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Redpath Museum

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Redpath Museum

Location

  • Redpath Museum
  • 859 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4086
  • Fax: 514-398-3185
  • Email: redpath [dot] museum [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/redpath

About Redpath Museum

The Redpath Museum is a unique interdisciplinary unit within the Faculty of Science offering graduate training in research devoted to biodiversity, ecology, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology, leading to M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. It is an institution with extensive collections of ancient and modern organisms, minerals, and ethnological artifacts. Research and teaching are centred on collections-based study, object-oriented investigation, and fieldwork.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Redpath Museum Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The Redpath Museum does not have its own graduate programs. All graduate students of the professors in the Redpath Museum have affiliations with either Biology, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Anthropology, Natural Resource Sciences, or Education. Admission requirements are subject to those home departments' regulations.

Application Procedures

Students in the Redpath Museum may enrol in McGill's Department of Biology or other units, including the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Natural Resource Sciences, or the Faculty of Education. Anyone interested should contact the unit concerned.

Application Deadlines

For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

History and Classical Studies

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

History and Classical Studies

Location

  • Department of History and Classical Studies
  • Stephen Leacock Building, 7th floor
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About History and Classical Studies

The Department of History and Classical Studies has particular strengths in:

  • Canadian history;
  • British and European history;
  • East Asian history;
  • the history of medicine;
  • the history of science;

and newer fields such as:

  • the history of gender and sexuality;
  • the history of the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds;
  • global history.

The Department offers interdisciplinary options in European studies, developmental studies, and women’s studies at the M.A. level. Both M.A. and Ph.D. students can also write their thesis or research paper on the History of Medicine. The Department is composed of 39 full-time faculty members as well as a strong complement of visiting professors, faculty lecturers, and postdoctoral fellows. This array of dedicated teachers and scholars supports high-quality instruction and research across the periods of history and regions of the globe. Our professors have won many prizes for their books and articles, and their ongoing investigations are supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the FQRSC, CFI, the Killam Trusts, and the Mellon Foundation. The Department is home to a number of major collaborative research projects, all of which also include students. Among these are the Montreal History Group; the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC); Quelques arpents de neige, an environmental history group; and the French Atlantic History Group.

Classics was among the first disciplines taught at McGill College. Our students benefit from the resources of closely related disciplines and draw on the academic expertise of scholars from various backgrounds. Many awards and prizes are available for students who excel in the classroom, and both undergraduates and graduates can join professors on study tours and field projects. Students can also become members of the Classics Students Association and publish their work in the McGill Journal of Classical Studies, aptly titled Hirundo—Latin for “swallow,” like the martlets found on the McGill coat-of-arms, ever soaring in search of knowledge.

We offer prospective students the chance to study with leading scholars in a variety of fields.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed regulations and information.

Degrees in History

The M.A. program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year (Fall, Winter, and Summer). Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. The M.A. in History offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of history in a variety of fields. The McGill History degree carries international prestige and cachet and contributes meaningfully to success on the job market. Careers pursued by our graduates, aside from those who have sought and found places on the faculties of colleges and universities, have included positions in the area of public history at museums and other public institutions, in libraries and archives, in the diplomatic and other branches of the civil service, and in a variety of NGOs.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) (45 credits)

Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. Preparation of a thesis provides an opportunity for the preparation of a sustained project under close supervision.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)

The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO coordinating committee.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)

The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their thesis on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The seminars, in particular, provide an opportunity to analyze primary sources under close supervision.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)

The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross-disciplinary program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This option is for master's students specializing in international development. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the Department of History's M.A. requirements. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues and write their research paper on a topic approved by the DSO coordinating committee.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)

The European Studies Option (ESO) is a cross-disciplinary M.A. program offered as an option within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of History, Political Science, and Sociology, as well as the Faculty of Law. This option is for students interested in combining the approaches of history and political science to European studies, whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the ESO coordinating committee.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women Studies (45 credits)

This option provides students with cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students admitted to this option participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in place of three history seminar credits and write their research paper on a topic approved by the specific option's coordinating committee.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. Degree in the History of Medicine does not have a thesis option. This non-thesis degree is normally completed in one year. Candidates for the M.A. degree follow an individual program approved by the Department. Students participate in courses and seminars that deepen their understanding of the problems, topics, and issues confronting professional historians. The curriculum is intended to provide students with a strong disciplinary competence in history and a distinctively interdisciplinary perspective. Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History, or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); History

The Ph.D. in History is a professional degree program that prepares students for participation in the academy as historians. They gain competence in historical methods and good control over at least three fields of study. The dissertation is a work of primary research that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. Candidates in the field of Medical History will prepare the major field for the comprehensive examination with a member of the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the two minor fields with members of the Department of History and Classical Studies. The thesis will normally be directed by the director of the major field. In all other respects, the same rules will apply to candidates in this area as apply to other Ph.D. students in History.

Degrees in Classics

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. in Classics offers advanced training in the scholarly discipline of classical studies in a variety of fields. The program emphasizes proficiency both in technical areas of the discipline, especially Greek and Latin language, and in critical reading, writing, and research skills. The McGill M.A. in Classics is designed to prepare students to enter doctoral programs and, eventually, an academic career in any of the related fields of classical studies. Graduates have also pursued successful careers in teaching, law, museum science, and branches of civil service. This program can be completed in one year, though it is normally completed in two years.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Classics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

Please click the above link for further information on this program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Classics

This program is currently not offered.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 27, 2015).

History and Classical Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

A minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.3 on 4.0 is required, as well as a minimum TOEFL of 86 on the Internet-based test (iBT), with each component score no less than 20.

Master in History

  1. Normally, candidates are required to possess a B.A. (Honours) in History consisting of 60 credits in history. But students with other undergraduate history degrees (normally including serious research components) may be considered eligible.
  2. A minimum CGPA of 3.3 out of 4.0 (B+) in your undergraduate degree is required.

Applicants not satisfying these conditions but otherwise judged worthy of serious consideration will be asked to register in a Qualifying program in which they will undertake advanced undergraduate work.

Master in History – Development Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – European Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History – Gender and Women's Studies Option

Students have the same admission requirements as above.

Master in History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either History—B.A. (Honours) or equivalent—or a degree in one of the health professions with some background in history. Candidates with a willingness to do preparatory work in history are also encouraged to apply.

Ph.D. in History

Normally, an M.A. in History (Students choosing the field of History of Medicine normally enter with an M.A. in History of Medicine).

Master in Classics

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. in Classics

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Refer to the Department of History and Classical Studies website for detailed information (www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate).

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of History and Classical Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Biology

Biology

Location

  • Department of Biology
  • Stewart Biological Sciences Building, Room W4/8
  • 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue
  • Montreal QC H3A 1B1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-5478
  • Fax: 514-398-5069
  • Email: ancil [dot] gittens [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: biology.mcgill.ca

About Biology

The Department offers graduate training in many areas of biology with particular strengths in the following areas:
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics;
  • Cell and Developmental Biology;
  • Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation;
  • Evolution;
  • Neurobiology;
  • Bioinformatics;
  • Plant Biology.
In addition to the regular M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs, the Biology Department offers specialized programs, known as “concentrations,” in the areas of Neotropical Environment (NEO), Bioinformatics, and Environment.

Graduate programs leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees are offered. Both are research-intensive degrees, and the emphasis in both programs is on development of the intellectual and technical skills necessary for independent research. The main component of both degrees is a thesis presenting results of this work and the student’s original contribution to scientific knowledge. Formal coursework, usually in the form of literature-based seminar courses, is minimal and typically completed within the first year. To complement their classroom and laboratory training, students regularly attend other seminar series and journal clubs and present their own work annually in a formal seminar.

In addition to working with world-class researchers, graduate students in Biology have access to top-notch research infrastructure. The recently renovated Stewart Biology Building and the newly constructed Bellini Life Sciences Complex are equipped with state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for sophisticated imaging, robotic, and genetic techniques, to name a few. These in-house capabilities are complemented by a wide range of field research facilities, which include:

These resources are also extended by affiliation with other organizations such as the Redpath Museum, the Biotechnology Research Institute of the National Research Council of Canada, the Groupe Interuniversitaire de Recherches Océanographiques du Québec (GIROQ), the McGill Macdonald campus, the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, the Jewish General Hospital, the Montreal General Hospital, the Montreal Children's Hospital, and the Royal Victoria Hospital (Note that MUHC-affiliated hospitals and institutes are scheduled to move to the new Glen site in summer 2015; further information is available on the MUHC website).

The Department specifies a minimum level of support for all graduate students. This amount is $15,500 per annum plus tuition fees. The required minimum duration of support is two years for the M.Sc. program, five years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 1 (directly from a bachelor's degree), and four years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D. 2 (after having completed a master's degree).

The graduate program of each student is established and regularly evaluated by a three-member supervisory committee appointed by the Graduate Training Committee and chaired by the student’s thesis supervisor.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) (45 credits)

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.).

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits)

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences. Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of disciplines.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Neotropical Environment (48 credits)

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program. NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the M.Sc. level, students successfully completing the Bioinformatics concentration will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology

The typical graduate student in this program has a strong background knowledge in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, organismal biology, ecology, developmental biology, and statistics, often with special strengths in the area of proposed study. Given the continuing trend toward interdisciplinary work, the program also accepts some students with a high scholastic standing who have completed a program in fields other than biology (medicine, engineering, chemistry, physics, etc.).

Alumni have gone on to pursue a wide range of careers. Many go on to pursue postdoctoral research and later assume faculty positions, while others work as researchers in industry, wildlife biologists, forensic technologists, or science policy advisers, to name a few.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment

The Environment graduate concentration offers students the opportunity to pursue environment-focused graduate research in the context of a range of different fields, including Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Entomology, Epidemiology, Experimental Medicine, Geography, Law, Microbiology, Plant Science, Parasitology, Philosophy, Renewable Resources, and Sociology. Through a program consisting of research, seminars, and two courses, this concentration adds a layer of interdisciplinarity that challenges students to develop and defend their research and think in a broader context. Students graduating from the M.Sc. or Ph.D. program under the Environment concentration will therefore be able to understand and critically analyze an environmental problem from several perspectives (e.g., social, cultural, scientific, technological, ethical, economic, political, legislative) and at a local, national, regional, and/or international scale. In addition, they will be able to explore and critically assess analytic and institutional approaches for alleviating the selected environmental problem, and to effectively communicate research findings to both specialist and lay audiences.

Coordinated and administered through the McGill School of Environment (MSE), the Environment concentration is aimed at students who wish to use interdisciplinary approaches in their graduate research on environmental issues and who wish to benefit from interactions that will occur as they interact with students from a wide range of different disciplines. This concentration is available from a variety of faculties and departments.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Neotropical Environment

The McGill-Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) is a research-based concentration for M.Sc. or Ph.D. students in the departments of Anthropology, Biology, Bioresource Engineering, Geography, Natural Resource Sciences, Plant Science, and Political Science at McGill University. The NEO is aimed at students who wish to focus their graduate research on environmental issues relevant to the Neotropics and Latin American countries. The typical NEO student has a very strong interest in conservation because NEO courses focus on conservation issues. Students in the program have diverse backgrounds, including both Latin American and Canadian students, and must either speak Spanish or enrol in a Spanish course when they enter the program.

NEO favours interdisciplinary approaches to research and learning through the participation of researchers from McGill and from STRI. Accordingly, each student will have two co-supervisors, one from McGill and one from STRI. Students will complete their research in Latin America, and the NEO's core and complementary courses will be taught in Panama. Through this educational approach, NEO seeks to facilitate a broader understanding of tropical environmental issues and the development of skills relevant to working in the tropics.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Bioinformatics

The goal of the Bioinformatics concentration is to train students to become researchers in the interdisciplinary field of Bioinformatics, which lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. This work includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating Bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases and the use of algorithms and statistics.

The Bioinformatics graduate concentration consists of a number of interdisciplinary courses, as well as a seminar designed to bring students from many backgrounds together and to provide a thorough overview of research in this field. The typical entering student will be affiliated with one of about fourteen different “home” departments in three different faculties, chosen based on his/her specific field of expertise, and will therefore meet the specific requirements for that department. The student will additionally be evaluated according to requirements specific to the Bioinformatics concentration. Students in this concentration will have access to five specialized courses that are open only to students within the Bioinformatics concentration. At the Ph.D. level students will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will also have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Biology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study with an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted.

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone). A score of 86 on the TOEFL Internet-based test (iBT; 550 on the paper-based test (PBT)) with each component score not less than 20, or 6.5 on IELTS is the minimum standard for admission. Specific programs may have additional requirements.

Admission is based on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee and on acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they wish to study before applying.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply. All applicants should read the academic faculty and admission procedure sections on the Biology Department website before completing the application form. These guidelines contain specific information on the application process, summaries of the research areas of staff, and contact information.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Biology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Aug. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit. All inquiries pertaining to admission procedures should be directed to the Graduate Admissions Secretary.

Note: Applications for Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Location

  • Department of Psychiatry
  • 1033 Pine Avenue West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1A1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-2458
  • Fax: 514-398-4370
  • Email: graduate [dot] psychiatry [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/psychiatry

About Psychiatry

McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry is one the most prestigious in the world. In the 1950s and 60s, Heinz Lehmann conducted the first North American clinical trials for antipsychotic and antidepressant medications. Theodore Sourkes identified the core neurobiological features of Parkinson’s disease, and Eric Wittkower and Jack Fried brought together scholars from Anthropology and Psychiatry to create Transcultural Psychiatric Studies. Since then, faculty members and graduate students continue outstanding research in addictions; Alzheimer’s and childhood disorders; eating, personality, and mood disorders; stress; trauma; and psychosis. The work is conducted in people and animal models, and also benefits from expertise ranging from neuroimaging and epigenetics to mental health services and public policy. Our work remains at the cutting edge of research on health, disease, and recovery.

Ph.D. (Ad Hoc)

The Department of Psychiatry also offers the possibility of directly entering a Ph.D. program on an ad hoc basis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Psychiatry (Thesis) (45 credits)

The graduate program in Psychiatry is designed to provide advanced research training in the basic, applied, and social sciences relevant to issues in psychiatry. Applicants are admitted from a wide range of backgrounds, including undergraduate degrees in relevant areas (e.g., psychology, neuroscience, sociology, medical anthropology, nursing, and medicine), and those who are pursuing their psychiatry residency at McGill. Most, though not all students, continue to a Ph.D. program. The graduate program does not provide clinical training.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Psychiatry Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

  • A B.Sc., B.A., B.N., or M.D. degree
  • A strong background in science and/or social science, as demonstrated by academic achievement equivalent to a GPA of 3.3 (on a 4-point scale) or 3.5 in the last two years
  • A written agreement from the proposed research supervisor, and student's statement of purpose for seeking an M.Sc
  • An outline of the proposed thesis research, to be written by the prospective student in collaboration with an appropriate research supervisor
  • Two letters of reference
  • Sufficient funding to support their studies
  • TOEFL or IELTS certificate of proficiency in English for non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue and language of education is not English, with a minimum score of 86 on the TOEFL Internet-based test (iBT; or 550 on the paper-based test [PBT]), with each component score not less than 20, or 6.5 on the IELTS test

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – describing the specific reasons for seeking a Master of Science degree in Psychiatry
  • Letters of Reference – with Applicant Evaluation checklist forms (see Department website)
  • Written Confirmation of Supervision form (see Department website) from the proposed research supervisor

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Psychiatry and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15 Fall: March 15
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15
Summer: Feb. 15 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Bioethics

Bioethics

Location

  • Biomedical Ethics Unit
  • 3647 Peel Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1X1
  • Canada

For information, contact the Graduate Program Director:

  • Jennifer Fishman – jennifer [dot] fishman [at] mcgill [dot] ca

About Bioethics

The Biomedical Ethics Unit was established in 1996 with the aim of supporting scholarly research, clinical services, teaching, and public outreach. Members of the unit have backgrounds in anthropology, history, law, medicine, molecular genetics, philosophy, and sociology. We offer a master's degree specialization in biomedical ethics for selected master's students in the Division of Experimental Medicine, the Department of Family Medicine, Department of Human Genetics, Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Religious Studies, and Faculty of Law.

Master's Specialization in Bioethics

The Master's Specialization in Bioethics is sponsored by the:

  • Faculty of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Human Genetics, Department of Family Medicine;
  • Faculty of Law;
  • Faculty of Religious Studies; and
  • Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.

Students receive an M.A., LL.M., or M.Sc. degree in the discipline chosen with a specialization in Bioethics.

Some applicants are mid-career professionals currently working as physicians, nurses, social workers, other health care providers, or lawyers. Other applicants have recently completed their undergraduate degrees in science, philosophy, law, religious studies, or other disciplines and wish to pursue specialized master's level training in bioethics before enrolling in doctoral level studies or entering the workplace.

Students pursuing the master's degree specialization normally take two semesters of courses before beginning their master's thesis. Courses offered include Bioethics Theory, Public Health Ethics and Policy, Research Ethics, and a Practicum that includes placement in a clinical or research setting. Research and writing the thesis normally takes one year. Students must also comply with the course and thesis requirements of their home disciplines.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Bioethics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.D., professional training in a health science, or bachelor's degree in the sciences, social sciences, law, philosophy, or religious studies. Other students may be considered on an individual basis.

Enrolment is limited to 12 students.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications for the Master’s Specialization in Bioethics are made initially through the Faculties of Law, Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Human Genetics, Department of Family Medicine), Religious Studies, and the Department of Philosophy.

Applicants must satisfy the admission criteria for their chosen discipline and those of the Bioethics Unit, which administers the program and teaches the core courses; see www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters/apply.

Applicants must be accepted by the appropriate Faculty, the Bioethics Graduate Studies Advisory Committee, and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Application Deadlines

Deadlines coincide with those of the chosen base discipline. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Note: Applications for Winter or Summer term admission will not be considered.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Environment

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Environment

Location

  • Downtown Campus
  • McGill School of Environment
  • 3534 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2A7
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-2827
  • Fax: 514-398-1643
  • Macdonald Campus
  • McGill School of Environment
  • Rowles House
  • 21,111 Lakeshore Road
  • Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue QC H9X 3V9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7559
  • Fax: 514-398-7846

About Environment

Resolving environmental issues requires a dialogue between pure and applied sciences, the social sciences, and humanities. The degradation of the biological and biophysical environment has roots in the structure of human societies while solutions to environmental problems have an impact on human livelihoods.

A number of academic departments and institutes at McGill promote graduate-level research and training on environmental topics and have faculty members whose main research interest falls in this domain. As such, environmental research is widespread throughout the McGill community. The Environment option provides a vehicle whereby discipline-based graduate programs can easily and effectively incorporate collaborations from at least one other discipline into their research.

Goals of the Option

  • To provide thesis or non-thesis students in existing graduate programs with an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment;
  • To develop an appreciation of the role of scientific, political, socioeconomic, and ethical judgments in influencing that process;
  • To provide a forum whereby graduate students in environment throughout the University bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

Students admitted into the Environment option will be supervised or co-supervised by an accredited McGill faculty member. Their Advisory Committee will include at least one individual from outside the home department. It is expected that the thesis, dissertation, or project, as well as the final seminar presentation, will contain an environmental component and will include a discussion of the applied implications of the research findings. Together with the courses common to the Environment option, specific course requirements for each program are given within the departmental listings cited below.

Program List

The Environment option is currently available with the following graduate programs:

Anthropology
Master of Arts (M.A.); Anthropology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits) (Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Anthropology)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits) (Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences)
Biology
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Biology (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits) (Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Biology — Environment (Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Biology)
Bioresource Engineering
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Bioresource Engineering (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering)
Master of Science, Applied (M.Sc.A.); Bioresource Engineering (Non-Thesis) — Environmental Engineering (45 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Bioresource Engineering — Environment (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Bioresource Engineering)
Earth and Planetary Sciences
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Earth and Planetary Sciences (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits) (Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Earth and Planetary Sciences — Environment (Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Earth and Planetary Sciences)
Entomology (under Natural Resource Sciences)
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Entomology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Entomology — Environment (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences)
Geography
Master of Arts (M.A.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits) (Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography)
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Geography (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits) (Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Geography — Environment (Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Geography)
Law
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Thesis); Environment (45 credits) (Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law)
Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law (Non-Thesis); Environment (45 credits) (Faculty of Law > Graduate > Academic Programs > Law)
Management (under Desautels Faculty of Management)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management — Environment (Desautels Faculty of Mangement > Graduate > Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures)
Medicine, Experimental
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Experimental Medicine (Thesis) — Environment (45 credits) (Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Experimental Medicine — Environment (Faculty of Medicine > Graduate > Academic Programs > Medicine, Experimental)
Microbiology (under Natural Resource Sciences)
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Microbiology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Microbiology — Environment (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences)
Parasitology
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Parasitology (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Parasitology — Environment (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Parasitology)
Philosophy
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Philosophy — Environment (Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Philosophy)
Plant Science
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Plant Science (Thesis) — Environment (48 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Plant Science — Environment (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Plant Science)
Renewable Resources (under Natural Resource Sciences)
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Renewable Resources (Thesis) — Environment (46 credits) (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Renewable Resources — Environment (Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences > Graduate > Academic Programs > Natural Resource Sciences)
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Please note that the department of sociology will no longer be offering an option in Environment.

Environment Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Candidates must apply separately to the McGill School of Environment (MSE) for the graduate Environment option. Their acceptability will be based on their academic experience and performance, and availability of a potential MSE-accredited supervisor or co-supervisor for their proposed research. For further information, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/mse/programs/envroption.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines to the graduate Environment option may vary depending on the department you are applying to. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Social Studies of Medicine

Social Studies of Medicine

Location

  • Department of Social Studies of Medicine
  • 3647 Peel Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 1X1
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-6033
  • Fax: 514-398-1498
  • Email: dept [dot] ssom [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ssom

About Social Studies of Medicine

The Department (SSOM) offers graduate studies in three areas:

  • Medical Anthropology thesis program, given jointly with the Department of Anthropology;
  • History of Medicine non-thesis program, given jointly with the Department of History and Classical Studies; and
  • Medical Sociology thesis & non-thesis programs, given jointly with the Department of Sociology.

In each program, the student may work toward the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. All degrees are awarded by the relevant Faculty of Arts department. For further information regarding those departments, please consult the Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology sections.

The Department (SSOM) is interdisciplinary, having faculty in the fields of medical anthropology, medical history, and medical sociology. In its programs of graduate studies, it attempts to provide two things: training that is solidly grounded in the discipline of the chosen program, i.e., in anthropology, history, or sociology; and, through seminars and interaction with Department members and other graduate students, exposure to the other disciplines that are represented in the Department. The Department aims to instill in its graduates a combination of disciplinary competence and interdisciplinary perspective.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Medical Anthropology (Thesis) (48 credits)

The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences. The M.A. degree is awarded by the Anthropology Department and admission is granted by a joint Admissions Committee made up of representatives from Anthropology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine.

Master of Arts (M.A.); History of Medicine (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The program is composed of required courses, graduate seminars, plus a major research paper. The program is normally completed in three terms, or one calendar year.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Medical Sociology (Thesis) (45 credits)

This includes coursework and a research thesis that is based on original research.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Medical Sociology (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

This includes coursework and a research paper based on original research.

Ph.D. Programs

For information on the doctoral programs, please refer to the appropriate Department – Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 14, 2015).

Social Studies of Medicine Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A. in Medical Anthropology

The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences.

M.A. in the History of Medicine

Candidates must have a background in either history (Honours B.A. in History or equivalent) or a degree in one of the health professions.

M.A. in Medical Sociology

The program is open to students with a background in social sciences, health professions, or health sciences. It aims to prepare candidates for a career of teaching and research in medical sociology, and there is consequently a preference for applicants with the potential to proceed to the doctoral degree.

Ph.D. Programs

Candidates for a Ph.D. will normally have taken their M.A. in the same field. Please refer to the appropriate department: Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

M.A. in Medical Anthropology

Admission is granted by a joint Admissions Committee made up of representatives from Anthropology and SSOM.

For details concerning applications, teaching assistantships, fellowships, etc., see the Department of Anthropology website.

M.A. in the History of Medicine

Application is made directly to the Department of History and Classical Studies. For details, see the Department of History and Classical Studies website.

M.A. in Medical Sociology

Admission is granted by representatives from Sociology and SSOM. For details concerning applications, teaching, assistantships, fellowships, etc., see the Department of Sociology website.

Ph.D. Programs

Please refer to the appropriate department: Anthropology, History and Classical Studies, or Sociology.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines to the Social Studies of Medicine Option may vary depending on the department you are applying to. For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the department you are interested in.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 29, 2015).

Political Science

Political Science

Location

  • Department of Political Science
  • Stephen Leacock Building, Room 414
  • 855 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 2T7
  • Canada

About Political Science

The Department offers programs leading to the M.A. (with or without thesis) and Ph.D. degrees. These programs combine depth of specialization in a particular field with breadth of knowledge in related fields. The staff offers courses and supervises research on most of the important areas of political science. Students may specialize in any of the following:

  • Canadian Government and Politics;
  • Comparative Politics;
  • Political Theory; or
  • International Relations.

M.A. graduates gain the scholarly preparation required to proceed to the Ph.D. program at McGill or elsewhere. Alternatively, the M.A. degree prepares graduates for teaching at the college level, for advanced study in other disciplines, or for rewarding jobs in government and in the private sector. Students in the M.A. program may choose either the Research Essay option or the Thesis option. Both options are generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada.

Besides its traditional M.A. program, the Department also offers M.A. options in Social Statistics, Development Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and European Studies. Interested students must apply and be accepted to both the political science M.A. program and to the option program.

Graduate students can benefit from expertise and advanced scholarship in such diverse research areas as:

  • Electoral Studies;
  • Comparative Federalism;
  • Constitutional Theory and Practice;
  • International Peace and Security Studies;
  • International Development;
  • Nations and Nationalism;
  • Health and Social Policy;
  • Identity Politics.

For a full list of our affiliated research centres and institutes, please consult our website: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/about-us/centres.

Changes may take place after this content is published. Students are advised to contact the Department Office for supplementary information, which may be important to their choice of program.

Master's Programs

Students may select a program with the Thesis or the Non-Thesis (Research Project) option in completing M.A. degree requirements. They may switch from one option to the other while completing their coursework.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. A main purpose of the M.A. degree is to demonstrate an ability to design and execute with competence a major piece of research, comparable to a full‐length article in a scholarly journal. The length will vary with the nature of the topic. A thesis that contains considerable data analysis might be well developed in 50 pages, while an institutional or historical study would generally be longer.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)

The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. This thesis option is open to master's students specializing in development studies. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to development studies, approved by the DSO Coordinating Committee.

Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/development-studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)

The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. The M.A. thesis must be on a topic relating to European Studies, approved by the ESO coordinating committee. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.A. program is generally recognized as among the most demanding and rewarding in Canada. Students in the non-thesis program will submit a research essay. The research essay will normally be based on a paper written for a graduate seminar or an independent reading course. The research essay requirement also applies to each of the non-thesis options listed below.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Development Studies (45 credits)

The Development Studies Option (DSO) is a cross‐disciplinary M.A. program offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Geography, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the M.A. requirements of that unit. Students take an interdisciplinary seminar that will be co‐taught by professors from two different disciplines (INTD 657 Development Studies Seminar) and a variety of graduate-level courses on international development issues.

Students interested in development will benefit from the expertise provided by the Institute for the Study of International Development. For more information on the Institute, see www.mcgill.ca/isid/teaching-programs/graduate/development-studies.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — European Studies (45 credits)

The European Studies Option (ESO) is an option offered within existing M.A. programs in the Departments of Political Science, History, and Sociology, as well as in the Faculty of Law. This option is open to students whose work is focused on Europe, in particular on issues relating to European integration, broadly understood. Students enter through one of the participating departments and must meet the requirements of that unit. Students will take an interdisciplinary capstone seminar and two other courses on European themes and issues as part of their M.A. program. Knowledge of French, while not a prerequisite, is an important asset for admission and will be encouraged as part of the program, as will knowledge of a third European language.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)

The Gender and Women’s Studies Option offers McGill graduate students who meet the degree requirements in a participating unit and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework, a cross‐disciplinary specialization in feminist, and gender and/or women’s studies, deploying a wide array of disciplinary methodologies and modes of inquiry. The student's research paper must be on a topic centrally focused on gender and/or women's studies. See www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Political Science (Non-Thesis) — Social Statistics (45 credits)

The Social Statistics Option complements disciplinary training with research experience applying statistical methods to Statistics Canada data or equivalent. Students complete course requirements, supplemented by further statistical courses, as advised by the Option Adviser, and subject to approval by the Department, and a statistics‐based M.A. research paper in conjunction with an interdisciplinary capstone seminar. See www.mcgill.ca/socialstatistics. Entrance to this option is by application to the Social Statistics Option Committee subsequent to acceptance into the Departmental program.

A research paper is required to demonstrate proficiency in research. It is normally about 50 pages in length and involves revision of a paper written for one of the graduate courses completed in the program. The research paper is evaluated by two faculty members in the Department.

Ph.D. Programs

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science

The doctoral program is designed to give students the necessary foundation for making original contributions to knowledge. Graduate courses provide students with analytical and theoretical tools used in particular subfields. This general training includes specialized training in research methods. Recent graduates of our doctoral program are pursuing diverse employment opportunities; see: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/news.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Political Science — Gender and Women's Studies

The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary program for students who meet the degree requirements in Political Science and who wish to earn 6 credits of approved coursework focusing on gender and women's studies, and issues in feminist research and methods.

This option is a cross-disciplinary specialization run by the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies (see www.mcgill.ca/igsf). The student's doctoral thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies. For more information on the option, see www.mcgill.ca/igsf/programs/gws.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).

Political Science Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The graduate Admissions Committee only considers applications from those who already have an undergraduate academic degree in political science or a closely related field (e.g., international studies, sociology, philosophy for prospective political theorists, etc.). Those without this required background occasionally enrol as Special Students in the undergraduate program and take upper-level undergraduate courses in order to build the academic record necessary to apply to the graduate program.

Master's

Students holding a B.A. degree may be eligible for admission to the M.A. program. Preparation equivalent to a McGill Honours degree in Political Science is desirable.

Ph.D.

Students holding a master’s degree in political science may be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program. In some instances, outstanding students with a B.A. in Political Science may be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program without having completed an M.A. degree. They will be considered Ph.D. 1 and some previous political science coursework could be applied to the requirements of the program, provided that it did not count toward any other degree.

Reference Letters

All applicants, including those who have done their undergraduate work at McGill, must submit two letters of reference. It is recommended that you contact your referees at least a month in advance of the deadline. Applications that do not have references by January 15 will not be considered.

GRE and TOEFL Exams

GRE results are required for applications to the doctoral program. Use codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 1999. The test should be written well in advance of the application deadline. GRE results are not required for students applying to the master's program.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian/American institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit TOEFL scores. A minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based test (iBT), with each component score not less than 20, or 600 on the paper-based test is required for admission. Please use the codes McGill 0935 – Political Science 89 when writing the TOEFL exam. The IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) with a minimum overall band of 6.5 is also acceptable. Files will not be considered unless TOEFL/IELTS scores are received before the application deadline (January 15).

For more information, consult the GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS websites.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:

  • Research Statement – maximum one (1) page single-spaced, a concise research statement
  • Writing Sample – Ph.D. only
  • GRE – required for applications to the Ph.D.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Political Science Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Completed applications (including all supporting documentation listed above) for all graduate programs in Political Science must be received by January 15. For detailed information, please see the Graduate Applicant Checklist at: www.mcgill.ca/politicalscience/grad/gradformsdocs.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2015-2016 (last updated Jul. 24, 2015).