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Funding Opportunities

Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI)

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

International Development Research Centre (IDRC)
IDRC Research Awards
The Bentley Cropping Systems Fellowship
Canadian Window on International Development Awards
IDRC Graduate Research Awards on Evaluation
IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Going Global Science and Technology Fund

Additional Funding Opportunities
Human Frontier Science Program
Grand Challenges Explorations
Thrasher Research Fund

Additional Funding Resources
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation – Global Health Program
Funding Guide for International Science and Technology Cooperation
The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research
Global Forum on Health Research

 


Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI)

Description: The Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI) is a partnership formed by four Canadian agencies - Health Canada; the Canadian Institutes of Health Research; the International Development Research Centre; and the Canadian International Development Agency- to strengthen Canada’s role on the global health research scene. GHRI funds and facilitates innovative, inter-disciplinary research and training programs to address the priorities of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

The Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI) principles are to:
• Support more egalitarian Canada-LMIC teams;
• Support interdisciplinary approaches to health problems that are a priority to LMICs;
• Engage multiple stakeholders (universities and affiliated organizations, civil society organizations, governments, community members);
• Promote and strengthen knowledge exchange and transfer mechanisms, including links to policy-makers and other research users;
• Support sustainable research environments;
• Support effective training and mentoring;
• Provide ongoing technical support and networking;
• Promote research excellence through peer review.
More Information: Website


Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Description: The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada's agency responsible for funding health research in Canada. CIHR was created in 2000 under the authority of the CIHR Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Health. CIHR's budget for 2008-09 is $928.6 million, of which $132 million is allocated to administering the Networks of Centres of Excellence and Canada Research Chair programs.
CIHR was created to transform health research in Canada by:
* funding more research on targeted priority areas;
* building research capacity in under-developed areas such as population health and health services research;
* training the next generation of health researchers; and
* focusing on knowledge translation, so that the results of research are transformed into policies, practices, procedures, products and services.

CIHR's mandate is to "excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health-care system."

CIHR consists of 13 "virtual" institutes, a structure that is unique in the world. These innovative institutes bring together all partners in the research process - the people who fund research, those who carry it out and those who use its results - to share ideas and focus on what Canadians need: good health and the means to prevent disease and fight it when it happens. Each institute supports a broad spectrum of research in its topic areas and, in consultation with its stakeholders, sets priorities for research in those areas.

CIHR at the service of Canadians
Through the research it funds, CIHR helps to:
* reduce the adverse impact of disease and illness on Canadians, increasing life expectancy, improving quality of life and contributing to a healthy and productive workforce;
* respond quickly and effectively to health crises such as outbreaks of infectious diseases, by rapidly mobilizing researchers as was evidenced during the SARS outbreak;
* contain the high and rising cost of delivering health care, by identifying innovative and cost-effective ways of providing health services;
* deliver concrete research evidence to help individual provinces make critical, evidence-based decisions about reforms to their health-care systems, reforms that will save money and improve services;
* sustain and enrich industry with a rich pipeline of new discoveries;
* ensure the ethical conduct of research, particularly when it involves human subjects, for instance through the world's first set of ethical guidelines for research involving Aboriginal peoples; and
* provide leadership on complex challenges such as the growing burden of obesity and mental health in the workplace, by launching initiatives in collaboration with partners both in Canada and internationally that are designed to have a real and tangible impact on these problems.

CIHR supports nearly 13,000 researchers and trainees in universities, teaching hospitals and other health organizations and research centres in Canada.

More Information: Website


International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

IDRC Research Awards

Description: The IDRC Internship awards provide exposure to research for international development through a program of training in research management and grant administration under the guidance of IDRC program staff. The internship is designed to provide hands-on learning experiences in research program management - in the creation, dissemination and utilization of knowledge from an international perspective.
Internships will be considered for a program of training and research responding to IDRC’s research priorities. IDRC’s research activities focus on four Program Areas: Social and Economic Policy; Environment and Natural Resource Management; Information and Communication Technologies ICT for Development; and Innovation, Policy and Science.

Eligibility: The program is aimed at candidates who, through demonstrated achievements in academic studies, work or research, have shown interest in the creation and utilization of knowledge from an international perspective. Canadian citizens, permanent residents of Canada and citizens of developing countries may submit an application. They must be either currently registered in a Master's Program or have completed a Master's Degree in a recognized university. Their research must focus on a developing country. Candidates need not be affiliated with an institution. They may participate in internships as part of an academic requirement.
More Information: Website


The Bentley Cropping Systems Fellowship

Description: This Fellowship (a bequest from Helen S. Bentley and C. Fred Bentley) provides assistance to Canadian and developing-country graduate students with a university degree in agriculture, forestry or biology, who wish to undertake postgraduate, applied, on-farm research with cooperating farmers in a developing country.
Projects should evaluate and/or promote the use of fertility enhancing plants, such as leguminous forages, shrubs, cover crops, and grain legumes in small farms. The intent is to seek ways to increase the yield of food crops, improve farmers’ livelihoods, and improve soil fertility.

The research should seek cropping system changes that will lead to: sustainable and increased crop yields; production of more and improved animal feed; improved soil and water conservation; improved weed control, and/or biological fixation of nitrogen. Projects should be planned and executed in cooperation with an international agricultural research centre, or with a developing-country institution involved in agricultural research that has an applied on-farm orientation.
More Information: Website


Canadian Window on International Development Awards

Description: These awards reflect the fact that the boundaries between international development policy and domestic policy increasingly parallel similar problems in developing countries so that both Canada and the less developed countries benefit from research on these issues. The complexities of national economic and social development in Canada are increasingly evident, and are often related to international issues. Similarly Canadian trade, investment, immigration and other policies often affect development in less developed countries.
Successful candidates will propose comparative research requiring data from both Canada and a developing country to better understand the common, interrelated problem/issue, identified by the applicant.
More Information: Website


IDRC Graduate Research Awards on Evaluation

Description: In honour of Terry Smutylo's (founding director of the Evaluation Unit) long commitment and work to promote evaluation as a contributor to positive change, organizational learning, and improved effectiveness in international development, the Evaluation Unit has established a research awards competition. These awards will assist Canadian and developing-country graduate students undertake their thesis research in the field of evaluation.
Applications will be accepted for research on evaluation at the doctoral and master's level that focus on the themes of:
• Developing innovative evaluation methodologies
• Researching the utilization of evaluation methodologies
• Developing evaluation processes for organizational learning
• Researching the utilization of evaluation processes for organizational learning
• Capacity building in evaluation and evaluative thinking: research on improving capabilities, professional competencies and tools needed to conduct better evaluation.
More Information: Website


IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

Description: Since 1982, IDRC has assisted Canadian graduate students to undertake their thesis research in the field of international development. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards are intended to promote the growth of Canadian capacity in research on sustainable and equitable development from an international perspective. Normally, such research is conducted in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East or Asia.
Eligible Fields of Study: Social and Economic Policy; Environment and Natural Resource Management; Information and Communication Technologies(ICTs) for Development; and Innovation, Policy and Science.
More Information: Website


Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Going Global Innovation

Deadline: Applications must be submitted at least eight weeks prior to the commencement of the project.
Description: Going Global Innovation (Going Global) is the innovation, science and technology pillar of the Global Commerce Support Program (GCSP). The GCSP provides a client focused consolidated approach for accessing funding sources from DFAIT in order to attract foreign direct investment, increase Canadian innovation and commercialization opportunities and to increase Canada's business share in foreign markets.
The objective of Going Global is to promote and enhance Canada's international innovation efforts by supporting Canadian companies and/or researchers in pursuing international R&D collaborative opportunities through the development of partnerships with key players in other countries/economies.
More Information: Website


Additional Funding Opportunities

Human Frontier Science Program

Description: The HFSP supports novel, innovative and interdisciplinary basic research focused on the complex mechanisms of living organisms; topics range from molecular and cellular approaches to systems and cognitive neuroscience. A clear emphasis is placed on novel collaborations that bring biologists together with scientists from fields such as physics, mathematics, chemistry, computer science and engineering to focus on problems at the frontier of the life sciences.
Postdoctoral Fellowships are available for scientists who wish to work in foreign laboratories, with emphasis on individuals early in their careers who wish to obtain training in a different field of research. Fellows who return to their home countries are eligible to apply for a Career Development Award.
More Information: Website


Grand Challenges Explorations

Description: Grand Challenges Explorations is a new five-year US$100 million fast-track grants initiative of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It will support hundreds of early-stage research projects pursuing creative concepts for new global health solutions, including vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, and other technologies for health problems disproportionately affecting poor countries. Projects will initially be funded at the level of US$100,000 each, with the opportunity for additional funding in the future for projects that show promise.
Goal: A key goal of the Explorations initiative is to promote greater diversity in global health research. In particular, we hope to involve scientists who don’t typically work in global health – this includes innovators in the developing world, from complementary disciplines, and in the private sector, as well as young investigators.
Fast Track Grants: To make it as easy as possible for scientists to apply, the Explorations initiative will use a new fast-track grantmaking approach. Applicants for Explorations grants will be asked to submit relatively short funding proposals, and will not necessarily be required to show preliminary data.
More Information: Grand Challenges in Global Health Website


Thrasher Research Fund

Deadline: Concept papers are accepted on a rolling basis with no specific deadline for submission.
Description: The Thrasher Research Fund remains open to a variety of pediatric medical research topics. Research projects with the potential to impact a large number of children as well as research projects that address severe problems affecting relatively few children will be considered. The Fund seeks to maintain a portfolio of grants with a balance of both domestic and international research.
The Fund's priorities are reviewed regularly to ensure that the mission of improving the health of children worldwide is promoted through high-quality research. Historically, the Fund has supported both domestic and international research with a particular emphasis on the potential to benefit children.
Eligibility: The Principal Investigator is expected to be qualified in terms of education and experience, maintain an active role in the project, and take full responsibility for its successful completion. Students may be employed as technical support personnel but may not apply as Principal Investigators. There are no citizenship or visa restrictions.
More Information: Website

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