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Chemistry

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Chemistry

Location

  • Department of Chemistry
  • Otto Maass Chemistry Building
  • 801 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B8
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6999
  • Fax: 514-398-3797
  • Email: graduate [dot] chemistry [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.chemistry.mcgill.ca

About Chemistry

Research in Chemistry

Members of the Department are organized into various research themes. Some of the current research interests are listed below, and are presented in much more detail on the Departmental website at www.chemistry.mcgill.ca.

Analytical/Environmental

The Analytical/Environmental Thematic Research Group at McGill is involved in a wide range of exciting fundamental and applied research with focus on: state-of-the-art instrumental development in spectroscopy; imaging; chemometric and analytical bio-spectroscopy; artificial intelligence; ultra trace sampling; state-of-the-art atmospheric kinetics and photochemistry; thermochemical, box, and cloud modelling; as well as the development and application of state-of-the-art numerical models of the chemistry of the regional and global atmosphere. Our collective research has direct implications in fields such as materials, environmental, and biomedical chemistry.

Chemical Biology

The Chemical Biology Thematic Research Group is engaged in a diverse range of research topics, which span structural biology, enzymology, nucleic acid research, signalling pathways, single-molecule biophysics, and biophysical chemistry of living tissues. Among the themes that unite the research being performed in this group is the attempt to learn new chemistry and physics from biological systems.

We have projects relating to pharmaceutically relevant enzymes such as those involved in drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance; development of therapeutic agents in the control of inflammation, cancer and viral infections; the chemical biology of NO; quantification of bioenergetic markers of metabolism; self-assembly mechanisms of the HIV-1 virion capsid; liposome microarray systems to address membrane protein dynamics and recognition; studies on reactive oxygen species translocation across the aqueous/lipid membrane interface; RNAi/antisense technologies; dynamic combinatorial chemistry; protein dynamics and function; mechanistic aspects involved in cellular adhesion and transport in membrane and zeolite channels; and cutting-edge microscopes used to examine transport, motility, and reactivity in cells.

Chemical Physics

The research interests of the members of the Chemical Physics Thematic Research Group are diverse, with groups focusing on high-end laser and NMR spectroscopies, kinetics and modelling of atmospheric chemical reactions, experimental and theoretical biophysical chemistry, polymers at interfaces, and statistical and quantum mechanics. In the field of biophysical chemistry, single molecule spectroscopy is being used to probe enzyme function as well as DNA recombination and repair. Our recent advances in image correlation spectroscopic techniques now allow researchers to precisely follow the macromolecular dynamics in living cells. In a similar vein, breakthrough ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments have opened the window to real-time observation of the making and breaking of chemical bonds. State-of-the-art multi-pulse femtosecond spectroscopy experiments are being applied to interesting and technologically important new materials such as photonic crystals and quantum dot superlattices. A molecular-level picture of polymer dynamics and structure at surfaces and interfaces is being developed through theoretical modelling, high-field solids NMR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and other surface characterization methods. In the area of atmospheric chemistry, the chemical transformation of the atmosphere is being modelled both experimentally and theoretically to understand how these processes are currently affecting and driving climate change. Finally, we have basic theory projects relating to the experimental work just described, as well as in transport and structure in complex colloidal or zeolite systems, protein dynamics, and fundamental issues in quantum and statistical mechanics.

Materials Chemistry

The chemistry of materials is a rapidly evolving domain of research. Materials chemistry seeks to understand how composition, reactivity, and structure are related to function from a molecular perspective. The functionality of materials is expressed in a variety of areas including photonics, micro- and nano-electronics, biosystems, nanotechnology, drug delivery, catalysis, polymer science, molecular biology, and chemical and biological sensing. Activities of the Materials Chemistry Thematic Research Group are often broadly interdisciplinary. University-wide synergies among members of this group have led to the creation of the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM) and the McGill Nanotools Facility. The latter comprises state-of-the-art micro/nanofabrication, atomic manipulation and high-performance computing facilities. MIAM and members of the Chemistry Department have established research that links the Centre for Self Assembled Chemical Structures, the Centre for Biosensors and Biorecognition, the Centre for the Physics of Materials, and the Centre for Bone and Periodontal Research. Synthetic approaches to new materials include research in dendrimers, polynucleic acid architectures, polymers that conduct electrons or light and biopolymers. Polymer and colloid science figure prominently as does research and applications of the chemistry and physical properties of nanostructures. There is significant activity in understanding directed molecular assembly at interfaces and in the application of sophisticated spectroscopic tools to explore them.

Synthesis/Catalysis

The Synthesis/Catalysis Research Activity Group is a collective to develop the state-of-art catalysts, synthetic methodologies, reaction mechanisms, and synthetic routes for organic chemicals, natural products, and materials. The following are the major research activities at McGill: (1) Development of novel catalysts and catalytic reactions for highly efficient organic synthesis; Green Chemistry. This includes the study and discovery of novel transition-metal catalysts, biological catalysts, nano- and dendrimer-based catalysts for synthetic purposes; new chemical reactivity such as C-H activation, asymmetric catalysis and theory, multi-component reactions and combinatorial chemistry; innovative chemistry in alternative solvents such as water, sub-critical water, ionic liquids, and liquid CO2; photocatalytic reactions, reaction mechanisms, and physical organic chemistry; and computational chemistry. (2) Synthesis of biological compounds, organic materials, and natural products. Focus areas are total synthesis of natural products, synthesis of DNA and RNA analogues; synthesis of antiviral and anticancer nucleoside analogues, synthesis of amino acid and peptides; synthesis and study of carbohydrate derivatives; design, synthesis, and study of speciality organic chemical and materials.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Chemistry (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please consult the Department for more information about this program.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Chemistry (Thesis) — Chemical Biology (45 credits)
This program is currently not offered.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Chemistry
Please consult the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Chemistry — Chemical Biology
This program is currently not offered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Chemistry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The minimum academic standard for admission to research thesis degree programs is a minimum standing equivalent to a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Applicants from other institutions should have an academic background equivalent to that of a McGill graduate in the Chemistry Honours/Major programs. If possible, candidates should specify the field of research in which they are interested.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees

Graduate students devote 12 hours per week (contact hours, plus grading of reports, etc.) during the academic session to their teaching duties. Financial assistance during the remainder of the year is provided from research funds. Scholarship holders, such as NSERC or awards of similar value, receive a tuition fee waiver.

Additional Requirements

  • GRE – may be required for international degrees

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Chemistry Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 1 Fall: March 15 Fall: June 1
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 30 Winter: Oct. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.

All inquiries concerning graduate work in the Department should be addressed to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Bioresource Engineering

Bioresource Engineering

Location

  • Department of Bioresource Engineering
  • Macdonald Campus
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7838
  • Email: gradstudies [dot] macdonald [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/bioeng

About Bioresource Engineering

The Department offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs in various areas of bioresource engineering including: plant and animal environments; ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management, and remediation); water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality); agricultural machinery, mechatronics, and robotics; food engineering and bio-processing; post-harvest technology; waste management and protection of the environment; bio-energy; and artificial intelligence. The Department also offers a Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering (Integrated Water Resources Management). The Department has well equipped laboratories for conducting research in all these areas.

The interdisciplinary nature of bioresource engineering often requires candidates for higher degrees to work in association with, or attend courses given by, a number of other departments at both the McGill University Macdonald campus and the Downtown campus.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) (46 credits)
This option for the M.Sc. degree is oriented toward individuals who intend to develop a career in bioresource engineering research.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits)
The Environmental option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (46 credits)
This option is a joint offering between McGill University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama. This interdisciplinary option encourages and promotes ethically sound and socially significant learning in the global context of environmental problems. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is a requirement of this program. This program trains students in the socio-political aspects of the Tropical Environment.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Water Resources Management (45 credits)
Integrated Water Resource Management is a one-year program providing an essential approach for sustainable management of our natural watershed resources. The 13-credit internship is a central feature of this master’s program. The degree gives students the unique opportunity to study the biophysical, environmental, legal, institutional, and socio-economic aspects of water use and management, in an integrated context. The degree is directed at practising professionals who wish to upgrade and/or focus their skill set to address water management issues. As a graduate from this program, you will be well suited to opportunities in diverse fields of employment, such as water resources consulting, international development project management, research with governments or universities, public policy and governance development, and climate change impact assessment.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas (soil and water, structures and environment, waste management, environment protection, post-harvest technology, food process engineering, environmental engineering) in order to attain a higher level of engineering qualification. Candidates must be qualified to be members of a Canadian professional engineering association such as the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ) and must maintain contact with their academic adviser in the Department of Bioresource Engineering before registration to clarify objectives, investigate project possibilities, and plan a program of study.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environment (45 credits)
The non-thesis Environment option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas with the coordination of the McGill School of Environment.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits)

The Environmental Engineering program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge, practical perspective, and awareness of environmental issues through a wide range of technical and non-technical courses offered by collaborating departments and faculties at the University.

The primary objective of the program is to train environmental professionals at the advanced level. The program is thus designed for individuals with a university undergraduate degree in engineering. Through this program, students will master specialized skills in their home disciplines and acquire a broader perspective and awareness of environmental issues.

Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Integrated Food and Bioprocessing (45 credits)
This graduate program will provide students with the tools to understand how food and agricultural production interact to better manage agricultural, food, and biomass systems for the adequate supply of wholesome food, feed, fiber, biofuel, and any other bio-based material. This course-based program will present students with the skills needed to assess existing production, delivery, and quality management systems; introduce improvements; and communicate effectively with policy makers and with colleagues in multi-disciplinary teams. The goals of this program are to provide up-to-date world class knowledge on techniques for adequate process design and management of biomass production strategies for the delivery of quality food, natural fiber, biochemicals, biomaterials, and biofuels, in a sustainable and environment-friendly way that benefits all. Training activities will include laboratory research and/or industrial/government internships.
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (45 credits)
The non-thesis option is aimed at individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas of the Tropical Environment. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is a requirement of this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering
Please contact the Department for more information about this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment
The Ph.D. Bioresource Engineering: Environment – MSE Option is coordinated through the McGill School of Environment (MSE). This option is intended for students who want to take an interdisciplinary approach in their graduate research on environmental issues. Students will learn how to transfer knowledge into action and develop an appreciation for the roles of science, politics, economics, and ethics with regard to the environment.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Neotropical Environment
This is a research-based degree with a team of co-advisers from McGill and Latin America with the requirements of a one-year residency in Panama or tropical Latin America, three interdisciplinary courses, at least two of them focusing on North-South issues, proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese, one-time off-campus (Panama) fees, and the possibility of NEO-specific fellowships. Only the accredited professors listed on the NEO website can accept students in the option.
Graduate Certificate in Bioresource Engineering — Integrated Water Resources Management (15 credits)
The Graduate Certificate in Integrated Water Resources Management is for practising professionals who wish to upgrade or focus their skill set to address water management issues. Students are trained in Water Ethics, Law and Policy of Water Management, Freshwater Ecosystems, Health, and Sanitation.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Bioresource Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and Graduate Certificates should indicate in some detail their fields of special interest when applying for admission. An equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class – upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study is required at the bachelor's level. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program. Experience after the undergraduate degree is an additional asset.

Qualifying Students

Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one Qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a Qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

Financial Aid – Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student’s supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student’s supervisor and the student obtaining financial support.
  • The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Bioresource Engineering Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: May 31 Fall: Mar. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 31 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: Feb. 28 Summer: Jan. 31 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of these dates because immigration procedures may be lengthy.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

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