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Management (doctoral programs)

Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the Joint Ph.D. in Management

  • Ph.D. Program Office
  • Desautels Faculty of Management
  • McGill University
  • 1001 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1G5
  • Canada
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management
The Ph.D. program in Management is offered jointly by the four Montreal universities: Concordia University, École des Hautes Études Commerciales (affiliated with the Université de Montréal), McGill University, and Université du Québec à Montréal. The program is intended to educate competent researchers and to stimulate research on management issues.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management — Environment
The Ph.D. program option in Environment is intended to develop an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment. It provides a forum whereby students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

The Ph.D. program is offered jointly with three other institutions:

  • Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Département des Sciences Administratives
  • 315 Ste-Catherine Est
  • Montreal QC H2X 3X2
  • Canada
  • Website: http://phdadm.esg.uqam.ca

The program represents a number of innovations in doctoral work in the field of administration. First, by cooperating, the four universities are able to make available to the program's students a diverse pool of approximately 250 professors qualified to direct doctoral-level study and research. Second, the program has been carefully developed to encourage independent, creative work on the part of its students, with close, personal contact with the professors. This program will appeal especially to the mature, experienced candidate with relatively well-defined interests. Across the four member universities, some courses are offered in English and some in French. (All papers may, however, be written in English or French.) This is viewed as a definite advantage of the program for those students who expect to work in Canada or francophone countries after graduation.

The program places considerable emphasis on the theoretical foundations of management and its underlying disciplines. Graduates of the program are expected to have: (1) some knowledge of all the main areas of management, (2) a thorough knowledge of one applied area of management, and one support discipline, (3) a complete command of the research methodologies used in management, and (4) some familiarity with modern theories and methods of the pedagogy of management.

The program consists of three phases: preparation, specialization, and dissertation.

Phase I – Preparation

Before entering the program, the student will have selected the area of specialization from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management
  • Organizational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Organization
  • NSERC CREATE*

Some students—notably those with strong master's degrees in administration or related disciplines—have a minimum of work in Phase I; others require up to one academic year of work.

Phase II – Specialization

In Phase II, students probe deeply into their chosen area of specialization. With their Advisory Committee, students work out an individual program of study, which takes about 18 months. The phase focuses on a specialization area and a support field. The specialization area could be one of the basic ones listed in Phase I (for example, marketing or operations management), a sub-area within one of these (such as organizational development within organizational behaviour), or an interdisciplinary area that combines two or more of these (such as behaviour aspects of accounting or international marketing).

The support field is selected to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge in a fundamental discipline that underlies the theory in administration. For example, a student in marketing might select psychology, sociology, or statistics. One in management policy might select political science or general systems theory, or perhaps even philosophy. Other choices are possible.

Students officially enter Phase II of the program when their Advisory Committee has been established and, together with the student, formally agrees on a proposal for the work to be done in Phase II. Phase II must be approved by the McGill and the Joint Doctoral Committees. This includes the following:

  • Doctoral seminars in the specialization area; minimum four courses
  • Any other existing graduate-level courses in the specialization area and support field deemed appropriate by the Advisory Committee; minimum two courses in support field
  • Seminar on Research Methodology (MGMT 707, 3 credits) or equivalent approved graduate-level course
  • Seminar in Pedagogy (MGMT 706, 3 credits) or Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDPH 689, 3 credits)
  • Comprehensive Examination (MGMT 701, 0 credits)
  • A publishable research paper (MGMT 720, 3 credits)

The Advisory Committee will normally consist of at least three or four persons; a Chair and others decided upon jointly by the Chair and the student. One of these members will typically come from the support field. Every student's Advisory Committee must have representation from at least two universities in the joint program.

Phase III – Dissertation

The third phase of the program consists of the dissertation in the course of which the student probes deeply into a well-defined research topic. The topic is developed with the Thesis Committee (at least three members), which may be the same as the Phase II Advisory Committee or may be reconstituted, again with representation from at least one of the other participating universities. The topic is approved formally by the Thesis Committee and, once the research is completed and the dissertation written, the student publicly defends the completed thesis.

* NSERC CREATE Ph.D. option in Healthcare Operations and Information Management – Offered jointly by six Canadian universities: McGill, British Columbia, Ottawa, Queen's, Toronto, and Montréal; this Ph.D. program brings together expertise on healthcare processes, operations research, information systems, and telecommunications engineering.

Admission Requirements

Candidates normally hold a master's-level degree, with a strong academic record from a recognized university.

GMAT (or GRE-General Test) results are required for applications to the doctoral program; this includes McGill master's students applying to the Ph.D. The minimum score required is 600. Tests must have been written within the past five years.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. A minimum score of 100 for the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, is required for admission. A minimum score of 7 for IELTS is required. Tests must have been written within the past two years.

Files will not be considered unless GMAT (or GRE-General Test) and TOEFL scores are received by the Application Deadlines.

Students may apply for admission to one or more of the participating universities. These applications will be processed by the individual university to which the applicant has applied and by the Joint Committee of the four schools. Students' preferences will prevail when more than one participating university is prepared to accept them. The Ph.D. degree will be granted by the university that admits the student. The program requires a minimum full-time residency of six terms.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GMAT (or GRE-General Test) written within the past 5 years
  • Answers to Personal Statement questions
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/desautels/programs/phd/admissions/deadline.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

History and Classical Studies

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

History and Classical Studies

Location

  • Department of History and Classical Studies
  • Stephen Leacock Building, 7th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About History and Classical Studies

The Department of History and Classical Studies has particular strengths in Canadian history, British and European history, East Asian history, the history of medicine, the history of science, and newer fields such as the history of gender and sexuality, the history of the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds, and global history. The Department offers interdisciplinary options in European studies, developmental studies, and women’s studies at the M.A. level. Both M.A. and Ph.D. students can also write their thesis or research paper on the History of Medicine. The Department is composed of 39 full-time faculty members as well as a strong complement of visiting professors, faculty lecturers, and postdoctoral fellows. This array of dedicated teachers and scholars supports high-quality instruction and research across the periods of history and regions of the globe. Our professors have won many prizes for their books and articles, and their ongoing investigations are supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the FQRSC, CFI, the Killam Trust, and the Mellon Foundation. The Department is home to a number of major collaborative research projects, all of which also include students. Among these are the Montreal History Group; the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC); Quelques arpents de neige, an environmental history group; and the French Atlantic History Group.

Classics was among the first disciplines taught at McGill College. Our students benefit from the resources of closely related disciplines and draw on the academic expertise of scholars from various backgrounds. Many awards and prizes are available for students who excel in the classroom, and both undergraduates and graduates can join professors on study tours and field projects. Students can also become members of the Classics Students Association and publish their work in the McGill Journal of Classical Studies, aptly titled Hirundo—Latin for “swallow,” like the martlets found on the McGill coat-of-arms, ever soaring in search of knowledge.

We offer prospective students the chance to study with leading scholars in a variety of fields.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed regulations and information (www.mcgill.ca/history).

Degrees in History

The M.A. program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year (Fall, Winter, and Summer). Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. The M.A. in History offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of history in a variety of fields. The McGill History degree carries international prestige and cachet and contributes meaningfully to success on the job market. Careers pursued by our graduates, aside from those who have sought and found places on the faculties of colleges and universities, have included positions in the area of public history at museums and other public institutions, in libraries and archives, in the diplomatic and other branches of the civil service, and in a variety of NGOs.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. Preparation of a thesis provides an opportunity for the preparation of a sustained project under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The seminars, in particular, provide an opportunity to analyze primary sources under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues and write their research paper on a topic approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. Degree in the History of Medicine does not have a thesis option. This non-thesis degree is normally completed in one year. Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The curriculum is intended to provide students with a strong disciplinary competence in history and a distinctively interdisciplinary perspective. Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History, or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); History
The Ph.D. in History is a professional degree program that prepares students for participation in the academy as historians. They gain competence in historical methods and good control over at least three fields of study. The dissertation is a work of primary research that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. Candidates in the field of Medical History will prepare the major field for the comprehensive examination with a member of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the two minor fields with members of the Department of History and Classical Studies. The thesis will normally be directed by the director of the major field. In all other respects, the same rules will apply to candidates in this area as apply to other Ph.D. students in History.

Degrees in Classics

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Classics offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of classical studies in a variety of fields. The program emphasizes proficiency both in technical areas of the discipline, especially Greek and Latin language, and in critical reading, writing, and research skills. The McGill M.A. in Classics is designed to prepare students to enter doctoral programs and, eventually, an academic career in any of the related fields of classical studies. Graduates have also pursued successful careers in teaching, law, museum science, and branches of civil service. This program can be completed in one year, though it is normally completed in two years.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Classics
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

History and Classical Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General: minimum CGPA of 3.3 on 4.0; minimum TOEFL of 550 on the paper-based test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score no less than 20.

Master in History

Normally, candidates are required to possess a B.A. (Honours) in History consisting of 60 credits in history. Students with other undergraduate history degrees (normally including serious research components) may be considered eligible. Applicants not satisfying these conditions but otherwise judged worthy of serious consideration will be asked to register in a Qualifying program in which they will undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Master in History – Development Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – European Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – Gender and Women's Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either History—B.A. (Honours) or equivalent—or a degree in one of the health professions with some background in history. Candidates with a willingness to do preparatory work in history are also encouraged to apply.

Ph.D. in History

Normally, an M.A. in History (Students choosing the field of History of Medicine normally enter with an M.A. in History of Medicine).

Master in Classics

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. in Classics

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed information (www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate).

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of History and Classical Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Classics

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Law

Law

Location

  • Faculty of Law
  • Graduate Programs in Law
  • New Chancellor Day Hall
  • 3644 Peel Street, Room 406
  • Montreal QC H3A 1W9
  • Canada

Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) – Angela Campbell

About Law

Graduate students in Law at McGill have one thing in common: a sharp curiosity to explore ideas and projects in an environment that is uniquely comparative and pluralist.

The extensive and impressive history of graduate teaching and supervision at McGill, combined with the innovations in legal pedagogy for which the Faculty of Law is celebrated, create an unrivaled quality and experience for graduate students. Grounded in Montreal, a city that embodies a lively mix of languages, cultures, and communities, the Faculty of Law invites students pursuing their D.C.L. and LL.M. degrees to discover and write within a community of legal scholars that is internationally renowned and engaging.

McGill Law is a meeting place for the major languages of North America, for the world’s legal traditions, and for students who wish to participate in the graduate life of a truly outstanding, prestigious, and intellectually vibrant Faculty of Law.

The Faculty of Law offers a range of programs at the graduate level. These include the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), as well as graduate certificates.

Students may choose to pursue either the LL.M. or the D.C.L. in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL), or the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL). Graduate certificates may only be completed within either the IASL or the ICL.

The Faculty of Law promotes study and research in private, commercial, international, and public law, as well as legal theory, from the perspectives of diverse legal traditions. In collaboration with the McGill School of Environment, the Faculty offers an LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis option in Environment. The Faculty also offers two other options within the LL.M. degree, a cross-disciplinary European Studies Option (ESO; availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year) in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts, and a specialization in Bioethics. The D.C.L. degree always involves a substantial thesis.

The Institute of Air and Space Law operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute offers a curriculum exploring legal issues that arise from international civil aviation and new technologies in space. It provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the legal processes regulating worldwide aerospace activities. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law.

The Institute of Comparative Law operates within the Faculty of Law as a centre of comparative legal studies. It accommodates national, international, and transnational studies and encourages openness to diverse legal cultures in teaching and research. The Institute offers the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) with thesis and non-thesis options, and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.), and a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law.

Master of Laws (LL.M.) Degrees

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education primarily through research, as the program concentrates on the production of a 30,000-word thesis, as well as some graduate-level coursework.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Bioethics (45 credits)
The master’s specialization in Bioethics is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes both the conceptual and practical aspects of Bioethics. Students apply through either the Faculty of Law, Medicine, Religious Studies, or the Department of Philosophy. Students entering pursuing an LL.M., Bioethics, are bound by the requirements of the Faculty of Law’s LL.M. program. This program is offered in the thesis option only.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of the Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis), providing students with an appreciation for the role of science, politics, and ethics in informed decision-making in the environment sector.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); European Studies (46 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within the existing LL.M. Thesis program. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood.
Note: Availability of this program is subject to relevant courses being offered in given year.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program is geared toward students who wish to continue their legal education largely through graduate-level coursework. The program requires two terms of coursework as well as a 15,000-word research project.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits)
The graduate option in Environment is a cross-disciplinary option offered in conjunction with the School of Environment within the LL.M. (Thesis or Non-Thesis) providing students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environment sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments.

Institute of Air and Space Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to focus on original scholarly research and writing under the supervision of a law professor. This program involves 20 credits in coursework and 25 research credits (a thesis of 100–150 pages). The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student’s capacity for independent analysis, writing skills, and organization.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Air and Space Law (45 credits)
The LL.M. Non-Thesis program in the Institute of Air and Space Law is available to qualifying applicants holding a bachelor’s law degree who wish to gain a wide exposure to a range of taught courses within, and related to, the domain of Air and Space Law. The Non-Thesis option requires a substantial Supervised Research Project (18 credits), with the remaining 27 credits earned in courses.

Institute of Comparative Law

Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their master’s thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Comparative Law (45 credits)
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes master’s students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their individual master’s supervised research project (for LL.M. Master’s Non-Thesis students). Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background in or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) Degrees

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.)
The Doctor of Civil Law program is centred around the doctoral thesis, which develops a substantive and original contribution to legal research and knowledge under the supervision of a faculty member. Many doctoral candidates intend on pursuing an academic career, and develop their approach to pedagogy, research, and writing while at McGill.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Air and Space Law
The Doctor of Civil Law in the Institute of Air and Space Law is a research degree ideal for scholars intent on deepening and broadening their critical understanding of the law, as well as their original engagement with it. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination to be done at the end of the first year, or during the second year of the D.C.L. program. The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidenced in concept and execution the original work of the candidate.
Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Comparative Law
The Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) welcomes doctoral students studying within the McGill Faculty of Law. ICL students are encouraged to think about the nature and value of comparative scholarship both through the courses that they take (particularly the Legal Traditions course, which is required for all ICL students) and through their doctoral thesis. Study within the ICL is ideally suited to students who have a background or a desire to pursue research in the field of comparative law, broadly defined. As such, ICL student members are encouraged and given opportunities to explore how juridical analyses are enriched through openness to learning from diversity in research methods, theoretical frameworks, legal traditions and doctrines, languages, and disciplinary perspectives.

Graduate Certificates in Law

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a coursework program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis. This certificate is particularly appropriate for jurists and other professionals who wish to pursue graduate-level legal studies in aviation, air and space law, government regulations, conventions, and treaties dealing with these areas.
Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the Institute of Comparative Law (ICL) to candidates who do not wish to undertake the master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Law Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law reviews applications and makes recommendations regarding admission. Final admission decisions are determined by admissions policies set by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

For information and application forms, please visit the Faculty website www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions or contact the Graduate Programs Office in Law, McGill University, at the Departmental address, or via email at grad [dot] law [at] mcgill [dot] ca or telephone at 514-398-6635.

Note that applicants must submit their application through uApply. Any questions regarding the status of an application must be sent via the uApply communication tool.

Language Requirement

Graduate-level courses are generally offered in English, and English-language abilities must be demonstrated for admission. In order to understand all course material, the ability to speak and read French is an asset. At McGill's Faculty of Law, all students may choose to write essays, examinations, and theses in English or French. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian or American (English or French) institution, must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, Cambridge English Language Assessment, or EDEXCEL offices. An institutional version of the TOEFL is not acceptable. For an application to be considered, a TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, Cambridge English Language Assessment, or EDEXCEL test result, McGill Certificate of Proficiency in English or McGill Certificate of Proficiency – English for Professional Communication must be submitted.

One of the following language requirements must be met: 100 on the TOEFL (iBT) with each component score no less than 25, 600 on the TOEFL (PBT), a band score of 7.0 or greater on the IELTS, a grade of 85 or higher on the MELAB, a grade of “A” (Excellent) on the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CAE), a grade of “B” (Good) or higher on the Cambridge English Language Assessment (CPE), an overall grade of at least “Distinction” on the EDEXCEL (Level 4) or an overall grade of at least “Merit” on the EDEXCEL (Level 5).

For information about the TOEFL, including the registration process, visit www.ets.org/toefl. For information about the IELTS, visit www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and it takes approximately 40 days to communicate the results. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institutions to McGill University. McGill’s institutional code is 0935; this code must be provided to the testing agencies when requesting a test report form. For further information on English proficiency tests, visit www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions/requirements.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the D.C.L. program occurs only when all four of the following conditions are met:
  1. The candidate holds a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.).
  2. The candidate holds a master's degree (or equivalent) in Law with thesis from McGill University or another university. (Review of the master’s thesis is normally part of the admission decision–making process. In exceptional cases, a candidate with a non-thesis master's degree with an outstanding academic record may be admitted to the D.C.L. program.)
  3. The candidate maintained, for each of the above degrees, a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of 4.0 (or equivalent) or higher. (Note that this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire dossier, including the applicant's reference letters and the quality of the research proposal.)
  4. The Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of the candidate's previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a D.C.L. program.

Admission to the doctoral program is always dependent on the availability of a suitable supervisor.

LL.M. Degrees

Candidates for admission to the master's programs must hold a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in Law (such as LL.B. or J.D.), with a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 our of 4.0 (or equivalent). Note that this standing does not guarantee admission; the Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire dossier, including the applicant's reference letters and the quality of the research proposal.

LL.M. Interdisciplinary Options

  1. Environment Option: This option is available to students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis or Non-Thesis program at the Faculty of Law. For further information, see this eCalendar under McGill School of Environment > Graduate > Academic Programs > Environment or visit www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.
  2. European Studies Option: This option is available to students who apply for admission to the LL.M. Thesis program at the Faculty of Law. Note the availability of this option is subject to relevant courses offered in a given year.

LL.M. Specialization in Bioethics

Requirements for admission to the master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information, see this eCalendar under Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioethics or visit www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the graduate certificate programs are essentially the same as for the master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience. For further information, visit www.mcgill.ca/law-admissions/graduates/admissions/requirements. Graduate certificate programs are available in the following two fields:

  1. Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law
  2. Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law
Note: ALL international students must obtain permission to study from the governments of Quebec and Canada. Immigration Quebec issues the Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada issues federal Study Permits. You may also wish to contact International Student Services at www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents for assistance.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by the Faculty of Law:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Faculty of Law and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: Dec. 15 Fall: N/A
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

The application deadline to all graduate law programs (LL.M., D.C.L., graduate certificates) is December 15. The Faculty of Law will not consider applications received on or after December 16.

The Faculty of Law offers Fall term admission only; the Faculty will not consider applications for Winter or Summer entry. Applications submitted for the Winter and Summer terms will be cancelled WITHOUT reimbursement of the application fee.

Note: The application fee remains non-refundable.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 31, 2014).

Urban Planning

Urban Planning

Location

  • School of Urban Planning
  • Macdonald Harrington Building, Room 400
  • 815 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C2
  • Canada

About Urban Planning

Urban planning is the process by which a community shapes its environment to meet its needs and realize its aspirations. Urban planning is also the profession of those who facilitate this process. While the practice of planning is as old as the cities themselves, the Urban Planning profession is only about a century old. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, architects, landscape architects, engineers, government reformers, lawyers, public health specialists, and others joined forces to tackle the serious social and environmental problems of the industrial city. They created new techniques and institutions to improve living conditions and decision-making processes, with an eye to improving cities in terms of health, safety, efficiency, equity, beauty, identity, etc. Today, people who enter the profession come from diverse backgrounds as well, including the design professions, engineering and applied sciences, environmental and social studies, and other fields. Their challenge is to reinvent tools and procedures to meet new challenges in making cities socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. A key feature of planning education is learning to view issues in a multidisciplinary way, to manage processes of collaboration and of conflict, and to generate equitable and efficient solutions to complex problems of urban development.

McGill University was the first institution in Canada to offer a full-time planning program starting in 1947. In 1972, the School of Urban Planning was created as a separate academic unit within the Faculty of Engineering. It shares a heritage building with the School of Architecture, right on the main open space of McGill’s Downtown campus. The primary objective of the Master of Urban Planning program is to educate professional urban planners for leadership in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. This happens in large part through project-based learning. The program also puts great emphasis on students doing policy-relevant research.

The School prepares doctoral students for high-level research and teaching positions. The doctoral program is an Ad hoc program—in which students are subject to the University’s regulations in terms of supervision and progress—that welcomes a small number of students, both local and international, who hold a master’s degree and apply on the basis of their own research interests. Prospective applicants should consult www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning.

The School’s teaching and research activities, for both master’s and Ph.D. students, pertain primarily to community planning; environmental policy and planning; international development planning; land-use planning and regulation; transportation and infrastructure planning; and urban design. These activities, which are conducted for the purpose of promoting better decision-making and improving human environments, often take place in partnership with other McGill departments (notably Architecture, Civil Engineering, Geography, and Law) and with units at other institutions in Montreal, across Canada, and abroad. The School uses Montreal and its region as its main teaching laboratory.

McGill's School of Urban Planning has a strong track record of contributing to the community and to the profession. It works with civil society as well as with government, at home and abroad, to understand urban challenges and to formulate policies and plans to meet them.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.) Program

The Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.) program is a two-year course of study that attracts students from Quebec, Canada, the U.S., and overseas. It is recognized by the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec (OUQ) and the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP). Graduates may become full members of the OUQ and other provincial planning associations by completing their respective internship and examination requirements. Similar requirements must be met for admission to the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and other such organizations.

The M.U.P. program was designed with a strong emphasis on project-based learning, in particular through practical work done in teams in three planning studios. Approximately half of the curriculum is devoted to required courses that teach basic knowledge and skills in urban planning; the other half enables students to select courses or research projects that match their particular interests. Students participate actively in professors’ research programs or define their individual research objectives, sometimes with their own research funding from major agencies (e.g., SSHRC, NSERC, FQRSC, FQRNT).

The core program provides a general education in spatial planning in its functional, environmental, and social dimensions. A formal specialization is available in Transportation Planning. M.U.P. students in the core program may also participate in the Barbados Field Study Semester, which focuses on global environmental issues. Details concerning these concentrations are available at www.mcgill.ca/urbanplanning/programs and www.mcgill.ca/bfss respectively. Students wishing to specialize in urban design, as in other subfields of planning, can do so within the core program. In all cases, electives, the summer internship, and the Supervised Research Project allow for individual concentration on a particular topic.

Graduates of the M.U.P. program work as planners, designers and policy analysts, as researchers, advocates and mediators, and they do so at various levels of government, in civil-society organizations, and with private consulting firms. Although their area of expertise varies, they devote their efforts in increasing numbers to sustainable development in its environmental, social, and economic dimensions.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The School of Urban Planning also offers the possibility of enrolling in a Ph.D. program managed under university regulations. Students can be admitted directly into the program if they hold a master’s degree. Exceptional students from the M.U.P. program can be admitted into the program as well. The Ph.D. program requires the equivalent of a year of course work and a year of preparation for examinations on the student’s field(s) of specialization and dissertation proposal. Work on the dissertation, which may be a monograph or a series of articles, takes two or more additional years.

Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) (66 credits)
The M.U.P. program requires two years of study, including a three-month summer internship in a professional setting. Upon completion of the program, graduates are expected to have acquired basic planning skills, a broad understanding of urban issues, and specialized knowledge in a field of their own choice.
Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) — Transportation Planning (66 credits)
Note: The Transportation Planning option is not being offered in 2014-2015. Students will be able to take some courses in this area and devote their Internship and Supervised Research Project to transportation-related topic, but a formal concentration will not be available.
The Transportation Planning concentration enables students to specialize in this field as part of their course of study for the M.U.P. degree. A number of core courses and electives, the summer internship, and the Supervised Research Project must be devoted to the acquisition of skills (including in quantitative analysis) necessary to work as a transportation planner. Admission into the concentration is based on a competitive selection process at the end of the first year of study in the M.U.P. program.
Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.); Urban Planning (Non-Thesis) — Urban Design (66 credits)
Note: The Urban Design option is being suspended. Students interested in Urban Design are able to specialize in this field of practice as part of the core M.U.P. program.
The Urban Design option allows students to specialize in this field as part of their course of study for the M.U.P. degree. Studio courses, an internship, and a final project involve real-life work that prepares students for the professional practice of Urban Design.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Urban Planning Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The M.U.P. degree is open to students holding a bachelor's degree or equivalent in Anthropology, Architecture, Economics, Engineering, Environmental Studies, Geography, Law, Management, Political Science, Social Work, Sociology, or Urban Studies. Students from other backgrounds are considered for admission on an individual basis.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement (one to two pages)
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. By the application deadlines, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. The minimum requirement for the TOEFL test is as follows: PBT – 600, iBT – 100, with each component score not less than 23. The minimum score for the IELTS test is 7.0

Awards and Financial Assistance

The School offers several fellowships and supports student applications to external grants from provincial and federal agencies. For information regarding awards and financial assistance, please refer to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Urban Planning and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and /or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mining and Materials Engineering

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines 

Mining and Materials Engineering

Location

  • Department of Mining and Materials Engineering
  • M.H. Wong Building
  • 3610 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C5
  • Canada
  • Mining Engineering
  • Telephone: 514-398-2215
  • Fax: 514-398-7099
  • Materials Engineering
  • Telephone: 514-398-4383
  • Fax: 514-398-4492

About Mining and Materials Engineering

Graduate programs leading to M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D. research degrees are available in the areas of Geomechanics; Mining Environments; Strategic Mine Planning and Optimization; Stochastic Modelling; Operations Research; Mineral Economics; Materials Handling; Process Metallurgy; Computational Thermodynamics; Hydrometallurgy; Effluent and Waste Treatment; Mineral Processing; Metal Casting and CFD Modelling; Surface Engineering; Composites; Ceramics; Electron Microscopy; Automotive and Aerospace Materials; Biomaterials; Nanomaterials; Nanoelectronic Materials; Multiscale Modelling of Materials; and Electronic and Solar Cell Materials.

Course programs leading to the M.Eng. (Project) degree in Mining or Materials Engineering and the Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering are also available.

Special programs are available for those holding degrees in subjects other than Materials or Mining Engineering (e.g., Chemical, Civil, or Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, Geology).

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Eng. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Eng. degree or its equivalent in Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering, or other related engineering fields.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Sc. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Sc. degree in Chemistry, Materials Science, Physics, Geology, or related fields.

Direct Transfer from a Master's to a Ph.D. – Students enrolled in a master's program (thesis) may transfer into the Ph.D. program without obtaining a master's degree if they have:

  1. an excellent academic standing for their undergraduate degree;
  2. been in the master's program for less than 12 months;
  3. passed with the minimum CGPA of 3.6 at least three of the required master's courses, and given one seminar with a minimum grade of A-;
  4. made good progress with their research;
  5. obtained a strong letter of recommendation from their supervisor.

Direct Entry from B.Eng. to Ph.D.

Exceptional B.Eng. graduates may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. The Ph.D. 1 students admitted through this process are required to complete at least four graduate-level courses.

M.Eng. (Project) Degrees

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Materials option) is primarily designed to train people with appropriate engineering or scientific backgrounds to allow them to work effectively in the metals and materials industries. The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Mining option) is primarily designed for graduates from mining engineering programs who have received adequate academic training in modern mining technology, mineral economics, computer programming, and probabilities and statistics.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mining and Materials Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)
This interdepartmental graduate program leads to a master’s degree in Environmental Engineering. The objective of the program is to train environmental professionals at an advanced level. The program is designed for individuals with an undergraduate degree in engineering. This non-thesis degree falls within the M.Eng. and M.Sc. programs, which are offered in the Departments of Bioresource, Chemical, Civil, and Mining and Materials Engineering. The Environmental Engineering program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge, practical perspectives, and awareness of environmental issues through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with the Graduate Program Director prior to enrolling in the program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mining and Materials Engineering
Please consult the Department for more information about the Ph.D.
Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering (30 credits)
This program normally requires one academic year of full-time study to complete. Candidates are required to take an integrated group of courses based on their academic background.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mining and Materials Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering is open to graduates with suitable academic standing in any branch of engineering or science. It is designed to provide a sound technical mining engineering background to candidates intending to work in the minerals industry.

The M.Eng. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Eng. degree or its equivalent in Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering, or other related engineering fields.

The M.Sc. (Thesis) degree is open to graduates holding the B.Sc. degree in Chemistry, Materials Science, Physics, Geology, or related fields.

The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Materials option) is primarily designed to train people with appropriate engineering or scientific backgrounds to allow them to work effectively in the metals and materials industries. Industrial experience is favourably viewed for entrance into the program, but is not considered a necessity.

The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Mining option) is primarily designed for graduates from mining engineering programs who have received adequate academic training in modern mining technology, mineral economics, computer programming, and probabilities and statistics. Students without this academic training must follow a Qualifying term. Industrial experience is favourably viewed for entrance into the program, but is not considered a necessity.

The Master of Engineering (Project) program (Environmental Engineering option) is also offered.

Ph.D. degree applicants may either be “directly transferred” from the M.Eng. or M.Sc. program (see below) or hold an acceptable master's degree in Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering, or other related fields, or under exceptional circumstances may be admitted directly from the bachelor's degree. In the latter case they are admitted to Ph.D. 1 as opposed to those holding a master's degree that are admitted to Ph.D. 2.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mining and Materials Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 1 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Jan. 15

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 31, 2014).

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