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History and Classical Studies

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

History and Classical Studies

Location

  • Department of History and Classical Studies
  • Stephen Leacock Building, 7th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About History and Classical Studies

The Department of History and Classical Studies has particular strengths in Canadian history, British and European history, East Asian history, the history of medicine, the history of science, and newer fields such as the history of gender and sexuality, the history of the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds, and global history. The Department offers interdisciplinary options in European studies, developmental studies, and women’s studies at the M.A. level. Both M.A. and Ph.D. students can also write their thesis or research paper on the History of Medicine. The Department is composed of 39 full-time faculty members as well as a strong complement of visiting professors, faculty lecturers, and postdoctoral fellows. This array of dedicated teachers and scholars supports high-quality instruction and research across the periods of history and regions of the globe. Our professors have won many prizes for their books and articles, and their ongoing investigations are supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the FQRSC, CFI, the Killam Trust, and the Mellon Foundation. The Department is home to a number of major collaborative research projects, all of which also include students. Among these are the Montreal History Group; the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC); Quelques arpents de neige, an environmental history group; and the French Atlantic History Group.

Classics was among the first disciplines taught at McGill College. Our students benefit from the resources of closely related disciplines and draw on the academic expertise of scholars from various backgrounds. Many awards and prizes are available for students who excel in the classroom, and both undergraduates and graduates can join professors on study tours and field projects. Students can also become members of the Classics Students Association and publish their work in the McGill Journal of Classical Studies, aptly titled Hirundo—Latin for “swallow,” like the martlets found on the McGill coat-of-arms, ever soaring in search of knowledge.

We offer prospective students the chance to study with leading scholars in a variety of fields.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed regulations and information (www.mcgill.ca/history).

Degrees in History

The M.A. program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year (Fall, Winter, and Summer). Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. The M.A. in History offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of history in a variety of fields. The McGill History degree carries international prestige and cachet and contributes meaningfully to success on the job market. Careers pursued by our graduates, aside from those who have sought and found places on the faculties of colleges and universities, have included positions in the area of public history at museums and other public institutions, in libraries and archives, in the diplomatic and other branches of the civil service, and in a variety of NGOs.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. Preparation of a thesis provides an opportunity for the preparation of a sustained project under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The seminars, in particular, provide an opportunity to analyze primary sources under close supervision.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues and write their research paper on a topic approved by the DSO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the ESO coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women Studies (45 credits)
This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee.
Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. Degree in the History of Medicine does not have a thesis option. This non-thesis degree is normally completed in one year. Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The curriculum is intended to provide students with a strong disciplinary competence in history and a distinctively interdisciplinary perspective. Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History, or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); History
The Ph.D. in History is a professional degree program that prepares students for participation in the academy as historians. They gain competence in historical methods and good control over at least three fields of study. The dissertation is a work of primary research that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. Candidates in the field of Medical History will prepare the major field for the comprehensive examination with a member of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the two minor fields with members of the Department of History and Classical Studies. The thesis will normally be directed by the director of the major field. In all other respects, the same rules will apply to candidates in this area as apply to other Ph.D. students in History.

Degrees in Classics

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Classics offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of classical studies in a variety of fields. The program emphasizes proficiency both in technical areas of the discipline, especially Greek and Latin language, and in critical reading, writing, and research skills. The McGill M.A. in Classics is designed to prepare students to enter doctoral programs and, eventually, an academic career in any of the related fields of classical studies. Graduates have also pursued successful careers in teaching, law, museum science, and branches of civil service. This program can be completed in one year, though it is normally completed in two years.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Classics
Not offered in 2014–2015.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

History and Classical Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

General: minimum CGPA of 3.3 on 4.0; minimum TOEFL of 550 on the paper-based test, or 86 on the Internet-based test, with each component score no less than 20.

Master in History

Normally, candidates are required to possess a B.A. (Honours) in History consisting of 60 credits in history. Students with other undergraduate history degrees (normally including serious research components) may be considered eligible. Applicants not satisfying these conditions but otherwise judged worthy of serious consideration will be asked to register in a Qualifying program in which they will undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Master in History – Development Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – European Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – Gender and Women's Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either History—B.A. (Honours) or equivalent—or a degree in one of the health professions with some background in history. Candidates with a willingness to do preparatory work in history are also encouraged to apply.

Ph.D. in History

Normally, an M.A. in History (Students choosing the field of History of Medicine normally enter with an M.A. in History of Medicine).

Master in Classics

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. in Classics

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed information (www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate).

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of History and Classical Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Quebec Studies/Études sur le Québec

Quebec Studies / Études sur le Québec

Location

  • Quebec Studies Program / Programme d'études sur le Québec
  • Ferrier Building, Room 332
  • 840 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 0G2
  • Canada

Director – TBA

Québec Studies Coordinator and Assistant to the Director – Stéphan Gervais

About Quebec Studies / Études sur le Québec

In 1963, McGill University established a French Canada Studies program. Some of the energies and resources of the program are devoted to research on Quebec and French Canada. In 1992, the name of the program was changed to Quebec Studies to reflect its central focus.

The program is offered at the undergraduate level. Should their main field of study be Quebec, graduate students must apply to the relevant departments.

Graduate students taking courses dealing in whole or in part with Quebec, or who are studying Quebec as their special field of study, are welcome to make use of the facilities of the Quebec Studies program.

En 1963, le Programme d'études canadiennes-françaises fut créé à l'Université McGill. En collaboration avec les autres départements de l'Université, le programme a notamment pour but de développer la recherche sur divers aspects du Québec et du Canada français. Depuis 1992, l'appellation du programme a été modifée pour celle de Programme d'études sur le Québec afin de refléter clairement les objectifs poursuivis.

Les activités du programme se concentrent au premier cycle. Les étudiants qui désirent poursuivre des études en vue de l'obtention d'une maîtrise ou d'un doctorat portant sur le Québec doivent s'adresser aux départements concernés.

Les étudiants dont les cours portent, en tout ou en partie, sur le Québec ou qui se spécialisent dans ce domaine, sont toutefois invités à se prévaloir des services du Programme d'études sur le Québec.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Political Science

Political Science

Location

  • Department of Political Science
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 414
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Political Science

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. (with or without thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. These programs combine depth of specialization in a particular field with breadth of knowledge in related fields. The staff offers courses and supervises research on most of the important areas of political science. Students may specialize in any of the following: Canadian Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, or International Relations.

M.A. graduates gain the scholarly preparation required to proceed to the Ph.D. program at McGill or elsewhere. Alternatively, the M.A. degree prepares graduates for teaching at the college level, for advanced study in other disciplines, or for rewarding jobs in government and in the private sector. Students in the M.A. program may choose either the Research Essay option or the Thesis option. Both options are generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada.

Besides its traditional M.A. program, the Department also offers M.A. options in Social Statistics, Development Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and European Studies. Interested students must apply and be accepted to both the political science M.A. program and to the option program.

Graduate students can benefit from expertise and advanced scholarship in such diverse research areas as Electoral Studies, Comparative Federalism, Constitutional Theory and Practice, International Peace and Security Studies, International Development, Nations and Nationalism, Health and Social Policy, and Identity Politics. For a full list of our affiliated research centres and institutes, please consult our website: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/centres.

Changes may take place after this content is published. Students are advised to contact the Department Office for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.

Master's Programs

Students may select a program with the Thesis or the Non-Thesis (Research Project) option in completing M.A. degree requirements. They may switch from one option to the other while completing their coursework.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. A main purpose of the M.A. degree is to demonstrate an ability to design and execute with competence a major piece of research, comparable to a full‐length article in a scholarly journal. The length will vary with the nature of the topic. A thesis that contains considerable data analysis might be well developed in 50 pages, while an institutional or historical study would generally be longer.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European Studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. Students in the non-thesis program will submit a research essay. The research essay will normally be based on a paper written for a graduate seminar or an independent reading course. The research essay requirement also applies to each of the non-thesis options listed below.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)
The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/option.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)
The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The Gender and Women’s Studies Option offers McGill graduate students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework, a cross‐disciplinary specialization in feminist, and gender and/or women’s studies, deploying a wide array of disciplinary methodologies and modes of inquiry. The student's research paper must be on a topic centrally focused on gender and/or women's studies. See www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)
The Social Statistics Option complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data or equivalent. Students complete course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, as advised by the Option Adviser, and subject to approval by the Department, and a statistics‐based M.A. research paper in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. See www.mcgill.ca/socialstatistics. Entrance to this option is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee subsequent to acceptance into the Departmental program. A research paper is required to demonstrate proficiency in research. It is normally about 50 pages in length and involves revision of a paper written for one of the graduate courses completed in the program. The research paper is evaluated by two faculty members in the Department.

Ph.D. Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science
The doctoral program is designed to give students the necessary foundation for making original contributions to knowledge. Graduate courses provide students with analytical and theoretical tools used in particular subfields. This general training includes specialized training in research methods. Recent graduates of our doctoral program are pursuing diverse employment opportunities. See: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/recentplacements.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Political Science and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. This option is a cross-disciplinary specialization run by the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies (see www.mcgill.ca/igsf). The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies. For more information on the option, see: www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).

Political Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The graduate Admissions Committee only considers applications from those who already have an undergraduate academic degree in political science or a closely related field (e.g., international studies, sociology, philosophy for prospective political theorists, etc.). Those without this required background occasionally enrol as Special Students in the undergraduate program and take upper-level undergraduate courses in order to build the academic record necessary to apply to the graduate program.

Master's

Students holding a B.A. degree may be eligible for admission to the M.A. program. Preparation equivalent to a McGill Honours program in Political Science is desirable.

Ph.D.

Students holding a master’s degree in political science may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program. In some instances, outstanding students with a B.A. in Political Science may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program without having completed an M.A. degree. They will be considered Ph.D. 1 and some previous political science coursework could be applied to the requirements of the program, provided that it did not count toward any other degree.

Reference Letters

All applicants, including those who have done their undergraduate work at McGill, must submit two letters of reference. It is recommended that you contact your referees at least a month in advance of the deadline. Applications that do not have references by January 15 will not be considered.

GRE and TOEFL Exams

GRE results are required for applications to the doctoral program. Use codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 1999. The test should be written well in advance of the application deadline. See www.ets.org/gre for more information on registering for the test. GRE results are not required for students applying to the master's program.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian/American institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum score of 600 on the paper-based test (or 100 on the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20) is required for admission. Please use the codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 89 when writing the TOEFL exam. See www.ets.org/toefl for more information on registering for the test. The IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) with a minimum overall band of 6.5 is also acceptable. Files will not be considered unless TOEFL/IELTS scores are received before the application deadline (January 15 for admission in the Fall).

For more information, consult the following websites: www.ets.org/gre and www.ets.org/toefl.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Writing Sample – Ph.D. only
  • GRE – required for applications to the Ph.D.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Political Science Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Completed applications (including all supporting documentation listed above) for all graduate programs in Political Science must be received by January 15. For detailed information, please see the Graduate Applicant Checklist at: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/gradformsdocs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Art History

Art History

Location

  • Department of Art History and Communication Studies
  • Arts Building, W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
  • 853 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0G5
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4933
  • Fax: 514-398-7247
  • Email: graduate [dot] ahcs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs

About Art History

The graduate program in Art History offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees and is extremely active. The programs cover a wide range of areas of study delimited by the Department's fields of specialization, which include the following: Ancient; Medieval; Renaissance; the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries; Contemporary; Canadian; East Asian; Architectural History; New Media; Print Culture; Gender and Sexuality; Race and Representation; and art historical methodologies, notably Feminism, Postcolonialism, and Queer Theory. All of our faculty members are outstanding scholars in their respective fields and are involved in a wide range of major collaborative and individual research projects, many involving faculty from other universities, departments, and programs (such as Communication Studies, English and Literary Studies, Histories of Science and Medicine, Religious Studies, Classics, History, and Women’s Studies). These research projects allow us to offer relevant research training opportunities and assistantships to our graduate students.

McGill is situated in one of the most vibrant cities in North America, and Montreal offers myriad opportunities for graduate students to engage with local arts institutions, either officially, through internships and research fellowships, or unofficially, through volunteering. Local institutions range from large-scale public museums (such as the Musée d'art contemporain, the Musée des beaux arts, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa) to smaller alternative galleries (such as feminist arts spaces La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse and Studio XX). There are also university-based venues such as the Redpath Museum on campus and the McCord Museum of Canadian History (which houses the McGill University Archives), and independent contemporary art galleries such as DHC and the Darling Foundry. The Canadian Centre for Architecture, with its archives and exhibitions, and the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec also offer grants and research opportunities for local graduate students. A close relationship with the other three major universities in Montreal (Concordia University, Université de Montréal, and Université du Québec à Montréal) affords students access to a broad network of additional courses, lectures, and colleagues across the city.

To obtain financial aid information, please consult the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs or email graduate [dot] fellowships [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

For programs in Art History and Communication Studies, refer to our website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs.

Residency Requirements

For students entering the master's program in Art History, three semesters of full-time resident study at McGill University are required to complete the degree. “Residence” means that the student is enrolled on a full-time basis during this period (i.e., it does not refer to housing or accommodations). This residence period represents the minimum time required to obtain the degree; however, there is no guarantee that the required coursework can be completed within this time. Students may register for additional semesters to complete the program, and most students take four semesters (see the eCalendar under University Regulations and Resources > Graduate > Regulations > Registration > Time Limitation). A typical timeline and further details regarding completing the M.A. may be found at www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/graduate/ahgradprograms/ma/timeline.

Coursework

Before classes begin, each student will meet with either the Graduate Program Director or with his/her supervisor to determine an appropriate selection of courses which, when considered in relation to the student's previous record, will provide a balanced breadth of coverage and specialization.

The candidate is required to pass, with a mark of 65% (B-) or better, all those courses that have been designated by the Department as forming a part of his/her program. These are the courses that have been entered on the registration form. A few extra courses may be taken, but it is then the responsibility of the student to see that these courses are clearly marked “not required” on the registration form.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Art History (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please see the Departmental website for more information about this program.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Art History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit, and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies and issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women’s studies.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Art History
Please see the Departmental website for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Art History — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women’s studies, and issues in feminist research and methods. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women’s studies.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Art History Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Entrance into either the M.A. or Ph.D. programs is limited to the best qualified applicants. A minimum CGPA of 3.3 or the equivalent, i.e., 75%, is highly recommended. The Department requires a research statement of at least 250 words outlining the candidate's particular research interest in Art History as well as a sample of his/her written work such as a seminar paper or, in the case of Ph.D. applicants, all or part of the M.A. paper or thesis. For a complete list of materials required, see Application Procedures below.

For international applicants whose first language is not English, please see www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply/prepare/international/proficiency.

M.A. Program

To apply to the M.A. program, candidates are normally expected to have a B.A. degree in Art History or in another closely related field; candidates may come from other fields such as literary studies, comparative literature, ethnic studies, Canadian studies, architecture, urban planning, film studies, history, performance studies, or philosophy/aesthetics, but must have taken at least 10 courses relating to the history and theory of some aspect of the visual arts, preferably covering a wide range of historical time periods and geographical regions. In exceptional cases, applicants without a strong background in art history may be admitted but with additional requirements arranged in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies to be completed before matriculation in the M.A. program.

Ph.D. Program

In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, candidates must hold an M.A. degree preferably in Art History or in a closely related field together with an appropriate number of art history and related courses such as are described for entrance into the M.A. program. All candidates for the Ph.D. program are strongly advised to contact a potential supervisor well in advance of submitting the application in order to establish a relationship. Applicants who have not vetted their research proposal (application statement) with a potential supervisor are unlikely to be admitted.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

For any admissions problems, please contact Maureen Coote, the Graduate Administrative Coordinator (Office: Arts W235; Telephone: 514-398-4933; Email: maureen [dot] coote [at] mcgill [dot] ca).

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Writing Sample (in English or French)
  • Research Proposal
    Note: The section of the application marked “Statement of Purpose” is not strictly required unless the applicant has specific items to remark on his/her candidacy that are not addressed in the research proposal.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Art History and Communication Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: There are no Winter or Summer term admissions for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Applying for External Funding

All prospective students, both Canadian and International are encouraged to apply for external funding. This includes fellowships and awards allocated by government departments and agencies, foundations and private companies.

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