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Courses & Timetables

May Session:

May 4 to May 29, 2015

(no classes Monday, May 18 - Victoria Day)

Timetable: eboh_summer_2015_may_20150219.pdf

EPIB 507 Biostatistics for Health Professionals

elham [dot] rahme [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. E. Rahme)

Basic principles of statistical inference applicable to clinical, epidemiologic, and other health research. Topics include: methods of describing data, statistical inference for means, statistical inference for proportions, non-parametric statistics, correlation and introduction to linear regression.

Restriction: Restricted to students registered in Occupational Health, Dentistry, Rehabilitation Sciences, Human Nutrition, Experimental Medicine, Family Medicine, Otolaryngology, Medical Residents, and Clinical Fellows, or permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor for students not listed in the restrictions above.

NOTES: Medical Residents and Clinical Fellows can register for this course only during the Summer term.

Course not opened to students registered in the Epidemiology, Public Health or Biostatistics programs.

May 4 to 29 - no classes Monday, May 18
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
13h00 to 16h15
Education Building, Rm 624

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 600-001 Clinical Epidemiology

nitika [dot] pai [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. N. Pai) / kaberi [dot] dasgupta [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. K. Dasgupta)

The general objective of this 3-credit course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the methods of epidemiology, as applied to clinical research. Issues to be addressed include measurement issues, study design, analysis, and inference in the clinical research setting. Students will have the opportunity to apply these concepts to their own areas of interest.

All students should have a strong clinical background in medicine or an allied health profession. Preference will be given to residents and fellows enrolled in postgraduate medical training programs at McGill University. Previous course work in epidemiology or research experience is not required.

May 4 to 29 - no classes Monday, May 18
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
09h00 to 12h15
Education Building, Rm 627

Academic credits: 3

EPIB-619: Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses

madhukar [dot] pai [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Pai) / kristian [dot] filion [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. K. Filion)

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are critical for evidence-based clinical and public health practice. The widespread and growing application of systematic reviews to synthesize evidence on key research and clinical questions makes it useful for most health professionals to be able to understand and critique this research design. This course will provide a detailed description of the systematic review process, discuss the strengths and limitations of the method, and provide step-by-step guidance on how to actually perform a systematic review. Specific topics to be covered (and emphasized through numerous examples from the medical literature) include: formulation of the review question, searching of literature, quality assessment of studies, data extraction, meta-analytic methods, and report writing. The course will also cover statistical issues such as selection of a proper statistical model for meta-analysis, including problem sets with practical examples of fixed and random effects models as well as examples of methods to evaluate heterogeneity and publication bias; graphical and tabular templates for the presentation of data from a meta-analysis. Several software packages (e.g. STATA) will be discussed, along with tutorials on how to effectively use tools such as PubMed and EndNote for conducting systematic reviews. This course will feature Dr Robert Platt as guest faculty who will discuss specific biostatistical issues relevant to meta-analysis.

Instructor's permission required for students NOT registered in the Epidemiology program.

Prerequisites: Introductory level training in epidemiology and biostatistics.

May 4 to 15
Monday to Friday
13h00 to 16h00
Leacock Building, Rm 212

Academic credits: 2

EPIB-631 PE II: Intermediate Pharmacoepidemiology

kristian [dot] filion [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. K. Filion) / laurent [dot] azoulay [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. L. Azoulay)

This course will build on the basic principles of pharmacoepidemiology from the introductory course and introduce more advanced theoretical concepts. The course will address both methodological and practical issues in pharmacoepidemiology by examining current publications and controversies in pharmacoepidemiology. General topics will include: an appreciation of the different perspectives and data sources used in pharmacoepidemiology as well as the role of pharmacoepidemiology in drug approval and particularly in post marketing review of drug safety. Methodological issues will consider selection bias, information bias, confounding and interpretation bias. Recent techniques to address some of these issues including instrumental variables, propensity scores and the role of meta-analysis for the sometimes diverse pharmacoepidemiology observational studies will be discussed. The strengths and weakness of the various study designs will be emphasized. Special topics will also include the ethical and legal implications of pharmacoepidemiology. The focus of the course and the choice of studies should be on interest to both consumers and producers of the pharmacoepidemiology literature including clinicians, regulators, public health professionals and industry.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

May 19 to 22
Tuesday to Friday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 25

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-633 PE I: Introduction to Pharmacoepidemiology

linda [dot] levesque [at] queensu [dot] ca (Dr. L. Lévesque)

This course is designed to introduce concepts and principles of pharmacoepidemiology in the context of drug evaluation and therapeutic decision-making. Topics to be covered include history of pharmacoepidemiology, choice of study design, sources of bias and their prevention and control, the importance of prescribing and drug taking behaviours, sources and use of exposure and outcome data, assessing causality, and measures of association. Examples will be drawn from published phar­macoepidemiologic studies. Special topics will include principles of clinical pharmacology relevant to pharmacoepidemiology and approaches to pharmacovigilance. Participants will have an opportunity to design and critique a study that addresses a current therapeutic controversy.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

May 11 to 15
Monday to Friday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 25

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-643 Clinical Trials
Substantive Epidemiology 3

tkoutsavlis [at] shire [dot] com (Dr. T. Koutsavlis)

This course is designed to provide an overview of issues and approaches to the design and analysis of randomized clinical trials. Topics to be considered include specification of a primary question, adherence to ethical guidelines, reasons for and means of implementing randomization, consideration of design alternatives, sample size determination, subject recruitment, analytic strategies and trial reporting. The course provides an alternative to students who are unable to pursue a more in depth treatment of clinical trials provided in the 3 credit course offered during the regular academic year.

May 7 to 28
Thursday
13h00 to 16h15
Purvis Hall, RM 48

Academic Credit: 1

EPIB-645 Introduction to Health Informatics
Substantive Epidemiology 5

christian [dot] rochefort [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. C. Rochefort)

This course provides a broad introduction to health informatics, the field concerned with the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) for the acquisition, storage, management, and use of information in health care. The course provides an overview of current developments in health informatics in Canada and abroad, discusses issues and challenges associated with this emerging field, and covers various underlying themes, including proper use of information technology, appropriate data entry, data privacy concerns, decision support, evidence-based medicine, electronic health record, among others. Ethical issues related to information management will also be introduced.

Pre-requisites: This course is offered to graduate students, and practicing healthcare providers. Participants are not expected to have extensive knowledge of health informatics or computer science. Knowledge of healthcare and of the health care system would be an asset.

May 5 to 14
Tuesday and Thursday
9h00 to 12h15
Purvis Hall, RM 48

Academic Credit: 1

EPIB-661 PE III: Advanced Pharmacoepidemiology

samy [dot] suissa [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. S. Suissa) / pierre [dot] ernst [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. P. Ernst)

This course is designed to develop skills necessary in the critical appraisal of pharmacoepidemiological studies with a particular focus on more recent methodological issues with advanced forms of design, analysis, interpretation of results, and limitations. Elements of the critical appraisal will be addressed through a review of several published pharmacoepidemiologic studies. The topics covered include ecological studies, exposure measures, confounding by indication, drug channeling, designs and analysis issues for cohort, case-control and nested case-control studies as well as the within-subject designs such as prescription sequence analysis, case-crossover and case-time-control studies, including situations with repeated event outcomes and time-risk functions. The course will also address methodological aspects of computerized databases used in pharmacoepidemiology.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

May 26 to 29
Tuesday to Friday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 24

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-672 Estimating the Causal Effects of Social Policy on Health
Special Topics 5

sam [dot] harper [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. S. Harper) / arijit [dot] nandi [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. A. Nandi) / jay [dot] kaufman [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. J. Kaufman) / erin [dot] strumpf [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. E. Strumpf)

This course will cover methods for estimating the effects of policies on health outcomes. We will define causal policy effects within the potential outcomes framework and contrast methods for describing the association between a policy and health outcome with methods for estimating causal policy effects. Students will learn to define policy-relevant research questions based on specific causal contrasts. We will review analytical strategies for estimating causal policy effects, including fixed effects regressions and synthetic control methods, as well as difference-in-differences and regression discontinuity designs.

Prerequisite: EPIB-603 and EPIB-607 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

May 4 to 15
Monday to Friday
09h00 to 11h30
Purvis Hall, RM 24

Academic Credit: 2

June Session:

June 1 to June 26, 2015

(no classes Wednesday, June 24 – St-Jean-Baptiste)

Timetable: eboh_summer_2014_june_20150119.pdf

EPIB 600-002 Clinical Epidemiology

sasha [dot] bernatsky [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. S. Bernatsky) / maida [dot] sewitch [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Sewitch)

The general objective of this 3-credit course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the methods of epidemiology, as applied to clinical research. Issues to be addressed include measurement issues, study design, analysis, and inference in the clinical research setting. Students will have the opportunity to apply these concepts to their own areas of interest.

All students should have a strong clinical background in medicine or an allied health profession. Preference will be given to residents and fellows enrolled in postgraduate medical training programs at McGill University. Previous course work in epidemiology or research experience is not required.

June 1 to 26 - no classes Wednesday, June 24th
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
09h00 to 12h15
Location: TBA

Academic credits: 3

EPIB-636 Reproductive Epidemiology

olga [dot] basso [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. O. Basso)

This course will provide an overview of reproductive epidemiology, as well as introduce basic concepts and principles for this area of research. The focus will be on methodological issues related to studying repeated pregnancy outcomes, infertility, fetal loss, neonatal mortality, birth weight and gestational age. The course will also provide students with tools for critical reading of scientific articles in this field.

June 1 to 12
Monday to Friday
13h15 to 16h00
Purvis Hall, RM 25

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-654 PE IV: Pharmacoeconomics

jaime [dot] caro [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. J. Caro)

The assessment of pharmaceuticals has expanded beyond efficacy and safety to cover their economic implications and other consequences. This course provides a detailed introduction to the key concepts of this field, including those providing the foundation for the new Economic Evalaution Guidelines of IQWiG in Germany. After defining the basic economic problem, study types (cost-benefit, cost-utility, cost-effectiveness) and corresponding decision rules are examined. An example is presented in detail to demonstrate how simulation models are developed and the advantages of using discrete event simulation instead of Markov models or decision trees. Students are shown approaches to populating the models – the determination of costs and parameterization of effectiveness – and how to analyze the model results, including how to deal with all levels of uncertainty. The course presents techniques for presentation of results to decision makers in the public and private health care systems, including the efficiency frontier approach.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

June 1 to 4
Monday to Thursday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 24

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-670 Introduction to Health Technology Assessment
Special Topics 3

nandini [dot] dendukuri [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. N. Dendukuri)

Modern technologies have been responsible for great advances in health-care delivery over the last century. However, increased reliance on these technologies has been an important contributor to rising health-care costs. This has led to an interest in evidence-based decision-making to support the induction of technologies into routine practice and evaluation of existing technologies. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a multi-disciplinary field that uses methods from Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Health Economics to summarize evidence from research studies in a form useful to policy makers.

This short course will introduce students to some of the basic concepts in health technology assessment - the need for HTA, producers of HTA, components of a HTA (systematic reviews, meta-analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis) and the impact of HTA.

Prerequisites: Exposure to introductory level courses in Epidemiology and Biostatistics, preferably EPIB-601 and EPIB-607 or their equivalent.

June 8 to 12
Monday to Friday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, Rm 24

Academic Credit: 2

EPIB-671 Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention

eduardo [dot] franco [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. E.L. Franco)

The course will explore the common epidemiologic approaches to studying etiologic relations in carcinogenesis and for assessing the efficacy of cancer prevention interventions. Emphasis will be given on both molecular and social epidemiology domains with examples of different study designs and data analysis methods and of the impact of measurement error and other biases.

Prerequisite: EPIB-601 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

June 8 to 19
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
13h00 to 17h00
Gerald Bronfman Centre, 546 Pine Ave West, Seminar Room

Academic Credit: 2