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Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Location

  • Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics
  • McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
  • 3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler, Room 1325
  • Montreal QC H3G 1Y6
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3623
  • Fax: 514-398-2045
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] pharmacology [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/pharma

About Pharmacology and Therapeutics

The Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics offers training leading to M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degrees.

The Department also offers the Chemical Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Option, together with the Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry. Students interested in training in this option must first be accepted for graduate studies by one of the participating departments. Information on this option can be found at www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/graduate-studies-2/chemicalbiology.

Pharmacology is a multidisciplinary science that deals with all aspects of drugs and their interactions with living organisms. Thus, pharmacologists study the physical and chemical properties of drugs, their biochemical and physiological effects, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and therapeutic and other uses. The Department offers broad exposure and training in both basic and clinical research in a range of areas of specialty, including:

  • neuropharmacology;
  • reproductive pharmacology;
  • endocrine pharmacology;
  • receptor pharmacology;
  • cardiovascular pharmacology;
  • cancer;
  • developmental pharmacology;
  • autonomic pharmacology;
  • clinical pharmacology;
  • biochemical pharmacology;
  • molecular biology;
  • toxicology.

The present 52 full and affiliate members of the Department have research laboratories located in the McIntyre Medical Sciences Building and in a variety of hospitals, institutes, and industry including the Douglas Hospital Research Centre, Allan Memorial Institute, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal General Hospital, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal Heart Institute, Lady Davis Research Institute, Pfizer Canada, and Merck Frosst Canada Inc. (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015. Buildings and room numbers are to be confirmed.) The participation of researchers from both industry and government ensures the relevance of the Department's applications-oriented training programs.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pharmacology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The objective of the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degree training programs is to provide in-depth independent research experience in a specific area of pharmacology. The program leading to a master’s degree is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire knowledge in pharmacology, to conduct a research project, to analyze data, and to write a thesis. Students will also receive essential training in research professionalism and scientific communication.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pharmacology (Thesis) — Chemical Biology (47 credits)

The Chemical Biology Thematic Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics that span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes that unite the research being performed in this group is trying to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer, and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pharmacology

The objective of the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degree training programs is to provide in-depth independent research experience in a specific area of pharmacology. The program leading to a doctoral degree is designed to provide students the opportunity to acquire knowledge in pharmacology, to conduct an original research project, to analyze data, and to write a thesis. Students will also receive essential training in research professionalism and scientific communication.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pharmacology — Chemical Biology

The Chemical Biology Thematic Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics that span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes which unite the research being performed in this group is the attempt to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Pharmacology and Therapeutics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates are required to hold a B.Sc. degree in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study; those with the M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degrees are also eligible to apply. A background in the health sciences is recommended, but programs in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physical sciences may be acceptable.

Admission is based on a student's academic record, letters of assessment, and, whenever possible, interviews with staff members. Students are required to take the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test (GRE) and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the equivalent, except as follows: in accordance with McGill policy, only those whose mother tongue is English, who graduated from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), or who completed an undergraduate or graduate degree at a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction are exempt from providing proof of competency in English.

Inquiries relating to all aspects of graduate study should be directed to the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, as early as possible in each academic year.

Admissions Requirements – Chemical Biology Option

As for the regular graduate programs of the participating departments, acceptance into the Chemical Biology option consists of two steps:

  1. Preliminary approval by the Department's Graduate Committee based on the student's transcript, references, and other documents submitted with the application. The criteria for assessment at this level are the same as those for the regular graduate programs of the participating departments.
  2. Acceptance by an individual research director. For students wishing to participate in the Chemical Biology option, the director must propose a research project for the student that provides training in the methods and philosophy of chemical biology. Project proposals are assessed by the Chemical Biology Program Committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • GRE – required for degrees from outside North America
  • Acceptance by a Chemical Biology research director (Chemical Biology option only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Please refer to our website for complete deadlines.

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Pathology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Pathology

Location

  • Department of Pathology
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7192, ext. 00481 or 00494
  • Fax: 514-398-3465
  • Email: pathologyteaching [dot] med [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/pathology

About Pathology

.Pathology is the specialized area of biomedical science that emphasizes the study of disease, and it is therefore one of the most multidisciplinary fields of research. Investigators in a pathology department may be utilizing information and experimental techniques originally developed in almost any area of modern biology and, in return, may contribute new knowledge of benefit to many other disciplines. Research on disease may target any of the organ systems, in normal and abnormal conditions, and studies may be conducted from a structural, biochemical, or functional perspective at any level, from the intact organism down to specific components of the individual cell.

The Pathology Department offers research training in a wide variety of areas such as immunology and transplantation, neoplasia, ophthalmic pathology, cell biology, pulmonary vascular and airways disease, pulmonary edema, neurodegenerative disorders, and smooth muscle pathophysiology.

Modern techniques and equipment include light, fluorescence and electron microscopy (both transmission and scanning), laser capture, DNA analysis, cell culture, advanced immunological, pharmacological, biochemical, and physiological techniques, as well as morphometry and computer-aided analysis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pathology (Thesis) (45 credits)

Graduates can directly enter rewarding careers in research, or opt to continue with their studies and obtain a Ph.D. Some combine their research training with subsequent training in medicine, law, or business administration.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pathology

Our graduates enter successful careers in industry, academia, government/international agencies, or clinical medicine, sometimes combining two of these options. They leave McGill with experience in leadership and communication skills in addition to being highly trained in biomedical research, and their career choices include a wide range of administrative and research positions around the world.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Pathology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. or an equivalent degree with an extensive background in the physical and biological sciences. An academic record equivalent to or better than a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 out of 4.0 at McGill is required for at least the two final full-time years of undergraduate training, with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 overall.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit the GRE and TOEFL examinations in order to be properly evaluated as to their suitability.

Students are normally accepted into the M.Sc. program, and those candidates showing exceptional ability may be permitted to transfer into the Ph.D. program after one year of training.

Applicants who already possess an additional degree (M.Sc., M.D.) and have some research experience may be allowed to register in the Ph.D. program directly.

For further information, applicants may contact the Teaching Office, Department of Pathology.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

All applications will be evaluated by the Graduate Students Committee. Candidates found suitable must then be accepted by a research director, and adequate funding must be obtained for both personal support and research expenses.

Additional Requirements

  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • GRE may be required for non-Canadian applicants

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Pathology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 21 Fall: May 1 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Nov. 10 Winter: Sept. 10 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Apr. 1 Summer: Jan. 10 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

Location

  • Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
  • Jewish General Hospital
  • 3755 Chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Suite E-903
  • Montreal QC H3T 1E2
  • Canada

About Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

The Master of Science degree in Otolaryngology trains otolaryngologists and physicians for clinical or basic science research in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. Master's programs can include research on normal function and disease of head and neck structures: otology, neuro-otology, laryngology, rhinology, oncology, surgery, auditory-vestibular sciences, middle-ear modelling, oto-toxicity, genomics, infection, thyroid disease, or genetics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Otolaryngology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The master's program is intended for otolaryngologists or for physicians with a strong interest in otolaryngology research. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) may be considered. The program addresses research questions using an interdisciplinary approach, combining methodologies of both the clinical sciences and the basic sciences. The master's program is unique in Canada and rare elsewhere. Medical professionals graduating from the program can better treat ear-nose-throat diseases; they are better positioned to do, and to evaluate, research in Otolaryngology. They typically obtain the most highly sought positions in their fields.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Otolaryngology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the M.Sc. program requires acceptance by a research supervisor, and the proposed program must be approved by the Department.

Applicants should be otolaryngologists, or they should be currently enrolled in a residency program leading to certification in Otolaryngology, or they should be physicians. Under exceptional circumstances, others (Ph.D.s, dentists, veterinarians, medical professionals, etc.) with a strong interest in Otolaryngology Research will be considered.

The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (minimum of 86 on the Internet-based test [iBT] with each component score not less than 20 or 567 on the paper-based test [PBT]) is required for applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone).

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Prospective students should contact research supervisors individually.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal Statement
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Otolaryngology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Epidemiology

Epidemiology

The Department offers master's and doctoral programs in both Epidemiology and Biostatistics, as well as a Master's of Science in Public Health. The methods learned in these fields are used not only in the study of diseases, but also in health services research, program planning and evaluation, and policy development. Our faculty members are at the forefront of their research domains and include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, clinician scientists, medical informatics specialists, health economists, medical sociologists, and health geographers. Research in the Department spans all clinical specialties, including:

  • biostatistics;
  • clinical and public health informatics;
  • environmental and occupational health;
  • health care delivery and organization;
  • infectious diseases;
  • pharmacoepidemiology;
  • population and public health;
  • social epidemiology;
  • and many cross-disciplinary activities.

Faculty members may have funding available for students through their research grants. We provide rich research environments at five university-affiliated hospitals, public health agencies, and university research centres. Graduates pursue careers in academia, clinical settings, government agencies, and industry.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Epidemiology (Thesis) (48 credits)

Applicants to the M.Sc. program should hold a bachelor’s degree in the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography) or social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or hold a degree in one of the health professional sciences (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The program leading to a master’s degree is designed to provide training in both theory and practice in the selected discipline. Courses require intellectual and academic rigour, and the program provides students with an opportunity to synthesize the training in the form of a thesis. Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and applied biostatistics, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, pharmaco-epidemiological, policy, and methodological health-related research. Graduates of the program often go on to do doctoral work or become research associates in public, private, and academic settings. McGill graduates are known for methodological and quantitative rigour, and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)

The mission of the Master's of Public Health is to train outstanding public health professionals and future leaders by offering a rigorous academic program in methods, research, and practice. This program may be of interest for students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, physical and occupational therapy, nutrition). Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and biostatistics, as applied to public health research and practice, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, policy, and methodological public health-related research. Graduates of the program will serve as public health practitioners, research professionals, and educators, and will possess the competencies and professionalism to carry out broad public health functions in local, provincial, national, and international settings. In exceptional circumstances, the Admissions Committee may take professional experience into account for mid-career or returning/re-entry applicants.

The Master's of Public Health program includes a 14–16 week practicum after the first year, which will provide the student with the opportunity to use knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a public health practice or research setting. Students who wish to focus on certain specific areas can choose to take all their elective credits in one domain and must complete their practicum in the same area (e.g., global health; health services research; program and policy development and evaluation; environmental health; etc.).

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (60 credits)

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered by the Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) as an option within existing master’s and doctoral programs in the Departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. The option is coordinated by the CPD, in partnership with participating academic units.

Thus, in addition to the rigorous training provided in the Department of EBOH, graduate students who choose this option become Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) student trainees. This affiliation notably offers opportunities for interdisciplinary research and supervision. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, a weekly seminar series, and informal discussions and networking.

With interdisciplinary research being increasingly important to understanding complex social and biological processes, CPD student trainees benefit from both a strong disciplinary foundation from their departmental affiliations, as well as from the sharing of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries through CPD activities.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology

This program may be of interest to students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The Ph.D. program prepares students with the advanced epidemiological research skills needed to undertake original contributions to new knowledge related to the determinants of health and disease, prevention, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The program is generally completed in four to five years. Graduates will be prepared to engage in scientific collaboration, and communicate results to other scientists and diverse audiences. They will go on to careers in public health, health planning, and quality monitoring in local, regional, federal, and international health authorities, statistical and technology assessment agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, and in clinical and academic research organizations. McGill graduates are known for their methodological and quantitative rigour and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology — Population Dynamics

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered by the Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) as an option within existing master’s and doctoral programs in the Departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. The option is coordinated by the CPD, in partnership with participating academic units.

Thus, in addition to the rigorous training provided in the Department of EBOH, graduate students who choose this option become Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) student trainees. This affiliation notably offers opportunities for interdisciplinary research and supervision. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, a weekly seminar series, and informal discussions and networking.

With interdisciplinary research being increasingly important to understanding complex social and biological processes, CPD student trainees benefit from both a strong disciplinary foundation from their departmental affiliations, as well as from the sharing of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries through CPD activities.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).
 

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Location

  • School of Communication Sciences and Disorders
  • 2001 McGill College Avenue, Suite 800
  • Montreal QC H3A 1G1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4137
  • Fax: 514-398-8123
  • Email: scsd [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/scsd

About Communication Sciences and Disorders

The School provides both professional and research training in communication sciences and disorders at the graduate level through its M.Sc. (Applied), M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees. We were the first department in Canada to provide both clinical and research degrees. Our M.Sc.A. program aims to educate the next generation of well-prepared and innovative speech-language pathology professionals by providing enriched classroom training, clinical laboratory activities that enhance the transition from theory to practice, and outstanding clinical practicum experiences. Our research degrees are designed to develop leading researchers and scholars, who will go on to train future investigators in the field of communication sciences and disorders and who, through their research, will advance our understanding of the processes of human communication and its breakdown.

Interdisciplinary interactions are at the core of our research training approach, which includes preparation to conduct both fundamental and clinically applied investigations. Our professors have collaborative ties with many departments and institutes of McGill:

  • psychology;
  • linguistics;
  • neuroscience;
  • otolaryngology;
  • biomedical engineering;
  • Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital;
  • other Montreal universities.

They also maintain national and international collaborations. Students can access this rich collaborative network via the McGill Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, a world-class interdisciplinary research centre established and directed by the School. The multilingual context in which we reside provides a unique environment for language research.

The School offers:

  • a professional degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the M.Sc. (Applied) level with specialization in Speech Language Pathology
  • two research degrees: an M.Sc. (Research) and a Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Requirements for Licensure

The majority of provinces in Canada and certain states in the U.S. require that those intending to practise as speech-language pathologists within their borders comply with special provincial or state licensing regulations. Graduates wishing to practise in the province of Quebec must be members of the Ordre des Orthophonistes et Audiologistes du Québec (OOAQ) in order to call themselves speech-language pathologists. Further information is available from the OOAQ at:

  • 235 boulevard René-Lévesque est, bureau 601
  • Montreal QC H2X 1N8
  • Telephone: 514-282-9123
  • Email: info [at] ooaq [dot] qc [dot] ca
  • Website: www.ooaq.qc.ca

Quebec law requires that candidates seeking licensure in provincially recognized professions demonstrate a verbal and written working knowledge of the French language. See University Regulations and Resources > Undergraduate > Admission to Professional and Graduate Studies > Language Requirements for Professions.

Funding

IODE Canada funds two $1,000 “Silence to Sound” awards for studies in hearing impairment. These in-course awards are based on academic merit, Canadian citizenship, financial need, and potential for excellence, and are awarded by the School with approval of funds by IODE Canada.

Montreal League for the Hard of Hearing Award – Candidates must be enrolled at the graduate level in the School and working in the area of hearing impairment. Awarded by the School. Value: up to $1,000.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Communication Sciences & Disorders (Non-Thesis) — Speech-Language Pathology (81 credits)

The professional degree leads to a Master of Science (Applied) with a specialization in Speech Language Pathology. The program involves two academic years of full-time study and related practical work followed by a Summer internship. To prepare students as creative professionals, the program emphasizes the understanding of principles and theories, and their present or potential clinical applications, in addition to the teaching of specific techniques for assessment and intervention. Active participation in the learning process is encouraged.

The profession of speech-language pathology concerns assessment and intervention in speech and language disorders. In particular, the speech-language pathologist is concerned with two major parameters of communication sciences and disorders: language and speech. At present, most speech-language pathologists in Canada work in hospitals, public school systems, rehabilitation centres, and in special education facilities.

Students pursuing the M.Sc.A. complete the basic academic content and clinical practica required in preparation for clinical practice as outlined by Speech-Language and Audiology Canada (SAC). Our M.Sc.A. program is completed in two years whereas some other programs require three years to complete. The emphasis on bridging theory and clinical practice is very strong in our program. Our admission requirements emphasize basic sciences and do not require completion of a specific undergraduate degree. This flexible entry accommodates students with undergraduate degrees in different fields and promotes diversity within our student body. Our goal is to recruit and train skillful therapists and problem-solvers who can rely on strong foundation in theory to address challenging clinical issues. Our M.Sc.A. graduates typically pursue a professional career working in schools, hospitals, rehabilitation centres, or in private practices. A subset of our graduates will enter a doctoral program (immediately or after a period of clinical employment) to pursue a research career.

Research Degrees – M.Sc. and Ph.D.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Communication Sciences and Disorders (Thesis) (45 credits)

Selected candidates may be accepted for the M.Sc. research degree. Each student's thesis supervisor and Thesis Committee design an individualized program of study in collaboration with the student. The program can include graduate courses offered by the School and by other departments at McGill.

This program is designed for students who wish to combine research training with their clinical (M.Sc.A.) program or students from related fields who wish to gain research experience in communication sciences to prepare for doctoral studies. Students are required to take two semesters (6 credits) of statistics and complete a thesis. Admission to the M.Sc. research program requires identification of an SCSD professor(s) with relevant expertise to mentor the student through the thesis process. Graduates of our M.Sc. research program follow diverse career paths working in clinical settings (if they also have a clinical degree) or settings that combine clinical and research activities or continuing their research training at the doctoral level.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Sciences and Disorders

Selected candidates may be accepted for the Ph.D. research degree. Each student's thesis supervisor and Thesis Committee design an individualized program of study in collaboration with the student. The program can include graduate courses offered by the School and by other departments at McGill.

Students pursuing a Ph.D. in SCSD have varied educational backgrounds, including both clinical and related non-clinical fields. Students who enter the program from a related field (e.g., Psychology, Linguistics) or without a master’s thesis complete a Qualifying year, which includes coursework and a research project. This flexible entry attracts independent scholars with diverse backgrounds and interests, which creates a stimulating and enriched training environment. The main component of the Ph.D. program (beyond the Qualifying year) has minimal required coursework and is structured to support students as they develop and pursue an innovative, individualized program of doctoral studies. Admission to the doctoral program requires identification of a SCSD professor(s) with relevant expertise to mentor the student in this process. Ph.D. students have the opportunity to pursue an interdisciplinary specialization in language acquisition through the McGill Language Acquisition Program, which intersects with McGill departments of Linguistics, Psychology, and Education. Our Ph.D. graduates typically pursue academic careers in universities or research institutes, but some work in settings that combine research and professional activities.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Sciences and Disorders — Language Acquisition

Information about this option is available from the School and at www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html. This unique interdisciplinary Ph.D. program is available for doctoral students across four departments at McGill including SCSD, Linguistics, Psychology, and Integrated Studies in Education. The program is designed to provide enriched training focused on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition Program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology. In addition to the SCSD Ph.D. requirements, students in this program must complete 6 credits of coursework in language acquisition (including at least one course that is not in their home department), and four interdisciplinary seminars (2 credits each) and must include a faculty member in the Language Acquisition Program on their thesis committee.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Communication Sciences and Disorders Admission Requirements and Applications Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. (Applied)

An applicant must hold an undergraduate degree with a minimum B average (3.0 on a 4.0 point scale) or better in areas relevant to the selected field of specialization. Specific requirements are 6 credits in statistics, a total of 18 credits across the disciplines of psychology and linguistics (with a minimum of 6 credits in each discipline). Knowledge of physiology is also desirable.

M.Sc. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

The M.Sc. provides research training for:

  1. students who are also taking courses for professional qualification;
  2. students who have a non-thesis professional degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders; and
  3. students with degrees in related fields who wish to do research but not obtain professional qualification in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Applicants should normally have a master's degree with thesis or its equivalent in Communication Sciences and Disorders or a related field (e.g., psychology, linguistics).

Students who possess an appropriate bachelor’s degree or master’s degree without thesis will also be considered for the Ph.D. program, but, if admitted, must first complete a Qualifying year of coursework and a research project.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission:

  • the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 95 on the Internet-based test (iBT; 587 on the paper-based test (PBT)) with minimum component scores of 24 in both Speaking and Writing and 21 in both Reading and Listening;

    OR

  • the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 7.0.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please see the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders website for required application materials.

M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs

All applications received by the application deadlines are automatically considered for any internal funding or awards made available to the Department for recruitment purposes. Students who apply for Fall admission generally have the most options with respect to applying for external funding as well as for being considered for internal support.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

M.Sc. (Applied)
  • Prerequisite Form
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Reference letters – one professional and one academic
M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D.
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Writing Sample
  • Acceptance by a research supervisor

Applications will be considered upon receipt of supporting documents as outlined above. All applicants are strongly encouraged to submit reports of their performance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please contact the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Social Work

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Social Work

Location

  • School of Social Work
  • Wilson Hall
  • 3506 University Street, Suite 300
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7070
  • Fax: 514-398-4760
  • Email: graduate [dot] socialwork [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/socialwork

About Social Work

The School of Social Work offers dynamic M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs, designed to explore cutting-edge knowledge on social work theory, practice, policy, and research. We have an exciting and growing faculty with a variety of research and practice expertise in the fields of:

  • child welfare;
  • health, mental health, and disability;
  • poverty;
  • aging;
  • First Peoples;
  • marginalized groups (e.g., immigrants and refugees, war affected populations, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people);
  • loss and bereavement;
  • domestic violence;
  • international social work.

Our approaches to practice and research cover all levels of intervention from individuals, families, groups, and communities. Located within the School of Social Work are specialized centres devoted to research and training in the areas of domestic violence; children and families; and international human rights. Graduate students also have access to workstations equipped with computers, and many professional development workshops and seminars. Several research assistantships and teaching assistantships are available each year.

The McGill School of Social Work is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW), the Canadian Association for Social Work Education – l'Association Canadienne pour la formation en travail social (CASWE-ACFTS), and of the Regroupement des unités de formation universitaire en travail social du Québec (RUFUTS).

The School of Social Work is a professional school with the primary objective of preparing students for careers and for leadership in the fields of social work and social welfare.

Qualifying Year Entry into the M.S.W. Program

Applicants demonstrating academic excellence and a minimum of one year of social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional) are considered for admission to the one-year, full-time (only) Qualifying year of study in preparation for entry to the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program. The objective of this preparatory year is to provide students with essential foundation social work knowledge that will provide a basis upon which to embark on graduate-level studies in social work.

M.S.W. Program

The overarching objective of the master's program is the provision of advanced professional training by means of integrated learning experiences. Specifically, the educational goals are to:

  1. develop a deepened and advanced competence in practice and research;
  2. embrace a capacity for critical understanding of social theories, social problems, and emergent issues; and
  3. understand population groups in need, institutional structures, and policy initiatives and processes.

There are three types of M.S.W. degrees: M.S.W. (Thesis), M.S.W. (Non-Thesis), and M.S.W. with B.C.L. and LL.B. The M.S.W. thesis and non-thesis programs carry a weight of 45 credits, and, taken on a full-time basis, both options involve three terms of study. In both options, part-time study can be arranged.

There are two points of entry into the M.S.W.: one for those who hold a B.S.W. degree; and one for those who have completed the one-year Qualifying year of study offered by the School of Social Work.

Note: With respect to M.S.W. programs and the Qualifying year of study for entry into the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program, possession of a working knowledge of the French language is important not only to candidates who intend to seek admission to the Quebec professional Ordre after graduation but also to candidates who wish to maximize their field placement opportunities during their program. In consultation with the Field Education Coordinator, students may have the option of completing their field requirements at an approved social service agency outside of Quebec.

Ph.D. Program in Social Work

The School of Social Work offers a dynamic Ph.D. program in social work/social policy in order to promote the development of scholarship on social issues within Canada and Quebec. Courses are offered in English at McGill. Parallel streams are offered in French at Université de Montréal and Université du Québec à Montréal. Students have the opportunity of taking courses at all three universities.

The program aims to:

  1. prepare graduates for careers in university teaching and research, policy development, implementation and evaluation, practice and program evaluation, leadership and management of human services;
  2. offer students the opportunity to acquire research methodology skills and to apply these to a range of areas relevant to social work; and
  3. stimulate original research on important social problems and issues.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Couple and Family Therapy (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)

The Master's in Couple and Family Therapy is designed to allow students with an M.S.W. degree, or an equivalent graduate level degree, to receive advanced credit and be eligible for Advanced level entry (minimum of 45 credits) taken over three terms. Admission to the program will be interdisciplinary, with candidates entering from related human science, social science, or helping profession backgrounds such as Social Work, Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology, Sociology, Nursing, or other related disciplines. Applicants, who have successfully completed a bachelor's or master's degree in a related human science, social science, or helping profession, with a minimum overall CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0, are eligible to apply.

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.S.W. Thesis program is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of research skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. Program requirements consist of a thesis and six courses (two of which are required), taken over an extended period of three to four terms of full-time study. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional).

Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.S.W. Non-Thesis program is designed for students who have a keen interest in developing an advanced intellectual understanding and a specialized set of practice skills in one of three areas: Children and Families; Health and Social Care; or International and Community Development. This program entails three semesters of full-time study that consist of coursework, professional education in a supervised field placement, and an independent study project. Prospective students will hold a B.S.W. degree with a minimum of one year of prior social work related experience (voluntary and/or professional), or will have successfully completed the Qualifying year entry into the M.S.W.

Subsequent career paths are varied and lead to exciting opportunities in health, social services, and community organizing, where social workers undertake clinical, leadership, or policy roles.

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

Please click the above link for further information on this program.

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.); Social Work (Non-Thesis) — International Partner Program (45 credits)

This program is offered intermittently, based on funding, to a specific cohort of students by invitation only.

Joint Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with Integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) (132 credits)

The School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law offer a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law/Bachelor of Laws (B.C.L./LL.B.) designed to transcend academic boundaries in social justice issues. Lawyers and social workers often operate in the same fields, whether in public policy, child protection, family law, poverty law, or domestic violence situations, yet each profession has been constrained by internal limitations. The joint M.S.W. (Non-Thesis)/Law program requires students to complete 132 credits (45 credits in M.S.W., 87 credits in Law). Students should take three and a half to four years to complete the M.S.W./B.C.L./LL.B. program. It is possible, however, to complete the program in three years, by doing work for credit over the summer and by carrying heavier course loads throughout the program. The joint program leads to conferral of the B.C.L./LL.B. law degrees and the master’s degree in social work. Prospective students possess a B.S.W. degree with prior practice experience or have completed the Qualifying year of study for entry into the M.S.W. (Non-Thesis) program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Social Work (offered jointly by McGill and Université de Montréal)

As one of the top Ph.D. programs in Canada, the School of Social Work promotes leading scholarship on social policy and practice. Students work closely with their supervisor, students pursue individualized programs of study, which include coursework, research, and professional development. Faculty have expertise in a variety of areas such as aging; social exclusion; child welfare; international social welfare; Aboriginal people and communities; violence against women and children; health and disability; poverty and social development; migration and community organizing. Students normally take two semesters of coursework after which they complete a comprehensive exam. In the second year of the program students begin their thesis work and take a course designed to facilitate the research process. Research and writing usually takes between one and two years to complete.

McGill offers competitive entrance fellowships, access to computers and library resources, and active student networks. There are many opportunities to be involved in faculty research projects and sessional teaching. Students go on to careers in teaching, organizational leadership, and social policy analysis.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Please note that the application procedures for the School of Social Work has changed slightly for the 2014-15 admissions cycle. Applicants are asked to refer to the School’s webpage (http://www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective/) for application instructions.

Social Work Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. For the TOEFL, McGill's institutional code is 0935.

  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) – International applicants must achieve a minimum score of 96* on the Internet-based test.

    * Each individual component of reading, writing, listening, and speaking must have a minimum score of 24.

  • The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) – International applicants must achieve a minimum overall band score of 8.0**.

    ** Each individual component of reading, writing, listening, and speaking must have a minimum score of 7.5.

M.S.W. Thesis and Non-Thesis Programs

Applicants who have successfully completed a B.S.W., with a minimum high B average (GPA 3.2/4.0), and who have completed coursework in statistics and in research methods at the undergraduate level within the last five years are admissible to the Master of Social Work program. Applicants are expected to have one year of paid or volunteer professional social work experience prior to admission.

Students who have completed the one-year, full-time Qualifying year of study at the School of Social Work are eligible for direct admission to the M.S.W. Non-Thesis program provided they have secured a minimum B+ average in Qualifying courses, and have successfully fulfilled all fieldwork requirements.

M.Sc.A. Program

The Master's in Couple and Family Therapy is designed to allow students with an M.S.W. degree, or an equivalent graduate level degree, to receive advanced credit and be eligible for Advanced level entry (minimum of 45 credits) taken over three terms. Admission to the program will be interdisciplinary, with candidates entering from related human science, social science, or helping profession backgrounds such as Social Work, Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology, Sociology, Nursing, or other related disciplines. Applicants, who have successfully completed a bachelor's or master's degree in a related human science, social science, or helping profession, with a minimum overall CGPA of 3.0 out of 4.0, are eligible to apply.

Joint program: Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) with integrated Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) / Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.)

Applicants must apply separately for admission to each Faculty. Applicants must meet or surpass the requirements for admission to both the M.S.W. program and to Law and must submit a brief statement explaining their interest in this joint program along with all other required admission materials.

Ph.D. Program

Applicants apply directly to the School of Social Work. Applicants applying to the Ph.D. program must hold a master's degree in social work or, exceptionally, a bachelor's degree in social work with a master's degree in a related subject from an accredited program. However, applicants who hold a master's degree in a related social science discipline with strong research interests and experience in social work/social policy may also be considered. All applicants must also have completed, at the university level, coursework in statistics and in research methods within the last five years.

Criteria considered in weighing applications include:

  • quality and relevance of the student's research proposal and one-page narrative;
  • quality of reference letters;
  • previous experience as demonstrated in the CV.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications will only be considered upon receipt of all required documents.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Qualifying year of study applicants (see www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective/qualifying-year-msw-applicants-without-bsw for forms and guidelines):
    • Curriculum Vitae (using form provided)
    • Prerequisite Form
    • Statement of Interest for Social Work
    • Three references (two academic and one professional)
  • M.S.W. Thesis, M.S.W. Non-Thesis, and M.S.W. with B.C.L. and LL.B applicants (see www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective/msw for forms and guidelines):
    • Prerequisite Form (provided)
    • Statement of Interest or Research Statement for Social Work
    • Three references (two academic and one professional)
  • M.Sc.A. applicants (see www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective/msca for forms and guidelines):
    • Curriculum Vitae (using form provided)
    • Program Application Face Sheet
    • Pre-requisite Form (using form provided)
    • Advanced Standing Form (provided)
    • Letter of Intent
    • Admission Interview (for selected candidates)
    • Three references (one academic and two professional)
  • Ph.D. applicants (see www.mcgill.ca/socialwork/prospective/phd for forms and guidelines):
    • Ph.D. Prerequisite Form
    • Personal Statement (maximum length one page, single-spaced)
    • Ph.D. Curriculum Vitae Form
    • Ph.D. Research Proposal (maximum length five pages, single-spaced, including references. Do not append detailed CV.)
    • Written Work (upload one sample)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Social Work and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

The Qualifying year, M.S.W., and M.Sc.A. deadlines below apply to all application documents, except university transcripts and references which must be received by January 15.

Qualifying year, M.S.W., M.Sc.A.
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The Ph.D. deadlines below apply to all application documents, including university transcripts and references.

Ph.D.
Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Psychology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Psychology

Location

  • Department of Psychology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W8/6B
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6124/514-398-6100
  • Fax: 514-398-4896
  • Email: gradsec [at] ego [dot] psych [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.psych.mcgill.ca

About Psychology

The aim of the Experimental program is to provide students with an environment in which they are free to develop skills and expertise that will serve during a professional career of teaching and research as a psychologist. Coursework and other requirements are at a minimum. Success in the program depends on the student's ability to organize unscheduled time for self education. Continuous involvement in research planning and execution is considered a very important component of the student's activities. Students are normally expected to do both master’s and doctoral study.

M.A. and M.Sc. degrees may be awarded in Experimental Psychology, but only as a step to the Ph.D.—students undergo formal evaluation beginning with the submission of their master's requirements (thesis or fast-track paper) to enter Ph.D. 2.

The Clinical program adheres to the scientist practitioner model and as such is designed to train students for careers in university teaching or clinical research, and for service careers (working with children or adults in hospital, clinical, or educational settings). Most of our clinical graduates combine service and research roles. While there are necessarily many more course requirements than in the Experimental program, the emphasis is again on research training. There is no master’s program in Clinical Psychology; students are expected to complete the full program leading to a doctoral degree.

Research interests of members of the Psychology Department include:

  • animal learning;
  • behavioural neuroscience;
  • clinical;
  • child development;
  • cognitive science;
  • health psychology;
  • psychology of language;
  • perception;
  • quantitative psychology;
  • social psychology;
  • personality psychology.

Facilities for advanced research in a variety of fields are available within the Department itself. In addition, arrangements exist with the Departments of Psychology at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Allan Memorial Institute, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Montreal General Hospital, to permit graduate students to undertake research in a hospital setting. (Note that some MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in June 2015; further information is available on the MUHC website.)

Students interested in neuroscience may apply to graduate programs in the Integrated Program in Neuroscience (IPN) department and work with an IPN supervisor from the Department of Psychology. For information about programs offered by the IPN department, see Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Neuroscience (Integrated Program) and www.mcgill.ca/ipn.

For inquiries about all programs and financial aid, and for application forms, contact the Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Psychology.

Ph.D. Option in Language Acquisition (LAP)

Information about this option is available from the Department and at www.psych.mcgill.ca/lap.html.

Ph.D. Option in Psychosocial Oncology (PSO)

A cross-disciplinary option in Psychosocial Oncology is offered within the existing Ph.D. program in Psychology. Information about this option is available from the Department and at www.medicine.mcgill.ca/oncology/programs/programs_psychosocialoncology.asp.

Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Arts (M.A.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)

Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.

Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Psychology > Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychology (Thesis) (45 credits)

Candidates must demonstrate a sound knowledge of modern psychological theory, of its historical development, and of the logic of statistical methods as used in psychological research. Candidates will be expected to have an understanding of the main lines of current work in areas other than their own field of specialization.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology

Please contact the Department for more information about this program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Language Acquisition

This unique interdisciplinary program focuses on the scientific exploration of language acquisition by different kinds of learners in diverse contexts. Students in the Language Acquisition Program are introduced to theoretical and methodological issues on language acquisition from the perspectives of cognitive neuroscience, theoretical linguistics, psycholinguistics, education, communication sciences and disorders, and neuropsychology.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Psychology — Psychosocial Oncology

The Department of Oncology, in conjunction with the Ingram School of Nursing, the Department of Psychology and the School of Social Work, has developed the cross-disciplinary Psychosocial Oncology Option (PSOO). This option is open to doctoral students in the Ingram School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychology who are interested in broadening their knowledge of psychosocial issues in oncology.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Please note: there have been changes in the required documents for the admission and application procedures. Please consult the link http://www.psych.mcgill.ca/grad/program/application_admission.htm for additional requirements.

Psychology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program depends on an evaluation of students' research interests and their aptitude for original contributions to knowledge and, if applicable, for professional contributions in the applied field.

The usual requirement for admission is an Honours or majors degree (B.A. or B.Sc.) in Psychology. This usually includes an introductory course plus twelve courses in psychology (each equivalent to three term hours). Courses in experimental psychology, the theoretical development of modern ideas in psychology, and statistical methods as applied to psychological problems (equivalent to an introductory course) are essential. Applicants' knowledge of relevant biological, physical, and social sciences is considered. Students applying to the clinical program are advised to complete 42 specific undergraduate credits in psychology as specified by the Order of Psychologists of Quebec (Ordre des psychologues du Québec).

Applicants who hold a bachelor's degree but who have not met these usual requirements should consult the Graduate Program Director to determine which (if any) courses must be completed before an application can be considered. Students with insufficient preparation for graduate work may register as Special Students (undergraduate level) in the Faculty of Arts or the Faculty of Science, and follow an appropriate course of study. Such registration requires the permission of the Department but carries no advantage with respect to a student's eventual admission to graduate studies.

Applicants should note that the deadline for many scholarships and fellowships is about four months earlier than the application deadlines and that applications for scholarships and fellowships should be submitted through their home university.

All applicants must take the GRE General Test if they have studied in an English-speaking university. For those who have psychology background, it is recommended to take the Subject component of the GRE. Applicants with little or no background in psychology are not required to submit scores on the Subject component of the GRE. Canadians who have not studied in an English-speaking university are not required to submit the GRE General Test and Subject component.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Three letters of reference
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – See above for details.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychology and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: Dec. 1 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Biostatistics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Biostatistics

Biostatistics involves the development and application of statistical methods to scientific research in areas such as medicine, epidemiology, environmental health, genetics, and ecology. Biostatisticians play key roles in designing studies—from helping to formulate the questions that can be answered by data collection to the decisions on how best to collect the data—and in analyzing the resulting data. They also develop new statistical methods for such data. Students will take courses, and may do research, on topics such as:

  • clinical trials;
  • generalized linear models;
  • longitudinal data;
  • mathematical statistics;
  • statistical methods for epidemiology;
  • survival analysis.

The Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health has one of the largest concentrations of Ph.D.-level statisticians in any Canadian Faculty of Medicine.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Thesis) (48 credits)

M.Sc. thesis students study a foundational set of courses, and write a thesis on a topic of their choice. Thesis students should have a strong interest in research. These students are well-placed to either continue in a Ph.D. program or to work in academic research in statistics or medicine; they will also have relevant qualifications for the pharmaceutical industry and government.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)

The M.Sc. non-thesis program is designed to expose students to a wide range of topics including statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, communication, and report writing are emphasized, and students graduate ready to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, in government, or in academic medical research.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biostatistics

Applicants should hold a master’s degree in mathematics or statistics or its equivalent. Mastery of calculus, linear algebra, real analysis, and mathematical statistics is essential. Exposure to data analysis is an asset. Ph.D. students typically work on development of statistical methods, and can specialize in statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, Bayesian methods, survival analysis, longitudinal data, causal inference, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, and report writing are emphasized. Ph.D. graduates typically work as faculty in universities, in research institutes, in government, or in the pharmaceutical industry.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).
 

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Location

  • School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition
  • Macdonald-Stewart Building
  • McGill University, Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada

About Dietetics and Human Nutrition

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, cutting-edge nutrition research is conducted by its 10 tenure-track professors and four faculty lecturers in all areas recommended by North American Nutrition Societies. These include molecular and cellular nutrition, clinical, community, and international nutrition. Domains emphasized by School researchers include:

  • nutritional biochemistry and metabolism;
  • embryonic and fetal origins of health and disease;
  • studies optimizing health in at-risk populations including Aboriginal populations, mothers and children, and the elderly;
  • the development of novel nutritional and/or nutraceutical approaches for treatment during surgery and recovery from disease.

Research is conducted in our on-site research labs, the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), the McGill Institute for Global Food Security, the Mary Emily Clinical Nutrition Research Unit (MECNRU), and the MUHC Teaching Hospitals. Students can conduct research or participate in clinical rotations in Ghana and field sites in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Human Nutrition (Thesis) (45 credits)

A master’s degree in Human Nutrition offers advanced Nutrition courses in a broad range of research areas. The program is suitable for students with an undergraduate degree in nutritional sciences, exercise physiology, kinesiology, food science, biochemistry, medicine, or another closely related field. Students are required to complete 14 credits in advanced nutrition coursework plus 31 credits related to their thesis research. Graduates of our M.Sc. thesis degree have pursued successful careers in research, international health agencies, government agencies, and industry.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Practicum (45 credits) and Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Project (45 credits)

The M.Sc. Applied program is a course-based master’s program. It allows students to further develop knowledge and expertise in nutrition. Students are required to complete 29 credits in advanced Nutrition courses plus 16 credits related to a research project or an advanced practicum (reserved for registered dietitians). Careers include managerial positions for practising dietitians, and careers in nutrition programs, government, and industry.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Human Nutrition (Non-Thesis) — Dietetics Credentialing (83 credits)

The M.Sc. Applied program in Dietetics Credentialing is a course-based master's program with a dietetics Stage (internship) included. At the end of the program, students are qualified to be licensed with one of the provincial regulatory bodies in Canada, as well as in other countries, and practise in the areas of clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and foodservice management; French competency is an asset. The program is preceded by a Qualifying year, if necessary, to complete certain courses required for licensure. This is followed by three semesters of graduate-level courses (46 credits) and 3 semesters of Stage (37 credits), which include a practice-based graduate project.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Human Nutrition

A Ph.D. degree in Human Nutrition is suitable for students with an M.Sc. degree in Nutritional Sciences or related areas who wish to become independent researchers and/or leaders in the field of nutritional sciences. The School offers a stimulating research environment with opportunities in a wide range of areas of basic science, clinical research with our many hospital clinicians, as well as population health in Canada and abroad. Careers include academic, senior government, and industry positions within Canada and internationally.

Graduate Diploma in Registered Dietitian Credentialing (30 credits)

This program is currently not offered.

In the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill, students pursuing a graduate degree in nutrition have the opportunity to apply to our Graduate Diploma in R.D. Credentialing, upon completion of the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program and upon completion of the undergraduate courses required by l'Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ). This Diploma consists of two semesters of Stage (internship) in Clinical Nutrition, Community Nutrition, and Foodservice Systems Management. Upon completion of the Diploma, the recipient is eligible to register and practice as a Dietitian in Quebec, as well as in other Canadian provinces and other countries.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Dietetics and Human Nutrition Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.Sc. Thesis and M.Sc. Applied (Project, Practicum, and Dietetics Credentialing)

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University’s credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class–upper division) for the M.Sc. Thesis and 3.5/4.0 for the M.Sc. Applied during their bachelor's degree program. Eligible candidates to the M.Sc. (Applied) program may select one of three options:

  1. The project option;
  2. The practicum option, which is reserved for those who have completed a dietetics internship and six months of work experience and wish to further develop their skills in a particular area of practice through an advanced internship;
  3. The dietetics credentialing option, for those who wish to follow a program combining courses and internship, leading to licensure as a dietitian.

Ph.D.

Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a B.Sc. and M.Sc. degree equivalent to a McGill degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. Applicants must have at least a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in McGill University's credit equivalency of 3.2/4.0 (second class–upper division) during their bachelor's and master's degree programs. Exceptional students may apply to transfer to the Ph.D. program after one year of study in the M.Sc. (Thesis) program.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the School's minimum CGPA of 3.2 out of 4.0. The courses to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year (two terms) is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program. Students must re-apply for admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid

Financial support is highly competitive. Teaching assistantships, scholarships, and stipends from research grants may be available; however, the School cannot guarantee financial support.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Final acceptance to the M.Sc. (Thesis) and Ph.D. programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor. A supervisor is not required for acceptance to the M.Sc. (Applied) program.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – The GRE is required for all Ph.D. applicants to the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition who are submitting non-Canadian and non-U.S. transcripts.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: April 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).