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biostatistics

Computer Science

Computer Science

Location

  • School of Computer Science
  • McConnell Engineering, Room 318
  • 3480 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 0E9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7071, ext. 00074
  • Fax: 514-398-3883
  • Email: grad [dot] cs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.cs.mcgill.ca

About Computer Science

The School of Computer Science is one of the leading teaching and research centres for computer science in Canada. We offer a Ph.D. program and several M.Sc. programs. All include coursework and research. In the basic M.Sc. programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option, which requires a project. The Ph.D. program includes an option in bioinformatics, and the thesis M.Sc. program includes options in bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering. Students are normally funded by their adviser's research grants; in the case of scholarship students, this typically takes the form of a 'top-up' to the scholarship. Research in the School covers a broad range of areas, including:

  • Theory: algorithms, combinatorial optimization, computational geometry, cryptography, graph theory, logic and computation, programming languages, quantum computing, theory of computation, and scientific computing;
  • Systems: compilers, computer games, distributed systems, embedded and real-time systems, modelling and simulations, networks, software engineering;
  • Applications: bioinformatics, machine learning, robotics, computer animation, graphics, and vision.

All students must consult the graduate program website www.cs.mcgill.ca, where up-to-date information about the graduate programs is posted. Any questions concerning programs should be addressed to the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students with a strong interest in research in computer science who hold at least the equivalent of an undergraduate minor in CS. This program combines a strong course component with a research thesis. It is the usual (but not mandatory) entry point for students who wish to do a Ph.D., but is also the program of choice for students who want to find challenging and exciting jobs after their master's.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (45 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (45 credits)
This program option is to train graduates in state-of-the-art applications of numerical and modelling methods and computer technology to scientific and engineering problems. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Computer Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
This program is designed for students who want to obtain broad knowledge of advanced topics in computer science but without the requirement of a thesis. It offers an excellent preparation for the job market, but is not recommended for students interested in eventually pursuing a Ph.D.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science
The Ph.D. program trains students to become strong, independent researchers in the field of their choice. Our graduates take challenging positions in industry or take academic positions at universities and research labs. In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, applicants should normally hold a master's degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university, but exceptional students can be admitted to the Ph.D. program directly without a master's degree.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Computer Science — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Computer Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Master’s (M.Sc.)

The minimum requirement for admission is a bachelor's degree (cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 or better, or equivalent) with the coursework in Computer Science as listed on our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/msc_applicants.

The website supplements the information in this publication, and should be consulted by all graduate students.

Ph.D.

In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, normally applicants should hold an M.Sc. degree in Computer Science or a closely related area, from a well-recognized university. Students who hold a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science but have an exceptionally strong academic record may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program, but they must initially apply to the M.Sc. program. Students who are in the M.Sc. program have the option to be fast-tracked into the Ph.D. program at the end of their first academic year, contingent on excellent performance as judged by the Ph.D. committee.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Curriculum Vitae – required for Ph.D. program
  • Statement of Purpose – required for Ph.D. program
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE General Test) – required for degrees from outside Canada. Recommended for Ph.D. program.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the School of Computer Science and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1 Fall: March 1
Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only) Winter: Sept. 1 (Ph.D. only)
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

For further details on our admission requirements, please visit our website at www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/applying/applying.

Scholarship Deadlines: January 1 for applicants who wish to be considered for scholarship awards; otherwise, March 1 for admission to the Fall term.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Epidemiology

Epidemiology

The Department offers master's and doctoral programs in both Epidemiology and Biostatistics, as well as a Master's of Science in Public Health. The methods learned in these fields are used not only in the study of diseases, but also in health services research, program planning and evaluation, and policy development. Our faculty members are at the forefront of their research domains and include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, clinician scientists, medical informatics specialists, health economists, medical sociologists, and health geographers. Research in the Department spans all clinical specialties, pharmaco-epidemiology, social epidemiology, infectious diseases, population and public health, environmental and occupational health, clinical and public health informatics, biostatistics, health care delivery and organization, and many cross-disciplinary activities. Faculty members may have funding available for students through their research grants. We provide rich research environments at five university-affiliated hospitals, public health agencies, and university research centres. Graduates pursue careers in academia, clinical settings, government agencies, and industry.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Epidemiology (Thesis) (48 credits)

Applicants to the M.Sc. program should hold a bachelor’s degree in the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography) or social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or hold a degree in one of the health professional sciences (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The program leading to a master’s degree is designed to provide training in both theory and practice in the selected discipline. Courses require intellectual and academic rigour, and the program provides students with an opportunity to synthesize the training in the form of a thesis. Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and applied biostatistics, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, pharmaco-epidemiological, policy, and methodological health-related research. Graduates of the program often go on to do doctoral work or become research associates in public, private, and academic settings. McGill graduates are known for methodological and quantitative rigour, and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) (60 credits)
The mission of the M.Sc.P.H. is to train outstanding public health professionals and future leaders by offering a rigorous academic program in methods, research, and practice. This program may be of interest for students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Students will study the foundations and principles of epidemiology and biostatistics, as applied to public health research and practice, in order to design, conduct, and analyze clinical, population-based, environmental, policy, and methodological public health-related research. Graduates of the program will serve as public health practitioners, research professionals, and educators, and will possess the competencies and professionalism to carry out broad public health functions in local, provincial, national, and international settings. In exceptional circumstances, the Admissions Committee may take professional experience into account for mid-career or returning/re-entry applicants. The Master's of Public Health program will include a three-month practicum after the first year, which will provide the student with the opportunity to use knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a public health practice or research setting.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Environment (60 credits)
A number of departments and faculties throughout McGill University have joined with the McGill School of Environment (MSE) to provide an Environment Option as part of a variety of existing graduate degrees. The graduate option in Environment provides students with an appreciation for the role of science in informed decision-making in the environmental sector, and its influence on political, socio-economic, and ethical judgments. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. Option requirements are consistent across academic units. The option is coordinated by the MSE, in partnership with participating academic units.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (60 credits)

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered by the Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) as an option within existing master’s and doctoral programs in the Departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. The option is coordinated by the CPD, in partnership with participating academic units.

Thus, in addition to the rigorous training provided in the Department of EBOH, graduate students who choose this option become Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) student trainees. This affiliation notably offers opportunities for interdisciplinary research and supervision. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, a weekly seminar series, and informal discussions and networking.

With interdisciplinary research being increasingly important to understanding complex social and biological processes, CPD student trainees benefit from both a strong disciplinary foundation from their departmental affiliations, as well as from the sharing of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries through CPD activities.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology

This program may be of interest to students from the natural and quantitative sciences (e.g., microbiology, computer science, statistics, economics, geography), social sciences (e.g., sociology, psychology, anthropology), or the health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition). Applicants must have an interest in health research, along with strong conceptual, analytic, and quantitative skills (differential and integral calculus) at the undergraduate level.

The Ph.D. program prepares students with the advanced epidemiological research skills needed to undertake original contributions to new knowledge related to the determinants of health and disease, prevention, prognosis, treatment, and outcomes. The program is generally completed in four to five years. Graduates will be prepared to engage in scientific collaboration, and communicate results to other scientists and diverse audiences. They will go on to careers in public health, health planning, and quality monitoring in local, regional, federal, and international health authorities, statistical and technology assessment agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, and in clinical and academic research organizations. McGill graduates are known for their methodological and quantitative rigour and quantitative analytic independence. While their core training is in methods, rather than specific substantive areas, students learn about substantive areas in the context of their research and through elective courses.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Epidemiology — Population Dynamics

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-faculty graduate program offered by the Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) as an option within existing master’s and doctoral programs in the Departments of Sociology, Economics, and Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health (EBOH) at McGill University. Students who have been admitted through their home department or faculty may apply for admission to the option. The option is coordinated by the CPD, in partnership with participating academic units.

Thus, in addition to the rigorous training provided in the Department of EBOH, graduate students who choose this option become Centre on Population Dynamics (CPD) student trainees. This affiliation notably offers opportunities for interdisciplinary research and supervision. The option also provides a forum whereby graduate students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, a weekly seminar series, and informal discussions and networking.

With interdisciplinary research being increasingly important to understanding complex social and biological processes, CPD student trainees benefit from both a strong disciplinary foundation from their departmental affiliations, as well as from the sharing of knowledge across disciplinary boundaries through CPD activities.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 30, 2014).
 

Biostatistics

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Biostatistics

Biostatistics involves the development and application of statistical methods to scientific research in areas such as medicine, epidemiology, environmental health, genetics, and ecology. Biostatisticians play key roles in designing studies—from helping to formulate the questions that can be answered by data collection to the decisions on how best to collect the data—and in analyzing the resulting data. They also develop new statistical methods for such data. Students will take courses, and may do research, on topics such as mathematical statistics, statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. The Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health has one of the largest concentrations of Ph.D.-level statisticians in any Canadian Faculty of Medicine.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Thesis) (48 credits)
M.Sc. thesis students study a foundational set of courses, and write a thesis on a topic of their choice. Thesis students should have a strong interest in research. These students are well-placed to either continue in a Ph.D. program or to work in academic research in statistics or medicine; they will also have relevant qualifications for the pharmaceutical industry and government.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biostatistics (Non-Thesis) (48 credits)
The M.Sc. non-thesis program is designed to expose students to a wide range of topics including statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, survival analysis, longitudinal data, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, communication, and report writing are emphasized, and students graduate ready to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, in government, or in academic medical research.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biostatistics
Applicants should hold a master’s degree in mathematics or statistics or its equivalent. Mastery of calculus, linear algebra, real analysis, and mathematical statistics is essential. Exposure to data analysis is an asset. Exceptional students without a master’s degree will be considered for admission, starting with a Qualifying year. Ph.D. students typically work on development of statistical methods, and can specialize in statistical methods for epidemiology, generalized linear models, Bayesian methods, survival analysis, longitudinal data, causal inference, and clinical trials. Skills in data analysis, statistical consulting, and report writing are emphasized. Ph.D. graduates typically work as faculty in universities, in research institutes, in government, or in the pharmaceutical industry.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).
 

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