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Maternal and Child Health Equity Research Program

Project Information
Description: 

The overall objective of the Maternal and Child Health Equity (MACHEquity) research program is to examine how social policies focused on reducing poverty, income and gender inequality have an impact on the burden of disease among children and women under the age of 50.

Partnering with international NGOs and dedicated to the training and mentoring of the next generation of researchers in the field, MACHEquity joins information from household surveys with global policy data and utilizes innovative methods to investigate associations between social policies, social determinants, and health outcomes prioritized by the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

We seek to understand how social policies aimed at reducing poverty, income and gender inequality in high- and low-income countries affect:

1). Major causes of morbidity and mortality in children
2). Morbidity and mortality in women under 50
3). HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and other major diseases
Project Date: 
2011-04-01 - 2016-03-31
Type of Project: 
Research
Research Area: 
Health Research
Sub-Research Area: 
Other
Other Sub-Research Area: 
Maternal and Child Health
Funding Source: 
CIHR
Other Details: 

Location

Montreal, QC
Canada

McGill University Project Leader Information

Project Leader: 

Arijit Nandi

Primary Position

Faculty: 
Faculty of Medicine
Department: 
Epidemiology & Biostatistics
Institute: 
Institute for Health and Social Policy
Position/Appointment: 
Assistant Professor
Research Interests: 
Dr. Nandi is primarily interested in the understanding the effects of social policies on health and health inequalities in a global context. Other interests include: (1) assessing multilevel associations between economic characteristics, including both individual-level and population-level exposures, and population health and (2) applying causal methods for addressing challenges to the study of social determinants of health.
Role: 
Principal Investigator