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Aspects of the Molecular Epidemiology of Schistosomiasis in Senegal, Mali and Niger and the Future Impact of Climatic and Environmental Change on Disease Transmission

Project Information
Description: 

Schistosomiasis is one of the major burdens on African health and health systems.  Changes in the Global climate, considered the biggest health threat of C21, could exacerbate the problem and hit the poorest countries hardest.  Furthermore, environmental change, whether a natural phenomenon or through human intervention, impacts the ecological balance and context within which humans and their livestock live, and how their parasites and pathogens evolve and transmit.   Our multidisciplinary proposal is of key strategic importance as its results will help elucidate the connectivity between the changing environment and parasite dynamics, and in particular how this influences the interdependence between humans, livestock, their shared parasites, and thereby ultimately the impact on human and animal health and disease control.  We will determine an accurate burden of disease, particularly in terms of novel and emerging human-animal hybrid schistosome infections, and thereby define and predict populations at current and future risk of infection and disease.  This will be achieved through the use of new, ethical, affordable and accessible molecular, phenotypic and geospatial modelling tools and technologies.  Furthermore, the prime positions of the PI’s and co-applicants supports local and endemic-country research, helps enable effective policy change and thereby ensure implementation of improved disease control. The overall objective is, with a focus on Niger, Mali and Senegal, to determine the spatial and temporal distribution and dynamics of human and animal schistosomiasis transmission and its association with changing environmental settings including alterations in climatic conditions, urbanization, agriculture and land use.

Project Date: 
2010-09-01 - 2022-10-05
Type of Project: 
Research
Research Area: 
Health Research

Location

Senegal

McGill University Project Leader Information

Project Leader: 

Momar Ndao

Primary Position

Faculty: 
Faculty of Medicine
Department: 
Medicine
Institute: 
McGill University Health Centre (MUHC)
Position/Appointment: 
Assistant Professor
Research Interests: 
During the past few years increased awareness of parasitic infections has led to newly recognized parasites, emerging pathogens, and bioterrorism considerations; the fields of diagnostic medical parasitology, treatment and vaccines are undergoing dramatic change. My laboratory has interests in 1) diagnosis of parasitic diseases 2) the study of host-parasite interactions; 3) screening drugs to be used as therapies for protozoan parasitic disease; 4) developing vaccines to prevent parasitic diseases and 5) applying proteomic technology to discover biomarkers for infectious diseases.
Biography: 
  • Laboratory Director- NRCP at National Reference Centre for Parasitology (NRCP)/McGill University Tropical Diseases Centre
  • Assistant Profesor at McGill University- Department of Medicine
Selected Publications: 

Plourde M, Coelho A, Keynan Y, Larios OE, Ndao M, Ruest A, Roy G, Rubinstein E, Ouellette M.
Genetic polymorphisms and drug susceptibility in four isolates of Leishmania tropica obtained from Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2012 Jan;6(1):e1463. Epub 2012 Jan 17.

Sampasa-Kanyinga H, Lévesque B, Anassour-Laouan-Sidi E, Côté S, Serhir B, Ward BJ, Libman MD, Drebot MA, Ndao M, Dewailly E.
Zoonotic Infections in Native Communities of James Bay, Canada. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2012 Jan 4. [Epub ahead of print]

Ndao M.
Biomarker discovery in serum/plasma using surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Methods Mol Biol. 2012;818:67-79.

Kassa FA, Shio MT, Bellemare MJ, Faye B, Ndao M, Olivier M.
New inflammation-related biomarkers during malaria infection. PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e26495. Epub 2011 Oct 20.

Amos FF, Ndao M, Ponce CB, Evans JS.
A C-RING-like domain participates in protein self-assembly and mineral nucleation. Biochemistry. 2011 Oct 18;50(41):8880-7. Epub 2011 Sep 26.

Role: 
Principal Investigator

Non-McGill Partners

Partner: 

Babacard Gaye

Country: 
United Kingdom
University/Organization: 
Imperial College Faculty of Medicine
Role: 
Collaborator
Partner: 

David Rollinson

Country: 
United Kingdom
University/Organization: 
Imperial College Faculty of Medicine
Role: 
Collaborator
Partner: 

Joanne Webster

Country: 
United Kingdom
University/Organization: 
Imperial College Faculty of Medicine