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Music (Schulich School of Music)

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Schulich School of Music

Location

  • Schulich School of Music
  • Strathcona Music Building
  • 555 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1E3
  • Canada

About Schulich School of Music

The Schulich School of Music of McGill University is internationally renowned for its leadership in combining professional conservatory-style musical training, humanities-based scholarship, and scientific-technological research at the highest levels. Its programs encourage musicians and music researchers alike to push boundaries and explore new possibilities. The School’s facilities are a physical affirmation of our commitment and belief in the future of music, artists, creators, and researchers, and they encourage multimedia productions and trans-disciplinary collaborations. Among the most notable facilities are:

  • a music library that houses one of the most important academic music collections in Canada;
  • four concert halls;
  • the Digital Composition Studio;
  • sound recording studios;
  • the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT);
  • as well as a research network that links the Faculty with other University departments and research institutes.

Nestled in the heart of the city, the School also draws on the rich cultural life of Montreal—a bilingual city with a celebrated symphony orchestra, dozens of annual festivals, and hundreds of live music venues hosting world-class concerts.

The Master of Arts degree (M.A.) is available as a thesis option in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and Theory (with an option in Gender and Women’s Studies), and as a non-thesis option in Music Education, Musicology, and Theory.

The Master of Music degree (M.Mus.) is available in Composition, Performance, and Sound Recording. Specializations offered within the performance option are: piano, guitar, orchestral instruments (including orchestral training), organ and church music, conducting, collaborative piano, opera and voice, early music, and jazz.

The Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance is open to accomplished professional musicians, singers, or established chamber ensembles wishing one year of in-depth studies to complete a specific project.

The Doctor of Music degree (D.Mus.) is offered in Composition and Performance Studies while the Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) is available in Composition, Music – Gender and Women’s Studies, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Interdisciplinary studies are encouraged.

Funding

The Schulich School of Music has several sources of funding for graduate students.

Entrance Excellence Scholarships for highly ranked graduate students (including Schulich Scholarships, Max Stern Fellowships, and McGill Excellence Fellowships) typically range in value from $1,500 to $15,000; some two- and three-year multi-year packages are available at the master's and doctoral levels, respectively (see www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs). A limited number of one-year differential fee waivers are also available for the most highly ranked incoming international students. The Scholarships and Student Aid Office offers information and options for out-of-province, American, and other international students (see www.mcgill.ca/studentaid).

In-course students may compete for a small number of Excellence Scholarships awarded annually to recognize excellence in academic and performance achievement.

The Schulich School of Music also has a renowned mentoring program that helps students develop applications for a wide variety of external funding for national, international, and university competitions (CIRMMT Research, DAAD, Fulbright, NSERC, NSERC Discovery, Connection grants, SSHRC, Vanier, etc.). Some provide for multi-year funding, others funding for individual projects.

Opportunities for funding through Work Study and as paid assistants also provide professional training. Positions for teaching assistantships are advertized each semester by departmental announcement. Typically there are few, if any, positions available for students in their first year of study. Other types of positions can include: invigilators, apprentice writers for program notes, sound recording technicians, library assistants, stage hands, Opera Studio, and front-of-house staff, among others. Posts are advertized through the Music Research and Performance Departments at the beginning of each semester and through the Work Study website.

A variety of research assistantships in selected areas are also available. Inquiries should be directed to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Associate Dean for Research (see www.mcgill.ca/music/people-research/staff-directory).

Opportunities for paid performances in the community for soloists, choristers, chamber ensembles, organists, orchestral and jazz musicians, and piano collaborators are facilitated through the Booking Office (see www.mcgill.ca/music/people-research/staff-directory).

The Schulich School of Music also provides travel funding for conferences and special performance and research initiatives. Graduate students may apply once per academic year; see www.mcgill.ca/music/student-resources/grads-postdocs/forms.

Master's Programs

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Music — Composition (Thesis) (45 credits)

Students in the M.Mus. program develop their own individual voices through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members' diverse interests ensure that students will find a suitable mentor/supervisor. The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer students an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology, including mixed works, interactive composition, gestural controllers, acousmatic works, multichannel audio, computer-assisted composition, and more. Students also benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles (e.g., McGill Symphony Orchestra, McGill Contemporary Music Ensemble, etc.) and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations.

Graduates have continued their studies at the doctoral level and then gone on to win prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize); they also have successful careers in composition, film, literature, conducting, and teaching.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Education (Thesis) (45 credits)

This program provides an opportunity for studio- and classroom-based teachers, and music educators working in other community settings, to explore current issues in music education and to implement their own research studies. Seminars develop facility in a breadth of research methodologies and examine pertinent research developments in different fields, while simultaneously providing opportunities to link with other departments such as the faculties of Education, Cognitive Psychology, and Physiology. Ties with The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology (CIRMMT), and Teaching and Learning Services provide a strong supportive network for interdisciplinary and multilingual research. Experienced faculty publishes regularly in the field’s leading journals in areas such as musical development, music perception, world and community-based music education, philosophical issues in music education, performance anxiety, music performance adjudication, technological applications, and the physiological bases of musical performance.

Graduates of the program continue on to doctoral studies and pursue teaching careers around the world in various settings.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Music Technology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. in Music Technology is the only program of its kind in the world to apply cutting-edge scientific research to music and music making. Students are accepted from a wide range of musical backgrounds. Research goals are tied to the work of the area’s five faculty members and include the development of new and flexible strategies for sound analysis, real-time processing, synthesis and gestural control, instrument design, melodic pattern recognition, auditory display, music information retrieval, and symbolic manipulation of formal music representations, as well as the psychoacoustics of musical sounds and structures, among others. Students’ research is supported by the six laboratories forming the large multidisciplinary research infrastructure of The Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology (CIRMMT), and almost unlimited technological resources (e.g., computing power, storage, measuring devices including several motion-capture systems). The Digital Composition Studio and state-of-the-art recording and acoustic environments provide opportunities to collaborate with accomplished performers and researchers in other music disciplines.

Graduates hold commercial positions related to media technologies (e.g., gaming and audio industries) and continue their studies at the doctoral level in preparation for academic careers.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) (45 credits)

This program is for students interested in developing research projects that bridge traditional methodologies with new critical approaches in musicology. The area’s humanistic orientation emphasizes the importance of political, social, and literary history, while also encouraging students to develop their skills in musical analysis, their sensitivity to different styles and performance practices, and their awareness of issues in aesthetics. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research ranges from medieval and renaissance music to the popular music of today. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics also exist through links with other departments, the Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas, and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate music history courses.

Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level at McGill and other major North American universities; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and archival curation, among others.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Musicology (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Musicology requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Sound Recording (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)

This internationally renowned program is a course-based, professional training program designed for musicians who wish to develop the skills required in the music recording and media industries. It is based on the German Tonmeister program and offers extensive, hands-on opportunities to record a broad spectrum of solo recitals, large opera, and symphonic repertoire with soloists and choirs, and complex Jazz Band and pop idioms. McGill’s professional-quality facilities provide state-of-the-art equipment for research and the recording of any size of ensemble in high-resolution multichannel audio and high-definition video, and include a variety of audio recording studios equipped for surround recording, four concert hall recording spaces, a technical ear training lab, an orchestral film scoring stage, an opera studio, and post-production and editing suites. The Faculty includes prominent researchers as well as award-winning recording engineers and producers in the fields of music production, television, and film sound familiar with cutting-edge technologies and new developments. The program also has close ties with industry that facilitate opportunities for internships.

Graduates are leaders in the field working in highly respected studios around the world and winning both creative and scientific international competitions.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. in Theory is for students interested in exploring how specific pieces of music are put together and how this understanding may be generalized to relate to the way other pieces of music are composed. Music theory and elective seminars develop expertise in various analytical models and familiarity with the critical issues that define the discipline as a basis for developing individual research projects. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminar discussions facilitate out-of-the-box thinking; opportunities to explore interdisciplinary research topics in perception and cognition exist through collaborations with music researchers from the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology. The area also provides valuable pedagogical training through teaching assistantships in undergraduate theory courses. The Faculty has a breadth of experience in early music theory, formal functions, Schenkerian analysis, mathematical models, theories of rhythm and meter, serialism, and popular music analysis.

Graduates have been accepted into doctoral programs at McGill, Yale, Eastman, Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, and Cambridge, among others.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

This program is open to students who qualify for the M.A. in Theory (thesis option) who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Theory requirements are augmented by participation in a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University.

Master of Arts (M.A.): Music — Music Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits),

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Musicology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits), and

Master of Arts (M.A.); Music — Theory (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This course-based program has options in music education, musicology, and theory. Seminars provide breadth of disciplinary knowledge and understanding of research methodologies and critical issues. Expertise in two areas is developed through two written papers. Students receive guidance from leading scholars whose internationally acclaimed research covers a broad spectrum of topics central to each discipline. Collaborations with students from other areas and the doctoral program in seminars facilitate outside-the-box thinking.

The option in Music Education provides an opportunity for studio-, classroom-, and community-based music educators to read, understand, and apply research studies in different fields to their own practices.

The option in Musicology is for students interested in a humanistic orientation to topics in music history and musicology that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches.

The option in Theory develops skill with different analytical models and the ways in which they may be used to explore how specific pieces of music are put together.

Some graduates continue to doctoral studies; others pursue careers in teaching, arts management, music business, journalism, and librarianship, among others.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Jazz Performance (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Mus. in Jazz Performance is flexibly designed to offer specialization in Jazz Composition, Jazz Performance, and Jazz Orchestra training. All students take courses in jazz pedagogy, composition, and arranging, and benefit from close interaction with a diverse, creative, and professionally active faculty. A recital and a CD recording of original music are the principal thesis requirements. Our outstanding ensembles include the McGill Jazz Orchestra, the ten-piece McGill Chamber Ensemble, two more jazz orchestras, a saxophone ensemble, and over twenty jazz combos. Teaching opportunities vary from year to year, but are generally available in Jazz Theory, Jazz Ear Training, Jazz Orchestra 3, Jazz Improvisation, and Jazz Combo. Montreal’s vibrant jazz scene also provides rich opportunities for performance and musical engagement.

Graduates have active touring careers, teach in university jazz programs, and have produced recordings that have earned Juno awards.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Early Music (Thesis) (45 credits)

Established in 1975, this program is the longest-standing Early Music program in North America. It offers early music specialists interested in historical performance practices a rich variety of performing experiences, including 15–20 chamber ensembles (vocal, madrigal, viol, and recorder consorts, etc.), the Cappella Antica, and the Baroque Orchestra. McGill is also the only North American music faculty to produce a fully staged performance of an early opera every year. Recent productions include: Handel’s Alcina, Agrippina, and Imeneo, Lully’s Thésée, and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas. Faculty are prominently involved in Montreal’s internationally acclaimed Early Music community. The Schulich School of Music also owns a large collection of early instruments that is available to students.

Graduates perform with Montreal-based early music ensembles, including, among others, Les Violons du Roy and the Arion Baroque Orchestra, as well as Aradia and Tafelmusik in Toronto, and various ensembles in Europe (e.g., Concerto Palatino, Centre de musique baroque de Versailles).

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Orchestral Instruments and Guitar (Thesis) (45 credits)

The premiere orchestral training program in Canada, this program is for talented instrumental musicians and guitarists wishing to hone their artistry and expressive, interpretative skills in a flexibly designed curriculum rich in performance opportunities. Ensembles emulate professional settings, and include five orchestras—two full orchestras (the renowned McGill Symphony Orchestra and the McGill Sinfonetta), one opera orchestra, one baroque orchestra, and one contemporary music ensemble—as well as one large wind symphony and one guitar ensemble. Opportunities for chamber music also abound. String players benefit from a rigorous string quartet training program and trail-blazing pedagogical approaches. Brass and wind musicians also perform a wide range of large ensemble repertoire for their instruments; percussionists perform, tour, and record with the esteemed McGill Percussion Ensemble. Thesis recitals foster individual creativity and diversity by offering a range of options important for orchestral musicians—orchestral excerpt exams run like orchestral auditions, chamber music recitals, and concerto competitions—as well as solo recitals, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects including collaborations with composers and the Digital Composition Studio, among others.

There is a focus on healthy performance and a broad range of seminars that ground performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music and artistic research-creation. Ensemble conductors are world-class; faculty include the concertmasters and principal players of major Canadian orchestras, including the Montreal Symphony Orchestra; percussion instructors have international profiles and a breadth of experience in world and contemporary repertoires.

Graduates have secured positions in orchestras throughout North and South America, and in Europe, and with the Canadian Opera Company, Ensemble Moderne, and others.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Collaborative Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)

Students in this program develop their artistry as collaborative musicians in vocal, instrumental, and opera repetiteur settings. The program is not a chamber music program in that it prepares pianists to assume coaching responsibilities as well as collaborate with other musicians. Candidates need to have excellent technique and interpretative skills, sight-reading abilities, and previous collaborative experience. The program is flexibly defined to allow students to specialize or gain experience in a variety of settings and with a broad cross-section of vocal, instrumental, orchestral, and theatrical repertoire. Concert recitals, choral ensembles, studio lessons with high-quality performers, and opera productions provide professional settings in which students master their craft. Faculty includes internationally renowned collaborative pianists, vocal coaches, conductors, and stage directors.

Graduates pursue careers as collaborative pianists, accompanists, opera repetiteurs, studio teachers, and coaches.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Piano (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Mus in Piano develops artistic expression and interpretative skills by immersing the advanced pianist in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program revolves around an integrated piano seminar involving all studios and includes collaborative opportunities in instrumental, vocal, and contemporary music performance at a high level, piano pedagogy, and performance practice through fortepiano/harpsichord study as options. Recital options include solo and chamber music performance, sound recording, and interdisciplinary projects, including collaborations with strong composition students and the Digital Composition Studio. Dynamic faculty performs internationally and has diverse teaching, coaching, and adjudicating experience in a broad range of solo, chamber, and concerto repertoires.

Graduates often continue their studies at the doctoral level, have been selected for national/international competitions, and pursue careers as collaborative pianists, opera coaches, and as independent studio teachers.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Organ and Church Music (Thesis) (45 credits)

This program provides talented organists and church music scholars with an opportunity to hone their artistry and interpretive skills. The flexibly designed program combines performance with seminars in historically informed performance practice, music and liturgy, counterpoint, improvisation, continuo playing, and choral conducting, among other options. Thesis performance options allow for creativity and diversity by including options for solo and chamber music recitals, concerto performances, recording projects, church music projects, and opportunities for interdisciplinary research and collaborations with strong composers and other departments. Students benefit from excellent facilities that include practice organs built by Beckerath, Casavant, Tsuji, Wilhelm, and Wolff, as well as the famous French classical organ in Redpath Hall. A number of assistantships are available in downtown churches with some of Montreal’s most distinguished church musicians.

Graduates have won prizes in major national and international competitions and pursue church music careers around the world.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Conducting (Thesis) (45 credits)

Students in this program specialize in orchestral, wind, or choral conducting. Enrolment is limited to outstanding candidates having highly developed musical skills in voice, instrumental, or piano performance. The program provides for concentrated podium time, interactions with world-class conductors, score study, and the development of rehearsal technique. A range of seminars provides for the in-depth study of performance practice and the development of analytical skills with leading scholars in musicology and theory. Thesis performance projects involve concert recitals with various Schulich School of Music ensembles.

Some graduates continue on to doctoral studies; others pursue conducting and teaching positions in schools, orchestras, and as opera assistants.

Master of Music (M.Mus.); Performance: Opera and Voice (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Mus in Opera and Voice develops vocal growth and artistic expression by immersing students in a vibrant musical environment that blends performance training with humanities-based scholarship. The flexibly designed program provides the option for students to specialize in opera performance or to develop artistry in a variety of solo and operatic repertoires.

There are three opera productions every year, including one Early Music opera with period instruments. Other performance opportunities include solo recitals, studio concerts, Cappella Antica, oratorios, chamber music ensembles, master classes with leading artists in the field, recording projects, and interdisciplinary collaborations. Performance opportunities emulate professional contexts, including rehearsals in a first-class opera studio and individual repertoire coaching with internationally renowned coaching staff. Voice faculty, stage directors, and set designers are outstanding soloists and creative artists involved with major companies, opera programs, and festivals the world over. McGill singers are selected to participate in various professional young artist programs and have won major national and international auditions including the MET auditions and NATSAA.

Recent graduates perform with orchestras and opera companies in Canada, as well as companies in the United States, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and Eastern Europe.

Graduate Diploma

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance (30 credits)

This is a new, one-year postgraduate diploma providing concentrated study for three types of extremely accomplished musicians: the emerging or professional singer, emerging or established chamber ensemble (including jazz combos, piano collaborations), and the individual artist preparing for competition, audition, concerto performance, tour, recording project, etc. The flexibly designed program assumes a high level of performance (doctoral/professional) and involves intensive coaching, performance, and repertoire study/research tied to the artist’s or chamber ensemble’s professional goals, and a media project. Singers have voice coaching and training in movement and acting, with performance opportunities linked to McGill Opera productions. Ensembles develop individual artistry as well as group identity, with respect to sound, communication, skills, and performance practice.

The first graduates of the program, the Cecilia String Quartet, won the 2010 International Banff String Quartet Competition and were prizewinners at the Bordeaux 2010 International Chamber Music Competition.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Composition

Students in this program create extended original works of art that push the boundaries of the discipline. Composers refine their musical language and artistic voice through private instruction with some of Canada’s most accomplished composers, all of whom have distinguished themselves through high-profile commissions, performances, recordings, and awards. The faculty members have diverse interests that ensure composers will find a suitable mentor.

The resources of the Digital Composition Studios also offer composers an opportunity to work with a wide range of cutting-edge approaches to music technology. Students benefit from international new music festivals and conferences co-sponsored by the Schulich School of Music, a visiting artist series, and high-quality performances, readings, and recordings of their works by some of the school’s most esteemed ensembles and advanced performers. Commissioning opportunities exist through an established composer-in-residence program and through student-initiated, performer-composer and interdisciplinary collaborations.

Graduates have won prestigious awards (e.g., Jules Leger Prize, SOCAN competition) and have successful careers in university teaching, (freelance) composition, film, literature, and conducting.

Doctor of Music (D.Mus.); Music — Performance Studies

This program is for the inspired artist/scholar interested in expanding horizons. Students perform at a professional or near-professional level, are curious, and have research interests linked to their artistic practice. A broad range of seminars explore performance practice in the broader humanistic and scientific contexts of music, while encouraging the critical thinking and the fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music. Two performance (recital/recording) projects extend repertoire interests. Comprehensive examinations develop credentials in three areas of expertise in preparation for teaching careers, while articulating the background and critical issues surrounding students' thesis work. The latter consists of a lecture/recital and a paper (including a recording of the recital). The artistic research may assume a variety of forms from the study of scores, works, and contextual influences through the analysis of performance itself and the creation of new works.

Students benefit from exceptional mentoring by internationally renowned coaches, the research expertise of faculty from the Department of Music Research, master classes, opportunities to collaborate with strong composition students, and the rich performance life of the Schulich School of Music and Montreal. Students win major fellowships (SSHRC, Fulbright, FRQSC, Canada Council).

Graduates have won major national and international competitions and pursue teaching and performing careers in a wide variety of contexts globally.

Ph.D. in Music

Students in the Ph.D. program pursue original research that makes a significant contribution to the fields of Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, and Theory. Seminars, a doctoral colloquium, visiting lecturer series, and international conferences provide forums for students from different areas to interact by encouraging the critical thinking and fertile exchange of ideas that promote new ways of engaging with music through listening, performing, cutting-edge technologies, and analytical methods.

Opportunities for inter- and cross-disciplinary collaborations exist through:

Supportive faculty recognized internationally as leaders in their respective disciplines mentor students from admission through job placements. Travel funding exists for students to present papers at conferences; many students win external scholarships (SSHRC, FRQSC, Vanier, Rhodes Scholar, etc.) and national and international awards; students gain valuable pedagogical or technological training through teaching and lab assistantships.

Graduates pursue careers in academia, industry, composition, and various other arts-related fields.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — (Composition, Music Education, Musicology, Music Technology, Sound Recording, Theory)

The thesis for the Ph.D. in composition involves the creation of an original large-scale work and research that increases our understanding of music and musical processes. Students in music education investigate a broad spectrum of critical issues through a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The Musicology area adopts a humanistic orientation that bridges traditional methodologies with new critical approaches. Research in Music Technology and Sound Recording can lead to patents, among other outcomes and benefits from unlimited technological resources. Theorists engage with all repertoires and analytical methods.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Music — Gender and Women's Studies

This program is open to doctoral students who are interested in cross-disciplinary research that focuses on issues centrally related to gender, sexuality, feminist theory, and/or women’s studies. Music requirements are augmented by participation in a Research Methods course and a Graduate Feminism Symposium that engages with a diverse array of critical and empirical perspectives. The program draws on the resources of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies that includes faculty and graduate students from across the University. Supporting music faculty has interests in Opera, film studies, aesthetics, theory of performance, and popular/jazz studies.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Schulich School of Music Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s Degrees

Applicants for the master's degree must hold a B.Mus. or a B.A. degree with a Major or Honours in music including considerable work done in the area of specialization.

Applicants found to be deficient in their background preparation may be required to take certain additional undergraduate courses.

All applicants (except those for Performance, Musicology, and Sound Recording) will be required to take placement examinations.

All M.Mus. applicants will be required to take a live audition. Conducting and female voice applicants will be required to submit screening material for pre-selection. Following a review of these materials, selected applicants will be invited to attend a live audition; see www.mcgill.ca/music/admissions/graduate/auditions.

Specific admission and document requirements for each program are outlined at www.mcgill.ca/music/admissions/graduate.

Graduate Diploma in Professional Performance

Applicants for the Graduate Diploma are typically highly accomplished performers who hold an M.Mus. or a B.Mus. degree with equivalent professional experience. All musicians are required to submit screening material (see D.Mus. audition list for repertoire and level at www.mcgill.ca/music/admissions/graduate/auditions) and a statement of the proposed performance project (that may be completed within one year) by the application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants will be invited to pass a live entrance audition. Chamber ensembles must apply and complete diploma requirements as a formed ensemble.

D.Mus. Degree

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. degree in Composition, or its equivalent, and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application.

Applicants for the D.Mus. degree in Performance Studies must hold an M.Mus. degree in Performance, or its equivalent, and are required to submit screening material, samples of written work, and a statement of proposed artistic research interests by the specified application deadlines. Only the most advanced applicants with artistic research interests will be invited to pass a live entrance audition and interview.

Ph.D. Degree

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Composition must hold an M.Mus. in Composition or equivalent and must submit scores and/or recordings of their compositions at the time of application, and a written description (no more than two pages) of the research path(s) they wish to follow.

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree in Music Education, Music Technology, Musicology, Sound Recording, Music – Gender and Women's Studies, or Theory must hold a master's or a bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill degree, in Music Technology, Music Education, Musicology, Theory, or Sound Recording. Applicants with a bachelor's degree will normally be admitted to the M.A. program for the first year and may apply for admittance to the Ph.D. program after the completion of one full year of graduate coursework. Qualified applicants who have already completed an appropriate master's degree will be admitted to the second year of the Ph.D. program.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • $63.48 audition fee for Performance degrees

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Schulich School of Music and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Urban Planning

Urban Planning

Location

  • School of Urban Planning
  • Macdonald Harrington Building, Room 400
  • 815 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C2
  • Canada

About Urban Planning

Urban planning is the process by which a community shapes its environment to meet its needs and realize its aspirations. Urban planning is also the profession of those who facilitate this process. While the practice of planning is as old as the cities themselves, the Urban Planning profession is only about a century old. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, architects, landscape architects, engineers, government reformers, lawyers, public health specialists, and others joined forces to tackle the serious social and environmental problems of the industrial city. They created new techniques and institutions to improve living conditions and decision-making processes, with an eye to improving cities in terms of health, safety, efficiency, equity, beauty, identity, etc. Today, people who enter the profession come from diverse backgrounds as well, including the design professions, engineering and applied sciences, environmental and social studies, and other fields. Their challenge is to reinvent tools and procedures to meet new challenges in making cities socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. A key feature of planning education is learning to view issues in a multidisciplinary way, to manage processes of collaboration and of conflict, and to generate equitable and efficient solutions to complex problems of urban development.

McGill University was the first institution in Canada to offer a full-time planning program starting in 1947. In 1972, the School of Urban Planning was created as a separate academic unit within the Faculty of Engineering. It shares a heritage building with the School of Architecture, right on the main open space of McGill’s Downtown campus. The primary objective of the Master of Urban Planning program is to educate professional urban planners for leadership in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. This happens in large part through project-based learning. The program also puts great emphasis on students doing policy-relevant research.

The School prepares doctoral students for high-level research and teaching positions. The doctoral program is an Ad hoc program—in which students are subject to the University’s regulations in terms of supervision and progress—that welcomes a small number of students, both local and international, who hold a master’s degree and apply on the basis of their own research interests. Prospective applicants should consult www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning.

The School’s teaching and research activities, for both master’s and Ph.D. students, pertain primarily to community planning; environmental policy and planning; international development planning; land-use planning and regulation; transportation and infrastructure planning; and urban design. These activities, which are conducted for the purpose of promoting better decision-making and improving human environments, often take place in partnership with other McGill departments (notably Architecture, Civil Engineering, Geography, and Law) and with units at other institutions in Montreal, across Canada, and abroad. The School uses Montreal and its region as its main teaching laboratory.

McGill's School of Urban Planning has a strong track record of contributing to the community and to the profession. It works with civil society as well as with government, at home and abroad, to understand urban challenges and to formulate policies and plans to meet them.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.) Program

The Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.) program is a two-year course of study that attracts students from Quebec, Canada, the U.S., and overseas. It is recognized by the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec (OUQ) and the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP). Graduates may become full members of the OUQ and other provincial planning associations by completing their respective internship and examination requirements. Similar requirements must be met for admission to the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and other such organizations.

The M.U.P. program was designed with a strong emphasis on project-based learning, in particular through practical work done in teams in three planning studios. Approximately half of the curriculum is devoted to required courses that teach basic knowledge and skills in urban planning; the other half enables students to select courses or research projects that match their particular interests. Students participate actively in professors’ research programs or define their individual research objectives, sometimes with their own research funding from major agencies (e.g., SSHRC, NSERC).

The core program provides a general education in spatial planning in its functional, environmental, and social dimensions. A formal specialization is available in Transportation Planning. M.U.P. students in the core program may also participate in the Barbados Field Study Semester, which focuses on global environmental issues. Further information concerning these concentrations is available at www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning/programs. Students wishing to specialize in urban design, as in other subfields of planning, can do so within the core program. In all cases, electives, the summer internship, and the Supervised Research Project allow for individual concentration on a particular topic.

Graduates of the M.U.P. program work as planners, designers and policy analysts, as researchers, advocates and mediators, and they do so at various levels of government, in civil-society organizations, and with private consulting firms. Although their area of expertise varies, they devote their efforts in increasing numbers to sustainable development in its environmental, social, and economic dimensions.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The School of Urban Planning also offers the possibility of enrolling in a Ph.D. program managed under university regulations. Students can be admitted directly into the program if they hold a master’s degree. Exceptional students from the M.U.P. program can be admitted into the program as well. The Ph.D. program requires the equivalent of a year of course work and a year of preparation for examinations on the student’s field(s) of specialization and dissertation proposal. Work on the dissertation, which may be a monograph or a series of articles, takes two or more additional years.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) (66 credits)

The M.U.P. program requires two years of study, including a three-month summer internship in a professional setting. Upon completion of the program, graduates are expected to have acquired basic planning skills, a broad understanding of urban issues, and specialized knowledge in a field of their own choice.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) — Transportation Planning (66 credits)

The Transportation Planning concentration enables students to specialize in this field as part of their course of study for the M.U.P. degree. A number of core courses and electives, the summer internship, and the Supervised Research Project must be devoted to the acquisition of skills (including in quantitative analysis) necessary to work as a transportation planner. Admission into the concentration is based on a competitive selection process at the end of the first year of study in the M.U.P. program.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) — Urban Design (66 credits)
Note: The Urban Design option is being suspended. Students interested in Urban Design are able to specialize in this field of practice as part of the core M.U.P. program.

The Urban Design option allows students to specialize in this field as part of their course of study for the M.U.P. degree. Studio courses, an internship, and a final project involve real-life work that prepares students for the professional practice of Urban Design.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Urban Planning Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The M.U.P. degree is open to students holding a bachelor's degree or equivalent in Anthropology, Architecture, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Geography, Law, Management, Political Science, Social Work, Sociology, or Urban Studies. Students from other academic backgrounds may also apply, but should explain in the Personal Statement why they would like to transition into urban planning.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures and www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning/how-apply for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Personal Statement (one to two pages)
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. By the application deadlines, appropriate exam results must be sent electronically directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. The minimum requirement for the TOEFL is a score of 100 on the Internet-based test (iBT), with each component score not less than 23. The minimum score for the IELTS test is 7.0, with a score of at least 6.5 for each component.

Awards and Financial Assistance

The Admissions Committee decides the allocation of internal awards for incoming students after the application deadline, and they are allocated, in part, based on merit; no special application is needed to be considered for this funding. Canadian students can also enter the program with a major external fellowship from a government funding agency such as SSHRC and NSERC. Descriptions of the external awards can be found at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Urban Planning and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and /or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Mechanical Engineering

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

 

Mechanical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Macdonald Engineering Building
  • 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Room MD-270
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C3
  • Canada
  • Telephone (Admissions & Scholarships): 514-398-8869
  • Telephone (All other inquiries): 514-398-6281
  • Fax: 514-398-7365
  • Email (Admissions & Scholarships): grad [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Email (All other inquiries): gradcoordinator [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad

About Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are traditionally concerned with the conception, design, implementation, and operation of mechanical systems. Common fields of work include aerospace, energy, manufacturing, machinery, and transportation. Due to the broad nature of the discipline, there is usually a high demand for mechanical engineers with advanced training.

The Department includes more than 30 faculty members and 200 graduate students, and is housed primarily within the recently renovated Macdonald Engineering building. The Department contains state-of-the-art experimental facilities (including a major wind tunnel facility) and has extensive computational facilities. Professors within the Department collaborate widely with professors in other units, often through research centres including the Centre for Intelligent Machines (CIM); the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM); and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (MNI). The research interests within the Department are very broad and fall largely within the following five areas:

  • aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering
  • mechanics of materials and structures
  • dynamics and control
  • design and manufacturing
  • bioengineering

Within these areas, specific topics of research are given in the following:

Aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering

Experimental fluid mechanics and aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and aeroacoustics; theoretical fluid mechanics; turbulence; mixing in turbulent flows; fluid flow control; fluid-structure interactions; computational fluid dynamics, multidisciplinary optimization, and computer flow visualization; heat transfer; combustion, shock wave physics, energetic materials, high-speed reacting flows, hypersonic propulsion, and alternative fuels.

Mechanics of materials and structures

Composite materials: structural design, analysis, manufacturing, and processing; micro/nano mechanics; MEMS/NEMS; adaptronic structures; thermomechanics, wave propagation, and computational mechanics.

Dynamics and control

Multibody systems, legged and wheeled vehicles, compliant mechanisms, and kinematic geometry; tethered systems, lighter-than-air craft, and underwater vehicles; spacecraft dynamics and space robotics; modelling and simulation; fluid-structure interactions, nonlinear and chaotic dynamics; dynamics of bladed assemblies.

Design and manufacturing

Design theory and methodology, design optimization; biomimetics; machine tools and systems, manufacturing processes, and management and control; micro/nano machining; wear and comminution processes.

Bioengineering

Biomechanics, biomaterials, blood and respiratory flows, mechanics of soft tissues, cardiovascular devices, image processing for medical diagnostics, voice production.

Programs Offered

The Department offers programs of study leading to the M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Both M.Eng. (Thesis) and M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) programs are offered.

There are several options for completing master’s degrees that do not involve the completion of a thesis. The M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program has more extensive course requirements and will appeal to students who desire to gain both a broad understanding of subjects within Mechanical Engineering as well as in-depth information in a specific area. Two other non-thesis master’s degree options are described below.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Eng. (Thesis) program requires the completion of 16 credits of technical complementary courses, a seminar course, and a thesis. The thesis involves advanced research supervised by one or more professors who are internationally known in their field. This program prepares students for either an industrial research career or further academic research at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (46 credits)

For students who would like to concentrate on computational work for their research, the M.Eng. (Thesis) – Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) option is available. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. In this program, students choose their complementary courses from within a list of scientific computing courses and courses that involve applications and specialized methods.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

Students in this program must complete four required courses in addition to 16 credits of complementary courses and a seminar course. They also complete a project that is less involved than a thesis and may involve a limited research project, or a technical or design study. Graduates of this program are well-prepared for carrying out research and development in industry and may also proceed to further research at the Ph.D. level.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Aerospace Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Eng. Aerospace degree is offered to students who wish to specialize in the general area of aerospace engineering. This degree is given in conjunction with Concordia University, École Polytechnique, Université Laval, Université de Sherbrooke, and École de Technologie Supérieure. Students registered at McGill are required to take two courses from two other institutions.

The aerospace industry is strongly established in Quebec. Representatives of the aerospace industry therefore requested that measures be taken to provide for qualified scientists in aerospace. Five universities offering courses in engineering came together to offer a master’s degree program in the field of aeronautics and space technology. This program is offered to students who wish to specialize in these disciplines. The industry’s participation is a special feature of this program. The universities and the participating industries, with the cooperation of the Centre of Aerospace Manpower Activities in Quebec (CAMAQ), have formed a Coordinating Committee, CIMGAS, to arrange for industrial internships and case study courses for the students and to implement specific program developments to meet the needs of the industry.

The M.Eng. (Aerospace) program requires a minimum of 45 credits, including an “Industrial Stage” (i.e., engineering work in an aerospace industry) of four months. Enrolment is limited to the number of industrial stages available, so admission to the program is typically quite competitive. While intended to be a full-time program, the M.Eng. Aerospace program may be completed on a part-time basis over a maximum of five years. By the time of completion of the program, graduates are extremely well-prepared to enter into a career in the aerospace industry.

Depending on their background, students would specialize in one of the four areas:

  1. Aeronautics and Space Engineering
  2. Avionics and Control
  3. Aerospace Materials and Structures
  4. Virtual Environment
Master of Management (M.M.); Manufacturing Management (Non-Thesis) (56 credits)

This program is currently not offered

The Master in Manufacturing Management (M.M.M.) program attracts business professionals from around the world who wish to pursue a career in the effective management of global operations and supply chain. It is a professionally-oriented graduate program offered jointly through the Faculties of Engineering and Management, aimed at those candidates with engineering or science backgrounds.

In just eleven months of academic studies, M.M.M. students sharpen their expertise in supply chain and operations through an intensive program that includes:

  • A challenging curriculum
  • Extensive industrial interaction
  • Innovative research projects

Additionally, students are exposed to the latest trends and developments in management and participate in professional development seminars to leverage their communication and leadership skills. After less than one year of studies, participants complete a paid work term at an industrial location. This is a unique opportunity to work on a real-world project with an M.M.M. partner company in North America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)

Please consult the Department for more information on this program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mechanical Engineering

In the Ph.D. program, students are required to demonstrate a significant new contribution to their field of research, as documented in an externally reviewed thesis. The research is carried out under the supervision of professors who are leaders in their field. Since research in Mechanical Engineering is often interdisciplinary in nature, it is common for Ph.D. students to have a co-supervisor in addition to their principle supervisor. Graduates from this program typically proceed to careers in research in either industrial or academic environments.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Mechanical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The general rules of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies apply. Candidates who come from other institutions are expected to have an academic background equivalent to the undergraduate curriculum in mechanical engineering at McGill or to make up any deficiencies in a Qualifying year.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering. Applicants who hold an undergraduate degree in a non-Engineering discipline—typically the Physical Sciences—may apply for the M.Sc. (Thesis) program, which is governed by the same regulations as the M.Eng. (Thesis) program.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Mechanical Engineering.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Aerospace) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program must have successfully completed a master's degree program (or equivalent) in Engineering or the Physical Sciences. In exceptional circumstances, students with outstanding performance at the bachelor's level may be offered direct entry into the Ph.D. program (Ph.D. 1).

In the case of all programs, applicants must have successfully completed their prior degree(s) with a minimum CGPA equivalent to 3.3 on a scale of 4.0. Satisfaction of these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit official results of either a TOEFL or an IELTS test. The minimum score required is 92 for the Internet-based TOEFL test, with each component score not less than 20 (or 580 on the paper-based test, with a minimum of 4.0 on the “Test of Written English”); or a minimum overall band of 7.0 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please consult www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad for further details on required application documents.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • two official Referee Reports
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Curriculum Vitae – please include a list of publications, if relevant
  • proof of French proficiency (for Aerospace program only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Oct. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics and Statistics

Location

  • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3800
  • Fax: 514-398-3899
  • Email: grad [dot] mathstat [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.math.mcgill.ca

About Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs that can be focused on applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to master’s degrees (M.A. or M.Sc.), with program options in Bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE). The research groups are:

  • Algebra Category;
  • Theory and Logic;
  • Geometric Group Theory;
  • Algebraic Geometry;
  • Discrete Mathematics;
  • Mathematical Physics;
  • Analysis and its Applications;
  • Differential Geometry;
  • Number Theory;
  • Applied Mathematics;
  • Differential Equations;
  • Probability and Statistics.

In the basic master’s programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option which requires a project. The Bioinformatics and CSE options require a thesis. In addition to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Statistics, there is a Ph.D. option in Bioinformatics.

The Department website provides extensive information on the Department and its facilities, including the research activities and research interests of individual faculty members. It also provides detailed supplementary information concerning our programs, admissions, funding of graduate students, thesis requirements, advice concerning the choice of courses, etc.

Students are urged to consult the Institut des Sciences Mathématiques (ISM) website, which coordinates intermediate and advanced-level graduate courses among Montreal and Quebec universities. A list of courses available under the ISM auspices can be obtained from the ISM website. The ISM also offers fellowships and promotes a variety of joint academic activities greatly enhancing the mathematical environment in Montreal and in the province of Quebec.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the Master's degree (M.A.). The thesis option requires a thesis and six approved courses.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The non-thesis option requires a project and eight approved courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.). The thesis option requires a thesis and six approved courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (47 credits)

CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. Please visit our website for more information.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.).The non-thesis option requires a project and eight approved courses.

Ph.D. Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics

The Department offers a course of studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. It differs substantially from the master’s programs in that the student must write a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge. The thesis topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the research supervisor. The thesis must be examined and approved by an internal examiner (normally the research supervisor), an external examiner and the Oral Examination Committee. The student must make an oral defense of the thesis before that Committee. In addition, the student has to pass comprehensive examinations.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics — Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Mathematics and Statistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements, the Department requirements are as follows:

Master's Degree

The normal entrance requirement for the master's programs is a Canadian honours degree or its equivalent, with high standing, in mathematics or a closely related discipline in the case of applicants intending to concentrate in statistics or applied mathematics.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in pure mathematics should have a strong background in linear algebra, abstract algebra, and real and complex analysis.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in statistics should have a strong background in linear algebra and basic real analysis. A calculus-based course in probability and one in statistics are required, as well as some knowledge of computer programming. Some knowledge of numerical analysis and optimization is desirable.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in applied mathematics should have a strong background in most of the areas of linear algebra, analysis, differential equations, discrete mathematics, and numerical analysis. Some knowledge of computer programming is also desirable.

Students whose preparation is insufficient for the program they wish to enter may, exceptionally, be admitted to a Qualifying year.

Ph.D. Degree

A master's degree with high standing is required, in addition to the requirements listed above for the master’s program. Students may transfer directly from the master’s program to the Ph.D. program under certain conditions. Students without a master's degree, but with exceptionally strong undergraduate training, may be admitted directly to Ph.D. 1.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Personal Statement – In the personal statement, the applicants should clearly explain their choice of preferred research group(s) and preferred area(s) of research, as well as providing relevant information that will not be reflected on their transcripts
  • Research Proposal (optional) – If applicants have a specific research problem of interest that they want to pursue, they may discuss the details in the research proposal
  • Applicants in pure and applied mathematics should provide a GRE score report, if available

For more details, please consult www.math.mcgill.ca/students/graduate/application.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Bioresource Engineering

Bioresource Engineering

Location

  • Department of Bioresource Engineering
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/bioeng

About Bioresource Engineering

The Department offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs in various areas of bioresource engineering including:

  • plant and animal environments;
  • ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management, and remediation);
  • water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality);
  • agricultural machinery, mechatronics, and robotics;
  • food engineering and bio-processing;
  • post-harvest technology;
  • waste management and protection of the environment;
  • bio-energy;
  • artificial intelligence.

The Department has well equipped laboratories for conducting research in all these areas.

The interdisciplinary nature of bioresource engineering often requires candidates for higher degrees to work in association with, or attend courses given by, a number of other departments at both the McGill University Macdonald campus and the Downtown campus.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) (46 credits)

This option for the M.Sc. degree is oriented toward individuals who intend to develop a career in bioresource engineering research. The research areas include: plant and animal environments; ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management and remediation); water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality); agricultural machinery, mechatronics and robotics; food engineering and bio-processing; post-harvest technology; waste management and protection of the environment; bio-energy; and artificial intelligence.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)

The Environmental option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (46 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Water Resources Management (45 credits)

Integrated Water Resource Management is a one-year program providing an essential approach for sustainable management of our natural watershed resources. The 13-credit internship is a central feature of this master’s program. The degree gives students the unique opportunity to study the biophysical, environmental, legal, institutional, and socio-economic aspects of water use and management, in an integrated context. The degree is directed at practising professionals who wish to upgrade and/or focus their skill set to address water management issues.

As a graduate from this program, you will be well suited to opportunities in diverse fields of employment, such as water resources consulting, international development project management, research with governments or universities, public policy and governance development, and climate change impact assessment.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas (soil and water, structures and environment, waste management, environment protection, post-harvest technology, food process engineering, environmental engineering) in order to attain a higher level of engineering qualification. Candidates must be qualified to be members of a Canadian professional engineering association such as the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ) and must maintain contact with their academic adviser in the Department of Bioresource Engineering before registration to clarify objectives, investigate project possibilities, and plan a program of study.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)

The non-thesis Environment option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas with the coordination of the McGill School of Environment.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)

The Environmental Engineering program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge, practical perspective, and awareness of environmental issues through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University.

The primary objective of the program is to train environmental professionals at the advanced level. The program is thus designed for individuals with a university undergraduate degree in engineering. Through this program, students will master specialized skills in their home disciplines and acquire a broader perspective and awareness of environmental issues.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Food and Bioprocessing (45 credits)

This graduate program will provide students with the tools to understand how food and agricultural production interact to better manage agricultural, food, and biomass systems for the adequate supply of wholesome food, feed, fiber, biofuel, and any other bio-based material. This course-based program will present students with the skills needed to assess existing production, delivery, and quality management systems; introduce improvements; and communicate effectively with policy makers and with colleagues in multi-disciplinary teams.

The goals of this program are to provide up-to-date world class knowledge on techniques for adequate process design and management of biomass production strategies for the delivery of quality food, natural fiber, biochemicals, biomaterials, and biofuels, in a sustainable and environment-friendly way that benefits all. Training activities will include laboratory research and/or industrial/government internships.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (45 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering

This is a research-based degree and is offered in the following areas: plant and animal environments; ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management and remediation); water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality); agricultural machinery, mechatronics and robotics; food engineering and bio-processing; post-harvest technology; waste management and protection of the environment; bio-energy; and artificial intelligence.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment

The Ph.D. Bioresource Engineering: Environment – MSE Option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Neotropical Environment

This program is currently not offered.

Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering — Integrated Water Resources Management (15 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Bioresource Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and Graduate Certificates should indicate in some detail their fields of special interest when applying for admission. An equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class–upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study is required at the bachelor's level. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program. Experience after the undergraduate degree is an additional asset.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid

Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE – not required, but highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Bioresource Engineering Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: Mar. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).