Quick Links

analysis

Management (doctoral programs)

Joint Ph.D. in Management Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

About the Joint Ph.D. in Management

  • Ph.D. Program Office
  • Desautels Faculty of Management
  • McGill University
  • 1001 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 1G5
  • Canada
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management
The Ph.D. program in Management is offered jointly by the four Montreal universities: Concordia University, École des Hautes Études Commerciales (affiliated with the Université de Montréal), McGill University, and Université du Québec à Montréal. The program is intended to educate competent researchers and to stimulate research on management issues.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Management — Environment
The Ph.D. program option in Environment is intended to develop an understanding of how knowledge is transferred into action with regard to the environment. It provides a forum whereby students bring their disciplinary perspectives together and enrich each other's learning through structured courses, formal seminars, and informal discussions and networking.

The Ph.D. program is offered jointly with three other institutions:

  • Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Département des Sciences Administratives
  • 315 Ste-Catherine Est
  • Montreal QC H2X 3X2
  • Canada
  • Website: http://phdadm.esg.uqam.ca

The program represents a number of innovations in doctoral work in the field of administration. First, by cooperating, the four universities are able to make available to the program's students a diverse pool of approximately 250 professors qualified to direct doctoral-level study and research. Second, the program has been carefully developed to encourage independent, creative work on the part of its students, with close, personal contact with the professors. This program will appeal especially to the mature, experienced candidate with relatively well-defined interests. Across the four member universities, some courses are offered in English and some in French. (All papers may, however, be written in English or French.) This is viewed as a definite advantage of the program for those students who expect to work in Canada or francophone countries after graduation.

The program places considerable emphasis on the theoretical foundations of management and its underlying disciplines. Graduates of the program are expected to have: (1) some knowledge of all the main areas of management, (2) a thorough knowledge of one applied area of management, and one support discipline, (3) a complete command of the research methodologies used in management, and (4) some familiarity with modern theories and methods of the pedagogy of management.

The program consists of three phases: preparation, specialization, and dissertation.

Phase I – Preparation

Before entering the program, the student will have selected the area of specialization from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management
  • Organizational Behaviour
  • Strategy and Organization
  • NSERC CREATE*

Some students—notably those with strong master's degrees in administration or related disciplines—have a minimum of work in Phase I; others require up to one academic year of work.

Phase II – Specialization

In Phase II, students probe deeply into their chosen area of specialization. With their Advisory Committee, students work out an individual program of study, which takes about 18 months. The phase focuses on a specialization area and a support field. The specialization area could be one of the basic ones listed in Phase I (for example, marketing or operations management), a sub-area within one of these (such as organizational development within organizational behaviour), or an interdisciplinary area that combines two or more of these (such as behaviour aspects of accounting or international marketing).

The support field is selected to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge in a fundamental discipline that underlies the theory in administration. For example, a student in marketing might select psychology, sociology, or statistics. One in management policy might select political science or general systems theory, or perhaps even philosophy. Other choices are possible.

Students officially enter Phase II of the program when their Advisory Committee has been established and, together with the student, formally agrees on a proposal for the work to be done in Phase II. Phase II must be approved by the McGill and the Joint Doctoral Committees. This includes the following:

  • Doctoral seminars in the specialization area; minimum four courses
  • Any other existing graduate-level courses in the specialization area and support field deemed appropriate by the Advisory Committee; minimum two courses in support field
  • Seminar on Research Methodology (MGMT 707, 3 credits) or equivalent approved graduate-level course
  • Seminar in Pedagogy (MGMT 706, 3 credits) or Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (EDPH 689, 3 credits)
  • Comprehensive Examination (MGMT 701, 0 credits)
  • A publishable research paper (MGMT 720, 3 credits)

The Advisory Committee will normally consist of at least three or four persons; a Chair and others decided upon jointly by the Chair and the student. One of these members will typically come from the support field. Every student's Advisory Committee must have representation from at least two universities in the joint program.

Phase III – Dissertation

The third phase of the program consists of the dissertation in the course of which the student probes deeply into a well-defined research topic. The topic is developed with the Thesis Committee (at least three members), which may be the same as the Phase II Advisory Committee or may be reconstituted, again with representation from at least one of the other participating universities. The topic is approved formally by the Thesis Committee and, once the research is completed and the dissertation written, the student publicly defends the completed thesis.

* NSERC CREATE Ph.D. option in Healthcare Operations and Information Management – Offered jointly by six Canadian universities: McGill, British Columbia, Ottawa, Queen's, Toronto, and Montréal; this Ph.D. program brings together expertise on healthcare processes, operations research, information systems, and telecommunications engineering.

Admission Requirements

Candidates normally hold a master's-level degree, with a strong academic record from a recognized university.

GMAT (or GRE-General Test) results are required for applications to the doctoral program; this includes McGill master's students applying to the Ph.D. The minimum score required is 600. Tests must have been written within the past five years.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English. Before acceptance, appropriate exam results must be submitted directly from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) Office. An institutional version of TOEFL is not acceptable. Applications will not be considered if a TOEFL or IELTS test result is not available. A minimum score of 100 for the Internet-based test, with each component score not less than 20, is required for admission. A minimum score of 7 for IELTS is required. Tests must have been written within the past two years.

Files will not be considered unless GMAT (or GRE-General Test) and TOEFL scores are received by the Application Deadlines.

Students may apply for admission to one or more of the participating universities. These applications will be processed by the individual university to which the applicant has applied and by the Joint Committee of the four schools. Students' preferences will prevail when more than one participating university is prepared to accept them. The Ph.D. degree will be granted by the university that admits the student. The program requires a minimum full-time residency of six terms.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • GMAT (or GRE-General Test) written within the past 5 years
  • Answers to Personal Statement questions
  • Curriculum Vitae

Application Deadlines

For application deadlines, please consult the following website: www.mcgill.ca/desautels/programs/phd/admissions/deadline.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 28, 2014).

Pathology

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

Pathology

Location

  • Department of Pathology
  • Duff Medical Building
  • 3775 University Street
  • Montreal QC H3A 2B4
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-7192, ext. 00481 or 00494
  • Fax: 514-398-3465
  • Email: pathologyteaching [dot] med [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/pathology

About Pathology

Pathology is the science of disease, and research in pathology is focused on understanding the cellular and molecular changes that cause disease, generating knowledge that is essential in the development of new methods for prevention and treatment. Pathology is a multidisciplinary science, and laboratory techniques overlap those used in all current fields of biomedical investigation. We offer unique opportunities for graduate students to conduct fundamental biomedical research that is directly linked to patient care, working with teams of highly experienced investigators and clinicians. Our laboratories are located on the main campus and throughout the McGill network of hospitals and research institutes. Our investigators collaborate with basic scientists from a variety of other departments, and undertake collaborative studies with colleagues in academic institutions around the world. Graduate students take part in joint clinical-experimental presentations involving our 48 faculty members, gaining broad exposure to current issues in diagnosis and treatment of disease. This opportunity to combine basic research and potential applications offers very exciting possibilities for a highly rewarding career.

The Pathology Department offers research training in a wide variety of areas such as immunology and transplantation, neoplasia, ophthalmic pathology, cell biology, pulmonary vascular and airways disease, pulmonary edema, neurodegenerative disorders, and smooth muscle pathophysiology.

Modern techniques and equipment include light, fluorescence and electron microscopy (both transmission and scanning), laser capture, DNA analysis, cell culture, advanced immunological, pharmacological, biochemical, and physiological techniques, as well as morphometry and computer-aided analysis.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Pathology (Thesis) (45 credits)
Graduates can directly enter rewarding careers in research, or opt to continue with their studies and obtain a Ph.D. Some combine their research training with subsequent training in medicine, law, or business administration.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Pathology
Our graduates enter successful careers in industry, academia, government/international agencies, or clinical medicine, sometimes combining two of these options. They leave McGill with experience in leadership and communication skills in addition to being highly trained in biomedical research, and their career choices include a wide range of administrative and research positions around the world.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Pathology Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. or an equivalent degree with an extensive background in the physical and biological sciences. An academic record equivalent to or better than a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.2 out of 4.0 at McGill is required for at least the two final full-time years of undergraduate training, with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 overall.

Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit the GRE and TOEFL examinations in order to be properly evaluated as to their suitability.

Students are normally accepted into the M.Sc. program, and those candidates showing exceptional ability may be permitted to transfer into the Ph.D. program after one year of training.

Applicants who already possess an additional degree (M.Sc., M.D.) and have some research experience may be allowed to register in the Ph.D. program directly.

For further information, applicants may contact the Teaching Office, Department of Pathology.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

All applications will be evaluated by the Graduate Students Committee. Candidates found suitable must then be accepted by a research director, and adequate funding must be obtained for both personal support and research expenses.

Additional Requirements

  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Research Proposal
  • GRE may be required for non-Canadian applicants

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Pathology Department and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: June 15 Fall: April 30 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Nov. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: March 31 Summer: Jan. 15 Summer: Same as Canadian/International

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mechanical Engineering

Programs | Application Procedures and Deadlines

 

Mechanical Engineering

Location

  • Department of Mechanical Engineering
  • Macdonald Engineering Building
  • 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Room MD-270
  • Montreal QC H3A 0C3
  • Canada
  • Telephone (Admissions & Scholarships): 514-398-8869
  • Telephone (All other inquiries): 514-398-6281
  • Fax: 514-398-7365
  • Email (Admissions & Scholarships): grad [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Email (All other inquiries): gradcoordinator [dot] mecheng [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad

About Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers are traditionally concerned with the conception, design, implementation, and operation of mechanical systems. Common fields of work include aerospace, energy, manufacturing, machinery, and transportation. Due to the broad nature of the discipline, there is usually a high demand for mechanical engineers with advanced training.

The Department includes more than 30 faculty members and 200 graduate students, and is housed primarily within the recently renovated Macdonald Engineering building. The Department contains state-of-the-art experimental facilities (including a major wind tunnel facility) and has extensive computational facilities. Professors within the Department collaborate widely with professors in other units, often through research centres including the Centre for Intelligent Machines (CIM); the McGill Institute for Advanced Materials (MIAM); and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (MNI). The research interests within the Department are very broad and fall largely within the following five areas:

  • aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering
  • mechanics of materials and structures
  • dynamics and control
  • design and manufacturing
  • bioengineering

Within these areas, specific topics of research are given in the following:

Aerodynamics, fluids, and thermal engineering

Experimental fluid mechanics and aerodynamics, aeroelasticity, and aeroacoustics; theoretical fluid mechanics; turbulence; mixing in turbulent flows; fluid flow control; fluid-structure interactions; computational fluid dynamics, multidisciplinary optimization, and computer flow visualization; heat transfer; combustion, shock wave physics, energetic materials, high-speed reacting flows, hypersonic propulsion, and alternative fuels.

Mechanics of materials and structures

Composite materials: structural design, analysis, manufacturing, and processing; micro/nano mechanics; MEMS/NEMS; adaptronic structures; thermomechanics, wave propagation, and computational mechanics.

Dynamics and control

Multibody systems, legged and wheeled vehicles, compliant mechanisms, and kinematic geometry; tethered systems, lighter-than-air craft, and underwater vehicles; spacecraft dynamics and space robotics; modelling and simulation; fluid-structure interactions, nonlinear and chaotic dynamics; dynamics of bladed assemblies.

Design and manufacturing

Design theory and methodology, design optimization; biomimetics; machine tools and systems, manufacturing processes, and management and control; micro/nano machining; wear and comminution processes.

Bioengineering

Biomechanics, biomaterials, blood and respiratory flows, mechanics of soft tissues, cardiovascular devices, image processing for medical diagnostics, voice production.

Programs Offered

The Department offers programs of study leading to the M.Eng., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Both M.Eng. (Thesis) and M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) programs are offered.

There are several options for completing master’s degrees that do not involve the completion of a thesis. The M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program has more extensive course requirements and will appeal to students who desire to gain both a broad understanding of subjects within Mechanical Engineering as well as in-depth information in a specific area. Two other non-thesis master’s degree options are described below.

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.Eng. (Thesis) program requires the completion of 16 credits of technical complementary courses, a seminar course, and a thesis. The thesis involves advanced research supervised by one or more professors who are internationally known in their field. This program prepares students for either an industrial research career or further academic research at the Ph.D. level.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (46 credits)
For students who would like to concentrate on computational work for their research, the M.Eng. (Thesis) – Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) option is available. CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. In this program, students choose their complementary courses from within a list of scientific computing courses and courses that involve applications and specialized methods.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Mechanical Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Students in this program must complete four required courses in addition to 16 credits of complementary courses and a seminar course. They also complete a project that is less involved than a thesis and may involve a limited research project, or a technical or design study. Graduates of this program are well-prepared for carrying out research and development in industry and may also proceed to further research at the Ph.D. level.
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.); Aerospace Engineering (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)

The M.Eng. Aerospace degree is offered to students who wish to specialize in the general area of aerospace engineering. This degree is given in conjunction with Concordia University, École Polytechnique, Université Laval, Université de Sherbrooke, and École de Technologie Supérieure. Students registered at McGill are required to take two courses from two other institutions.

The aerospace industry is strongly established in Quebec. Representatives of the aerospace industry therefore requested that measures be taken to provide for qualified scientists in aerospace. Five universities offering courses in engineering came together to offer a master’s degree program in the field of aeronautics and space technology. This program is offered to students who wish to specialize in these disciplines. The industry’s participation is a special feature of this program. The universities and the participating industries, with the cooperation of the Centre of Aerospace Manpower Activities in Quebec (CAMAQ), have formed a Coordinating Committee, CIMGAS, to arrange for industrial internships and case study courses for the students and to implement specific program developments to meet the needs of the industry.

The M.Eng. (Aerospace) program requires a minimum of 45 credits, including an “Industrial Stage” (i.e., engineering work in an aerospace industry) of four months. Enrolment is limited to the number of industrial stages available, so admission to the program is typically quite competitive. While intended to be a full-time program, the M.Eng. Aerospace program may be completed on a part-time basis over a maximum of five years. By the time of completion of the program, graduates are extremely well-prepared to enter into a career in the aerospace industry.

Depending on their background, students would specialize in one of the four areas:

  1. Aeronautics and Space Engineering
  2. Avionics and Control
  3. Aerospace Materials and Structures
  4. Virtual Environment
Master of Management (M.M.); Manufacturing Management (Non-Thesis) (56 credits)

This program is currently not offered

The Master in Manufacturing Management (M.M.M.) program attracts business professionals from around the world who wish to pursue a career in the effective management of global operations and supply chain. It is a professionally-oriented graduate program offered jointly through the Faculties of Engineering and Management, aimed at those candidates with engineering or science backgrounds.

In just eleven months of academic studies, M.M.M. students sharpen their expertise in supply chain and operations through an intensive program that includes:

  • A challenging curriculum
  • Extensive industrial interaction
  • Innovative research projects

Additionally, students are exposed to the latest trends and developments in management and participate in professional development seminars to leverage their communication and leadership skills. After less than one year of studies, participants complete a paid work term at an industrial location. This is a unique opportunity to work on a real-world project with an M.M.M. partner company in North America.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mechanical Engineering (Thesis) (45 credits)
Please consult the Department for more information on this program.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mechanical Engineering
In the Ph.D. program, students are required to demonstrate a significant new contribution to their field of research, as documented in an externally reviewed thesis. The research is carried out under the supervision of professors who are leaders in their field. Since research in Mechanical Engineering is often interdisciplinary in nature, it is common for Ph.D. students to have a co-supervisor in addition to their principle supervisor. Graduates from this program typically proceed to careers in research in either industrial or academic environments.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mechanical Engineering Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

The general rules of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies apply. Candidates who come from other institutions are expected to have an academic background equivalent to the undergraduate curriculum in mechanical engineering at McGill or to make up any deficiencies in a Qualifying year.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering. Applicants who hold an undergraduate degree in a non-Engineering discipline—typically the Physical Sciences—may apply for the M.Sc. (Thesis) program, which is governed by the same regulations as the M.Eng. (Thesis) program.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Non-Thesis) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Mechanical Engineering.

Applicants to the M.Eng. (Aerospace) program must hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in Engineering.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program must have successfully completed a master's degree program (or equivalent) in Engineering or the Physical Sciences. In exceptional circumstances, students with outstanding performance at the bachelor's level may be offered direct entry into the Ph.D. program (Ph.D. 1).

In the case of all programs, applicants must have successfully completed their prior degree(s) with a minimum CGPA equivalent to 3.3 on a scale of 4.0. Satisfaction of these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Applicants to graduate studies whose mother tongue is not English, and who have not completed an undergraduate or graduate degree from a recognized foreign institution where English is the language of instruction or from a recognized Canadian institution (anglophone or francophone), must submit official results of either a TOEFL or an IELTS test. The minimum score required is 92 for the Internet-based TOEFL test, with each component score not less than 20 (or 580 on the paper-based test, with a minimum of 4.0 on the “Test of Written English”); or a minimum overall band of 7.0 on the IELTS test.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Please consult www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad for further details on required application documents.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • two official Referee Reports
  • Personal Statement – one page
  • Curriculum Vitae – please include a list of publications, if relevant
  • proof of French proficiency (for Aerospace program only)

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: Oct. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Oct. 15
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Please also consult the Departmental website for the application deadlines: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng/grad/date.

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 31, 2014).

Mathematics and Statistics

Mathematics and Statistics

Location

  • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Burnside Hall, Room 1005
  • 805 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0B9
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-3800
  • Fax: 514-398-3899
  • Email: grad [dot] mathstat [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.math.mcgill.ca

About Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs that can be focused on applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to master’s degrees (M.A. or M.Sc.), with program options in Bioinformatics and in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE). The research groups are: Algebra Category; Theory and Logic; Geometric Group Theory; Algebraic Geometry; Discrete Mathematics; Mathematical Physics; Analysis and its Applications; Differential Geometry; Number Theory; Applied Mathematics; Differential Equations; and Probability and Statistics. In the basic master’s programs, students must choose between the thesis option, and the non-thesis option which requires a project. The Bioinformatics and CSE options require a thesis. In addition to the Ph.D. program in Mathematics and Statistics, there is a Ph.D. option in Bioinformatics.

The Department website (www.math.mcgill.ca) provides extensive information on the Department and its facilities, including the research activities and the research interests of individual faculty members. It also provides detailed information, supplementary to this eCalendar, concerning our programs, admissions, funding of graduate students, thesis requirements, advice concerning the choice of courses, etc.

Students are urged to consult the website (www.math.uqam.ca/ISM) of the Institut des Sciences Mathématiques (ISM), which coordinates intermediate and advanced-level graduate courses among Montreal and Quebec universities. A list of courses available under the ISM auspices can be obtained from the ISM website. The ISM also offers fellowships and promotes a variety of joint academic activities greatly enhancing the mathematical environment in Montreal and in the province of Quebec.

Master of Arts (M.A.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.A. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Arts > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the Master's degree (M.A.). The thesis option requires a thesis (24 credits) and six approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 21 credits.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.A.). The non-thesis option requires a project (16 credits) and eight approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 29 credits.

Master of Science (M.Sc.) Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Detailed program requirements for the following M.Sc. programs are found in the eCalendar under Faculties & Schools > Faculty of Science > Graduate > Academic Programs > Mathematics and Statistics.

Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.). The thesis option requires a thesis (24 credits) and six approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 21 credits.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Bioinformatics (48 credits)
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the M.Sc. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Thesis) — Computational Science and Engineering (47 credits)
CSE is a rapidly growing multidisciplinary area with connections to the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. CSE focuses on the development of problem-solving methodologies and robust tools for the solution of scientific and engineering problems. Please visit our website for more information: www.cs.mcgill.ca/prospective-students/graduate/msc_cse_option.
Master of Science (M.Sc.); Mathematics and Statistics (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs with concentrations in applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and statistics leading to the master's degree (M.Sc.).The non-thesis option requires a project (16 credits) and eight approved courses of 3 or more credits each for a total of at least 29 credits.

Ph.D. Programs in Mathematics and Statistics

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics
The Department offers a course of studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. It differs substantially from the master’s programs in that the student must write a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge. The thesis topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the research supervisor. The thesis must be examined and approved by an internal examiner (normally the research supervisor), an external examiner and the Oral Examination Committee. The student must make an oral defense of the thesis before that Committee. In addition, the student has to pass comprehensive examinations.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Mathematics and Statistics — Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics research lies at the intersection of biological/medical sciences and mathematics/computer science/engineering. The intention of the Bioinformatics option is to train students to become researchers in this interdisciplinary field. This includes the development of strategies for experimental design, the construction of tools to analyze datasets, the application of modelling techniques, the creation of tools for manipulating bioinformatics data, the integration of biological databases, and the use of algorithms and statistics. Students successfully completing the Bioinformatics option at the Ph.D. level will be fluent in the concepts, language, approaches, and limitations of the field and will have the capability of developing an independent bioinformatics research program.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Mathematics and Statistics Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirements, the Department requirements are as follows:

Master's Degree

The normal entrance requirement for the master's programs is a Canadian honours degree or its equivalent, with high standing, in mathematics or a closely related discipline in the case of applicants intending to concentrate in statistics or applied mathematics.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in pure mathematics should have a strong background in linear algebra, abstract algebra, and real and complex analysis.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in statistics should have a strong background in linear algebra and basic real analysis. A calculus-based course in probability and one in statistics are required, as well as some knowledge of computer programming. Some knowledge of numerical analysis and optimization is desirable.

Applicants wishing to concentrate in applied mathematics should have a strong background in most of the areas of linear algebra, analysis, differential equations, discrete mathematics, and numerical analysis. Some knowledge of computer programming is also desirable.

Students whose preparation is insufficient for the program they wish to enter may, exceptionally, be admitted to a Qualifying year.

Ph.D. Degree

A master's degree with high standing is required, in addition to the requirements listed above for the master’s program. Students may transfer directly from the master’s program to the Ph.D. program under certain conditions. Students without a master's degree, but with exceptionally strong undergraduate training, may be admitted directly to Ph.D. 1.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Personal Statement – In the personal statement, the applicants should clearly explain their choice of preferred research group(s) and preferred area(s) of research, as well as providing relevant information that will not be reflected on their transcripts.
  • Research Proposal (optional) – If applicants have a specific research problem of interest that they want to pursue, they may discuss the details in the research proposal.
  • Applicants in pure and applied mathematics should provide a GRE score report, if available

For more details, please consult the website at www.math.mcgill.ca/students/graduate/application.

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Same as Canadian/International
Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Sept. 15 Winter: Same as Canadian/International
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Location

  • Department of Art History and Communication Studies
  • Arts Building, W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
  • 853 Sherbrooke Street West
  • Montreal QC H3A 0G5
  • Canada
  • Telephone: 514-398-4933
  • Fax: 514-398-7247
  • Email: graduate [dot] ahcs [at] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs

About Communication Studies

The graduate program in Communication Studies offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. The program is concerned with the study of communication phenomena through interdisciplinary training that draws on a variety of fields including cultural studies, critical media and technology studies, public policy and governance, film, and sound studies. The program strives to offer a balance of humanities and social sciences approaches to the analysis of communication, and its orientation is primarily qualitative (rather than quantitative) in nature. The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are academic in character, and do not include professional training in journalism, organizational communication, or media production. The Communication Studies program offers courses and directs project research in preparation for the M.A. Thesis and Ph.D. in Communication Studies. The graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies is available as a program option, and students benefit from the resources and activity of Media@McGill, a hub of research and public outreach on critical issues in media, culture, and emerging technology.

McGill is situated in one of the most vibrant cities in North America, and Montreal offers myriad opportunities for graduate students to engage with local arts institutions, either officially, through internships and research fellowships, or unofficially, through volunteering. Local institutions range from large-scale public museums (such as the Musée d'art contemporain, the Musée des beaux-arts, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa) to smaller alternative galleries (such as feminist arts spaces La Centrale Galerie Powerhouse and Studio XX). There are also university-based venues such as the Redpath Museum on campus and the McCord Museum of Canadian History (which houses the McGill University Archives), and independent contemporary art galleries such as DHC and the Darling Foundry. The Canadian Centre for Architecture, with its archives and exhibitions and the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec also offer grants and research opportunities for local graduate students. A close relationship with the other three major universities in Montreal (Concordia University, Université de Montréal, and Université du Québec à Montréal) affords students access to a broad network of additional courses, lectures, and colleagues across the city.

To obtain financial aid information, please consult the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website at www.mcgill.ca/gps/funding/students-postdocs or email graduate [dot] fellowships [at] mcgill [dot] ca.

For programs in Art History and Communication Studies, refer to our website: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs.

Master's and Ph.D. Degrees

The master's program requires a three-semester residency, the successful completion of a total of seven courses (21 credits, including the Pro-Seminar course), and a thesis (equivalent to 24 credits). Three years of residence are normally required for the Ph.D. degree (candidates with an M.A. will be admitted at the Ph.D. 2 level of the doctoral program, thereby gaining credit for one year of resident study). The Ph.D. program of study is comprised of five courses (15 credits), the Pro-Seminar (3 credits), a comprehensive examination (0 credits), a dissertation proposal, and a written dissertation with its defense. Ph.D. students who have selected the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies are required to take 9 credits (within the total credits that are required for the Ph.D. degree); WMST 601 AND WMST 602 are required, plus one 3-credit complementary Art History course related to gender and women’s studies. All course selections must first be approved by the supervisor/Graduate Program Director.

Students enter our graduate programs from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, though all have a history of documented academic excellence and aptitude for advanced scholarly research. Over the past 30 years, the Graduate Program in Communication Studies has trained many of Canada's leading communications scholars. Graduates of the program may be found working in all levels of government, within the cultural industries, and in dozens of university Communication Studies departments around the world.

For the language requirement for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, please see: www.mcgill.ca/ahcs/graduate/language-requirement.

Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) (45 credits)
The M.A. in Communication Studies offers advanced training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Thesis) — Gender and Women's Studies (45 credits)
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in GWS will appear on a student’s transcript along with the M.A. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship. The thesis must be on a topic centrally related to gender and/or women's studies.
Master of Arts (M.A.); Communication Studies (Non-Thesis) (45 credits)
Please contact the Department for more information about this non-thesis option.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies
The Ph.D. in Communication Studies offers in-depth training in the critical, historical, and theoretical analysis of communication in culture, communication technology, and communication policy. Doctoral students pursue coursework, submit a comprehensive exam and thesis proposal, with the goal of writing a dissertation that makes an original contribution to knowledge in Communication Studies. The Ph.D. degree is academic in character, and does not include professional training in media production.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.); Communication Studies — Gender and Women's Studies
The graduate option in Gender and Women's Studies (GWS) provides graduate students obtaining degrees in a variety of participating departments and faculties with a cross-disciplinary specialization in feminist, women's, and gender studies. Students who pursue this option obtain a graduate degree in their own department as well as an “option/concentration” in GWS. Thus, the graduate option in Gender and Women’s Studies will appear on a student’s transcript along with the Ph.D. The option was developed by the Women's Studies program in response to needs expressed by the Graduate Group for Feminist Scholarship (GGFS) and to the range of inquiries the Women's Studies program regularly receives from potential students interested in graduate-level work with a feminist focus at McGill University. There are no prerequisites to enter into the option. However, undergraduate or graduate courses in gender or women’s studies provide an ideal foundation for more in-depth study of, and research in, feminist scholarship.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Communication Studies Admission Requirements and Application Procedures

Admission Requirements

M.A.

An honours bachelor's degree or equivalent is required of applicants to the M.A. program, with a minimum CGPA of 3.3 out of 4.0, or equivalent, i.e., B+ (75%). In whichever case, the transcript must show breadth or depth in related areas of study.

Ph.D.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program are expected to have completed the equivalent of an M.A. degree. Admission will be based on academic achievement and evidence of talent and strong motivation in Communication Studies.

Application Procedures

McGill’s online application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/apply.

See Application Procedures for detailed application procedures.

Applications will be considered by the deadline of January 15.

Inquiries regarding the program should be addressed to the Graduate Administrative Coordinator, Department of Art History and Communication Studies.

Additional Requirements

The items and clarifications below are additional requirements set by this department:
  • Research Proposal – at least 500 words
  • Written Work – two examples

Application Deadlines

The application deadlines listed here are set by the Department of Art History and Communication Studies and may be revised at any time. Applicants must verify all deadlines and documentation requirements well in advance on the appropriate McGill departmental website; please consult the list at www.mcgill.ca/gps/contact/graduate-program.

Canadian International Special/Exchange/Visiting
Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15 Fall: Jan. 15
Winter: N/A Winter: N/A Winter: N/A
Summer: N/A Summer: N/A Summer: N/A

Admission to graduate studies is competitive; accordingly, late and/or incomplete applications are considered only as time and space permit.

Note: There are no Winter or Summer term admissions for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.
Taken from Programs, Courses and University Regulations 2014-2015 (last updated Jul. 22, 2014).

Social Media