. Graduates pursue careers in academia, clinical settings, government agencies, and industry.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Epidemiology (Thesis) (48 credits)

Applicants to the M.Sc. program should hold a bachelor’s degree in the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography) or social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or hold a degree in one of the health professional sciences (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The program leading to a master’s degree is designed to provide training in both theory and practice in the selected discipline. Courses require intellectual and academic rigour, and the program provides students with an opportunity to synthesize the training in the form of a thesis. Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and applied biostatistics, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, pharmaco-epidemiological, policy, and methodological health-related research. Graduates of the program often go on to do doctoral work or become research associates in public, private, and academic settings. McGill graduates are known for methodological and quantitative rigour, and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
The mission of the M.Sc.P.H. is to train outstanding public health professionals and future leaders by offering a rigorous academic program in methods, research, and practice. This program may be of interest for students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and biostatistics, as applied to public health research and practice, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, policy, and methodological public health-related research. Graduates of the program will serve as public health practitioners, research professionals, and educators, and will possess the competencies and professionalism to carry out broad public health functions in local, provincial, national, and international settings. In exceptional circumstances, the Admissions Committee may take professional experience into account for mid-career or returning/re-entry applicants. The Master's of Public Health program will include a three-month practicum after the first year, which will provide the student with the opportunity to use knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a public health practice or research setting.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Environment (60 credits)
A number of departments and faculties throughout McGill University have joined with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) to provide an Environment Option as part of a variety of existing graduate degrees. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology

This program may be of interest to students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The Ph.D. program prepares students with the advanced epidemiological research skills needed to undertake original contributions to new knowledge related to the determinants of health and disease, prevention, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The program is generally completed in four to five years. Graduates will be prepared to engage in scientific collaboration, and communicate results to other scientists and diverse audiences. They will go on to careers in public health, health planning, and quality monitoring in local, regional, federal, and international health authorities, statistical and technology assessment agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, and in clinical and academic research organizations. McGill graduates are known for their methodological and quantitative rigour and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).
 

Kinesiology and Physical Education

 Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Kinesiology and Physical Education

Location

  • Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education
  • Sir Arthur Currie Memorial Gymnasium
  • 475 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal, QC H2W 1S4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4184
  • Fax: 514-398-4186
  • Email: kin [dot] physed [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-kpe

About Kinesiology and Physical Education

The Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education provides a large variety of research opportunities in a number of areas related to human health and physical activity.

Master's Programs

In Exercise Physiology, research is being conducted on obesity treatment, public health surveillance, and health disparities; biology and physiology of aging skeletal muscle; adaptive plasticity of skeletal muscle in health, disease, and aging; the role of mitochondria in skeletal muscle health, disease, and aging; interventions to protect and/or restore mass and function of aging muscle; biology and physiology of the aging heart; clinical and integrative exercise and cardio-respiratory physiology; COPD research; and muscle physiology and biophysics.

Other research in Biomechanics includes specialization in ergonomics, motor control, fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders; locomotion and gait research; applied ice hockey research; and neurophysiology and rehabilitation.

In Exercise and Health Psychology, research is presently underway examining the psychosocial determinants of health behaviour, body-related emotions, and physical self; motivation in youth sport and physical activity; school and community-based physical activity promotion; and physical education and health development.

In Sports Psychology, research questions examine determinants of coaching expertise, team building, psychology of athletic injuries (concussions), and hockey violence.

Research in Adapted Physical Activity examines issues of self-regulation of individuals with movement difficulties, physical activity in persons with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), play and movement skill proficiency, perceptions and professional skill development of physical education teachers, motor behaviour, and autism.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program on an ad hoc basis, or, with the permission of the supervisor and the approval of the Graduate Program Director, exceptional students may transfer from the master's program to the ad hoc Ph.D. program.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Thesis) (45 credits) and Master of Science (M.Sc.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
The thesis programs in Kinesiology and Physical Education are designed to help students develop research skills and expertise in their selected areas of research. All students must have a physical science background to study in the M.Sc. program and a social-psychological background to study in the M.A. program. Researchers in our program have their own research facilities. These research programs often lead to pursuits in research and teaching careers, or in professional careers in kinesiology. For example, many students pursue careers in fitness/wellness, exercise rehabilitation settings, and sport science settings. Students may become teachers, health club directors, work in cardiac rehabilitation centres, and/or become exercise prescription counsellors.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits) and Master of Science (M.Sc.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The non-thesis programs are not being offered in 2013–2014.

The non-thesis programs in Kinesiology and Physical Education are intended to help students develop professional skills related to their careers in kinesiology and physical education who do not have an interest in research. Students will work with a supervisor and will take a number of courses in the academic areas of interest and will also complete a research project in the area of interest.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 18, 2013).

Kinesiology and Physical Education Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate degree in Physical and Health Education, Exercise Science, Kinesiology, or its equivalent is required.
  2. A minimum academic standing equivalent to a CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Feb. 15 Fall: Feb. 15 Fall: June 30
Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Sept. 1
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 18, 2013).

Biostatistics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Biostatistics

Biostatistics involves the development and application of statistical methods to scientific research in areas such as medicine, epidemiology, environmental health, genetics, and ecology. Biostatisticians play key roles in designing studies—from helping to formulate the questions that can be answered by data collection to the decisions on how best to collect the data—and in analyzing the resulting data. They also develop new statistical methods for such data. Students will take courses, and may do research, on topics such as mathematical statistics, statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. The Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health has one of the largest concentrations of Ph.D.-level statisticians in any Canadian Faculty of Medicine.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Thesis) (48 credits)
M.Sc. thesis students study a foundational set of courses, and write a thesis on a topic of their choice. Thesis students should have a strong interest in research. These students are well-placed to either continue in a Ph.D. program or to work in academic research in statistics or medicine; they will also have relevant qualifications for the pharmaceutical industry and government.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. non-thesis program is designed to expose students to a wide range of topics including statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, communication, and report writing are emphasized, and students graduate ready to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, in government, or in academic medical research.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biostatistics
Applicants should hold a master’s degree in mathematics or statistics or its equivalent. Mastery of calculus, linear algebra, real analysis, and mathematical statistics is essential. Exposure to data analysis is an asset. Exceptional students without a master’s degree will be considered for admission, starting with a Qualifying year. Ph.D. students typically work on development of statistical methods, and can specialize in statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, Bayesian methods, survival analysis, longitudinal data, causal inference, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, and report writing are emphasized. Ph.D. graduates typically work as faculty in universities, in research institutes, in government, or in the pharmaceutical industry.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).
 

Plant Science

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Please note that Summer admission is no longer an option for the Plant Science programs. Please choose either Fall or Winter admission.

Plant Science

Location

  • Department of Plant Science
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7851
  • Fax: 514-398-7897
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/plant

About Plant Science

The Department offers an M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Plant Science with options in Bioinformatics, Environment, or Neotropical Environment, and provides for study in all fields of plant science. Research facilities—both field and laboratory—are available for investigations in plant breeding, crop physiology, crop management, crop quality, plant ecology, the epidemiology and biology of plant diseases, epigenetics, biosystematics, recombinant DNA technology, mycology, weed biology, tissue culture, plant biochemistry, and bioinformatics. Facilities include: the Horticultural Research Centre, the Emile A. Lods Agronomy Research Centre, greenhouses, growth cabinets, the McGill University Herbarium, the Applied Biotechnology laboratory, the CT Scanning laboratory, and a Level 2 Quarantine Facility.

An advisory committee is named for each student and has the responsibility of developing the program of study appropriate to the student's background and area of specialization.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. The goal of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This option has an added emphasis on bioinformatics, including additional seminars. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field. This option has an added emphasis on environmental sciences, including additional courses and seminars. The Environment graduate option is aimed at students who wish to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions with students from a wide range of disciplines.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires approximately two years for completion. Overall, the program consists of two graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project leading to a thesis. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field. This option has an added emphasis on neotropical environments, including additional courses and seminars. Part of the program takes place in Panama.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Plant Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This M.Sc. in Plant Science requires about 18 months or four to five terms for completion. Overall, the program consists of graduate-level courses, seminars, and a research project. The courses and the research project are chosen and defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, the private sector, or further graduate studies in a related field.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Bioinformatics
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector. This option has an added emphasis on bioinformatics, including additional courses and seminars. The goal of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Environment
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector. This option has an added emphasis on environmental sciences, including additional courses and seminars. The Environment graduate option is aimed at students who wish to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions with students from a wide range of disciplines.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Neotropical Environment
This Ph.D. in Plant Science requires approximately three years for completion. Overall, the program consists of seminars and a research project leading to a thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive examination within their first year of study. The research project is defined with the help of an advisory committee. Subsequent career paths are varied, but include work with government agencies, universities, or the private sector. This option has an added emphasis on neotropical environments, including additional courses and seminars. Part of the program takes place in Panama.
Graduate Certificate in Bioinformatics (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Bioinformatics is a new cross-disciplinary program that teaches students the foundations of bioinformatics thinking, methodology, and applications through hands-on experience with computers and bioinformatics tools. The program introduces students to many areas of application such as medicine, agriculture, and chemistry. Required courses include basic UNIX skills, genomics data, common bioinformatics software, relational databases, and web resources. The Certificate is completed in one term (Winter) after which graduates may go on to pursue successful careers in the biomedical, biotechnology, and biosciences fields.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Plant Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General

The minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or a GPA of 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

Ph.D.

Ph.D. candidates are required to have an M.Sc. degree in an area related to the chosen field of specialization for the Ph.D. program. Outstanding M.Sc. students may be permitted to transfer to the second year of the Ph.D. program following one year of study.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: March 1 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant’s file until the following admittance period if application materials, including supporting documents, are received after the application deadlines. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Location

  • School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition
  • Macdonald-Stewart Building, Room MS2-039
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7762
  • Fax: 514-398-7739
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/dietetics

About Dietetics and Human Nutrition

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, cutting-edge nutrition research is conducted by its nine tenure-track professors and six faculty lecturers in all areas recommended by North American Nutrition Societies. These include molecular and cellular nutrition, clinical, community, and international nutrition. Domains emphasized by School researchers include: epigenetics; proteomics; metabolomics; embryonic and fetal origins of health and disease; the development of improved recommendations and policies for optimizing health in at-risk populations including Aboriginal populations, mothers and children, and the elderly; and the development of novel nutritional and/or nutraceutical approaches for treatment during surgery and recovery from disease.

Research is conducted in our on-site research labs, the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), the Mary Emily Clinical Nutrition Research unit, and the MUHC Teaching Hospitals. Students can conduct research or participate in clinical rotations with the BITS – Barbados, IDRC – Ghana and field sites in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Nutrition (Thesis) (45 credits)
A master’s degree in Human Nutrition offers advanced Nutrition courses in a broad range of research areas. The program is suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in nutritional sciences, exercise physiology, kinesiology, food science, biochemistry, medicine, or another closely related field. Students are required to complete 14 credits in advanced nutrition coursework plus 31 credits related to their thesis research. Graduates of our M.Sc. thesis degree have pursued successful careers in research, international health agencies, government agencies, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Practicum (45 credits) and Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program is a course-based master’s program. It allows students to further develop knowledge and expertise in nutrition. Students are required to complete 29 credits in advanced Nutrition courses plus 16 credits related to a research project or an advanced practicum (reserved for registered dietitians). Careers include managerial positions for practising dietitians, and careers in nutrition programs, government, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Dietetics Credentialing (83 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program in Dietetics Credentialing is a course-based master's program with a dietetics Stage (internship) included. At the end of the program, students are qualified to be licensed with one of the provincial regulatory bodies in Canada, as well as in other countries, and practise in the areas of clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and foodservice management; French competency is an asset. The program is preceded by a Qualifying year, if necessary, to complete certain courses required for licensure. This is followed by three semesters of graduate-level courses (46 credits) and 3 semesters of Stage (37 credits), which include a practice-based graduate project.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Nutrition
A Ph.D. degree in Human Nutrition is suitable for students with an M.Sc. degree in Nutritional Sciences or related areas who wish to become independent researchers and/or leaders in the field of nutritional sciences. The School offers a stimulating research environment with opportunities in a wide range of areas of basic science, clinical research with our many hospital clinicians, as well as population health in Canada and abroad. Careers include academic, senior government, and industry positions within Canada and internationally.
Graduate Diploma in Registered Dietitian Credentialing (30 credits)
In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill, students pursuing a graduate degree in nutrition have the opportunity to apply to our Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing, upon completion of the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program and upon completion of the undergraduate courses required by l'Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ). This Diploma consists of two semesters of Stage (internship) in Clinical Nutrition, Community Nutrition, and Foodservice Systems Management. Upon completion of the Diploma, the recipient is eligible to register and practice as a Dietitian in Quebec, as well as in other Canadian provinces and other countries.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis and M.Sc. Applied (Project or Practicum)

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University’s credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) for the M.Sc. Thesis and 3.5/4.0 for the M.Sc. Applied during their bachelor's degree program. All eligible candidates to the M.Sc. (Applied) program may select the project option; those who have completed a dietetic internship and six months' work experience are eligible to apply for a practicum option.

Ph.D.

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. and M.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University's credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) during their bachelor's and master's degree programs.

Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing

For information on admission requirements, applicants must contact Dr. Maureen Rose in the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and Standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the School's minimum CGPA of 3.2 out of 4.0. The courses to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year (two terms) is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program. Students must re-apply for admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. While the school cannot guarantee financial support, teaching assistantships and other scholarships may be available.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Final acceptance to the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor. A supervisor is not required for acceptance to the M.Sc. (Applied) program.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – The GRE is required for all applicants to the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition who are submitting non-Canadian and non-U.S. transcripts.

Application Deadlines

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Dec. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant’s file until the following admittance period if application materials including supporting documents are received after the application deadlines. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2013-2014 (last updated Jul. 17, 2013).

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