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Urban Planning

Urban Planning

Location

  • School of Urban Planning
  • Macdonald Harrington Building, Room 400
  • 815 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C2
  • Canada

About Urban Planning

Urban planning is the process by which a community shapes its environment to meet its needs and realize its aspirations. Urban planning is also the profession of those who facilitate this process. While the practice of planning is as old as the cities themselves, the Urban Planning profession is only about a century old. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, architects, landscape architects, engineers, government reformers, lawyers, public health specialists, and others joined forces to tackle the serious social and environmental problems of the industrial city. They created new techniques and institutions to improve living conditions and decision-making processes, with an eye to improving cities in terms of health, safety, efficiency, equity, beauty, identity, etc. Today, people who enter the profession come from diverse backgrounds as well, including the design professions, engineering and applied sciences, environmental and social studies, and other fields. Their challenge is to reinvent tools and procedures to meet new challenges in making cities socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. A key feature of planning education is learning to view issues in a multidisciplinary way, to manage processes of collaboration and of conflict, and to generate equitable and efficient solutions to complex problems of urban development.

McGill University was the first institution in Canada to offer a full-time planning program starting in 1947. In 1972, the School of Urban Planning was created as a separate academic unit within the Faculty of Engineering. It shares a heritage building with the School of Architecture, right on the main open space of McGill’s Downtown campus. The primary objective of the Master of Urban Planning program is to educate professional urban planners for leadership in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. This happens in large part through project-based learning. The program also puts great emphasis on students doing policy-relevant research.

The School prepares doctoral students for high-level research and teaching positions. The doctoral program is an Ad hoc program—in which students are subject to the University’s regulations in terms of supervision and progress—that welcomes a small number of students, both local and international, who hold a master’s degree and apply on the basis of their own research interests. Prospective applicants should consult www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning.

The School’s teaching and research activities, for both master’s and Ph.D. students, pertain primarily to community planning; environmental policy and planning; international development planning; land-use planning and regulation; transportation and infrastructure planning; and urban design. These activities, which are conducted for the purpose of promoting better decision-making and improving human environments, often take place in partnership with other McGill departments (notably Architecture, Civil Engineering, Geography, and Law) and with units at other institutions in Montreal, across Canada, and abroad. The School uses Montreal and its region as its main teaching laboratory.

McGill's School of Urban Planning has a strong track record of contributing to the community and to the profession. It works with civil society as well as with government, at home and abroad, to understand urban challenges and to formulate policies and plans to meet them.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.) Program

The Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.) program is a two-year course of study that attracts students from Quebec, Canada, the U.S., and overseas. It is recognized by the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec (OUQ) and the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP). Graduates may become full members of the OUQ and other provincial planning associations by completing their respective internship and examination requirements. Similar requirements must be met for admission to the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and other such organizations.

The M.U.P. program was designed with a strong emphasis on project-based learning, in particular through practical work done in teams in three planning studios. Approximately half of the curriculum is devoted to required courses that teach basic knowledge and skills in urban planning; the other half enables students to select courses or research projects that match their particular interests. Students participate actively in professors’ research programs or define their individual research objectives, sometimes with their own research funding from major agencies (e.g., SSHRC, NSERC, FQRSC, FQRNT).

The core program provides a general education in spatial planning in its functional, environmental, and social dimensions. A formal specialization is available in Transportation Planning. M.U.P. students in the core program may also participate in the Barbados Field Study Semester, which focuses on global environmental issues. Details concerning these concentrations are available at www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning/programs and www.mcgill.ca/bfss respectively. Students wishing to specialize in urban design, as in other subfields of planning, can do so within the core program. In all cases, electives, the summer internship, and the Supervised Research Project allow for individual concentration on a particular topic.

Graduates of the M.U.P. program work as planners, designers and policy analysts, as researchers, advocates and mediators, and they do so at various levels of government, in civil-society organizations, and with private consulting firms. Although their area of expertise varies, they devote their efforts in increasing numbers to sustainable development in its environmental, social, and economic dimensions.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The School of Urban Planning also offers the possibility of enrolling in a Ph.D. program managed under university regulations. Students can be admitted directly into the program if they hold a master’s degree. Exceptional students from the M.U.P. program can be admitted into the program as well. The Ph.D. program requires the equivalent of a year of course work and a year of preparation for examinations on the student’s field(s) of specialization and dissertation proposal. Work on the dissertation, which may be a monograph or a series of articles, takes two or more additional years.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) (66 credits)
The M.U.P. program requires two years of study, including a three-month summer internship in a professional setting. Upon completion of the program, graduates are expected to have acquired basic planning skills, a broad understanding of urban issues, and specialized knowledge in a field of their own choice.
Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) — Transportation Planning (66 credits)
Note: The Transportation Planning option is not being offered in 2014-2015. Students will be able to take some courses in this area and devote their Internship and Supervised Research Project to transportation-related topic, but a formal concentration will not be available.
The Transportation Planning concentration enables students to specialize in this field as part of their course of study for the M.U.P. degree. A number of core courses and electives, the summer internship, and the Supervised Research Project must be devoted to the acquisition of skills (including in quantitative analysis) necessary to work as a transportation planner. Admission into the concentration is based on a competitive selection process at the end of the first year of study in the M.U.P. program.
Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) — Urban Design (66 credits)
Note: The Urban Design option is being suspended. Students interested in Urban Design are able to specialize in this field of practice as part of the core M.U.P. program.
The Urban Design option allows students to specialize in this field as part of their course of study for the M.U.P. degree. Studio courses, an internship, and a final project involve real-life work that prepares students for the professional practice of Urban Design.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Urban Planning Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The M.U.P. degree is open to students holding a bachelor's degree or equivalent in Anthropology, Architecture, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Geography, Law, Management, Political Science, Social Work, Sociology, or Urban Studies. Students from other backgrounds are considered for admission on an individual basis.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement (one to two pages)
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. By the application deadlines, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. The minimum requirement for the TOEFL test is as follows: PBT – 600, iBT – 100, with each component score not less than 23. The minimum score for the IELTS test is 7.0

Awards and Financial Assistance

The School offers several fellowships and supports student applications to external grants from provincial and federal agencies. For information regarding awards and financial assistance, please refer to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Urban Planning and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and /or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Kinesiology and Physical Education

 Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Kinesiology and Physical Education

Location

  • Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education
  • Sir Arthur Currie Memorial Gymnasium
  • 475 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal QC H2W 1S4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4184, ext. 0302
  • Fax: 514-398-4186
  • Email: eileen [dot] leduc [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/edu-kpe

About Kinesiology and Physical Education

The Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education provides a large variety of research opportunities in a number of areas related to human health and physical activity.

Master's Programs

In Exercise Physiology, research is being conducted on obesity treatment, public health surveillance, and health disparities; biology and physiology of aging skeletal muscle; adaptive plasticity of skeletal muscle in health, disease, and aging; the role of mitochondria in skeletal muscle health, disease, and aging; interventions to protect and/or restore mass and function of aging muscle; biology and physiology of the aging heart; clinical and integrative exercise and cardio-respiratory physiology; COPD research; and muscle physiology and biophysics.

Other research in Biomechanics includes specialization in ergonomics, motor control, fatigue, and musculoskeletal disorders; locomotion and gait research; applied ice hockey research; and neurophysiology and rehabilitation.

In Exercise and Health Psychology, research is presently underway examining the psychosocial determinants of health behaviour, body-related emotions, and physical self; motivation in youth sport and physical activity; school and community-based physical activity promotion; and physical education and health development.

In Sports Psychology, research questions examine determinants of coaching expertise, team building, psychology of athletic injuries (concussions), and hockey violence.

Research in Adapted Physical Activity examines issues of self-regulation of individuals with movement difficulties, physical activity in persons with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), play and movement skill proficiency, perceptions and professional skill development of physical education teachers, motor behaviour, and autism.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program on an ad hoc basis, or, with the permission of the supervisor and the approval of the Graduate Program Director, exceptional students may transfer from the master's program to the ad hoc Ph.D. program.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Thesis) (45 credits) and Master of Science (M.Sc.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Thesis) (45 credits)
The thesis programs in Kinesiology and Physical Education are designed to help students develop research skills and expertise in their selected areas of research. All students must have a physical science background to study in the M.Sc. program and a social-psychological background to study in the M.A. program. Researchers in our program have their own research facilities. These research programs often lead to pursuits in research and teaching careers, or in professional careers in kinesiology. For example, many students pursue careers in fitness/wellness, exercise rehabilitation settings, and sport science settings. Students may become teachers, health club directors, work in cardiac rehabilitation centres, and/or become exercise prescription counsellors.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits) and Master of Science (M.Sc.); Kinesiology and Physical Education (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The non-thesis programs are not being offered in 2014–2015.

The non-thesis programs in Kinesiology and Physical Education are intended to help students develop professional skills related to their careers in kinesiology and physical education who do not have an interest in research. Students will work with a supervisor and will take a number of courses in the academic areas of interest and will also complete a research project in the area of interest.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Kinesiology and Physical Education Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate degree in Physical and Health Education, Exercise Science, Kinesiology, or its equivalent is required.
  2. A minimum academic standing equivalent to a CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 or a GPA of 3.2 out of 4.0 in the last two years of full-time studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Feb. 15 Fall: Feb. 15 Fall: June 30
Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Sept. 1
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete application are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Social Work

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Social Work

Location

  • School of Social Work
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street, Suite 300
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7070
  • Fax: 514-398-4760
  • Email: graduate [dot] socialwork [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/socialwork

About Social Work

The School of Social Work offers dynamic M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, designed to explore cutting-edge knowledge on social work theory, practice, policy, and research. We have an exciting and growing faculty with a variety of research and practice expertise in the fields of: child welfare; health, mental health, and disability; poverty; aging; First Peoples; marginalized groups (e.g., immigrants and refugees, war affected populations, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people); loss and bereavement; domestic violence; and international social work. Our approaches to practice and research cover all levels of intervention from individuals, families, groups, and communities. Located within the School of Social Work are specialized centres devoted to research and training in the areas of domestic violence; children and families; and international human rights. Graduate students also have access to workstations equipped with computers, and many professional development workshops and seminars. Several research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available each year.

The McGill School of Social Work is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW), the Canadian Association for Social Work Education – l'Association Canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE-ACFTS), and of the Regroupement des unités de formation universitaire en travail social du Québec (RUFUTS).

The School of Social Work is a professional school with the primary objective of preparing students for careers and for leadership in the fields of social work and social welfare.

Qualifying Year Entry into the M.S.W. Program

Applicants demonstrating academic excellence and a minimum of one year of social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional) are considered for admission to the one-year, full-time (only) Qualifying year of study in preparation for entry to the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program. The objective of this preparatory year is to provide students with essential foundation social work knowledge that will provide a basis upon which to embark on graduate-level studies in social work.

M.S.W. Program

The overarching objective of the master's program is the provision of advanced professional training by means of integrated learning experiences. Specifically, the educational goals are to:

  1. develop a deepened and advanced competence in practice and research;
  2. embrace a capacity for critical understanding of social theories, social problems, and emergent issues; and
  3. understand population groups in need, institutional structures, and policy initiatives and processes.

The M.S.W. degree can be pursued via two options: thesis and non-thesis. Both options carry a weight of 45 credits, and, taken on a full-time basis, both options involve three terms of study. In both options, part-time study can be arranged.

There are two points of entry into the M.S.W.: one for those who hold a B.S.W. degree; and one for those who have completed the one-year Qualifying year of study offered by the School of Social Work.

Ph.D. Program in Social Work

The School of Social Work offers a dynamic Ph.D. program in social work/social policy in order to promote the development of scholarship on social issues within Canada and Quebec. Courses are offered in English at McGill. Parallel streams are offered in French at Université de Montréal and Université du Québec à Montréal. Students have the opportunity of taking courses at all three universities.

The program aims to:

  1. prepare graduates for careers in university teaching and research, policy development, implementation and evaluation, practice and program evaluation, leadership and management of human services;
  2. offer students the opportunity to acquire research methodology skills and to apply these to a range of areas relevant to social work; and
  3. stimulate original research on important social problems and issues.
Note: With respect to M.S.W. and Q.Y. programs, while not a prerequisite for admission, possession of a working knowledge of the French language is important not only to candidates who intend to seek admission to the Quebec professional Ordre after graduation but also to those who wish to maximize their field placement opportunities during their program. In consultation with the Field Education Coordinator, students may have the option of completing their field requirements at an approved social service agency outside of Quebec.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Couple and Family Therapy (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
The Master's program in Couple and Family Therapy is a full-time professional Master's program of 60 credits taken over five terms. Graduates of this program will qualify for two professional permits: the Couple and Family Therapist permit (Ordre des travailleurs sociaux et des thérapeutes conjugaux et familiaux du Québec (OTSTCFQ)); and the Psychotherapist permit (Ordre des Psychologues du Québec (OPQ)). The high standards for admission, course requirements, and clinical supervision will produce highly trained graduates who will be desirable future employees with enhanced career and employment opportunities. Graduating from McGill University's Master of Science, Applied in Couple and Family Therapy will be an esteemed professional credential.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of research skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. Program requirements consist of a thesis and six courses (two of which are required), taken over an extended period of three to four terms of full-time study. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional). Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.S.W. Non-Thesis option is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of practice skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. This program entails three semesters of full-time study that consist of coursework, professional education in a supervised field placement, and an independent study project. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional), or will have successfully completed the Qualifying year entry into the M.S.W. Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) — International Partner Program (45 credits)
This program is offered intermittently, based on funding, to a specific cohort of students by invitation only.
Joint Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with Integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) (132 credits)
The School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law offer a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law/Bachelor of Laws (B.C.L./LL.B.) designed to transcend academic boundaries in social justice issues. Lawyers and social workers often operate in the same fields, whether in public policy, child protection, family law, poverty law, or domestic violence situations, yet each profession has been constrained by internal limitations. The joint M.S.W. (non-thesis option)/Law program requires students to complete 132 credits (45 credits in M.S.W., 87 credits in Law). Students should take three and a half to four years to complete the M.S.W./B.C.L./LL.B. program. It is possible, however, to complete the program in three years, by doing work for credit over the summer and by carrying heavier course loads throughout the program. The joint program leads to conferral of the B.C.L./LL.B. law degrees and the master’s degree in social work. Prospective students possess a B.S.W. degree with prior practice experience.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Social Work (offered jointly by McGill and Université de Montréal)
As one of the top Ph.D. programs in Canada, the School of Social Work promotes leading scholarship on social policy and practice. Over the course of three to four years, working closely with their supervisor, students pursue individualized programs of study, which include coursework, research, and professional development. Faculty have expertise in a variety of areas such as aging; social exclusion; child welfare; international social welfare; Aboriginal people and communities; violence against women and children; health and disability; poverty and social development; migration and community organizing. Students normally take two semesters of coursework after which they complete a comprehensive exam. In the second year of the program students begin their thesis work and take a course designed to facilitate the research process. Research and writing usually takes between one and two years to complete. McGill offers entrance fellowships, access to computers and library resources, and active student networks. There are many opportunities to be involved in faculty research projects and sessional teaching. Students go on to careers in teaching, organizational leadership, and social policy analysis.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Please note that the application procedures for the School of Social Work has changed slightly for the 2014-15 admissions cycle. Applicants are asked to refer to the School’s webpage (http://www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective/) for application instructions.

Social Work Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. For the TOEFL, McGill's institutional code is 0935.

  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) – International applicants must achieve a minimum score of 96* on the Internet-based test.

    * Each individual component of reading, writing, listening, and speaking must have a minimum score of 24.

  • The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) – International applicants must achieve a minimum overall band score of 8.0**.

    ** Each individual component of reading, writing, listening, and speaking must have a minimum score of 7.5.

M.S.W. Program

Applicants who have successfully completed a B.S.W., with a minimum high B average (GPA 3.2/4.0), and who have completed coursework in statistics and in research methods at the undergraduate level within the last five years are admissible to the Master of Social Work program. Applicants are expected to have one year of paid or volunteer professional social work experience prior to admission.

Students who have completed the one-year, full-time Qualifying year of study at the School of Social Work are eligible for direct admission to the M.S.W. program (non-thesis only) provided they have secured a minimum B+ average in Qualifying courses, and have successfully fulfilled all fieldwork requirements.

M.Sc.A. Program

The Master's in Couple and Family Therapy is designed to allow students with prior coursework in Family Theory/Therapy (e.g., M.S.W. graduates or Counselling Psychology graduates with master's level family courses) to receive advanced credit for these courses and be eligible for Advance level entry (minimum of 45 credits) taken over three terms. Admission to the program will be inter-disciplinary, with candidates entering from related social science or helping profession backgrounds such as Social Work, Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology, Sociology, Nursing, or other related disciplines.

Applicants who have successfully completed a bachelor's or master's degree in a related human science or helping profession, with a minimum overall CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0, are eligible to apply.

Joint program: Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.)

Applicants must apply separately for admission to each Faculty. Applicants must meet or surpass the requirements for admission to both the M.S.W. program and to Law and must submit a brief statement explaining their interest in this joint program along with all other required admission materials.

Ph.D. Program

Applicants apply directly to the School of Social Work. Applicants applying to the Ph.D. program must hold a master's degree in social work or, exceptionally, a bachelor's degree in social work with a master's degree in a related subject from an accredited program. However, applicants who hold a master's degree in a related social science discipline with strong research interests and experience in social work/social policy may also be considered. All applicants must also have completed, at the university level, coursework in statistics and in research methods within the last five years.

Criteria considered in weighing applications include:

  • quality and relevance of the student's research proposal and one-page narrative;
  • quality of reference letters;
  • previous experience as demonstrated in the CV;
  • relevance and availability of proposed research supervisor.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications will only be considered upon receipt of all required documents.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Qualifying year of study applicants:
    • Curriculum Vitae (using form provided)
    • Program Application Face Sheet
    • Statement of Interest for Social Work
  • M.S.W. and Joint Program (M.S.W. & B.C.L/LL.B.) applicants:
    • Curriculum Vitae (using form provided)
    • Program Application Face Sheet
    • Plan of Study (non-thesis or thesis)
  • M.Sc.A. applicants:
    • Curriculum Vitae (using form provided)
    • Program Application Face Sheet
    • Pre-requisite Form (using form provided)
    • Advanced Standing Form (using form provided)
    • Letter of Intent
  • Ph.D. applicants:
    • Curriculum Vitae (using form provided)
    • Program Application Face Sheet
    • Research Proposal
    • Writing Sample
    • One-page Narrative
    • Statement of Availability

Details regarding these requirements can be found on the Department website at: www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Social Work and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 (for M.Sc.A. program: April 15) Fall: Jan. 15 (for M.Sc.A. program: March 31) Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Location

  • School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition
  • Macdonald-Stewart Building
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Dietetics and Human Nutrition

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, cutting-edge nutrition research is conducted by its 10 tenure-track professors and four faculty lecturers in all areas recommended by North American Nutrition Societies. These include molecular and cellular nutrition, clinical, community, and international nutrition. Domains emphasized by School researchers include: epigenetics; proteomics; metabolomics; embryonic and fetal origins of health and disease; the development of improved recommendations and policies for optimizing health in at-risk populations including Aboriginal populations, mothers and children, and the elderly; and the development of novel nutritional and/or nutraceutical approaches for treatment during surgery and recovery from disease.

Research is conducted in our on-site research labs, the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), the Institute for Global Food Security, the Mary Emily Clinical Nutrition Research unit, and the MUHC Teaching Hospitals. Students can conduct research or participate in clinical rotations with the BITS – Barbados, IDRC – Ghana and field sites in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Nutrition (Thesis) (45 credits)
A master’s degree in Human Nutrition offers advanced Nutrition courses in a broad range of research areas. The program is suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in nutritional sciences, exercise physiology, kinesiology, food science, biochemistry, medicine, or another closely related field. Students are required to complete 14 credits in advanced nutrition coursework plus 31 credits related to their thesis research. Graduates of our M.Sc. thesis degree have pursued successful careers in research, international health agencies, government agencies, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Practicum (45 credits) and Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program is a course-based master’s program. It allows students to further develop knowledge and expertise in nutrition. Students are required to complete 29 credits in advanced Nutrition courses plus 16 credits related to a research project or an advanced practicum (reserved for registered dietitians). Careers include managerial positions for practising dietitians, and careers in nutrition programs, government, and industry.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Dietetics Credentialing (83 credits)
The M.Sc. Applied program in Dietetics Credentialing is a course-based master's program with a dietetics Stage (internship) included. At the end of the program, students are qualified to be licensed with one of the provincial regulatory bodies in Canada, as well as in other countries, and practise in the areas of clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and foodservice management; French competency is an asset. The program is preceded by a Qualifying year, if necessary, to complete certain courses required for licensure. This is followed by three semesters of graduate-level courses (46 credits) and 3 semesters of Stage (37 credits), which include a practice-based graduate project.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Nutrition
A Ph.D. degree in Human Nutrition is suitable for students with an M.Sc. degree in Nutritional Sciences or related areas who wish to become independent researchers and/or leaders in the field of nutritional sciences. The School offers a stimulating research environment with opportunities in a wide range of areas of basic science, clinical research with our many hospital clinicians, as well as population health in Canada and abroad. Careers include academic, senior government, and industry positions within Canada and internationally.
Graduate Diploma in Registered Dietitian Credentialing (30 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill, students pursuing a graduate degree in nutrition have the opportunity to apply to our Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing, upon completion of the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program and upon completion of the undergraduate courses required by l'Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ). This Diploma consists of two semesters of Stage (internship) in Clinical Nutrition, Community Nutrition, and Foodservice Systems Management. Upon completion of the Diploma, the recipient is eligible to register and practice as a Dietitian in Quebec, as well as in other Canadian provinces and other countries.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis and M.Sc. Applied (Project, Practicum, and Dietetics Credentialing)

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University’s credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) for the M.Sc. Thesis and 3.5/4.0 for the M.Sc. Applied during their bachelor's degree program. Eligible candidates to the M.Sc. (Applied) program may select one of three options:

  1. The project option;
  2. The practicum option, which is reserved for those who have completed a dietetics internship and six months of work experience and wish to further develop their skills in a particular area of practice through an advanced internship;
  3. The dietetics credentialing option, for those who wish to follow a program combining courses and internship, leading to licensure as a dietitian.

Ph.D.

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. and M.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University's credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class – upper division) during their bachelor's and master's degree programs.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the School's minimum CGPA of 3.2 out of 4.0. The courses to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year (two terms) is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program. Students must re-apply for admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. While the school cannot guarantee financial support, teaching assistantships and other scholarships may be available.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Final acceptance to the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor. A supervisor is not required for acceptance to the M.Sc. (Applied) program.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – The GRE is required for all Ph.D. applicants to the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition who are submitting non-Canadian and non-U.S. transcripts.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: April 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).